Out Among the Stars (Star Wars #6)
Marvel's epic and thrilling exploration of the Star Wars galaxy continues! COLLECTING: STAR WARS 33-37

Out Among the Stars (Star Wars #6) Details

TitleOut Among the Stars (Star Wars #6)
Author
ReleaseDec 5th, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302905538
Rating
GenreMedia Tie In, Star Wars, Sequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fiction, Science Fiction, Superheroes, Marvel

Out Among the Stars (Star Wars #6) Review

  • FanboyBen
    January 1, 1970
    And with that, Jason Aaron’s storied run on Marvel’s flagship “Star Wars” title comes to an end. Volume 6 – “Out Among the Stars” collects issues #33-37, the majority of which are one-shot issues featuring individual adventures with the usual gang of heroes, as well as Sana Starros and Lando Calrissian. While these issues may not represent the pinnacle of either Aaron or artist Salvador Larroca’s talents, this final volume still stands as a decent enough farewell for Aaron, before Kieron Gillen And with that, Jason Aaron’s storied run on Marvel’s flagship “Star Wars” title comes to an end. Volume 6 – “Out Among the Stars” collects issues #33-37, the majority of which are one-shot issues featuring individual adventures with the usual gang of heroes, as well as Sana Starros and Lando Calrissian. While these issues may not represent the pinnacle of either Aaron or artist Salvador Larroca’s talents, this final volume still stands as a decent enough farewell for Aaron, before Kieron Gillen comes aboard next month to steer the series.As is usually the case with comic one-shots, the stakes for most of these issues feels low. That’s okay, though because Aaron mostly does enough fun stuff with character dynamics and dialogue exchanges – pairing Luke and Leia together in issue #33, Lando and Sana together in #34, and Han and Chewie (shocker) in #35– to make up for his stories’ lack of “importance.” He also, finally, gets around in issue #36 to resolving the long-dangling plot thread that is C-3PO’s capture by Scar Squadron, which we witnessed all the way back at the end of Volume 4, “Last Flight of the Harbinger.” Although it’s hard not to wish that we’d gotten a bit meatier of a follow-through to this story after waiting so long for it to be resolved – issue #25, which depicted C-3PO’s capture, was published all the way back in November 2016, pre-“Rogue One”s release - it’s still nice to see Aaron dot all of his i’s and cross his t’s before walking out the door.If there’s a major disappointment in this last Volume, and really, in the last two volumes of the series as well, it’s Salvador Larroca’s art. Like a lot of people, I really enjoyed his style on “Darth Vader,” but for some reason, his time on the main “Star Wars” title has been marred by an overreliance on photorealism and tracing, which – at least for my money – is distracting at best and at worst, downright garish. It’s hard not to wish that Aaron’s final issues on the series had been accompanied by artwork that was as strong as that of his first, second, or even third arc, but hey - you can’t have everything.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Aaron wraps up his tenor on the main Star Wars title with an arc of rotating one-shot stories that all tie together a little bit. Scar Squadron returns! Han does some smuggling! R2-D2 takes down a bunch of Stormtroppers!I don't mean to sound salty, because it's not a bad volume and far from the worst. And the Star Wars brand is bigger than the writer so there wasn't going to be any big send off. And hopefully the book will benefit from a new writer with some fresh ideas and stories, and on Jason Aaron wraps up his tenor on the main Star Wars title with an arc of rotating one-shot stories that all tie together a little bit. Scar Squadron returns! Han does some smuggling! R2-D2 takes down a bunch of Stormtroppers!I don't mean to sound salty, because it's not a bad volume and far from the worst. And the Star Wars brand is bigger than the writer so there wasn't going to be any big send off. And hopefully the book will benefit from a new writer with some fresh ideas and stories, and one who is already familiar with writing Star Wars (ser Kieron Gillen of Darth Vader fame)I think they should have kept rotating artists, rather than just stick with Larroca, because I find his art boring after a while. His stuff on Vader was good but here the character faces seemed very traced a repetitive.
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  • John H
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this one a lot more than the last couple of SW books.
  • Eric Mikols
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes, this series has new and interesting adventures. Most times, it's like Jason Aaron wants me to be thinking, "Gee, I wonder if Han and Leia will ever kiss?".
