We're Going to Need More Wine
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “A book of essays as raw and honest as anyone has ever produced.” — Lena Dunham, Lenny Letter In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please, Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, and Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman.One month before the release of the highly anticipated film The Birth of a Nation, actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape allegations made against director and actor Nate Parker, Union—a forty-four-year-old actress who launched her career with roles in iconic ’90s movies—instantly became the insightful, outspoken actress that Hollywood has been desperately awaiting. With honesty and heartbreaking wisdom, she revealed her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault: "It is for you that I am speaking. This is real. We are real." In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.

We're Going to Need More Wine Details

TitleWe're Going to Need More Wine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 17th, 2017
PublisherDey Street Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Audiobook, Biography

We're Going to Need More Wine Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    You don’t actually need wine to read this book, but it sure feels as though Gabrielle Union herself is in front of you, at the other end of the table, telling you her life story. She comes out as very approachable through her wonderful writing style. She is detailed and precise, and a skilled story-teller. I could picture everything happening clearly in my mind, and the fact that these stories are all true makes them all the more important.You see, Gabrielle Union may have grown up in an affluen You don’t actually need wine to read this book, but it sure feels as though Gabrielle Union herself is in front of you, at the other end of the table, telling you her life story. She comes out as very approachable through her wonderful writing style. She is detailed and precise, and a skilled story-teller. I could picture everything happening clearly in my mind, and the fact that these stories are all true makes them all the more important.You see, Gabrielle Union may have grown up in an affluent neighbourhood, but that doesn’t mean she hasn’t seen and experienced dark events. In fact, she knew she had to be extra careful and pay extra attention to everything she did and said because the world is harder on people of colour.But even knowing this and taking precautions, she still got hurt. She still got taken advantage of. She still had her heart broken. And she still was raped at her workplace. You think everyone has it figured out, or you assume that the only things they’ve had to deal with were mildly serious issues. You don’t think something like that could happen to a celebrity, to someone who is loved and admired by many. You don’t think they’ve had to overcome something so… soul-shattering. Gabrielle Union did. Now you look at her and you see everything you want to be, but to get to that point she’s had to climb a mountain and dodge a few icebergs. What surprises me most about this memoir are the little details about herself that she so willingly shares with us, like the fact that she first masturbated at the age of five, or how much she wanted to be like the white girls when she was young. It is not one hundred percent cohesive, seeing that Ms. Union goes back and forth quite a few times, and the last chapter feels extremely random despite being inspiring, but it is entirely interesting, refreshing and honest.I know a lot of people refuse to read memoirs from celebrities, for many reasons that I respect, but if ever you want to give one a chance and are looking for a meaningful read, this is it. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Reading in Black & White
    January 1, 1970
    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly w I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly white community, relationships, sex, racism, the pressure of dealing with public perception, friendships, and most importantly, the freedom one can feel when they decide to truly be themselves.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I love Gabrielle Union! I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it. We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what interests you I love Gabrielle Union! I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it. We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what interests you this isn't your book. We're Going To Need More Wine is a collection of essays that touch on pivotal moments in her life. I prefer essays over memoirs, because honestly I don't care about where you we're born or what elementary school you attended unless its a supercool story(its usually not). So if you love Gabrielle Union, Read this book. If you love books written by strong women about strong women, Read this book. If you just enjoy hilarious and honest storytelling, Read this book.Basically READ THIS BOOK!
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  • Sher❤ The Fabulous BookLover
    January 1, 1970
    4 Stars:)*Audiobook Review*I’ve never really known what to think of Gabrielle Union. I loved her in Bring it On and Being Mary Jane, but I didn’t know what to think since I've never really been crazy about her. We’re Going To Need More Wine is a collection of stories that are so transparent and real, from stories about infertility, rape to racism and Hollywood. I was surprised by how candid she is. There’s heartbreaking moments, funny moments and moments where you can just relate. Love the title 4 Stars:)*Audiobook Review*I’ve never really known what to think of Gabrielle Union. I loved her in Bring it On and Being Mary Jane, but I didn’t know what to think since I've never really been crazy about her. We’re Going To Need More Wine is a collection of stories that are so transparent and real, from stories about infertility, rape to racism and Hollywood. I was surprised by how candid she is. There’s heartbreaking moments, funny moments and moments where you can just relate. Love the title, I love cover and it’s definitely plus that she’s the audio narrator. She’s smart, funny, talented and I’m honestly glad I gave this a chance.
