The Sky Is Yours
A sprawling, genre-defying epic set in a dystopian metropolis plagued by dragons, this debut about what it’s like to be young in a very old world is pure storytelling pleasureIn the burned-out, futuristic city of Empire Island, three young people navigate a crumbling metropolis constantly under threat from a pair of dragons that circle the skies. When violence strikes, reality star Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, the spoiled scion of the metropolis’ last dynasty; Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg, his tempestuous, death-obsessed betrothed; and Abby, a feral beauty he discovered tossed out with the trash; are forced to flee everything they've ever known. As they wander toward the scalded heart of the city, they face fire, conspiracy, mayhem, unholy drugs, dragon-worshippers, and the monsters lurking inside themselves. In this bombshell of a novel, Chandler Klang Smith has imagined an unimaginable world: scathingly clever and gorgeously strange, The Sky Is Yours is at once faraway and disturbingly familiar, its singular chaos grounded in the universal realities of love, family, and the deeply human desire to survive at all costs.The Sky Is Yours is incredibly cinematic, bawdy, rollicking, hilarious, and utterly unforgettable, a debut that readers who loved Cloud Atlas, Super Sad True Love Story, and Blade Runner will adore.

The Sky Is Yours Details

TitleThe Sky Is Yours
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherHogarth
ISBN-139780451496263
Rating
GenreFantasy, Science Fiction, Fiction, Dystopia, Dragons

The Sky Is Yours Review

  • Stormi (Bewitched Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    These reviews are my least favorite to write. And I've had two of them in one week. The Sky is Yours is a very creative and well written book. This is actually the entire reason I gave this book one star. I really tried to like this book, but I just couldn't. I didn't like any of the characters and I didn't really get the point of the story. I kept pushing through hoping that something would change and everything would click and I would end up changing my mind about this book, but that never hap These reviews are my least favorite to write. And I've had two of them in one week. The Sky is Yours is a very creative and well written book. This is actually the entire reason I gave this book one star. I really tried to like this book, but I just couldn't. I didn't like any of the characters and I didn't really get the point of the story. I kept pushing through hoping that something would change and everything would click and I would end up changing my mind about this book, but that never happened. Even though I didn't enjoy this book, I do think there is an audience out there who will absolutely love it. So please, if you are someone who typically enjoys dystopian sci-fi adventures and this blurb intrigues you, give this one a chance. Maybe you will completely disagree with me and this will be your next 5-Star read.I voluntarily received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/01/23/...It’s rare that I find myself at a loss for words about a book, and while I’m sure I can come up with any number of adjectives to describe Chandler Klang Smith’s The Sky Is Yours, I doubt even that would be sufficient to give the full picture of the novel. This is just one of those once-in-a-lifetime books with a story that is much bigger than the sum of its parts, and can’t be easily summarized or placed neatly into any 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/01/23/...It’s rare that I find myself at a loss for words about a book, and while I’m sure I can come up with any number of adjectives to describe Chandler Klang Smith’s The Sky Is Yours, I doubt even that would be sufficient to give the full picture of the novel. This is just one of those once-in-a-lifetime books with a story that is much bigger than the sum of its parts, and can’t be easily summarized or placed neatly into any one category. Here’s to giving it my best shot, though!Imagine a city, at once high-tech and futuristic, but also burned-out and falling apart. This is Empire Island, where our story takes place. High above in the skies, a pair of dragons continually rain down fire upon the buildings and citizens, creating mass havoc. This has been going on for so many years that they have become a become a fixture on the landscape; those who could not bear the constant threat of destruction have long since fled the city, while those who chose to remain have learned to live with the new reality.As such, Empire Island has become a place of dichotomies. Within its crumbling underbelly there lives a thriving world of danger and violence, where the gangs are effectively in control. Meanwhile, the rich and the famous live in decadence and luxury, safely shielded from the chaos and poverty in their own backyard. One of our main protagonists, Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, is a young man who belongs to this wealthy upper class. As the scion of one of the city’s oldest and most powerful families, he is also the star of a reality TV show called Late Capitalism’s Royalty, and just like the monarchies of old, his parents have decided that it is time for their pampered and foppish teenage son to be married. A betrothal is thus arranged between Ripple and the Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg—AKA Swanny—whose mother will stop at nothing to see her daughter become ruler of all of Empire Island.But before he can formerly meet Swanny, Ripple ends up crashing his hover car into a landfill, where he meets a young feral woman who has been living among the trash. Her name is Abracadabra—Abby for short—and she has been waiting her whole life for her prince to drop from the skies. Ripple becomes quite taken with Abby too, and when he is eventually rescued by his family, he decides to bring her along.More than this, I dare not say for fear of revealing anything else; The Sky Is Yours is one of those books where it’s best to go in with a blank slate, the better to be surprised by all its wonders and oddities. The imagination and creativity displayed here is off the charts. It’s almost overwhelming at first; at times it felt like I was thrown into a hyper-imaginative child’s dreams without a tether, with the amount of new sights and sounds you have to take in, but the world is so amazing that you can’t help but give it your full attention. The writing also made it easy to immerse myself; Chandler Klang Smith’s prose is incredibly polished and well put together considering this is her debut, and the story’s wry, humorous tones succeeded in drawing me deeper into the plot.This book is also populated with a number of fascinating characters. Ripple is a spoiled, self-absorbed, and impudent brat with a terrible case of “affluenza”, and yet I enjoyed reading from his perspective despite his many flaws. I watched with a perverse satisfaction as he lost everything and had to bumble his way through life in a series of events that were packed with both tragedy and hilarity. Then there’s Swanny, who is a study in contrasts. Intelligent, proper, and well-read, she’s nevertheless capable of the most outrageous thoughts and acts. Swanny’s anger is something to behold, though her character does mellow out somewhat once she discovers that a bizarre condition she suffers from will end her life prematurely. And finally, we have Abby, a girl who has been living wild in junkyard, scavenging for her survival. Before Ripple crash-landed on her doorstep, Abby believed all people to be evil half-machines—clearly, she has been alone for a long time with only her pet vulture for a companion—and her naivete can be as irritating as it is endearing.Needless to say, this book will not be for everyone. Its greatest strength is also its greatest weakness, with the sheer weight of its creativity and uniqueness threatening to overwhelm or sidetrack the reader. Sometimes I felt like I was reading an epic fantasy complete with noble houses, dragons, and a sprawling quest line involving an orphan’s search for her true parents; at other times it felt like I was lost in a futuristic sci-fi dystopian not unlike Blade Runner, and the dissonance caused by this might prove jarring for some. Though I enjoyed the first and last sections of the novel immensely, I also felt the middle part of the story faltered by focusing on too many threads and meandering a little off-track. And finally, some readers might find the characters too off-putting. Ripple, Swanny, and Abby are all products of their environment and upbringing, and their flaws are the results of their individual circumstances. However, because they are also a part of this strange and unfamiliar world, some of their more eccentric or extreme personality traits can make them difficult to connect with.If you’re seeking something fresh and completely out of this world though, look no further because The Sky Is Yours is the book you’ve been waiting for. I really enjoyed it for the most part, despite some of the plot’s more confounding and meandering moments, but readers with an interest in genre mash-ups and exploring strange new worlds should find Chandler Klang Smith’s debut irresistible and satisfying.
