We're Going to Need More Wine
In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please, Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, and Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman.One month before the release of the highly anticipated film The Birth of a Nation, actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape allegations made against director and actor Nate Parker, Union—a forty-four-year-old actress who launched her career with roles in iconic ’90s movies—instantly became the insightful, outspoken actress that Hollywood has been desperately awaiting. With honesty and heartbreaking wisdom, she revealed her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault: "It is for you that I am speaking. This is real. We are real." In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.

We're Going to Need More Wine Details

TitleWe're Going to Need More Wine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 17th, 2017
PublisherDey Street Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Writing, Essays, Cultural, African American, Audiobook

We're Going to Need More Wine Review

  • Reading in Black & White
    January 1, 1970
    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly w I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly white community, relationships, sex, racism, the pressure of dealing with public perception, friendships, and most importantly, the freedom one can feel when they decide to truly be themselves.
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  • Read In Colour
    January 1, 1970
    Very open & honest, Gabrielle Union is not just a pretty face. She's really smart and really funny and now I want to be her BFF.
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I w Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I was impressed with how this book read like a conversation with friends. I liked how she was so blunt with her language, never being afraid to use explicit words when necessary.There were many highlights in this book, but I don't want to spoil anything. It is a very witty and memorable book that will have you laughing so loud, whether it was intentional or not. I did not really like the ending but because I was immersed in every chapter, I rounded it up to five stars.Really good memoir, trust me after reading this, you are going to need more wine!
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  • Andre
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollyw If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollywood, sexuality, school, college, step-parenting, marriage, divorce and even rape. She manages to tell these stories with a fearlessness that entertains as well as informs. Like a high-wire act with no safety net. Gabrielle comes across as a very thoughtful, likable, brave and funny woman, one that I think readers would indeed enjoy a glass of wine with. There are of course elements of memoir, as she takes us through her school years growing up in the suburbs of California, one of the few Black girls in her schools of Pleasanton, CA. There are also elements of essay, like the chapter called Mittens which deals with how Blacks are perceived and policed, and how we often go out of our way to make accommodations to those perceptions. In reference to this she says, "Worse, I am told that people don’t want to hear these stories, but the reality is we experience life in a never-ending loop in which we are told that if we just “make it,” we will enjoy the fruits of our labor: assimilation."But what makes this book special are the stories and the way she tells them. And digesting the stories on the whole, we see her blossom into the confident audacious and vivacious woman she is presently. She wasn't always the beautiful woman we think of, when we hear the name Gabrielle Union. In fact she describes herself at an early age,"I was so thin that I looked like a black daddy longlegs spider with buckteeth. This is not overly earnest, false-humility celebrity speak, I swear."It is those type of self-deprecating comments along with the willingness to bare it all that portends an air of authenticity. If you are a fan, you will become a bigger fan and if you're not than surely you will become one after reading these stories from Gabrielle Union. Thanks to Edelweiss and Dey St. books for an advanced ebook. Book drops 10/17/17.
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  • Isabel Jones
    January 1, 1970
    This woman is a national fucking treasure
  • Paige Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. I don't know what else to say right now but wow.
