Bingo Love
Bingo Love is a LGBTQ romance story that spans over 60 years. A chance meeting at church bingo in 1963 brings Hazel Johnson and Mari McCray together. Through their formative years, these two women develop feelings for each other and finally profess their love for one another.Forced apart by their families and society, Hazel and Mari both married young men and had families. Decades later, now in their mid 60’s, Hazel and Mari are reunited again at a bingo hall. Realizing their love for each other is still alive, what these grandmothers do next takes absolute strength and courage.From TEE FRANKLIN (NAILBITER’s “THE OUTFIT,” Love is Love) and JENN ST-ONGE (Jem & the Misfits), BINGO LOVE is a touching story of love, family, and resiliency that spans over 60 years.

Bingo Love Details

TitleBingo Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 1st, 2017
PublisherInclusive Press
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Romance, Comics, Glbt, Fiction

Bingo Love Review

  • Carol Tilley
    January 1, 1970
    Is it perfect? Nope. It's got a big heart though and that's all that matters.
  • ambyr
    January 1, 1970
    The art is the best thing about this book--fluid, colorful, bold, expressive. The writing, I thought, could have used some more work; the dialogue is painfully stilted in places, and the strong opening frame story never closes, leaving the reader awkwardly hanging. But I'm glad the story exists in the world.
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  • Cat (cat-thecatlady)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.ADORABLE BOOK!really loved this. beautiful story and amazing art. too cute to handle
  • Thomas Maluck
    January 1, 1970
    Reviews forthcoming on No Flying No Tights and The Secret Stacks, but rest assured this was GOOD.
  • Robert S Rodgers
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it. The story is great and heartwarming. The art is fantastic!Romance normally isn't my thing, but I've followed Tee for years and wanted to support her. I'm glad I did.
  • Briana Lawrence
    January 1, 1970
    I saw the Kickstarter for this book because one of the artists did the cover to my own book I Am Magical: magnifiqueNOIR Book 1 I knew I had to back it. The art is amazing, and I love the fact that one of the leads (Hazel) is dark skin, plus size, and treated as someone to be sought after. I love that the story tells the story from the 60s, to today, and finally, to the future. We get to see Hazel and Mari's love for each other and how it went from being seen as taboo to more acceptable, not jus I saw the Kickstarter for this book because one of the artists did the cover to my own book I Am Magical: magnifiqueNOIR Book 1 I knew I had to back it. The art is amazing, and I love the fact that one of the leads (Hazel) is dark skin, plus size, and treated as someone to be sought after. I love that the story tells the story from the 60s, to today, and finally, to the future. We get to see Hazel and Mari's love for each other and how it went from being seen as taboo to more acceptable, not just through the eyes of the world, but the eyes of those closest to them.I know some people will look at this story and say that it's been told before, and to that end, yes, it has, but it hasn't been told in this way before. We rarely get to see queer women of color front and center, in love, and growing old together. This is the queer story I've been looking for, one that has characters who represent me and go through the fears I felt (and still feel) as a queer woman of color. If you're someone who talks the "Representation Matters" talk then this needs to be on your shelf. These are women who don't often have stories like this told about them, yet they exist in our world. We need more black women who are allowed to love and be loved. And the twist at the end? So powerful, and so painfully real.This book shows a range of emotion with women of color. Hazel and Mari are allowed to be strong, are allowed to break, are allowed to cry, are allowed to love, they're allowed to be human and it's so refreshing to see. I'm so glad I backed this, and I hope to see more from this author and these artists.
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  • T.C.
    January 1, 1970
    I backed this twice (one for me and one for my sis) on Kickstarter and just finished reading the PDF. When I first heard about this graphic novel on Twitter I knew that I wanted to get a copy. First of all the artwork caught my eye. Secondly the premise sounded great and intriguing. And finally because bingo is part of my childhood I played it first at church and then later on as a young adult at synagogue.The writing is awesome. Ms. Franklin does an excellent job expressing the emotions and fee I backed this twice (one for me and one for my sis) on Kickstarter and just finished reading the PDF. When I first heard about this graphic novel on Twitter I knew that I wanted to get a copy. First of all the artwork caught my eye. Secondly the premise sounded great and intriguing. And finally because bingo is part of my childhood I played it first at church and then later on as a young adult at synagogue.The writing is awesome. Ms. Franklin does an excellent job expressing the emotions and feelings of each character. After reading I know for certain that the characters in this book are just as real as anyone that I would meet in real life. Not only that, the author does and exceptional job of capturing the journey of Hazel and Mari's quest for true love. As you read you feel the pain, anger, sadness and joy of the story. The artwork is phenomenal and showcases the diverse and inclusive characters. So many black hairstyles, body types, ages, and skin colors! It put a smile on my face to see all of that showcased in this book. What a beautiful book! This is what I want to see and read about in comics. Bingo Love is an example of what-as Ms. Franklin has mentioned many times-seasoned comics looks like. I'm looking forward to more stories revolving around Hazel, Mari and their family and friends.