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  • Read In Colour
    January 1, 1970
    Very open & honest, Gabrielle Union is not just a pretty face. She's really smart and really funny and now I want to be her BFF.
  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I w Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I was impressed with how this book read like a conversation with friends. I liked how she was so blunt with her language, never being afraid to use explicit words when necessary.There were many highlights in this book, but I don't want to spoil anything. It is a very witty and memorable book that will have you laughing so loud, whether it was intentional or not. I did not really like the ending but because I was immersed in every chapter, I rounded it up to five stars.Really good memoir, trust me after reading this, you are going to need more wine!
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  • Obsidian
    January 1, 1970
    I recall this came out last year. A friend of mine went to a book signing by Gabrielle Union and was raving over this book. I was hesitant to read cause I'm heard on memoirs and always feel guilty when I don't like them. Cause if you don't like the memoir, you don't like the person. If it's ghostwritten though all bets are off.I know of Gabrielle Union. I'm an African American woman and have been watching and obsessing over her since I was a teen. She's been in so many movies (Bring it On, 10 Th I recall this came out last year. A friend of mine went to a book signing by Gabrielle Union and was raving over this book. I was hesitant to read cause I'm heard on memoirs and always feel guilty when I don't like them. Cause if you don't like the memoir, you don't like the person. If it's ghostwritten though all bets are off.I know of Gabrielle Union. I'm an African American woman and have been watching and obsessing over her since I was a teen. She's been in so many movies (Bring it On, 10 Things I Hate About You, Daddy's Little Girls, Bad Boys II, Good Deeds, etc.) and she stars in one of my favorite shows, Being Mary Jane (yeah I get rowdy about that show on Twitter). I always feel weirdly proud when an African American woman kicks ass in any field. As Union says at one point, we are taught since we're small we have to be better than everyone else to even be looked at as the same. A Super Negro can spot their own.Union begins her memoir in chronological manner before she jumps back and forth between her first marriage (my butt didn't even know she was married before Dwayne Wade) and second marriage. She talks about hearing the "n" word as a kid and doing her best to walk between two world's at school and with her family during her summers away. And she's painfully honest about doing what she could to be found "cute" since her dark skin was not seen as attractive with so many boys she was growing up with.One of my favorite sections is when Union discusses colorism in the African American community in a very great way. I know our community still hasn't addressed it and there's still the lingering shame of being "too dark" or "too light" and you think we be over it as adults, and we're not. Hell people still trying to hide Lupita away on screen which is why I'm so happy to see her fully out and gorgeous in Black Panther.Another favorite section is when Union recounts when she was raped and how it affected and still affects her. I remember her clapping back at Mayim Bialik and her terrible op-ed going into how if women dressed more conservative they would be less likely to be sexually assaulted. I have never wanted to reach through my phone so much in my life. Gabrielle shares her thoughts on being a stepmother, helping to raise young black men in America, and what drove her to support Planned Parenthood and other initiatives dealing with women's health.I will say there are also some sections that will make you howl with laughter. My favorites have to be her reminiscing about a bully looking to beat her butt, her period and not understanding tampons, and when she tried some homeopathic (I guess I can call them that) to cure a yeast infection. She's also pretty upfront about sex and owning her sexuality. As I said in my update, I laughed, I cried, I loved it.
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  • Ezinwanyi
    January 1, 1970
    Gabrielle was rather honest about where she is from, where she's been, and where she hopes she is headed. Some of it is funny, some were sad but all of it was candid. I feel like most of Being Miss Jane is based loosely on Gabrielle's life. It is a reminder that celebrities are just humans who have all the same tragedies, work places struggles, and need for privacy like everyone. I enjoyed it and wish her all the success in her life.
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  • Luvvie
    January 1, 1970
    I just read this whole book in 4 hours in 1 sitting. It was so honest. So vulnerable. So real. Also funny. Could not have been easy to write cuz she really puts herself on the stand. This is so good. Loved it. Gabby did that!