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  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    Often laugh out loud funny novel with manic prose and devilish plotting - echoes of David Foster Wallace. Couldn't get into the characters at all, but I managed to get through most of it rather merrily before realizing I didn't care about anything that was happening.May write a longer review, if I ever feel like it.
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  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    The Sky is Yours is an outrageously colourful fantasy that might take place in the far future, or it might be set on another planet or in an alternate universe. Empire Island has reality TV, video streaming (the 'Toob') and phone-like devices (the 'LookyGlass') alongside flying machines, a network of underground canals and a purpose-built prison district. For the upper classes, arranged marriages, designed to consolidate the fortunes of two prominent families, are typical. Thus Ripple – aka Dunc The Sky is Yours is an outrageously colourful fantasy that might take place in the far future, or it might be set on another planet or in an alternate universe. Empire Island has reality TV, video streaming (the 'Toob') and phone-like devices (the 'LookyGlass') alongside flying machines, a network of underground canals and a purpose-built prison district. For the upper classes, arranged marriages, designed to consolidate the fortunes of two prominent families, are typical. Thus Ripple – aka Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, the spoilt, laddish former star of Late Capitalism's Royalty – has been reluctantly betrothed to Swanny – aka the Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg, a voracious reader and hopeful romantic with an unfortunate problem involving the continual eruption of extra teeth. But before they even meet in real life, Ripple crash-lands in the middle of a landfill and hooks up with Abby, a girl who's been living wild as a scavenger and has come to believe the inhabitants of Empire Island are evil, half-robot 'People Machines'.By the time Swanny rocks up at the Ripple estate, her would-be fiancé is ensconced with Abby (with whom he's having copious amounts of sex, described in unnecessary and disturbing detail). Needless to say, the marriage is practically over before it begins. Then a string of even more disastrous events sends Swanny (who now hates Ripple), Ripple (who's tiring of Abby) and Abby (who has become obsessed with finding her parents) into the chaos of the city itself. Here, two enormous dragons circle above the wrecked metropolis, occasionally dropping down to torch buildings – and people. Our protagonists go their separate ways, each embarking on a wildly imaginative adventure with various degrees of success. The most interesting narrative belongs to Swanny, who ends up in the notorious Torchtown, and whose unconventional, oddly touching romance provides the plot with some much-needed emotional resonance.Of the three main characters, there was only one (Swanny) I found bearable; it would've been nice if Ripple had made at least some progress towards growing out of his misogyny by the end, and I found Abby's arc a bit formulaic and couldn't warm to her bizarre personality. But this is a rich, entertaining and unpredictable novel nonetheless. The 'trashed splendour' of Empire Island is vivid and I rarely knew what was going to happen next. Unique, inventive fun.I received an advance review copy of The Sky is Yours from the publisher, Penguin Random House.TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • Faith
    January 1, 1970
    It is really hard to describe this book, and too much description would probably spoil it anyway. Just know that it is decidedly weird with extremely imaginative world building. I had a difficult time getting into the story due to strange speech patterns and invented words that initially put me off. I'm glad that I persisted however because I wound up liking the book, more for its world and the characters rather than for the plot, which wasn't all that compelling and petered out at the end.In th It is really hard to describe this book, and too much description would probably spoil it anyway. Just know that it is decidedly weird with extremely imaginative world building. I had a difficult time getting into the story due to strange speech patterns and invented words that initially put me off. I'm glad that I persisted however because I wound up liking the book, more for its world and the characters rather than for the plot, which wasn't all that compelling and petered out at the end.In the post-apocalyptic ruined city of Emerald Island Duncan Humphrey Ripple V (Ripple) is about to marry Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg (Swanny) in an arranged marriage joining two wealthy families. For 50 years the city has been periodically torched by two dragons and a dragon attack causes Ripple to crash his flying vehicle and be helped by Abracadabra (Abby) a feral waif-like girl. When he is finally rescued, Ripple brings Abby home with him, basically as his sex toy. Part I of the book brought these characters together and described their families. It was my favorite part of the book and Swanny was my favorite character. Her first meeting with Ripple doesn't go well. "You are the most despicable chauvinist I could ever hope to encounter; it is as though you looked into my secret heart and answered every fear with your Neanderthal's 'hell yeah'. And while we're on the subject of each other's mothers, as we were a while ago, I'd like to express my admiration for the immigrant showgirl who gave you life. Digging for gold is exhausting work. I now know from experience. Thank you for the intoxicants. Also, I hate your dog." Ripple's assessment of Swanny after he gets to know her better: "It's a toss-up: that fem loves her crème fraîche, but there's also a heaping dose of murder rage squeezed into those ruffly plus-sized outfits."Part II of the book dragged a little and Part III felt rushed. Also, don't get your hopes up about the dragons because they are barely in the book and they really can't compete with the other bizarre stuff going on here.I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    "From below, the dragon does not resemble a living thing. It is an oppression, a ceiling on the world." This book is really hard to describe but here goes: Jane Austen meets Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH in an early post apocalypse setting with dragons. This was one of one. Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, The Dunk Reality star of Late Capitalism’s Royalty is the scion, and embarrassment, of the last great family of Empire Island. He’s a douchy harmless pretty boy trying to figure things out.Ba "From below, the dragon does not resemble a living thing. It is an oppression, a ceiling on the world." This book is really hard to describe but here goes: Jane Austen meets Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH in an early post apocalypse setting with dragons. This was one of one. Duncan Humphrey Ripple V, The Dunk Reality star of Late Capitalism’s Royalty is the scion, and embarrassment, of the last great family of Empire Island. He’s a douchy harmless pretty boy trying to figure things out.Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg, Swanny A storm of a woman: intelligence, pride, rage, pettiness, girth. Her mother will stop at nothing to see Swanny as Empress of Empire Island. Stronger shoulders have broken under such weight.Abracadabra, Abby Raised in isolation on an island of garbage the feral beauty has magic unknown to the world. These are just the top three unique and well written characters.And no, this is not a classic love triangle. Each character has their own journey. I loved that.What I did not like was the lack of world building. There should be a warning on the jacket that this is a liminal space story. If you enjoy gorgeously strange character driven dramas, pros and fems, this one’s for you.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    It was really impressive how quickly I hated this book. Absolutely could not stand it.This review is in exchange for a free copy received from bloggingforbooks.com.
  • Jonathan Hawpe
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This is a very bold, fresh, hilarious, sad and smart combination of literary satire and apocalyptic Scifi. It manages to combine elements of a futuristic Austenesque marriage plot with a Vonnegut/Saunders style blackly humorous take on virtual reality TV celebrity culture, and a strange decaying city a la Philip K. Dick novelizing Escape From New York. And Dragons! Should be great for fans of Jonathan Lethem's Chronic City, Kirsten Bakis' Lives of the Monster Dogs, Nick Harkaway's Gone-away Wow! This is a very bold, fresh, hilarious, sad and smart combination of literary satire and apocalyptic Scifi. It manages to combine elements of a futuristic Austenesque marriage plot with a Vonnegut/Saunders style blackly humorous take on virtual reality TV celebrity culture, and a strange decaying city a la Philip K. Dick novelizing Escape From New York. And Dragons! Should be great for fans of Jonathan Lethem's Chronic City, Kirsten Bakis' Lives of the Monster Dogs, Nick Harkaway's Gone-away World, or G. Willow Wilson's Alif the Unseen. I will be recommending it heartily at my book store.
