Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Vol. 1
The webslinging, wallcrawling wonder returns to New York City in the all-new PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN. A companion series to the best-selling Amazing Spider-Man series, Peter Parker is going back-to-basics for big heroics in the Big Apple. Featuring adversaries old and new, be there as Spider-Man returns to his friendly neighborhood for his never ending battle against crime and the dreaded "Parker Luck." COLLECTING: PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDERMAN 1-6

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Vol. 1 Details

TitlePeter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 26th, 2017
PublisherMarvel Comics
ISBN-139781302907563
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Spider Man, Graphic Novels Comics

Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man, Vol. 1 Review

  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    Having been around for fifty-five years through comics and other media, we ought to know the origin story of how Peter Parker got bitten by a radioactive spider, which gained him superpowers and how "with great power comes great responsibility". Even based on recent works like the cinematic Homecoming didn't need to explain this backstory whilst introducing us a new incarnation of everyone's favourite wall-crawler.Opening the first issue of Chip Zdarsky's Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man Having been around for fifty-five years through comics and other media, we ought to know the origin story of how Peter Parker got bitten by a radioactive spider, which gained him superpowers and how "with great power comes great responsibility". Even based on recent works like the cinematic Homecoming didn't need to explain this backstory whilst introducing us a new incarnation of everyone's favourite wall-crawler.Opening the first issue of Chip Zdarsky's Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, the eponymous hero explains his origin to Johnny Storm, the Human Torch, who has heard it for the millionth time and asks why he's telling it again. Peter responds by saying it's an integral part of who he is. This sequence may be playing for laughs, but throughout this volume, Zdarsky understands what makes Spider-Man tick, both in humour and heart.Whilst Dan Slott's The Amazing Spider-Man primarily focuses on Peter Parker continuing to run Parker Industries, and becoming a successful businessman who is operating worldwide, Zdarsky's comic is telling a more "back-to-basics" Spidey story with our hero fighting crime in New York whilst constantly being criticised by J. Jonah Jameson who now runs a blog. Zdarsky is clearly looking back at the character's history and even acknowledging certain aspects that some readers wouldn't consider as canon. As a loose continuation of the 2014 graphic novel Amazing Spider-Man: Family Business, we witness the return of Peter's fake sister Teresa, a former agent who becomes a fugitive when she's in possession of classified information about taking down super villains and super heroes. For something that is meant to be "back-to-basics", this is a story that involves espionage, journalism, multiple villains and the tinkering of gadgetry from both sides.There is a lot going on as the central plot involving a crime ring that is connected with hacked phones feels more like a way of Spidey interacting with various characters, including hanging out with his fellow super-mates that feels more like an over-extended episode of Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends. With this much going on, Adam Kubert tries his best in illustrating the spectacle of it all and despite some nice panel work and intricate character design (colourised by Jordie Bellaire), his art is rough around the edges, especially in the wide paneled action sequences. As with Zdarsky's Howard the Duck, this is really a writer-oriented title as the storytelling relies more on Chip's quippy dialogue from Spidey's jokes much to the chagrin from his friends, particularly the Human Torch, to the writer's captions that break the fourth wall and have deep-cut references. With this recurring theme of looking back at the past, it culminates in the final issue featuring a confrontational interview with Spider-Man by his worst enemy J. Jonah Jameson. Drawn by Michael Walsh, who is a more ideal fit with Zdarsky's gag-heavy writing, this issue is a masterful read that balances argumentative humour, clever call-backs to Spidey's history (including the pages of co-creator Steve Ditko), and heart-breaking character drama that leads to a huge revelation that changes the status quo. With a central storyline that balances a lot of elements and embracing the old and the new, it doesn't always hand together, but Chip Zdarsky knows how to write Peter Parker, both in and out of the costume, with this ongoing arc that has featured good twists along the way, it'll be interesting where the web-slinger will go next.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]I really like Chip Zdarsky. His humour really resonates with me, but when he tries to play it straight it doesn't always end well. This volume is an example of that.He has a solid grasp of plotting, with lots of seemingly disconnected threads tying together in different ways as the series progresses, but none of them feel like they play to his strengths. There's a lot of exposition, and sometimes a lot of set-up for a joke that doesn't quite land. I like the re-introductio [Read as single issues]I really like Chip Zdarsky. His humour really resonates with me, but when he tries to play it straight it doesn't always end well. This volume is an example of that.He has a solid grasp of plotting, with lots of seemingly disconnected threads tying together in different ways as the series progresses, but none of them feel like they play to his strengths. There's a lot of exposition, and sometimes a lot of set-up for a joke that doesn't quite land. I like the re-introduction of Peter's 'sister' Teresa, as well as Uatu Jackson, but the villains aren't particularly compelling.The best parts are Zdarsky's pairings of characters - Peter and Johnny Storm are always a gold mine, and the final issue with Peter and Jonah Jameson is easily the best issue of the series, but then other times we get characters like the new 'love interest' for Peter who feels like her suspension of disbelief is off the charts.The art doesn't always play to Zdarsky's strengths either. Adam Kubert is not an artist I want on monthly books; trying to keep to schedules makes his art suffer, and particularly with this book he seems to be phoning it in. It also doesn't mesh well with Zdarsky's humour; there should be some element of physical comedy to go with Zdarsky's dialogue, and that doesn't happen. Like at all.I'm not sure what Marvel are aiming for with this book, but it has a lot of potential that isn't landing yet.
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Ooo that ending!
  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    The first half seemed really disjointed but the second half was interesting
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    I was a massive fan of Howard the Duck, specifically because of the humor. I'm not convinced Zdarsky is the right fit for this, though. It feels like he's trying to walk the line between the absurdity of Howard the Duck and the more straight forward nature of a mainline Spiderman series. I will say that I really enjoyed issue #6 which is the main reason I am not giving up on Chip, just yet.
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  • Ran
    January 1, 1970
    A few of these issues showed up in my mail, seemingly free. I only wasted my time struggling to read them. In this trade, Parker is pals with Johnny Storm, finds a long-lost not-sister, meets the new Ironheart, and goes up against the Wilson Fisk among other events that really didn't catch or hold my attention.
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  • Jesse Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Chip Zdarsky has become one of my favourite comics writers in recent years. His wit and humour always make for an enjoyable read. Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man is not as flat out funny as say "Howard the Duck" but that's to be expected. The storyline dives deep into Marvel history without being overbearing in its use of continuity. Masterful work. The art by Adam Kubert is great but my one quibble is about how the webs are drawn on Spidey's gloves and boots. They look more like cross- Chip Zdarsky has become one of my favourite comics writers in recent years. His wit and humour always make for an enjoyable read. Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man is not as flat out funny as say "Howard the Duck" but that's to be expected. The storyline dives deep into Marvel history without being overbearing in its use of continuity. Masterful work. The art by Adam Kubert is great but my one quibble is about how the webs are drawn on Spidey's gloves and boots. They look more like cross-hatching than the web pattern Steve Ditko originated. Granted all those teeny lines would be painstaking to draw but this shortcut just looks off. Overall a great read and a fun Spider-Man book that does have a distinctive voice separate from "The Amazing Spider-Man."
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  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    This was okay. Not great, but not terrible. Best issues for me were #1 (great interaction with Johnny Storm) and #6 (great interaction with J. Jonah Jameson). I'm not sure I like this Peter. Theoretically I'd love reading an adult Peter, but this just missed the mark for me. Ultimate Spider-Man is probably my favorite Spider-Man run by far. Maybe I'll give that a re-read....
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Quirky and fun take on spidey
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Read single issues. Was frequently delighted.
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