  • Evette
    January 1, 1970
    I thought I was done reading celebrity memoirs. I've read Gabourey Sidibe's, Shonda Rhimes', Phoebe Robinson's and countless others, and all of them were good, but I thought I'd had my fill. Gabrielle Union proved me wrong. Her memoir in essays is absolutely incredible. It's bitingly funny, but also sobering as Union delves into so many different subjects, including rape, PTSD, racism, colorism, and metastatic breast cancer. By far, "We're Going to Need More Wine" is one of the best books of 201 I thought I was done reading celebrity memoirs. I've read Gabourey Sidibe's, Shonda Rhimes', Phoebe Robinson's and countless others, and all of them were good, but I thought I'd had my fill. Gabrielle Union proved me wrong. Her memoir in essays is absolutely incredible. It's bitingly funny, but also sobering as Union delves into so many different subjects, including rape, PTSD, racism, colorism, and metastatic breast cancer. By far, "We're Going to Need More Wine" is one of the best books of 2018.
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    Celebrity memoirs are a special breed of animal. Considering how much speculation goes on around celebrity lives in the tabloids, it must be nice to be able to steer the conversation, and admit or deny things of which they have been accused. Gabriela Union keeps it lively; to my sensibility she appears fearless. Forty-five years old now, I suppose it is not too early for her to tell all. She is happily married, her work is widely admired and keeps her in demand, and she has figured out there is Celebrity memoirs are a special breed of animal. Considering how much speculation goes on around celebrity lives in the tabloids, it must be nice to be able to steer the conversation, and admit or deny things of which they have been accused. Gabriela Union keeps it lively; to my sensibility she appears fearless. Forty-five years old now, I suppose it is not too early for her to tell all. She is happily married, her work is widely admired and keeps her in demand, and she has figured out there is little time for regret.But I probably wouldn’t have been so explicit about the sex. I don’t really care who she decides to sleep with, but even if one is a celebrity, one is not required to explain one's sexual preferences or positions. Why is her experience with multiple partners so different from that of other people? I didn't understand that part. Union writes about growing up in a white culture in California, and it may be the California part, or the celebrity part, or the movie part that feels distant to me. I’ll take her word for it what she describes is white California culture. It could be another universe from a strict white New England Yankee upbringing. White can’t be the operative word here. It’s something else.The movie industry in California is all about appearances so it shouldn’t surprise me to find someone in the industry concerned with appearances. The discussion about hair is just interesting. As high school students we all obsessed about hair, but because Union is in the movies, she needs to continue to think about this stuff. I’m just gonna state for the record that I would not put all that effort into hair, acting a role aside. I like black hair. I like the hair of NYTimes analyst and reporter Yamiche Alcindor. She wears it natural. It is interesting and it changes day to day, depending on humidity, I guess. It’s sculptural, and is a relief among Washington people who primp to excess. And yeah, it looks touchable. Isn’t that what guys always said they liked? What Union does really well in this memoir is show us how minority actors are treated in majority white culture, how overlooked their talents often are, and how so few film companies are interested in minority stories or leading roles. This seems such a big mistake to me…is it really true the great films featuring black or other minority actors in major roles don't recoup their investments? I find that difficult to believe, frankly.The other thing Union does really well is demonstrate that no matter how famous a black person is, they are treated differently by the public and by law enforcement. She explains that buying a house in a fancy neighborhood may invite more scrutiny and suspicion, and even going for a walk in one’s own neighborhood is not as straightforward as it should be. The American dream is nothing without the presumption of innocence.I haven’t seen enough films with black leads. I remember Union’s performance in Bring It On as being exceptional, considering…everything about that film. I’d like to see her in more things. I’d also like to see again a female lead I saw in a Turkish soap opera once. I want to see the great actors no matter what color they are or what language they speak. It is pitiful that they don't have the same opportunity to develop their talent as do the least talented white actors.
There are some harrowing experiences in this book that Union is willing to share. I suppose when one’s life is under a microscope all the time with fans, one becomes accustomed to sharing with the world. She is generous.