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  • Eric Taxier
    January 1, 1970
    Obviously I'm biased, but regardless: this book is an IQ test for your soul.
  • jenni
    January 1, 1970
    A completely unreasonable fantasy novel ft. a cacophonous alt-Manhattan island and a pair of perplexing hyper-objects in the form of DRAGONS complete with oligarchical mansions the size of city blocks, a (quite literally) incendiary penal colony bent on lawlessness and potent hallucinogens, a hopelessly sheltered romantic and misinformed baroness with a credible intellect but an unpleasant mutation, a reality-TV-addled man-child heir with contempt for restraint and responsibility, and a feral-ch A completely unreasonable fantasy novel ft. a cacophonous alt-Manhattan island and a pair of perplexing hyper-objects in the form of DRAGONS complete with oligarchical mansions the size of city blocks, a (quite literally) incendiary penal colony bent on lawlessness and potent hallucinogens, a hopelessly sheltered romantic and misinformed baroness with a credible intellect but an unpleasant mutation, a reality-TV-addled man-child heir with contempt for restraint and responsibility, and a feral-child reared in the dump with a slightly telekinetic ability that may or may not be part of the solution to the current crisis-levels of sheer fucking madness going on in this book.
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  • hannah ♡ peanutbutter&books
    January 1, 1970
    "Beneath our city lies another city, carved into the earth, a city of hollowness, a city of emptiness, a city of negative space. Its skyline will never be revealed, not until that time in the future when our society's final resting place is excavated and disturbed by a more advanced species." Truthfully? I avoid DNF-ing books with every fiber of being, but let me tell you, I was very, very, very tempted to DNF this. I feel cheated by that pretty cover.(This is the part where I usually give a br "Beneath our city lies another city, carved into the earth, a city of hollowness, a city of emptiness, a city of negative space. Its skyline will never be revealed, not until that time in the future when our society's final resting place is excavated and disturbed by a more advanced species." Truthfully? I avoid DNF-ing books with every fiber of being, but let me tell you, I was very, very, very tempted to DNF this. I feel cheated by that pretty cover.(This is the part where I usually give a brief summary of the basic plot points. However, I'm disappointed to tell you that this book was just so confusing and all-over-the-place that I'll be unable to do so.)Upon first glance, The Sky is Yours seemed to promise all the elements I love in a story: a fantastical, futuristic world, solid friendships, and most importantly, DRAGONS. Unfortunately, all I found was the latter—the rest was absolutely not there. And even the dragons were so tedious? (How is that even possible. How can you make dragons unimaginative.)I'll admit, the book was very well-written and dense with pretty imagery and metaphors. But even that couldn't make up for the fact that everything was so insufferably boring.The biggest problem I had with this was the characters and their development—more accurately, their lack thereof. It was a complete pain reading about spoiled Duncan-Humphrey-Ripple-Whatever, the insufferable Abby, and the bland Baroness. I quite literally felt like ripping my eyes out of my skull a grand total of ten times throughout the book. I could not bring myself to care about what happened to any of them because they were all such terrible people. Perhaps this is supposed to be satire, but I did not find anything funny, relevant, or thought-provoking about any of it. Not to mention that the characters' actions are vaguely problematic and not at all fun to learn about.I hate being so brutally honest, especially to a debuting author, but this is my unfiltered opinion. In conclusion? Skip this. With all the amazing books being released this year, you don't want to waste your time.Thank you to Crown Publishing for the ARC.blog 💞instagram 💞twitter 💞email yours truly
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  • Karen Heuler
    January 1, 1970
    People move through Chandler Klang Smith’s new novel like they’re being swept down a river—rushing, bumping into things, being redirected constantly. The world they live in—Empire City—is not a pleasant world, and the people in it aren’t particularly pleasant either and in some cases remind me of Flannery O’Connor’s grotesques. But there are moments when I was moved by the perfect details of authentic emotion—when Abby talks to Hooligan, who leads her to the greenhouse with the dead bird, for in People move through Chandler Klang Smith’s new novel like they’re being swept down a river—rushing, bumping into things, being redirected constantly. The world they live in—Empire City—is not a pleasant world, and the people in it aren’t particularly pleasant either and in some cases remind me of Flannery O’Connor’s grotesques. But there are moments when I was moved by the perfect details of authentic emotion—when Abby talks to Hooligan, who leads her to the greenhouse with the dead bird, for instance, and there are many more. People in this world, which has dragons arbitrarily raining fire on them, adjust to a life very short on explanations or improvement. Not that it’s grim; it isn’t. It’s a little gritty here and there, but it’s also an interesting world to look at, and it’s all described down to the bone. I can almost feel the texture of the island Abby (my favorite character) comes from. Torch Town still gives me shivers. All the characters have agendas that are formed by their backgrounds but also by their own weirdly arranged self-image. Who they are and what they want are questions that affect their decisions in revealing ways. Who they are and what they want after they’ve lost the thing that defines them is even more interesting. They are forced, time after time until they get it straight, to become something new to themselves. It’s the constant bumping up against fate that makes the story as involving as it is, the struggle, failure, resurrection and resistance in a world that may occasionally take notice, but then moves on—these are the things that make the book strong and involving and make the characters come alive. One of the many things I loved was the way Smith names things (HowFly; GoFly; grandcesters, etc.); names have a real suggestion of time and place to them, and also a sort of timeworn casualness; these words weren’t invented, they arose. The language throughout is vivid and engulfing, reflecting not only a sense of specific space, but also an evolving and responsive culture. Smith’s Empire City in "The Sky Is Yours" is an excursion into the possible future and it stands out, it is sui generis; it’s appalling and intensely involving as well. It’s a place that becomes a literary reference point, and its geography is overwritten by the adjustments that get made when life is both arbitrary and compelling—which is ordinary life, after all, whether
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  • Meigan
    January 1, 1970
    Delightfully weird and incredibly unique, The Sky is Yours tells the story of three teens, Swanny, Ripple, and Abby, who are navigating a twisted, broken, burning world. Empire City has been under siege from a pair of dragons that circle the sky and light fires on a whim, but that’s not the only threat. The city is also home to an underbelly of danger where kingpin Sharkey and his gangs bring violence, drugs, murder, and every kind of horror imaginable to Empire City. Sharkey and his crew are mo Delightfully weird and incredibly unique, The Sky is Yours tells the story of three teens, Swanny, Ripple, and Abby, who are navigating a twisted, broken, burning world. Empire City has been under siege from a pair of dragons that circle the sky and light fires on a whim, but that’s not the only threat. The city is also home to an underbelly of danger where kingpin Sharkey and his gangs bring violence, drugs, murder, and every kind of horror imaginable to Empire City. Sharkey and his crew are mostly contained in the worst part of the city, an area known as the Nest, but he’s slowly but surely branching out to every corner, and now it’s not just the dragons the other residents have to worry about. Swanny, Ripple, and Abby are at once confronted with the reality that together, they will have to navigate this dangerous metropolis because of...circumstances. While each comes from different backgrounds with two being incredibly pampered rich kids, the journey is treacherous for all. Any skills they possess, any knowledge they’ve been given will do very little to prepare them for life outside their comfy walls. This is where the book shined for me because despite the characters appearing incredibly shallow at first, the characters grow and develop over the course of their journey and the kids we end with are definitely stronger, wiser, and more mature than the kids we started with. Their growth and maturity felt realistic, despite the fact that its forced by circumstance. Equal parts satire and serious, The Sky is Yours is peppered with humor that often takes the edge off the ever-present undercurrent of hopelessness and despair. From a girl who’s constantly teething (gross, yes) even as a teen, another who’s a few degrees away from feral who grew up on an island of garbage (also gross), and an over-indulged, overgrown, over-sexed, over-everything man-child, the characters were each so endearing in their own ways, and were definitely the highlight of this tale. This book was so incredibly weird (as evidenced by the weird characters) and fun and unique, and it’s definitely a book that I’m going to recommend the heck out of. * I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads giveaways.
