BRANCHES
Twenty-five poems by Rhiannon McGavin, published under her tenure as Youth Poet Laureate of Los Angeles. Third in the LA Youth Poet Laureate Series.

BRANCHES Details

TitleBRANCHES
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2017
Publisherpenmanship books
Rating
GenrePoetry, Religion, Judaism

BRANCHES Review

  • Alyssa Shulman
    January 1, 1970
    Branches is the poetry collection of Rhiannon McGavin, the youth poet laureate of Los Angeles 2016. Her unique voice lifts the reader off the page and into a vision of hot LA summers and days in Paris. This is a bittersweet yet hopeful collection that could've only been written in 2016, cleverly covering sensitive topics in a way that doesn't seek to alienate the reader in a flurry of strong language. McGavin expertly describes traumatic experiences and bitter hurt as well as hopeful love in thi Branches is the poetry collection of Rhiannon McGavin, the youth poet laureate of Los Angeles 2016. Her unique voice lifts the reader off the page and into a vision of hot LA summers and days in Paris. This is a bittersweet yet hopeful collection that could've only been written in 2016, cleverly covering sensitive topics in a way that doesn't seek to alienate the reader in a flurry of strong language. McGavin expertly describes traumatic experiences and bitter hurt as well as hopeful love in this collection alongside her more current event oriented pieces. As a long time subscriber to Rhiannon's YouTube channel, reading this felt like coming home. I highly recommend this book to anyone who can appreciate a mix of classic style with something new and fresh that feels almost like biting into a summer tangerine. You can see her read poems from this book and more on her YouTube page, thegeekyblonde. Rhiannon, if you're reading this, thank you. Your voice has fueled me though my high school years, so it is the least I can do to give you a good review on Goodreads.
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  • Melanie McKnight
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t read poetry often but I love a Rhiannon’s. I have a feeling I’ll be reading some of these over and over.
  • J.
    January 1, 1970
    The goodreads librarian who added it to the site has finally read the book (and it was a delight!). Review forthcoming.
  • Daisy
    January 1, 1970
    Quality Rating: Five StarsEnjoyment Rating: Four StarsIt's been quite a few years since I first stumbled on Rhiannon's work in Slam Poetry, but I think it's fair to say she was my gateway into reading and watching poetry as a whole. Her collection (though somewhat hard to get your hands on in the UK) differs from her bold feminist performance poetry and instead turns to more quietly rebellious tones. Reading her written poetry - especially the historical ones dealing with Jewish persecution - is Quality Rating: Five StarsEnjoyment Rating: Four StarsIt's been quite a few years since I first stumbled on Rhiannon's work in Slam Poetry, but I think it's fair to say she was my gateway into reading and watching poetry as a whole. Her collection (though somewhat hard to get your hands on in the UK) differs from her bold feminist performance poetry and instead turns to more quietly rebellious tones. Reading her written poetry - especially the historical ones dealing with Jewish persecution - is just as emotional an experience as watching her speak. She's vivid, vivacious and poignant without having to make a sound. Regardless of which topics you prefer, her work shouts with passion and whispers with hope.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Her poetry feels so well thought out and I feel a connection in some way or another with each poem. On top of having amazing poetry her youtube is informative as heck. She make me want to be a better poet and I like that she hasn’t fallen into the style of having three line and an illustration (it’s not bad just a lot of people doing it right now).
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  • Helen Leigh-Phippard
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning collection of poetry by LA Youth Poet Laureate Rhiannon McGavin. Funny, heartfelt, often deeply touching, rooted in the American experience but also very aware of the historical and cultural roots of that experience. A great read.
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars - absolutely lovely
  • Sarah Williams
    January 1, 1970
    Will be used to make boys in my literature class uncomfortable and to share with friends.
  • Elle Sala
    January 1, 1970
    Really, really wonderful :)
  • sara
    January 1, 1970
    4.5
  • Danni
    January 1, 1970
    Rhiannon McGavin is one of the most astounding and relatable writers in the youth poet scene to date. Every single poem within BRANCHES is masterful and beautiful in its own right.
  • Mehtab Boparai
    January 1, 1970
    The book’s cover is decorated with the face of whom I can only presume is the author of the lovely collection: a Miss Rhiannon McGavin. Also noteworthy is the fact that she has a very cute nose.**McGavin’s writing calls into question contemporary fixations with apocalyptic themes in young literature. More specifically, in Doomsday Vault decrepit landscapes described as having ‘the sidewalks… peeled from the earth like rotting wallpaper,’ are also portrayed as being paradoxically fertile, the ‘ri The book’s cover is decorated with the face of whom I can only presume is the author of the lovely collection: a Miss Rhiannon McGavin. Also noteworthy is the fact that she has a very cute nose.**McGavin’s writing calls into question contemporary fixations with apocalyptic themes in young literature. More specifically, in Doomsday Vault decrepit landscapes described as having ‘the sidewalks… peeled from the earth like rotting wallpaper,’ are also portrayed as being paradoxically fertile, the ‘rich, dark soil’ as being ‘snug with their vow of harvest.’ Similarly, other poems in this collection (see Garlic Bread) will subvert their sometimes oppressive settings, suggesting at a resolution despite themselves. Among the shorter pieces in Branches are the cuisine-related poems, seemingly intended to cause in their readers a ravenous hunger. Food is often linked to the atmosphere and surroundings; the anonymous ‘your’ in Freshet has his or her back ‘speckled as a spring egg.’ In other cases the act of preparing food has the ability to shape the poem’s setting; In Garlic Bread the pasta demands a ventilation as well as another unnamed person to ‘fan smoke with a baking pan.’ Among this reviewer’s favorite poems is the fourth in this collection, Chick Lit:'…, as if they cannot See theFingerprints on the film strip and I guess it’s a good song but that bass drum'McGavin will sometimes characterize the role of women in various settings, here in the industries relating to film and the written word, as leaving on the final project an edifying marking of remembrance. Here, with the aforementioned “fingerprints on the film strip,” we seemingly have an allusion to the ‘directed by a man, edited by a woman’ aphorism in reference to well-known Hollywood productions. At the collection’s best, there is a loosening of distinction between the speaker and her written word; in Foreign Correspondent, the speaker refers to herself as literally being a grammatical symbol in the wake of her paper route and ‘notebooks rung out on assignment’:'I was a lovely comma lovely for nearly seven hoursI read verses and none of them were mine 'This is a wonderful wonderful collection of poetry. **It should also be noted that any more shallow or pithy observations made by this reviewer do not reflect the attitudes and themes present in the poetry collection in question.
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  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    This was incredible. By far one of the best poetry collections I have ever read.
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