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  • Book of the Month
    January 1, 1970
    With We’re Going to Need More Wine, the talented, superbly cool actress Gabrielle Union gets real in a collection of true-life tales that is as wise as it is unfiltered. Beginning with her childhood in a predominantly white Californian suburb, Union takes us through the mishaps and triumphs of a bright career, from cagily finding success in Hollywood to overcoming professional disappointment to assuming––and excelling at––a role as an advocate for victims of sexual abuse. Heroic and hilarious, U With We’re Going to Need More Wine, the talented, superbly cool actress Gabrielle Union gets real in a collection of true-life tales that is as wise as it is unfiltered. Beginning with her childhood in a predominantly white Californian suburb, Union takes us through the mishaps and triumphs of a bright career, from cagily finding success in Hollywood to overcoming professional disappointment to assuming––and excelling at––a role as an advocate for victims of sexual abuse. Heroic and hilarious, Union’s voice rings true whether she’s recounting an impromptu party thrown by Prince or describing the importance of mentoring young black actresses. Pour one out for us, please.Read more at https://www.bookofthemonth.com/were-g...
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  • Monica **can't read fast enough**
    January 1, 1970
    This was so good! Union is honest, raw, and uninhibited in this memoir! Review to come.
  • Eliza
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5) I wanted to give this four stars but...I’ll be honest: if you weren’t that crazy about Gabrielle Union before, this book probably won’t help. Overall, this was a more honest read than I was expecting. There were times I literally laughed out loud and what she says about raising Black sons is spot on.It’s clear by the end of the book that there were certain topics she wasn’t going to speak on (and that’s 100% her right). I felt it did a disservice to the reader to omit those items, but - be (3.5) I wanted to give this four stars but...I’ll be honest: if you weren’t that crazy about Gabrielle Union before, this book probably won’t help. Overall, this was a more honest read than I was expecting. There were times I literally laughed out loud and what she says about raising Black sons is spot on.It’s clear by the end of the book that there were certain topics she wasn’t going to speak on (and that’s 100% her right). I felt it did a disservice to the reader to omit those items, but - beyond that - this read will solidify your opinion either way about the actress.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    What an honest and candid conversation. I was left open-mouthed most times and other times, I was like, yass...girl, you are the one.My experience with Gabriele Union has been through the movie or tv roles she played and I only started paying attention to her a few years ago. Her characters always appeared so in control of everything: their emotions, careers and love lives. I was always in awe of the women she was playing.Reading this book felt like I was having a conversation with her. Such a c What an honest and candid conversation. I was left open-mouthed most times and other times, I was like, yass...girl, you are the one.My experience with Gabriele Union has been through the movie or tv roles she played and I only started paying attention to her a few years ago. Her characters always appeared so in control of everything: their emotions, careers and love lives. I was always in awe of the women she was playing.Reading this book felt like I was having a conversation with her. Such a candid account of her life. There are some parts which she kept out of the book, I guess if you are interested in those, you can always find them online. We Are Going To Need More Wine is a loaded title. Catchy with a pull factor but the contents were not eye-poppin'. More every-lback-woman. Gabrielle walked us through her struggles as a black teenager growing up in an affluent suburb and going back to the hood to visit family over holidays and immersed herself in all things black only to shrug these off like a frayed jersey when she got back home. We've had those moments. A lot of them. I certainly had them when I was in high school. Trying to appear a little less black at school but when I got home, I was the anomaly. The girl who was gaped at. Pointed at. Really shreds your already waning self-esteem.Back to the book. The writing is okay, after all, English is a very subjective language. American- English takes a getting used to but what surprised me was how it sounded to me. The way she spoke. Tone and the languaging. I wasn't expecting that. Gabrielle is so prim and preppy, at least the one I saw on television. The intersectionality of class and language runs deep. There's no getting away from it.I enjoyed reading it. I resonated so much with her struggles and celebrated her wins. We all make mistakes on our journeys and I am glad that she found herself. The self she is comfortable in.Her guilt about being a working mom. That will resonate with every working mother the world over but she is blessed to have a support system. Husband and nannies/housekeeper. Equality of the sexes never catered for the average black woman. The one who works twice as hard as a man, takes home way less but still gets home and works some more. The ones who have to pay more for daycare. This world, is skewed to ensure that the man keeps on winning ALL THE TIME.Her advocacy work is commendable. A bit sad that it had to take a traumatic experience to propel her but she is working tirelessly, especially for the marginalised to ensure that they get the care that they deserve. This brought Zinzi Clemmons' autofuction "What We Loose" to mind.I enjoyed this book. It read like a conversation between best friends. A perfect book club read. So many discussion points arose.4 stars.