  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Totally heart-tugging as well as captivating! This series of heartfelt essays are also extremely enlightening regarding race relations in America. Ms. Union "talks the talk" about what life throws at us and how our reaction to the experience will either lift us up or slam us to the ground. Her experiences as a young, black girl in school, trying to blend in with her insensitive white schoolmates, are hilarious as well as heartbreaking and painful. Ironically, Ms Union finds herself navigati Wow! Totally heart-tugging as well as captivating! This series of heartfelt essays are also extremely enlightening regarding race relations in America. Ms. Union "talks the talk" about what life throws at us and how our reaction to the experience will either lift us up or slam us to the ground. Her experiences as a young, black girl in school, trying to blend in with her insensitive white schoolmates, are hilarious as well as heartbreaking and painful. Ironically, Ms Union finds herself navigating the same treacherous and racist journey as an adult, also in America. Nothing has changed. I applaud her resilience and courage as the voice of sexual assault victims as they try to survive the most horrendous acts of power seeking cowards. Wow! Just Wow! I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Copy of this book (Goodreads Winner). Thank you.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    More like 3.5 stars
  • Ariel
    January 1, 1970
    More like 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a chronological play-by-play of Gabrielle Union's life, this book isn't it. Instead, this book feels--exactly like the author says in the introduction--like meeting up with one of your really thoughtful and worldly friends, reminiscing over a few glasses of wine and laughing so loud with each other that everyone in the restaurant is staring. The books starts with her as young awkward black girl, spending the school year with predominantly white friends More like 4.5 stars. If you're looking for a chronological play-by-play of Gabrielle Union's life, this book isn't it. Instead, this book feels--exactly like the author says in the introduction--like meeting up with one of your really thoughtful and worldly friends, reminiscing over a few glasses of wine and laughing so loud with each other that everyone in the restaurant is staring. The books starts with her as young awkward black girl, spending the school year with predominantly white friends and classmates in Pleaseanton, California, and summers with her extended family in Omaha, Nebraska. We then follow her through college, her first marriage and eventual divorce, to the beginning of her career, second marriage and her induction into true Hollywood fame (aka, being invited to Prince's house).The beginning narratives deal with the typical coming-of-age topics such as crushing on boys, stealing booze, dealing with parents and navigating the halls of highschool, but are deepened with her thoughts on being an outsider, code switching and trying to downplay her blackness in California, then doing the exact opposite in Nebraska when surrounded by her family and Omaha's rising gang violence. Later chapters deal with more adult topics, including rape and PTSD, post-divorce depression, being Hollywood mean-girl and her thoughts on the black Hollywood elite.This book feels surprisingly honest. She doesn't shy away from the intimate details of her marriage, including their prenup, her feelings about being a stepmom to growing black boys, and the fact that she calls her husband, Dwyane Wade, basketball superstar, "poopy." Even more shockingly honest is her experience with multiple miscarriages, a chapter brilliantly called "Get Out of My Pussy." She's definitely not afraid to talk about serious issues and to point out her own flaws as black woman, as a friend, wife, and actress. There were several paragraphs where I thought, "I would NEVER admit that out loud, much less in a memoir to be read by people who don't know me!"The writing style sort of goes back and forth from super casual to college essay. Any time she brings the issue away from the personal and into the universal, her tone felt a little stilted and soapbox-y. There is one section where she's listing statistics that really stuck out as odd to me, but she's always able to end a chapter back to the personal, funny tone I preferred. Oh yeah, Gabrielle Union is funny--like, laugh out loud, "omg I can't believe she said that," kiki-ing funny. Did I mention there's a scene of her putting yogurt into her vagina with a straw? Yes, you read that right. I've never considered how famous women deal with buying Monistat at crowded CVS, but in Union's case--they don't. They improvise.
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  • Marzie
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advance Reader's copy of this book from Edelweiss and won a paperback copy in a Goodreads Giveaway.Actress Gabrielle Union pulls no punches in this memoir filled with vignettes from her early life to present day. An outspoken activist for women's reproductive rights, against sexual assault, and against race and gender-related implicit bias, Union gives us a book that is bold and speaks to the challenges of being a black woman, a black actor, and a black parent. Her searing honesty I received an Advance Reader's copy of this book from Edelweiss and won a paperback copy in a Goodreads Giveaway.Actress Gabrielle Union pulls no punches in this memoir filled with vignettes from her early life to present day. An outspoken activist for women's reproductive rights, against sexual assault, and against race and gender-related implicit bias, Union gives us a book that is bold and speaks to the challenges of being a black woman, a black actor, and a black parent. Her searing honesty about her own sexual assault, her struggles with infertility, her fears for her stepsons are but some of the strong points in this memoir. For me, the most poignant aspects of her personal story lie in her lifelong need to prove herself. From avoiding the Black Pitfalls to having to drop the occasional Black Bombs on D Wade and her stepsons, her need (and good reason) to be heard is clear. Some may be troubled by her language and the no-holds-barred quality of this book. Nickie Union is not shy here. And she says many things that need to be said. I sincerely hope that she continues to write. In fact, someone give this woman a byline, please.The episodic nature of the memoir and its occasional out-of-sequence time references were the only negative factors from this book for me. But she did say it was "stories" from her life!Thank you, HarperCollins for my Giveaway prize. I'm buying Nickie's book and passing the one you sent me forward!