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  • Kurt Moore
    January 1, 1970
    "A queer black love story" was the initial pitch I saw for this, the full-length writing debut of Tee Franklin, who at the time I only knew as the creator of Black Comics Month. Full disclosure: I'm a 40 year old straight white guy from the South, which means I am certainly NOT this book's target audience. But I AM a fan of Jenn St-Onge's art, and the teaser images she'd posted on Twitter were enough to make me check out the book on Kickstarter. And I was, quite frankly, stunned. This was a stor "A queer black love story" was the initial pitch I saw for this, the full-length writing debut of Tee Franklin, who at the time I only knew as the creator of Black Comics Month. Full disclosure: I'm a 40 year old straight white guy from the South, which means I am certainly NOT this book's target audience. But I AM a fan of Jenn St-Onge's art, and the teaser images she'd posted on Twitter were enough to make me check out the book on Kickstarter. And I was, quite frankly, stunned. This was a story that had never been told before, quite possibly COULD never have been told before, spanning two whole lives and all the experiences therein. I backed it, followed the updates, and then got the book a month early as a PDF, which was awesome. And it was better than I'd hoped; at times deadly serious, touching, funny, heartbreaking, and ultimately hopeful. Tee's characters are real, flawed, dynamic; their interactions true to their backgrounds. Jenn St-Onge's art is stellar, every single person given a totally different look and physicality. Joy San's coloring couldn't be better, each richly toned image pops off the page.As I told Tee at HeroesCon, I've been reading comics for over 30 years. Sometimes I still want to read about a planet getting ripped in half, but mostly what I want is a good, ORIGINAL story. This book delivers, and then some. A+.
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  • Penny
    January 1, 1970
    This is really charming and pretty much exactly what it says it is - two women of color who meet as teenagers are forcibly separated, they meet again when they're older and get together then. This is a love story we don't get to see often even though there are a lot of women who have kids and then partner with other women, and love stories between two women of color are perhaps even more rare - to get both at once is a delight.This gets a four rather than a five because I would have liked more d This is really charming and pretty much exactly what it says it is - two women of color who meet as teenagers are forcibly separated, they meet again when they're older and get together then. This is a love story we don't get to see often even though there are a lot of women who have kids and then partner with other women, and love stories between two women of color are perhaps even more rare - to get both at once is a delight.This gets a four rather than a five because I would have liked more development on the women's personalities and their lives - Mari was an attorney, but we never find out what kind. We don't know if Elle went to college, and if she hadn't this would have created a huge gulf between her and Mari, who as a attorney has a post-college education. We don't know what either of them likes other than their families and bingo and each other. I love what the story offers us, but would have liked even more.What I want in a sequel is to see the story about Elle's husband finding love in the service.
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  • Fabian
    January 1, 1970
    I saw a GoFundMe post for this comic book earlier this year and the art is adorable, the plot line hooked me, and I was so excited to get my copy of this book! I’m torn because on one hand, I love representation and the love story between Hazel and Mari, and the fact the writer took an approach that people had to settle for a fake happiness and how families can be torn apart when you realize they were built on a facade. But there’s a huge pacing problem with this story. It jumps, it skips detail I saw a GoFundMe post for this comic book earlier this year and the art is adorable, the plot line hooked me, and I was so excited to get my copy of this book! I’m torn because on one hand, I love representation and the love story between Hazel and Mari, and the fact the writer took an approach that people had to settle for a fake happiness and how families can be torn apart when you realize they were built on a facade. But there’s a huge pacing problem with this story. It jumps, it skips details, I know this story would have been much more vibrant with even 20 pages added to it. Limiting it to 97 pages really killed the vibe of the story. The character development was lackluster, their reactions became unbelievable, and the ending felt so rushed. I would honestly probably give this story 2 stars if it weren’t for the art work making up for where the story lacks.
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