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  • Isabel Jones
    January 1, 1970
    This woman is a national fucking treasure
  • Eilonwy
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually read celebrity memoirs. But Lola’s review was so glowing, I made an exception. And I am glad I did! Gabrielle Union is amazingly open and willing to share the parts of her life that have caused her the most pain and shame (among happy times, too), and she does it engagingly and with zero judgement for either herself or her reader. Like Trevor Noah's Born a Crime, this is more a collection of essays organized around a timeline of experiences than a linear autobiography. Gabrielle I don't usually read celebrity memoirs. But Lola’s review was so glowing, I made an exception. And I am glad I did! Gabrielle Union is amazingly open and willing to share the parts of her life that have caused her the most pain and shame (among happy times, too), and she does it engagingly and with zero judgement for either herself or her reader. Like Trevor Noah's Born a Crime, this is more a collection of essays organized around a timeline of experiences than a linear autobiography. Gabrielle talks about being the only black girl in her upper middle class California town; about how that affected her perception of her own color and the complexion of the boys/men she chose to date; her rape and how she became an advocate for legal and emotional support for rape victims; how she learned to stop tearing other women down and made a conscious decision to support women, instead; she shares the lessons she's taken from her two marriages, one bad and one good; shares the pain of infertility; and describes what it's like to be a black woman living in a wealthy neighborhood where she's seen as "the help" and where she has to worry about her husband's kids being viewed as dangers. The one thing I was really curious about, and which she glosses right over, just as Trevor Noah also did, was how she got into modeling/acting and ended up famous. One day she's moping over how unattractive she feels because she is only "pretty for a dark-skinned girl," and spending all her time holed up at home after her rape, and then bam, "I went and got famous." Is it just assumed that readers already know that part of the story? Because I don't, and I wish she had told it to me. But this is one lack in an otherwise awesome book. This was a super-fast read, and I actually wished it had been longer. The weirdest thing for me was that, after finishing this, I spent a few days feeling as if I should just be able to call Gabrielle up and have a chat, because obviously we're friends now. I had to remind myself that she still doesn't know me, even though I know all kinds of intimate things about her. It's funny how close this book made me feel to her. That is some powerful effect. I hope she writes a follow-up in the not-too-distant future! Thanks to Lola for bringing this to my attention. I recommend this to everyone!
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  • Andre
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollyw If you are looking for a memoir in the strictest sense, this is not that book. If you are seeking a book of essays in the sense of argument presentation, again this is not that book. And that's a good thing, because what this is, as the subtitle states are stories from the accomplished Gabrielle Union, which works out absolutely fine. And these stories run the gamut from the personal to the professional. She tells stories about race, gender, feeling inadequate, hair, colorism, homophobia, Hollywood, sexuality, school, college, step-parenting, marriage, divorce and even rape. She manages to tell these stories with a fearlessness that entertains as well as informs. Like a high-wire act with no safety net. Gabrielle comes across as a very thoughtful, likable, brave and funny woman, one that I think readers would indeed enjoy a glass of wine with. There are of course elements of memoir, as she takes us through her school years growing up in the suburbs of California, one of the few Black girls in her schools of Pleasanton, CA. There are also elements of essay, like the chapter called Mittens which deals with how Blacks are perceived and policed, and how we often go out of our way to make accommodations to those perceptions. In reference to this she says, "Worse, I am told that people don’t want to hear these stories, but the reality is we experience life in a never-ending loop in which we are told that if we just “make it,” we will enjoy the fruits of our labor: assimilation."But what makes this book special are the stories and the way she tells them. And digesting the stories on the whole, we see her blossom into the confident audacious and vivacious woman she is presently. She wasn't always the beautiful woman we think of, when we hear the name Gabrielle Union. In fact she describes herself at an early age,"I was so thin that I looked like a black daddy longlegs spider with buckteeth. This is not overly earnest, false-humility celebrity speak, I swear."It is those type of self-deprecating comments along with the willingness to bare it all that portends an air of authenticity. If you are a fan, you will become a bigger fan and if you're not than surely you will become one after reading these stories from Gabrielle Union. Thanks to Edelweiss and Dey St. books for an advanced ebook. Book drops 10/17/17.