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  • Samantha Colwell
    January 1, 1970
    Review from Hello Yellow Room. Feels like: if The Princess Bride were a reality television show starring the whole cast of Peaky Blinders and Jersey Shore.Sounds like: “Hung Up On You” by Tate McRae Listen Here / 2018 HELLO YELLO REVIEWS Playlist Why? Roving adventure tales set in dystopian futurescapes are usually wrought with this philosophical quandary. Usually the “why” is to tell an allegory of our present time, to encourage discussion about the tyranny of this-or-that, to question the bou Review from Hello Yellow Room. Feels like: if The Princess Bride were a reality television show starring the whole cast of Peaky Blinders and Jersey Shore.Sounds like: “Hung Up On You” by Tate McRae Listen Here / 2018 HELLO YELLO REVIEWS Playlist Why? Roving adventure tales set in dystopian futurescapes are usually wrought with this philosophical quandary. Usually the “why” is to tell an allegory of our present time, to encourage discussion about the tyranny of this-or-that, to question the boundaries or the moral implications of technology, etc.This adventure tale doesn’t ask “why?” but instead asks “why not?” And maybe doesn’t ask it, but rather nudges it at you with a jeering elbow, tells you impolitely to sit down and shut up while it takes you on a ride through an almost-New-York swarmed by fire breathing dragons, anti-hero drug dealers, reality TV princes, and android fire fighters.KEEP GIVING ME THIS BEAUTIFUL MIX OF CREATIVITY AND LITERARY SOPHISTICATION. THIS IS WHAT I’M ALWAYS LOOKING FOR, AND THERE ARE JUST TOO FEW EXAMPLES.The characters in this novel are genuinely unforgettable. Swanny is a plump and perfect heiress; incredibly sharp, sardonic, and my favorite vengeful heroine to grace the page since Camille Bordas’ suicidal school girl Denise in How To Behave In A Crowd. Duncan (Dunk) Humphrey Ripple V is the reluctant Prince Charming, a debonair internet-era douchebag with a reality show and a set of problematic anti-feminist qualities that will make your face melt. Abby is an abandoned damsel growing up alone on a trash pile island just outside the roaring city; she talks to “magic” animals in her mind and develops a tender love for Dunk, who rescues her from her trash heap and takes advantage of her… naivety. I’m still struggling with the lack of consent in their relationship, but I’ll get back to you on that.Lastly we have Sharkey the anti-hero, the chef of the underworld chew-drug named “chaw”, the heart-throb bad boy coming in very shy of six foot, very hairy of knuckle, very suave of manner. He wears a top hat and rules with a cavalier, self-possessed quiet that I find superb. Even his murder jags do little to dissuade me from loving him, which makes me honestly question my own morals.The story is set thousands of years ahead of our world, but with dragons. Two very brooding dragons rise up from the ocean and stalk the skies above the city, periodically setting fire to rooftops, generally undermining humanity as best they can. But humanity struggles on.There’s a part of the city nicknamed Torchtown because of how often the dragon’s target that area. It used to be a prison sector, built to give criminals a chance to rehabilitate and re-learn how to be a part of society. Once the dragons came, the city locked the criminals inside. Now years have passed, generations upon generations of children born into Torchtown who inherit the crimes of their great-great-grandparents, born into a system that has long since forgotten them. Sounds vaguely familiar.Outside the city are the rich families, safe in their castles, beyond the reach of the dragon’s flames. As with most rich families, Swanny and Duncan have been promised to each other in the event that their marriage will unite two long family lines and perpetuate their wealth. After Duncan returns from a harrowing journey on his HowFly (a personal helicopter) which crash landed onto the trash island Abby lived on, he brings his new prized female home with him to warm his bed, though she’s illiterate and incapable of understanding modern living. Abby suffers his fair-weather attentions while navigating this monstrous new world filled with machines, while Swanny prepares to be the miserable bride of this same selfish man-child. (We’re supposed to hate Dunk, but in an eye-roll kind of way. I hate him maybe more than that.)On the night of Dunk and Swanny’s devastating marriage, ordained by Dunk’s strange savant Uncle Osmond who gives the most amazingly dark wedding speech I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading, the Ripple Manor is under attack. Torchies (dangerous youths from Torchtown) rise up from their hellish existence to rob, pillage and murder the rich. Swanny, Duncan and Abby make it out alive, where their epic journey of self-discovery begins.I ripped through this novel in days, I loved it. It blended surreal fantasy, science fiction, and literary prose without strain. I desperately want to return to this world. I’m already drafting personal letters to Chandler Klang Smith, begging her to write another book occupying dragon-plagued Empire Island. Though the novel ends succinctly, there are a lot of questions left hovering like a ghostly after-image. What of Swanny’s ingrown teeth, consuming her organs with their bone and bite? What of Abby’s sacrificial powers, her dive into oblivion? What of Sharkey’s disconsolate walk into a flame engulfed chawhouse? What of Dunk’s depressing parallels with problematic masculinity derived of internet culture, and his inability to actually grow?Keep giving me this beautiful mix of creativity and literary sophistication. This is what I’m always looking for, and there are just too few examples. Memorable Quotes: “[The city] is a system we plug into…a system that we are. As that system fails, we fail too, by degrees. Abandoning it would mean abandoning ourselves. So instead, we stay. We wait for the buses that never come. We walk the streets at night, but we are never alone. The dragons fly above, unleashed.”“We believe that we love the places where we live, but this is only an illusion. It is never a place we long for, but a time.”“This is a story of inheritance–of what parents leave to their children, the curses and the gifts. Of how our families call us home, even when return would mean forsaking everything we have.” I received this book from Penguin Random House through Blogging for Books for an honest review.