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    This isn't memoir but more a series of essays about her life and experiences. Gabrielle Union is the actress you see in movies and offering interviews, but this book is more Nickie Union. That was her name in school. Nickie is funnier, a little meaner, more honest and hilarious. I often found myself laughing aloud in public. She is honest about her first marriage, her jealousy about her career and other actresses, and her childhood as one of the few black girls in her suburb to summers in her pa This isn't memoir but more a series of essays about her life and experiences. Gabrielle Union is the actress you see in movies and offering interviews, but this book is more Nickie Union. That was her name in school. Nickie is funnier, a little meaner, more honest and hilarious. I often found myself laughing aloud in public. She is honest about her first marriage, her jealousy about her career and other actresses, and her childhood as one of the few black girls in her suburb to summers in her parents' hometown Omaha, Nebraska and its closeknit black community. Union's writing style is pretty engaging because it is so conversational. She has some wonderful insights on race, colorism, and the unrealistic expectations people have of women and female actors.It's a very funny book.This review is based on an ARC won in a Goodreads drawing.
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  • Eliza
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5) I wanted to give this four stars but...I’ll be honest: if you weren’t that crazy about Gabrielle Union before, this book probably won’t help. Overall, this was a more honest read than I was expecting. There were times I literally laughed out loud and what she says about raising Black sons is spot on.It’s clear by the end of the book that there were certain topics she wasn’t going to speak on (and that’s 100% her right). I felt it did a disservice to the reader to omit those items, but - be (3.5) I wanted to give this four stars but...I’ll be honest: if you weren’t that crazy about Gabrielle Union before, this book probably won’t help. Overall, this was a more honest read than I was expecting. There were times I literally laughed out loud and what she says about raising Black sons is spot on.It’s clear by the end of the book that there were certain topics she wasn’t going to speak on (and that’s 100% her right). I felt it did a disservice to the reader to omit those items, but - beyond that - this read will solidify your opinion either way about the actress.
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  • Candy
    January 1, 1970
    Standing ovation to Gabrielle. This was an amazing well written well told story. She had me drawn in from beginning to the very end. There were tears, laughter and eye opening “no she did not just say that” moments. I absolutely love it. She’s so real. I highly recommend this book especially if you’re a fan and more so if you’re not. You just may end up liking the real life down to earth women who lives inside Gabrielle.
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  • Naeemah Huggins
    January 1, 1970
    This book was hilarious as hell, it didn't seem intentional though, it just was. I love her experiences, I didn't like her in a few of them but I could understand her motivations and she always told the truth. I respect a truth teller, its says 'This is me, a complete complex human being, and this is how and why I became this way. Take it or leave it'. Well I choose to take it Nicki, warts and all.She talks about her life growing up in Pleasanton, CA and you remember seeing some of her personali This book was hilarious as hell, it didn't seem intentional though, it just was. I love her experiences, I didn't like her in a few of them but I could understand her motivations and she always told the truth. I respect a truth teller, its says 'This is me, a complete complex human being, and this is how and why I became this way. Take it or leave it'. Well I choose to take it Nicki, warts and all.She talks about her life growing up in Pleasanton, CA and you remember seeing some of her personality come through in her movies, in the roles she chose or was chosen for and its like two hands coming together. It just clicks.She made me laugh and she made me cry and she made me love and understand her a little bit more. Kudos Nicki. Cheers to you. #FONU
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  • Samira Simpson
    January 1, 1970
    The wine helped. I laughed, and cried. Gabrielle was so candid and every story resonated with me in a way. Very relatable, great read.