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I really wish that Lena Dunham's name would stop being dropped when talking about feminist books. I haven't read Dunham's book because everytime she opens her mouth, she shows me that she isn't a feminist. Why she is consider the standard I have no friggin idea.If you want a book that is really by a feminist and someone with a brain, this is the book for you. I can't say that I have seen every movie or tv show in Union's body of work, but she is one of those actors who I always seriously conside I really wish that Lena Dunham's name would stop being dropped when talking about feminist books. I haven't read Dunham's book because everytime she opens her mouth, she shows me that she isn't a feminist. Why she is consider the standard I have no friggin idea.If you want a book that is really by a feminist and someone with a brain, this is the book for you. I can't say that I have seen every movie or tv show in Union's body of work, but she is one of those actors who I always seriously consider seeing a film simply because she is in it. Quite frankly, Deliver Us From Eva is the only version of Taming of the Shrew that ties with Moonlight's. But more importantly, Union has long had my respect simply for her vocal support and work in women's issues. She has been speaking about rape, for example, long before the #MeToo movement took Hollywood.This book is reall a collection of essays about her life. Union is honest; she doesn't always come off well in these stories - for instance there is the bit about the imatation crab and, more importantly, when she writes about her use of the word "faggot".What Union does is use her personal experience, in many cases, to make larger comments about society or about Hollywood. Her story about parties with Prince is really about how important networking is, why Hollywood is so inclusive and why Prince's networking was so important. She mourns Prince but also makes larger points. Her essay about raising her stepchildren deals with raising young, tall black men in a majority rich, white neighborhood. Her passage about the family's home in Chicago is really wonderful.At times the stories are funny - like her story about the teen who wanted to beat her up - at times they are horrible and sad - she details her rape and a death of a friend. They are always interesting highlighting differences in places, cultures, how people view drugs, and why everyone seems to care about a woman's utereus (and why they shouldn't).Honesty, how can you not want to read a book that includes an oath with Judy Blume in it?I would especially reccomend this book if you enjoyed Carrie Fisher's books. Union and Fisher have much in common.
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  • Seymone
    January 1, 1970
    She spoke to the nuances of my life. I loved this memoir!!! Will reread and take my time with her words.
  • Jess7
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ 5/5 Stars. I absolutely loved this book! I learned so much about Gabrielle Union that I did not know before. I listened to the audiobook (read by the author) and I really enjoyed it. It’s very easy to listen to and follow along. She was raw and honest about her experiences. Some of her stories were tear-jerking and some were laugh-out-loud funny. I listened to this memoir in only two sittings and I highly recommend it! #jpbookreview ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5/5 Stars. I absolutely loved this book! I learned so much about Gabrielle Union that I did not know before. I listened to the audiobook (read by the author) and I really enjoyed it. It’s very easy to listen to and follow along. She was raw and honest about her experiences. Some of her stories were tear-jerking and some were laugh-out-loud funny. I listened to this memoir in only two sittings and I highly recommend it! #jpbookreview
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Her stories were entertaining and thought provoking, her sense of humor is hilarious and she isn’t afraid to use profanity. Score!
  • MissFabularian
    January 1, 1970
    Can't wait for book club! I have so many feelings.
  • Brandice
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been a fan of Gabrielle Union for many years, and I enjoyed this book. It’s a collection of stories from her life, not in any particular order, but I appreciated the relatively informal tone throughout the book. It felt relatable, like reminiscing with or catching up with an old friend. She touches on race, class and gender, from her own experiences in work and in life. Some chapters were more relatable than others, and some more enjoyable than others. Overall, it was a quick read and one t I’ve been a fan of Gabrielle Union for many years, and I enjoyed this book. It’s a collection of stories from her life, not in any particular order, but I appreciated the relatively informal tone throughout the book. It felt relatable, like reminiscing with or catching up with an old friend. She touches on race, class and gender, from her own experiences in work and in life. Some chapters were more relatable than others, and some more enjoyable than others. Overall, it was a quick read and one that I liked - I think most Gabrielle Union fans would also like it.