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  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    I....still don't know what I read or whether I liked it. It didn't seem to have a point? I have to think on this one. I will say that the characterizations were interesting. Definitely fully fleshed out, but not all that easy to root for since they were kinda dickish, but I still enjoyed reading their stories. But the plot, of which there really wasn't much of one, just seemed to kind of meander without much of an end goal. This book is being compared to Blade Runner, and as that is one of my fa I....still don't know what I read or whether I liked it. It didn't seem to have a point? I have to think on this one. I will say that the characterizations were interesting. Definitely fully fleshed out, but not all that easy to root for since they were kinda dickish, but I still enjoyed reading their stories. But the plot, of which there really wasn't much of one, just seemed to kind of meander without much of an end goal. This book is being compared to Blade Runner, and as that is one of my favorite films, I can say with certainty that I do not get the comparison and feel it is inaccurate. But I'll write more on that in my full review. I need to marinate of this one for a bit.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    The Sky is Yours is a deeply, deeply flawed book. It has all this potential and a promising start but it falls flat. This was one of my most anticipated reads for 2018. I thought I was going to love it, and in the beginning I was loving it but then it just failed me so much. I wish I hadn't enjoyed it so much in the beginning so I could have stopped reading it. But by the time it got bad I'd invested so much time in it that I carried on to see if it would get better. It didn't.Chandler Klang Smi The Sky is Yours is a deeply, deeply flawed book. It has all this potential and a promising start but it falls flat. This was one of my most anticipated reads for 2018. I thought I was going to love it, and in the beginning I was loving it but then it just failed me so much. I wish I hadn't enjoyed it so much in the beginning so I could have stopped reading it. But by the time it got bad I'd invested so much time in it that I carried on to see if it would get better. It didn't.Chandler Klang Smith's novel is a futuristic dystopian novel. It takes place in Manhattan, now called Empire Island. Fifty years ago, two dragons inexplicably rose from the bay and started breathing fire onto the city. The dragons' relentless assault means there's always a building burning somewhere in the city. The only people left are the very poor and the very rich. Duncan Humphrey Ripple V is one of the very rich: the heir to an Empire Island dynasty. He's betrothed to Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg without having met her. The baroness (who goes by "Swanny") lives in the country until the time comes to move to Empire Island for her marriage. She's morbid and romantic and very sheltered. Shortly before his intended nuptials, Ripple crashes his flying craft into a landfill. There he meets the wild Abby, a girl who's lived at the dump ever since she can remember, alone except for the animals since the lady who brought her there died. Abby falls for Ripple and leaves with him for his mansion. When Swanny arrives and an act of violence occurs, the three young people flee into the dangerous city and struggle to survive.Here's why I was initially so taken with this book. I liked the cool first person plural narration, the collective voices of the residents of Empire Island. There's great worldbuilding. I thought it was a believable future, with many remnants from our day and age, such as Ripple being the star of his own reality show. Smith does a good job of providing details of the future where they're needed and not just info-dumping at the beginning. For the most part, the futuristic vernacular is integrated well. There are helpful, funny footnotes (which disappear after the beginning). I enjoyed the descriptions of the quirky cast of characters. Abby was my favorite character. She reminded me of Ariel when she first meets Eric in The Little Mermaid.But she's more mysterious and interesting than that, and hers is the most intriguing story. Swanny and Ripple are bratty, obnoxious, and annoying right off the bat. At first I didn't mind because I could see that these characterizations are intentional. It's meant to be funny and at first I found it to be so. I saw a lot of humor in the first part and laughed out loud on a few occasions. I enjoyed this novel during Part 1. I was loving the writing style. I enjoyed being immersed in the technicolor world. I thought Smith was so imaginative and inventive. I loved the mythology of Empire Island and this future America. Some passages contain really lovely writing. I really loved The Sky is Yours for pretty much all 186 pages of Part I. Unfortunately, there are 457 pages in this novel. And I didn't enjoy the other 271 pages.The problem is there is all this buildup and then the story just goes nowhere. It's not enough to have cool worldbuilding; you need a story to go along with it. This novel is meandering and for the most part doesn't go anywhere. After the glamorous character and setting intros, the interest fades fast. The summary on the book flap is misleading as it makes it seem like Swanny, Ripple, and Abby will all be together having adventures. In the beginning, all three aren't together at all. And though the flap says the "trio" are forced to flee and wander underground they really aren't a trio for long and this book is definitely not set underground for the most part. A huge issue with the book is that the three main characters' quests, motivations, and stories are too disparate. The main characters and story threads desperately needed to be more connected. There is no overarching plot and nothing is tying it all together. In fact, there's no plot to speak of in this novel. Some things happen but not enough things occur. And it's not governed by a narrative arc.Most of the characters except for Abby are truly unlikable and unpleasant people. Ripple is a selfish, egotistical, narcissistic male chauvinist. Ripple is an obnoxious millennial on crack. Every infuriating, entitled aspect of millennials is magnified in him times one hundred. He really is TSTL. At one point, Swanny is referred to as "intelligent and sensible" when there's absolutely NOTHING to back up this claim. She's naive and also TSTL. Smith is telling us Swanny's character traits and not only failing to show them, but actively contradicting them. The way Ripple and Swanny speak is also highly annoying. Ripple uses nauseating "hip" slang and Swanny speaks in an affected, old-fashioned, and formal manner. Even worse, the writing style is sometimes irritating when the story follows these two characters to reflect their odious personalities. It really gets to be too much.Part 2 is way too long and tedious (there are three parts but the third part is tiny compared to the first two). Abby, the most likable, compelling character is given short shrift in the second part. She has the best story and yet it's underrepresented in Part 2. Smith would have been better off focusing on Abby instead of spending so much time on annoying characters. It was unwise to have two out of three main characters be truly horrible. I didn't like or buy the "romances" in this story. The romantic relationships all feature huge power imbalances and consent is dubious at best. Trigger warnings for abuse of women, sexual assault, violence, child murder, and animal abuse. It's striking that with such such apparent imagination, Smith still couldn't come up with a world where women aren't treated like shit. Come on, it's a futuristic Manhattan with flying cars and hybrid animals, and you're telling me women are still treated really badly? It always irks me when you get to come up with a whole new world (with dragons!) and you choose to have the rampant abuse of women be the norm. This same thing really bothered me in A Game of Thrones. The sky's the limit as you construct your fantasy world and this is what you come up with?While I enjoyed the prose at first, as the book went on and on, and I just wanted it to be over, it began to feel overwritten. Ironically, on page 330 it says, "When will all of this end?" Not soon enough. There's definitely some purple prose. The Swanny parts can be so pretentious. Smith uses the word "amid" too frequently. Why not use synonyms sometimes so it's not appearing on every other page? The slang words for women—"fem," "damsel," and "wench" —are so annoying and misogynistic. It's inexplicable. Why, in the future, did they go back to archaic words for women? Just so Ripple could have more obnoxious things to say? After Part 1, I didn't find The Sky is Yours to be funny anymore, just grating. There is one good revelation at the end. There's not much of a resolution for some of the characters, and after going on for so long you'd think we were owed a decent wrap up. There's an unsatisfying/unbelievable conclusion for two of the main characters.It's sad when a book deteriorates so much that it goes from being a 5-star read to being a 2-star read. That was my experience with this book. A dystopian tale of dragons in futuristic Manhattan needs, no deserves and demands an exciting story to go with it. Instead we're left with some cool ideas, mostly bad characters, and no story to back any of it up. The vibrant promise of the beginning is not fulfilled. It's very disappointing.
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  • Maren
    January 1, 1970
    I give up. I was really intrigued by the synopsis and cover of this book but from almost the moment I began reading this book, I was at a loss. I don't think I have ever disliked a book so much so early on while reading. I hate the characters, the world doesn't make any sense nor anything in it. I set it to the side for a few days hoping to come back to it a few days later just in case but every time I thought about picking it up again, I felt nothing but dread. DNF for me on this one.I received I give up. I was really intrigued by the synopsis and cover of this book but from almost the moment I began reading this book, I was at a loss. I don't think I have ever disliked a book so much so early on while reading. I hate the characters, the world doesn't make any sense nor anything in it. I set it to the side for a few days hoping to come back to it a few days later just in case but every time I thought about picking it up again, I felt nothing but dread. DNF for me on this one.I received a review copy via Blogging For Books.