  • Ngiste
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful stories from her life. Less about being an actress, and more about being a successful black woman.
  • Justine
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the best memoirs I have ever read. Gabrielle is so relatable, honest and hilarious. I did NOT want this book to end. It truly was just like sitting down with a girlfriend and listening and laughing to stories for hours. I wish I could grab more wine and come back to book number 2.
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  • Cris
    January 1, 1970
    I've always liked her as an actress, but after reading this book I LOVE her as a woman :)
  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    This book right here?! Love this. I was so pleasantly surprised by how honest and open Gabby is in this book. She shares so much of herself through this book, but it's not just a book about her life. There are so many good nuggets, quotes, and lessons in these stories. A must read, especially for Black women. It's so relatable. So real. So good.
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  • Kris Marley Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    I’m Gabrielle Union’s newest fan. :) I was hoping to catch some recent photos of her while flipping through as many US Weekly and INTouch magazines as possible during a 45 minute pedicure this evening. I admire her advocacy work.
  • M.
    January 1, 1970
    A very good read.
  • Tricia (TellHerAStory)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 / 5 starsI received a free ARC of this book from the bookshop I work at. We're Going to Need More Wine is a completely appropriate title for this book.A quick and flowing read, I couldn't put it down. I very much enjoyed the structure of this book being a collection of essays/'stories', rather than being a full-blown memoir. While Gabrielle Union offers us chuckle worthy moments, these essays are deep, brutally honest, and completely heartfelt. At times her essays demand the reader t Rating: 4.5 / 5 starsI received a free ARC of this book from the bookshop I work at. We're Going to Need More Wine is a completely appropriate title for this book.A quick and flowing read, I couldn't put it down. I very much enjoyed the structure of this book being a collection of essays/'stories', rather than being a full-blown memoir. While Gabrielle Union offers us chuckle worthy moments, these essays are deep, brutally honest, and completely heartfelt. At times her essays demand the reader take a moment for inner reflection, and at others her stories touch on topics that provide prompts for important discussion.I definitely recommend this book.
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  • LillaLovesBooks
    January 1, 1970
    I've grown up seeing Gabrielle Union on TV and she always seemed to be the popular, outgoing, and pretty black woman who has everything together. Now that I have read her honest memoir, I see she is just as messy and is a work in progress like the rest of us. Her stories were funny and also very relatable as a woman and as a person in America. From her adolescent years in San Francisco area/Omaha and trying to muddle the waters of fitting in with black and white kids, to her time as an a black a I've grown up seeing Gabrielle Union on TV and she always seemed to be the popular, outgoing, and pretty black woman who has everything together. Now that I have read her honest memoir, I see she is just as messy and is a work in progress like the rest of us. Her stories were funny and also very relatable as a woman and as a person in America. From her adolescent years in San Francisco area/Omaha and trying to muddle the waters of fitting in with black and white kids, to her time as an a black actress, to step-mother, we see a wide range of Gabrielle's life.I too remember being the black girl trying to fit in at a predominately white school and the awkwardness and humiliation that can come along with that experience. Gabrielle captures that so well in the beginning of this book. Readers also get glimpse into her first and second marriage and taking on a role as a step-mother, specifically raising black boys in one of the best chapters titled "Mittens".Though Union's observations and embarrassing anecdotes made me laugh, the chapter detailing her rape and consequently always feeling out of control for the rest of her life nearly made me wept. We're Going to Need More Wine has parts that will make you laugh and some that will make you want to cry, this is a fantastic book for women to see that people who we think have everything under control are just as scared, confused, and lost just like everyone else. If you are a fan of Gabrielle's before this book, you'll truly fall in love with her when you're done reading this.