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  • Valerie
    January 1, 1970
    Gabrielle Union is funny . Like "laugh out loud, I want to be your friend, can we share a glass of wine and dinner together?" funny. There were multiple instances reading this book when I laughed out loud and I'm 1000% percent positive that the woman behind them delivers just as effectively and hilariously in person as she does on the page (mainly because I've been enjoying her press tour for this book over the last few weeks). On top of being someone you just want to befriend, Union weaves sto Gabrielle Union is funny . Like "laugh out loud, I want to be your friend, can we share a glass of wine and dinner together?" funny. There were multiple instances reading this book when I laughed out loud and I'm 1000% percent positive that the woman behind them delivers just as effectively and hilariously in person as she does on the page (mainly because I've been enjoying her press tour for this book over the last few weeks). On top of being someone you just want to befriend, Union weaves story after relatable story of honesty, vulnerability, and the journey she's taken to become the woman we know her as in We're Going To Need More Wine. I could see myself in so many of the moments she relayed to the reader, (view spoiler)[from having a nickname that has followed you from adolescence and holds zero similarity to your given one to the more in-depth moments that follow the trials and tribulations of growing up in all-white neighborhoods and communities. Her words on seeking acceptance and thus attempting assimilation hit close to home in so many ways. Though I didn't experience the levels of ignorance she did in her own childhood (the general veil of ignorance was a lot more subtle in 90s NJ and those in my immediate circle of friends were, thankfully, not as blatantly disrespectful of people of color because there were a few of us that banded together), I remember those feelings of wanting to fit in and knowing that despite being like everyone else in many ways, I would always be Black and, to an extent, unseen as a result. Getting those moments of kinship so early in the collection offered a backdrop of familiarity that carried throughout this collection of stories. She pulls in stories of trauma, despair, and disappointment as well as she does those of frankness, the perils of fame and health issues (an LOL chapter for sure), and the magic of "being in the room." I appreciated the balance of lightness and real talk that's present throughout. What stood out to me the most while reading this book is how self-aware Union reads throughout. It's very evident that she has taken the steps and done the work to free the beautiful person she's always been inside. Going through this collection of essays offers a look at the Nickie that came before Gabrielle and it was an incredibly rewarding and entertaining journey. (hide spoiler)]As is usually the case with autobiographical work, I've left wanting to know more and feeling a kinship with the author. I look forward to reading and hearing the stories she said hadn't made their way to this book. I know they'll make for an enjoyable read in the future and most importantly, they'll keep allowing this incredible woman to shine and see herself fully, more openly, and with more love of self.
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  • C.M. Arnold
    January 1, 1970
    First and foremost, this book is hilarious. I’ve read the works of a lot of popular “humor section” authors, and Gabrielle can hold her own with the comedians…if not show them up. We’re Going to Need More Wine is not just humor, though. It’s insight, experiences, self-reflection, and more. Up until a few years ago I wasn’t really what you’d call a Gabrielle Union fan. That’s not to say I wasn’t a fan. I’d seen her in things here and there, I just wasn’t going to see things solely because of her. First and foremost, this book is hilarious. I’ve read the works of a lot of popular “humor section” authors, and Gabrielle can hold her own with the comedians…if not show them up. We’re Going to Need More Wine is not just humor, though. It’s insight, experiences, self-reflection, and more. Up until a few years ago I wasn’t really what you’d call a Gabrielle Union fan. That’s not to say I wasn’t a fan. I’d seen her in things here and there, I just wasn’t going to see things solely because of her. Then I stumbled upon Being Mary Jane, instantly got hooked, and became a big fan. The first thing I heard about this book—when it was getting ready to release and she was doing promo—came from interviewers who were fixated on one thing in particular she wrote. This “thing” turned out to literally be one line. One very brief line that got blown way out of proportion for the sake views. I’ll say this, if that’s the only thing you’ve heard about it…just know the book as a whole is way more interesting than that one off-handed comment made while discussing the importance of reciprocation with a young woman who’d been getting gypped in her encounters with young men. You get scenes and stories from all eras of her life—it doesn’t go in any kind of order, but that ended up not mattering much to me. Never once did I get bored while reading. There are just as many thought-provoking lines as there are laugh-out-loud lines. Her ability to admit things about herself is admirable. Like “Yeah, I said that, I thought that way, that was my ignorance, that was my ego, and that was wrong.” Her personality never comes across fake, forced, or rehearsed. And she’s so candid. Yeast infection candid. I really don’t know if there are many other actors who could/would be THIS authentic and candid to give you a book THIS good. I respect Gabrielle Union immensely & I highly recommend this book.