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  • Nicholas Kaufmann
    January 1, 1970
    I was thrilled to get a sneak peek at this novel thanks to an ARC from Penguin Random House! All the promise that Chandler Klang Smith showed in GOLDENLAND PAST DARK is both confirmed and built upon impressively in THE SKY IS YOURS, an epic adventure tale set in a richly imagined world that has gone on way past its expiration date. The alternate near-future of Empire Island comes to life in astonishing detail through Smith's colorful, expert prose, as well as through the eyes of the three main c I was thrilled to get a sneak peek at this novel thanks to an ARC from Penguin Random House! All the promise that Chandler Klang Smith showed in GOLDENLAND PAST DARK is both confirmed and built upon impressively in THE SKY IS YOURS, an epic adventure tale set in a richly imagined world that has gone on way past its expiration date. The alternate near-future of Empire Island comes to life in astonishing detail through Smith's colorful, expert prose, as well as through the eyes of the three main characters as they're let loose into the city to find their own ways (and themselves): Duncan, the selfish, spoiled son of a wealthy family; Swanny, Duncan's fiancee, whose love of old Gothic romances informs not just the way she sees the world but also the path her life is about to take; and Abby, the naive, feral girl rescued from an island of trash to live in what is basically another island of trash.While many of the science-fictional elements in THE SKY IS YOURS are satirical, I hesitate to call the novel itself a satire. It's definitely wacky and whimsical in places--Smith's sense of humor is evident on most pages and takes many forms, from bawdy jokes to the way certain scenes are presented as film scripts or video game charts--but it can also be quite dramatic and serious. It's a hopeful novel about what it takes to grow up and find your place in the world, even if the world is dying; a deeply cynical novel about whether such a world is even worth saving; and, in some ways, a bittersweet novel about first romantic relationships, all the dreams, passion, and disappointment that go hand in hand.THE SKY IS YOURS is a remarkable achievement by a writer with a seemingly boundless imagination. Smith's creative energy fills each page to bursting. Like its characters, THE SKY IS YOURS exists in a balance between two worlds, the literary and the science-fictional, and readers who enjoy both will find it to be a treat both delicious and filling.
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  • Jenny Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very difficult review to write. I REALLY wanted to love this book. The concept and world it works within is adventurous, mystical and exciting. Unfortunately even though it was an intriguing world, the characters could not hold my interest, or should I say I wanted the dragons to just burn them sooner than later. The 4 central characters had no redeemable qualities. The men were spoiled brats who abused the women (emotionally, mentally and physically) while the women took the abuse alm This is a very difficult review to write. I REALLY wanted to love this book. The concept and world it works within is adventurous, mystical and exciting. Unfortunately even though it was an intriguing world, the characters could not hold my interest, or should I say I wanted the dragons to just burn them sooner than later. The 4 central characters had no redeemable qualities. The men were spoiled brats who abused the women (emotionally, mentally and physically) while the women took the abuse almost as if they were grateful due to their "love" for those men. I can not recall a single character I wanted to get behind and rally for. So while there were awesome elements like electricity tied to magical creatures, scary underworld societies, and aristocratic intrigue, the characters themselves made me want to leave on every page.
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  • Sarah Furger
    January 1, 1970
    5 star is not enough. This book was an amazing ride. At the risk of sounding like Stefon from SNL, this book has everything: dragons; family secrets; genetically modified creatures; political intrigue; love triangles; meditations on climate change and how humans interact with their environment, especially the consequences of pollution; discussions on reproduction, freedom vs. security, and gender roles. And all of this is written in prose that sings. Please read this book.
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  • Haley
    January 1, 1970
    This cover is fantastic...but that's really all I can find positive to say about it. This is a DNF, and to be honest, I didn't get far. I found Ripple completely appalling, and when he sexually assaults an intellectually disabled or mentally ill girl in the first 50 pages and doesn't understand that SHE doesn't understand what just happened--NOPE, bye.
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  • Christina Sparks
    January 1, 1970
    The Sky Is Yours is crazily creative and kept me intrigued from beginning to end.I really just loved everything about it from the quirky and interesting characters to the authors wonderfully inventive story telling abilities. It's one of those books you get hooked on and are sad when it comes to an end. The story starts off strange and only gets stranger as you read on. Duncan Ripple, a reality TV star, Baroness Swann Lenore Dahlberg- his betrothed and Abby, a strange feral girl who lives on an The Sky Is Yours is crazily creative and kept me intrigued from beginning to end.I really just loved everything about it from the quirky and interesting characters to the authors wonderfully inventive story telling abilities. It's one of those books you get hooked on and are sad when it comes to an end. The story starts off strange and only gets stranger as you read on. Duncan Ripple, a reality TV star, Baroness Swann Lenore Dahlberg- his betrothed and Abby, a strange feral girl who lives on an island where the cities trash is dumped, are forced to leave the safety of their homes and navigate the dangerous city.2 Dragons soar above the city and unleash their fiery breathes unto the city and are constantly burning down buildings, damaging the earth and causing chaos in their wake for years. Most of the cities inhabitants have been long gone but some stragglers remain as well as the prison inmates who have been sealed inside the prison walls and forced to remain. The fire department has given up and disbanded and the police force is small and mostly focused on throwing the escaped prisoners back into prison.The three main characters set out together but quickly find themselves on their own separate journeys, trying to survive and find their places in the world. I love love love love love this book so much that I've already pre-ordered it and added it to my Amazon cart. Its an instant must have for my little at home library. Its one of those books that takes you on a roller coaster ride of emotions as you navigate through the story. Its about love, friendship, survival, a strange girl who can talk to magical animals, dragons and its hilariously fake and real all at once.I love the way the characters morph and grow throughout the story and the different paths they are led down but are ultimately drawn back together. It was unique and well written to where i had no idea what was going to happen but i desperately needed to find out. I would highly recommend this book for someone tired of reading the same old plot line with different characters.I dare you to find me a more unique and interesting novel.