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  • Jen Kirsch
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Started this book last night and finished it tonight. This memoir written by actress Gabrielle Union focuses on various points in her life, from going up, to dealing with black culture, her first marriage, various relationships, what it's like to be a step-mom to husband Dwayne Wade's three sons, and everything in between. I was pleasantly surprised and impressed with the conversational tone, and how open and honest Union was with sharing her lifes little secrets, challenges, trials a 4.5 stars. Started this book last night and finished it tonight. This memoir written by actress Gabrielle Union focuses on various points in her life, from going up, to dealing with black culture, her first marriage, various relationships, what it's like to be a step-mom to husband Dwayne Wade's three sons, and everything in between. I was pleasantly surprised and impressed with the conversational tone, and how open and honest Union was with sharing her lifes little secrets, challenges, trials and triumphs. I wasn't prepared for the book to be as intense as it was, delving into such hands-on topics as rape, and the loss of her best friend from metastatic breast cancer. And yet, the way she didn't shy away from the subjects and storylines that make up the script that is her life, allowed me to relate even more and grasp some sort of understanding of the woman Nickie Union, behind the brand Gabrielle Union.Real and raw, I love how she spoke about failed relationships and the loss of her first marriage, and laughed out loud at her tales of being the crazy ex, and her guide of what to do when you break up with someone. The tone and content was just her being her, a woman who has lived this life and knows her truth, critics and trolls be damned.It also opened my eyes to a world I was a bit naive about, and I'm grateful to Union for sharing her truth and using her voice and celebrity to share what so many of us need to be aware of and learn.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Gabrielle Union is everything and more. So much that I didn't know about this remarkable woman. Her story and descriptions ring true. Her experiences vividly shared--great details. I think the hardest part was laughing one minute and crying the next. I can't reveal more, but I can say that she is smart, way smart. A feminist, an out spoken activist and a good friend, sister, daughter. I really, really enjoyed the early part of the book--her youth spent between Nebraska and California and growing Gabrielle Union is everything and more. So much that I didn't know about this remarkable woman. Her story and descriptions ring true. Her experiences vividly shared--great details. I think the hardest part was laughing one minute and crying the next. I can't reveal more, but I can say that she is smart, way smart. A feminist, an out spoken activist and a good friend, sister, daughter. I really, really enjoyed the early part of the book--her youth spent between Nebraska and California and growing up African American and her struggle to differentiate herself as being more than the only black girl. Her life as an actress--other than her experience in making Bring it On and discussing Heath Ledger as I forgot about that movie--and life with her first husband less interesting. I did appreciate the chapter about speaking to her stepsons about what to say in speaking with the police. Serious. All i can say is that this is NOT the typical celeb book at all. I was really hit hard and if anything I would go out of my way to say Gabi-Nicky, I'm officially a fan and well done. We need more women like you on our planet, and if you ever need a friend, you've got one.
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  • Abbi
    January 1, 1970
    "My humanness doesn't insulate me from racism or sexism. In fact, I think I can deal effectively with the world precisely because I am a black woman who is so comfortable in my black-womanness. I know what I can accomplish. And anything I have accomplished, I did so not in spite of being a black woman, but because I am a black woman."I heard about Gabrielle Union's book the day it was released; and I was adamant about purchasing it that day (and I did, thank you very much!). Not only do I think "My humanness doesn't insulate me from racism or sexism. In fact, I think I can deal effectively with the world precisely because I am a black woman who is so comfortable in my black-womanness. I know what I can accomplish. And anything I have accomplished, I did so not in spite of being a black woman, but because I am a black woman."I heard about Gabrielle Union's book the day it was released; and I was adamant about purchasing it that day (and I did, thank you very much!). Not only do I think she is incredibly beautiful, I also respect her as an actress, so I was very interested in learning about her background in her own words. What people should know is that this is a book of essays; not a memoir, despite the fact that the stories are centered around her life & experiences. Her stories are very Being Mary Jane-ish raw & uncut, which wasn't surprising, since she plays the role of Mary Jane Paul so well! Aside from being a great actress, I think it's also due to the fact that she personally identifies with Mary Jane Paul so much. Overall, I enjoyed her book and am very happy that I decided to make the drive to my local B&N to purchase it.