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  • Tender&Delicate
    January 1, 1970
    Great Audiobook! She really reveals herself to her readers layer by layer. A truly relatable woman.
  • Latanya (CraftyScribbles)
    January 1, 1970
    Fan-fucking-tastic!I never saw Gabrielle Union as one that would crack my sides open with laughter. Trust. Not a glass of wine spilled as I read. Read this book. Listen to the audiobook, which she narrates, as soon as possible. But, before that, get your favorite bottle or box and sip fondly.5/5
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  • Alana Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    “My humanness doesn’t insulate me from racism or sexism. In fact, I think I can deal effectively with the world preciously because I am a black woman who is so comfortable in my blackwomanness. I know what I can accomplish. And anything I have accomplished, I did so not in spite of being a black woman, but because I am a black woman.”Man, these short essays are required reading. Union, bravely and boldly, tells her story in vignettes about aspects of her life and in turn, subtly yet forcefully, “My humanness doesn’t insulate me from racism or sexism. In fact, I think I can deal effectively with the world preciously because I am a black woman who is so comfortable in my blackwomanness. I know what I can accomplish. And anything I have accomplished, I did so not in spite of being a black woman, but because I am a black woman.”Man, these short essays are required reading. Union, bravely and boldly, tells her story in vignettes about aspects of her life and in turn, subtly yet forcefully, gives a voice to the often voiceless. I read chapters like, Black Girl Blues and I felt seen and completely understood. These essays cover a range of issues, from finding one's identity in an environment where you are the exception, not the rule, rape and PTSD, marriage, motherhood, infertility, celebrity and its invasive nature, being black (and famous) in America, Hollywood and its lack of access, among others. The author really mastered the one-liner praiseworthy quotes, like 'you can't self-esteem your way out of the way the world treats you.' *praise stomp* The essays are short and digestible but long enough to get a full appreciation of the point being made. I wish some essays were longer and more detailed but the author reveals a lot of personal trauma so I totally understand why some essays were structured the way they were. This book must have taken a lot of courage to write for many reasons and she deserves a reader with an open mind. She ends the book with a wish from her best friend with a terminal illness, 'I want you to tell people that fear can kill you ... I was afraid and it killed me.' You can't help but ugly cry by the end.
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  • Lekeisha The Booknerd
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so relevant. So relevant, that it needs to be passed around and be required reading for young black girls. And hey, I know that a lot of females, not matter your race (and males, if I'm to be honest) can relate to these stories. True stories. Like, this stuff is so honest that I cringed at certain points. Gabrielle lays it all out on the table. Some stories are even funny (I hope you never see Queeshaun again, Gabby), and then there are the ones that I definitely could relate to the This book is so relevant. So relevant, that it needs to be passed around and be required reading for young black girls. And hey, I know that a lot of females, not matter your race (and males, if I'm to be honest) can relate to these stories. True stories. Like, this stuff is so honest that I cringed at certain points. Gabrielle lays it all out on the table. Some stories are even funny (I hope you never see Queeshaun again, Gabby), and then there are the ones that I definitely could relate to the most. Growing up trying to live in opposite worlds. Except, my worlds were reversed. And I think all black girls have been exposed to colorism in their communities. "The standard of beauty and intelligence that has historically been praised by the oppressor has been adopted by the oppressed."Truer words have never been spoken. This is some honest shit. I can see how some will take offense or disagree, but you have been warned. Thank you, Gabrielle, for writing these hilarious & heartfelt stories.
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