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    The nitty-gritty: A big, bold, and chaotic futuristic story where the absurd is commonplace, dragons patrol the skies, and everyone has a chance at redemption.Grub and Morsel told me on another occasion that one day soon, Duluth will take them to touch a dragon--it seems this is a coming-of-age ritual in this savage locale. At a certain age, boys climb the water tank upon the roof of the Wedge, the tallest building in Torchtown, to skim their hand along the underside of a sky lizard when one pas The nitty-gritty: A big, bold, and chaotic futuristic story where the absurd is commonplace, dragons patrol the skies, and everyone has a chance at redemption.Grub and Morsel told me on another occasion that one day soon, Duluth will take them to touch a dragon--it seems this is a coming-of-age ritual in this savage locale. At a certain age, boys climb the water tank upon the roof of the Wedge, the tallest building in Torchtown, to skim their hand along the underside of a sky lizard when one passes just above. The scales feel like giant fingernails, living plastic, featherbones; no two stories quite agree. Sometimes it takes many nights for a dragon to swoop down close enough. Sometimes one comes too close, or its breath does, and manhood is over before it can begin.I knew when I was only 100 pages into this book that it would end up being a favorite this year, and I was right. I can’t tell you how excited I am to have read The Sky is Yours, although I guess that’s the point of writing a review, to tell people how excited you are! This is a very strange book, and I suspect you’re either going to be on board for this story or you’re not. But sometimes books touch you on an emotional level that’s hard to explain, and this is that book for me. Some reviewers are going to argue that the characters are horrid and unlikable (they are); other reviewers will mention that the plot is a bit convoluted (it sort of is) and some might be disappointed that this isn’t really a story about dragons (the dragons are part of the story but yep, this isn’t really about them). So why did I love it? I think for me it was a perfect storm of elements that came together in just the right way, an odd combination of future tech (flying cars, "People Machines" and more) and old-fashioned, Jane Austen-like mannerisms. The story takes place in the crumbling, apocalyptic city of Empire Island, where fifty years earlier the skies were taken over by the sudden appearance of two flying dragons. Since then, the people of the city have lived in fear of the dragons, who circle overhead non-stop, spitting fire on the structures below them. This has resulted in a city filled with charred buildings and a dim, smoky atmosphere. The story begins with the impending arranged wedding between Duncan Humphrey Ripple V and the young and very naive Baroness Swan Lenore Dahlberg. Swanny and her mother Pippi arrive at the Ripple mansion to prepare for the ceremony, but meanwhile, Duncan has crash-landed his HowFly in a garbage dump, fallen in lust with a homeless waif named Abby and brought her home with him. When Swanny happens upon Abby while exploring the mansion (and realizes that Duncan has been having sex with her), she understands on some level that this is her life now, and she needs to accept it. After all, she is going to be rich.But the wedding reception is interrupted by a home invasion of the worst kind: “Torchies” with chainsaws have broken into the mansion (despite Humphrey Ripple’s expensive and private security system) and are on a rampage to kill everyone in sight, grab the family jewels and get the hell out. In the chaos, everyone in the mansion scatters, and so begin the adventures of Ripple, Swanny, Abby and the rest.OK, I have to get something out of the way. The dragons are not a big part of this story. Or rather, they are constantly there in the background, and they are certainly the reason that everyone is living in a burnt-out, apocalyptic city, but this story is really all about the characters. My favorite part of Emerald Island was probably Torchtown, a walled-in city-within-a-city where criminals are dumped, to live out their lives behind the walls. A drug kingpin named Sharkey was born in Torchtown and grew up to be the most feared man in town, making his own drug called “chaw” and peddling it to the denizens of Torchtown. Sharkey was the one character who really didn’t have any redeeming qualities. He’s simply a horrible person, and when Swanny (unwisely) enters his orbit, his controlling personality made me want to go after him with a chainsaw. Alas, poor Swanny doesn’t always make the best choices.In fact, most of the characters in this story make terrible choices at one time or another. There’s Duncan Ripple, who, despite the fact that he’s signed a marriage contract with Swanny, brazenly picks up a girl and brings her home to the mansion (on the day of his wedding!); Abby, the girl in question, who blindly proclaims her love for Ripple and follows him away from the only home she’s ever known; Pippi, Swanny’s mother, who agrees to the marriage, consigning her daughter to life with the sex-crazed Ripple; Katya and Humphrey, Ripple’s parents, who—well, I can’t even tell you the terrible mistake that they make! Then there’s uncle Osmond, confined to a wheelchair after a terrible accident, who simply sits in his chair and observes everyone else’s horrible mistakes. Yes, this book has a big cast of characters. And I haven’t even mentioned Trank, Duluth, or Hooligan (the apehound)!Did I mention this book is funny as hell? Well, it is. I laughed my way through most of it, but it was an uncomfortable kind of laughter, when the humor is black and you know you’re really not supposed to be laughing. One of the funniest scenes was the marriage ceremony, which I’d love to quote in full, but it’s just too long. Here’s a snippet:“A marriage is a mutation, the artificial merging of discrete elements from nature that turn monstrous when combined. But we would not be human if we did not summon monsters into our midst. Today, young Duncan will devour the baroness whole, and he will die of her poison.”Just when you think there isn’t possibly anything else that the author could possibly think up, she throws in another side story at the end that (dare I say it) made me love Ripple just a little. What I loved about this story is that each character is on their own journey, making their own mistakes and learning their own lessons. At the end, Abby finally realizes her purpose in life, and not only was I surprised and delighted with the way her story line plays out, but I loved the way the story comes full circle and ties everything up.One thing’s for sure. I have never read anything quite like The Sky is Yours. Chandler Klang Smith—in lovely, pristine prose, I might add—has created a world and characters that still haunt me, and I know I’ll be mulling over this story for a long time. For discerning readers who aren’t afraid to read something completely outside the box, you should not miss this book.Big thanks to Goodreads and the publisher for supplying a review copy. Above quotes were taken from an uncorrected proof, and may differ in the final version of the book.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Alright, I received an ARC through Goodreads.Things I liked: the cover.Yeah, that's about it. And I didn't even love the cover, I just kind of liked it.If you like horrible characters that do crappy things, this is the book for you.If you like worlds where women are only referred to as fems, damsels, wenches, or milfs, this is the book for you.If you like women being treated as nothing more than living sex dolls, this is the book for you.If you like people who sexually assault/rape people who do Alright, I received an ARC through Goodreads.Things I liked: the cover.Yeah, that's about it. And I didn't even love the cover, I just kind of liked it.If you like horrible characters that do crappy things, this is the book for you.If you like worlds where women are only referred to as fems, damsels, wenches, or milfs, this is the book for you.If you like women being treated as nothing more than living sex dolls, this is the book for you.If you like people who sexually assault/rape people who don't have the mental capacity to understand what's happening, this is the book for you. (Why would you like that though?)If you hate fat people and love being reminded that a character is fat every time they appear, this is the book for you. (Seriously. Swanny is pudgy, chunky, has enormous arms/many chins, etc. she doesn't develop a tremor after watching her mother plunge to her death, she develops a jiggle. Because she's fat. LOLZ Oh wait, her fat is ok when she's squeezed into a corset/dress or wriggling on the floor in a tantrum and you can fap to her. 🙄)If you enjoy spoiled, rich brats, this book is for you.If you like creepy lab experiment animals as pets, this is the book for you.If you want a book where you end up rooting for the dragons to kill everyone, this is NOT the book for you. While you do end up rooting for them to destroy everything, they don't, they just leave. Yes, I am disappointed that everyone didn't die!Why I finished: I don't like not finishing books. Even if I don't really like it, I still want to know what happens. I won't finish a book if it's structured in a way I don't like, if it's written in a different era and I just can't get into it, or its that badly written that I just can't take more of it. This fit none of those, so I finished it.I was thinking about giving it 2 stars since it wasn't badly written, but looking at the notes I took while I read it made me give it my original 1 star. If I could share those notes, I would, they're probably more entertaining.