  • Sesana
    January 1, 1970
    Despite (or maybe because?) it's a bunch of one-off stories, this is one of the most enjoyable volumes of the Aaron's run. Didn't love the annual, but every other issue is solid.
  • Kaye
    January 1, 1970
    This volume is basically a collection of one-shots. You kind of have to take it for what they are and suspend the need for context. It might be a little confusing, but its not all that bad; at least for me. For the first time in awhile I'm not feeling disappointed or being left with questions of "why does this matter?".#33, Rebels in the Wild: 2 starsLuke and Leia are on the run from the Empire and they get stranded on an island—for quite awhile. Of course there is no need to worry. They survive This volume is basically a collection of one-shots. You kind of have to take it for what they are and suspend the need for context. It might be a little confusing, but its not all that bad; at least for me. For the first time in awhile I'm not feeling disappointed or being left with questions of "why does this matter?".#33, Rebels in the Wild: 2 starsLuke and Leia are on the run from the Empire and they get stranded on an island—for quite awhile. Of course there is no need to worry. They survive, they always do. The situation even puts out a new perspective of just how bigger the galaxy is for them.#34, The Thirteen Crates: 4 starsSana has her own agenda, with the surprise aid of Lando Calrissian. I do believe this is his first appearance in the series. It was nice. Sana though; I've always thought she's been the most consistent characterization, through the good and the bad of it all. She's quite clever and fools a lot of people, all for a reward that will better someone else. I'd love to see more of her backstory. #35, The Hutt Run: 3 starsA straight forward and action filled story. It's returning to classics. I am starting to get a bit over the use of Hutt's (it's been here and in the Poe Dameron series), but that's it. Nothing bad to really say.#36, Revenge of the Astromech: 2 starsIt's a take on the determination of a droid and getting back something it cares about, but that kind of emotion is not supposed to be in their programing. It does seem a little to easy that a droid can infiltrate a Star Destroyer and escape by piloting an X-Wing... but conveniently lackeys of the Empire weren't taking any real action. This is where you have to take it for what it is. It brings C-3PO back into the fold from when he ended up stuck with the Empire. Otherwise it's kind of fun. I can move on from it. It's better than the short story they wrote for Kenny Baker.#37, Imperial Pride 1 starScar Trooper. Scar Squad. I don't like it. Stormtroopers don't need to be using a lightsaber, they don't need to be flying, they don't need extra abilities. I get needing a special squad for specific missions and targets, but Stromtroopers shouldn't be that complex. They're pushing it to much. The Sand Will Provide: 2 starsAn emotional short about Tusken Raiders at the end of issue #37
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  • Willie Krischke
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book more than the rest - it's all one-offs, short adventures, where there’s space to explore the characters and their relationships. That’s what I’ve enjoyed most about this whole run, when there’s time to do some more of that. I love the idea of Luke and Leia scanning the stars, comparing their childhoods, completely unaware they are siblings. (Of course, Luke would be macking on Leia the whole time, and that would be gross.) Also it’s an interesting twist that Leia can repeated I enjoyed this book more than the rest - it's all one-offs, short adventures, where there’s space to explore the characters and their relationships. That’s what I’ve enjoyed most about this whole run, when there’s time to do some more of that. I love the idea of Luke and Leia scanning the stars, comparing their childhoods, completely unaware they are siblings. (Of course, Luke would be macking on Leia the whole time, and that would be gross.) Also it’s an interesting twist that Leia can repeatedly outrun light, which means she can watch the death of her people over and over again in real time. That’s pretty dark.034 Another nice one-off, featuring Lando and Sana, who does a triple-crossing deal with the Empire, the Hut, and some crab-looking people. 035 - Han Solo and Chewbacca transport Grakkus the Hut to a special prison, but really, it’s all a ruse to get Grakkus to reveal where his secret lair is. I still have the issues with the photorealistic faces, and in the end, Han Solo seems to like torturing Grakkus, which is troubling. But a pretty good issue over all. 036 - R2 D2’s rescue mission to save C 3PO. I’ve never been as enamored with R2D2 as other people are, and this doesn’t help. It really seems like this little robot has no limitations of any sort, and it makes you wonder why he doesn’t just kill Darth Vader himself. Maybe he’s secretly evil. Also I am more and more turned off by the photorealistic art, which occasionally feels like a cut and paste job. 037 Feels like it's setting up the next arc. More adventures of Sergeant Kreel and the SCAR squad. What I like about this one is that the bad guys win. Is that bad? Of course no one important is ever in any danger, but we at least get to see our principles return to find the carnage, and grapple with their grief and anger. That’s good stuff.