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  • Jodi
    January 1, 1970
    I won an uncorrected proof copy of "We're Going to Need More Wine", thru the Goodreads Giveaway program. This memoir is a standout - Gabrielle Union writes the way she talks, joyous and free of BS. Her stories of growing up, surviving sexual violence, finding fame and success in acting, and the deep and abiding love she has for her family and friends all ring with that voice - speaking (sometimes hard) truths about race, gender, sex, love, money, fame, friendship, justice and health care. I trul I won an uncorrected proof copy of "We're Going to Need More Wine", thru the Goodreads Giveaway program. This memoir is a standout - Gabrielle Union writes the way she talks, joyous and free of BS. Her stories of growing up, surviving sexual violence, finding fame and success in acting, and the deep and abiding love she has for her family and friends all ring with that voice - speaking (sometimes hard) truths about race, gender, sex, love, money, fame, friendship, justice and health care. I truly loved this book, and look forward to sharing it with my friends and family, and to reading it again, myself. Ms. Union, if you are ever in NE Texas, drop by and we can share a glass or two of wine :)
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  • Angie-Leonie
    January 1, 1970
    Congrats to me,first time hearing an audiobook ( yes I'm sooooo late to the table), but this was a great introduction to audiobooks. Listening to the author read their own work gave me a better feeling into the book, which is something that made me shy away from audiobooks initially. Union's debut is full of humour,stark realness, questionable behaviour habits and moments of discussion for later on. Yes my favourite part was her advice to her step son's/nephew. Some may think it's controversal, Congrats to me,first time hearing an audiobook ( yes I'm sooooo late to the table), but this was a great introduction to audiobooks. Listening to the author read their own work gave me a better feeling into the book, which is something that made me shy away from audiobooks initially. Union's debut is full of humour,stark realness, questionable behaviour habits and moments of discussion for later on. Yes my favourite part was her advice to her step son's/nephew. Some may think it's controversal, as a POC nope,hell nnoooooo, this is standard saviour skills you pass onto your male relatives/family young ones to see them another day. I already am ordering a kindle copy for my library, because I need a physical copy, that's just me.
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  • Erika Brown
    January 1, 1970
    I read this to get away from it all. (I've been on a tear of "getting away from it all" books.) This one surprised me. I didn't know what to expect from Gabrielle Union, except funny, gossipy stories from a successful actress. Hell, I didn't even know if she could write! Well, I got all I expected. This is a really funny read from a no-holds-barred, sharp, modern, got-it-together woman who has succeeded in a what I imagine is a really, really hard business. She takes on all the hard issues that I read this to get away from it all. (I've been on a tear of "getting away from it all" books.) This one surprised me. I didn't know what to expect from Gabrielle Union, except funny, gossipy stories from a successful actress. Hell, I didn't even know if she could write! Well, I got all I expected. This is a really funny read from a no-holds-barred, sharp, modern, got-it-together woman who has succeeded in a what I imagine is a really, really hard business. She takes on all the hard issues that face girls today -- image, body, sex, friends, family, marriage. She's learned a lot, and she's learned much of it the hard way. Funny, honest, fresh. And she can write! (Must be her UCLA degree.)Worth the read.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t know much about Gabrielle Union before reading this collection of essays. I knew her from some of my favorite 90s teen movies, and more recently as Dwayne Wade’s wife. Within the first few pages of this collection of essays I was so surprised to see how honest and hilarious she is. The stories range from hysterical to heartbreaking and I loved every bit of it. Her reflections on racism and sexism are also incredibly relevant, unfortunately, to our daily life. This is a very courageous b I didn’t know much about Gabrielle Union before reading this collection of essays. I knew her from some of my favorite 90s teen movies, and more recently as Dwayne Wade’s wife. Within the first few pages of this collection of essays I was so surprised to see how honest and hilarious she is. The stories range from hysterical to heartbreaking and I loved every bit of it. Her reflections on racism and sexism are also incredibly relevant, unfortunately, to our daily life. This is a very courageous book and my only regret is not drinking more wine while reading it.Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an advanced copy!
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