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  • Birdie O
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still kind of reeling from this book.  Chandler Klang Smith's The Sky Is Yours starts out like a commentary on the consumerism of society.  A society crashing and, quite literally, burning into oblivion.  However, it quickly becomes apparent that this isn't ALL that's going on.  Smith leads the reader through a rabbit warren of emotions with her characters.At the beginning, nearly all characters are rather detestable.  When your choices are between a spoiled teenager and a criminal boss, it' I'm still kind of reeling from this book.  Chandler Klang Smith's The Sky Is Yours starts out like a commentary on the consumerism of society.  A society crashing and, quite literally, burning into oblivion.  However, it quickly becomes apparent that this isn't ALL that's going on.  Smith leads the reader through a rabbit warren of emotions with her characters.At the beginning, nearly all characters are rather detestable.  When your choices are between a spoiled teenager and a criminal boss, it's hard not to just throw your arms up in the air and call the whole book terrible.  However, something Smith does REALLY well is show how characters change and grow.  From Duncan to Swanny to Sharkey, and even Abby, you see very definite changes in voice and thought in all the characters.  You start to want them ALL to be redeemable.  You want them all to become the lead characters you expect out of books.Smith also paints a fairly desolate picture of a Postapocalyptic-style cityscape.  While the apocalyptic event isn't widespread and normal, the aftermath is very similar.  You have a privatized world where the criminals live in a walled city with no door.  The fact that any of the characters survive it is astounding.  However, Smith really sucks you in with descriptions of open markets, deserted streets, and smoldering ruins.She intersperses scripts, video game flow charts, and poetry in her prose, using them to illustrate how the minds of her characters view the world.  While this can be jarring for some, they generally introduce a new area of thought and are well-executed.  I really enjoyed the video game sequence toward the end.The ending will make you rage...or at least it made me rage.  But the more I thought about it, the more I realized that anything else just didn't make sense.  And even if we were spotty on some details, we have resolution for the MC...the rest of the characters are really a supporting cast and following them any further would feel more like Smith was prolonging the end of the book for the sake of prolonging it.This book evokes strong emotions about characters that are not (or are barely) likeable, and it will definitely make you think.
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  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    Really 4.5 - this book is one of those wildly inventive, delightfully overstuffed kind of novels, where you could reasonably have pulled three or four books out of its contents if you'd wanted to. But why? Why do that when the thing we got was so fun? This book is FUN, it is strange, it is a delight. Give over to it, allow yourself the weariness that sometimes come from its pacing/overfulness, and enjoy.
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  • Roxy Bruss
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. I loved the inventiveness of this book. It's a great example of the new weird genre. Reminded me a lot of Jeff VanderMeer's Borne, but with more of a tongue in cheek tone. Two things I did not care for: Ripple constantly calling women names (wench, fem, etc). I also think he was not the only character to do this. The setting of the novel seemed very sexist, but that part was never really explored. Of course there will be flawed, sexist characters and situations, but I expected more of 3.5 stars. I loved the inventiveness of this book. It's a great example of the new weird genre. Reminded me a lot of Jeff VanderMeer's Borne, but with more of a tongue in cheek tone. Two things I did not care for: Ripple constantly calling women names (wench, fem, etc). I also think he was not the only character to do this. The setting of the novel seemed very sexist, but that part was never really explored. Of course there will be flawed, sexist characters and situations, but I expected more of an exposition on why this world in particular was that way. Also, Ripple's character development felt a bit flat for me. He was so horrendous throughout the book, and I didn't believe he truly cared for anyone else at the end either.Things I loved: Abby's relationship with Hooli and Scavenger. Freaking dragons. General madcap adventures. The marriage plot. Swanny's mom. Swanny in general (but I wish she was given more to do than become someone's wife/gf.)If you love the new weird, you will probably love this. If you prefer your books with more in depth character analysis, pick up Borne. Final note: I loved Sharkey so much. I would love a spinoff where Sharkey and Swanny stay together, Swanny stays away from the drugs, and they start a crime dynasty. 🐊
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  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    I had a blast reading the wild and whimisical sort-of sci-fi/dystopia/romance satire that is 'The Sky is Yours'. What a ride. 'The Sky is Yours' is set on the post-apocalyptic, metaphorical "Empire Island" resembling Manhattan, where spoiled reality TV star Duncan Ripple is getting ready to marry fellow wealthy person Baroness Swann Lenore Dahlberg. Also there's Abby, a feral girl from a dumpster island who can speak to animals and technology and other entities. 'The Sky is Yours' is a dizzying, I had a blast reading the wild and whimisical sort-of sci-fi/dystopia/romance satire that is 'The Sky is Yours'. What a ride. 'The Sky is Yours' is set on the post-apocalyptic, metaphorical "Empire Island" resembling Manhattan, where spoiled reality TV star Duncan Ripple is getting ready to marry fellow wealthy person Baroness Swann Lenore Dahlberg. Also there's Abby, a feral girl from a dumpster island who can speak to animals and technology and other entities. 'The Sky is Yours' is a dizzying, intoxicating cocktail of themes, and in part it's a commentary on America -- on privilege and social inequality, how the destitute are most affected by the dragon fires and how the incarcerated are trapped inside a very literal cycle. The only detractors to 'The Sky is Yours' are the rushed and tidy ending and the almost complete lack of dragons after them being prominently featured on the cover. However, the other 98% of this book makes it a very worthwhile read and I enjoyed it very much. Can't wait to read more from this author!
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  • BAM The Bibliomaniac
    January 1, 1970
    Netgalley #60Many thanks go to Klang Smith, Hogarth, and Netgalley for the free copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. So you know when one is a huge fan of fantasy novels and a new one is released with dragons in it so of course it has to be read? Not so much this one. It's rather bizarre. Sky takes place somewhat in the future. Basically there is some genetic engineering and some drug dealing and some money spending but nothing is serious minded. The dragons just fly in a circul Netgalley #60Many thanks go to Klang Smith, Hogarth, and Netgalley for the free copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review. So you know when one is a huge fan of fantasy novels and a new one is released with dragons in it so of course it has to be read? Not so much this one. It's rather bizarre. Sky takes place somewhat in the future. Basically there is some genetic engineering and some drug dealing and some money spending but nothing is serious minded. The dragons just fly in a circular pattern around the city setting things on fire. There are three, no four, no ummmm well, I'm not sure how I consider how many main characters there are? It really focuses are three I'd say-one who lives on a garbage dump island and referred to as a "wild teenaged female" or WTF. See? Not a serious book at all. It was funny in many parts. But not enough for me to say I enjoyed the book. I really was hoping it had more to do with the dragons lol i dont know why I had that idea?
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  • S.E. Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so dang weird. I think I liked it? How is it so hard to figure out how I feel about this novel?it's a coming of age story in a world so advanced but burned out as well. A place where dragons are constantly fighting overhead, killing those below in their wake. A world where the rich can fly around the skies and the poorest of the poor were born and raised in a prison. And the thing is, all the characters are really unlikeable, in their own way. You can't relate to them, only to what This book was so dang weird. I think I liked it? How is it so hard to figure out how I feel about this novel?it's a coming of age story in a world so advanced but burned out as well. A place where dragons are constantly fighting overhead, killing those below in their wake. A world where the rich can fly around the skies and the poorest of the poor were born and raised in a prison. And the thing is, all the characters are really unlikeable, in their own way. You can't relate to them, only to what they're going through: growing up. And I think for that reason I would recommend this book to people who struggle to find their place in the world. Otherwise I'm not sure what else to say, except that I couldn't put it down.
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