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, I'm gonna start out by saying that this installment of the Disney canon Star Wars comics was genuinely fun to read.The Star Wars Disney canon comics kind of bounce back and forth between being plot-arc volumes and just random collections of issues, and this is one of the better examples of the latter. There isn't much of an overall plot, although the issues do sort of lead into one another. It's just a bunch of short issues following one or two of the characters we know and love.For exampl Okay, I'm gonna start out by saying that this installment of the Disney canon Star Wars comics was genuinely fun to read.The Star Wars Disney canon comics kind of bounce back and forth between being plot-arc volumes and just random collections of issues, and this is one of the better examples of the latter. There isn't much of an overall plot, although the issues do sort of lead into one another. It's just a bunch of short issues following one or two of the characters we know and love.For example, the first section is Luke and Leia hanging out on a planet, bonding and killing swimming AT-ATs holy shit you guys that's so cool. Then we get Han's Ex-Spouses Running Cons, which is a lot of fun (especially for Lando's various faces). After that, Han and Chewie go on a roadtrip with a Hutt (who I think is the same Hutt that Poe Dameron later accidentally breaks out of prison...? long story). Then R2-D2 FUCKS SHIT UP, followed by Scar Squadron also FUCKING SHIT UP, followed by a weird little short story about Tuscan Raiders, followed by Leia saving Han's ass. It's really a fun collection, very in-character, with good art and some really fun moments. Definitely worth the read.
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  • Don
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun collection of stand alone adventures featuring the heroes and villains writer Jason Aaron used throughout his tenure as Star Wars writer. (This edition features his final work.) Along with Luke, Leia, Han, Chewie, and the droids, you have Sana Starros, and the SCAR troopers. Stand outs are the R2-D2 story that wraps up a storyline from Volume 4 and the story featuring Sana Starros and Lando. The Tusken Raider story was nicely done. And I liked the Annual at the end with Han and Le This was a fun collection of stand alone adventures featuring the heroes and villains writer Jason Aaron used throughout his tenure as Star Wars writer. (This edition features his final work.) Along with Luke, Leia, Han, Chewie, and the droids, you have Sana Starros, and the SCAR troopers. Stand outs are the R2-D2 story that wraps up a storyline from Volume 4 and the story featuring Sana Starros and Lando. The Tusken Raider story was nicely done. And I liked the Annual at the end with Han and Leia being chased by an alien Han had pissed off. Others have some nice moments. All in all, just a good collection of smaller stories.I do have one minor complaint that may shock some people. I didn't care for Salvador Lraroca's art. More specifically, the photo-realistic depictions of the "face" characters. It was a little jarring to see what looked like movie stills and freeze frames edited to look like line art side by side with true line art.
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  • Jorge de la Vega
    January 1, 1970
    Ignoring R2's solo outing (which was, as most droid solo outings, just awful), and the Annual III continuing on the trend of downplaying male characters to a laughable extreme (the whole "lowering the bar so female characters may look badass in comparison to men rather than in spite of men being badasses themselves" thing I mentioned in my review of The Screaming Citadel), I really liked this anthology of standalone adventures to close 2017's run and going into the New Year's. It brought some st Ignoring R2's solo outing (which was, as most droid solo outings, just awful), and the Annual III continuing on the trend of downplaying male characters to a laughable extreme (the whole "lowering the bar so female characters may look badass in comparison to men rather than in spite of men being badasses themselves" thing I mentioned in my review of The Screaming Citadel), I really liked this anthology of standalone adventures to close 2017's run and going into the New Year's. It brought some storylines to a close and opened up possibilities for future storylines. However, this flagship title remains the weakest of the ongoing Star Wars comic books, so either the writers step up their game (and quit the pandering), or I don't foresee it making it to 2019.
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