Riot Days
A Pussy Rioter's riveting, hallucinatory account of her years in Russia's criminal system and of finding power in the most powerless of situationsIn February 2012, after smuggling an electric guitar into Moscow's iconic central cathedral, Maria Alyokhina and other members of the radical collective Pussy Riot performed a provocative "Punk Prayer," taking on the Orthodox church and its support for Vladimir Putin's authoritarian regime.For this, they were charged with "organized hooliganism" and were tried while confined in a cage and guarded by Rottweilers. That trial and Alyokhina's subsequent imprisonment became an international cause. For Alyokhina, her two-year sentence launched a bitter struggle against the Russian prison system and an iron-willed refusal to be deprived of her humanity. Teeming with protests and police, witnesses and cellmates, informers and interrogators, Riot Days gives voice to Alyokhina's insistence on the right to say no, whether to a prison guard or to the president. Ultimately, this insistence delivers unprecedented victories for prisoners' rights.Evocative, wry, laser-sharp, and laconically funny, Alyokhina's account is studded with song lyrics, legal transcripts, and excerpts from her jail diary--dispatches from a young woman who has faced tyranny and returned with the proof that against all odds even one person can force its retreat.

Riot Days Details

TitleRiot Days
Author
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherMetropolitan Books
ISBN-139781250164926
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Cultural, Russia, Autobiography, Memoir, Feminism, Politics

Riot Days Review

  • Roman Clodia
    January 1, 1970
    'We wrote and, letter by letter, we became a revolutionary statement'Arrested for 'hooliganism' in a Moscow cathedral, this is Alyokhina's account of her arrest, trial and 2-year imprisonment in penal camps in the Urals. Young, intellectual, self-aware, her writing is fragmented yet vivid, locating itself alongside other texts of repression and institutional absurdity (1984, The Trial): 'officially there are no political prisoners in the Russian criminal justice system. But, in official quarters 'We wrote and, letter by letter, we became a revolutionary statement'Arrested for 'hooliganism' in a Moscow cathedral, this is Alyokhina's account of her arrest, trial and 2-year imprisonment in penal camps in the Urals. Young, intellectual, self-aware, her writing is fragmented yet vivid, locating itself alongside other texts of repression and institutional absurdity (1984, The Trial): 'officially there are no political prisoners in the Russian criminal justice system. But, in official quarters, they called me a 'political' - a political prisoner, that it.'Impressionistic, angry, absolutely committed and unrepentant, not without a black sense of humour, Alyokhina confronts modern Russia head-on and refuses to step down: 'Freedom doesn't exist unless you fight for it every day.'An important proponent of where art, feminism and activism coalesce. Thanks to Penguin for an ARC via NetGalley
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    Now I know that 5 stars disguises the difficulties in the writing style and at times the lack of structure but it reflects more the person, that is Maria Alyokhina and her struggle inside the Russian penal system.She came to my attention on Radio 2, when I caught the end of her interview with Jeremy Vine. I had already requested this book as I had previously been a great reader of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and his famous account "The Gulag Archipelago" about the Soviet forced labor camp system. I w Now I know that 5 stars disguises the difficulties in the writing style and at times the lack of structure but it reflects more the person, that is Maria Alyokhina and her struggle inside the Russian penal system.She came to my attention on Radio 2, when I caught the end of her interview with Jeremy Vine. I had already requested this book as I had previously been a great reader of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and his famous account "The Gulag Archipelago" about the Soviet forced labor camp system. I wanted to compare a modern day account of a political prisoner.What I didn't appreciate was that the author's notority and custodial sentence surrounded her involvement with the punk group 'Pussy Riot' and their infamous playing in a Moscow cathedral.Before I began to read this personal account, I listened again to the radio download of her interview in full which is part of a series I think about what it is to be human.Her declaration and subsequent answers to the questions about her interment greatly impressed me and made any difficulties associated with the advanced reading copy of little concern.No doubt the finished published book will appear more coherent and hopefully sell in its millions. I can not comprehend her self determination to see that protest is what makes us human and if we just comply we lose our identity and appear as machines.I loved the honesty of this book, the lack of ego and self promotion. I loved her concern and inclusion of others from the prisoners to the guards and jailers. Her spirit is a crative force and could not be broken, yet the book reads not as a tribute to her resilience but that of those prisoners who do not face the prospect of an early release.I guess the establishment sees such individuals as radical elements in a society, undermining the status quo. I guess through punk and music she has grown into the woman she is, a political activist and seeker of justice for others.I am not sure how she is universally received from Human Rights organisations to Amnesty International. She clearly has no time for Putin's regime but as a person I can not judge her on her politics but on her humanity. Which I commend to you as you read this book for yourself.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book free from Netgalley for an honest review and is out on the 14th of September this year. I'm not sure if this was translated badly or just not edited well but this book is erratic to say the least. Beyond this, the story of Pussy Riot is still one that shocks me. I think this is a fascinating look not only at trial and circumstances but the moral and political sphere of modern day Russia.
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  • Jessica Darling
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Punchy, frank, and unapologetically angry. This is a big ol' feminist middle finger and I loved every word. Riot Days is structured fairly chaotically for a piece of non fiction, but rather than feeling disorienting, this works in its favour. Not neat, nor necessarily 'eloquent', it's arresting and compulsively readable. Urgent, illuminating, and strangely poetic. Go read it!Thanks to Netgalley and Allen Lane for providing this ebook for review.
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  • Sue Kichenside
    January 1, 1970
    A riff on revolt.This is an impressionistic account by Pussy Riot’s Maria Alyokhina ('Masha') of her two-year incarceration as a political prisoner. In 2012, she and other band members smuggled a guitar into Moscow’s central cathedral to perform a protest song against the Orthodox church and its support of Vladimir Putin. She doesn’t elucidate as to why she’s so against them; perhaps it goes without saying. But it would have been interesting to hear more. Whilst this sketchy account of Alyokhina A riff on revolt.This is an impressionistic account by Pussy Riot’s Maria Alyokhina ('Masha') of her two-year incarceration as a political prisoner. In 2012, she and other band members smuggled a guitar into Moscow’s central cathedral to perform a protest song against the Orthodox church and its support of Vladimir Putin. She doesn’t elucidate as to why she’s so against them; perhaps it goes without saying. But it would have been interesting to hear more. Whilst this sketchy account of Alyokhina's imprisonment is convincing as a brave revolt against the system (one loses count of the number of times she goes on hunger strike), the fragmentary nature of her narrative robs it of its power. Or, at least, it did for me. Masha’s story comes across as bordering on self-indulgent. “I protest wherever I can, wherever I need to. That’s my nature. I need to protest.”My thanks to the publisher for an ARC courtesy of NetGalley.
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  • Eaycrigg
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. If you want to be inspired to take action against an oppressive political system, look no further. Alyokhina’s memoir reads like one long prose poem. Her words elicit strong emotions in the reader, outrage, a yearning for freedom, and a desire to rise up and join the revolution.Maria Alyokhina is a founding member of Pussy Riot, the punk band whose widely covered protest against the collusion of the Russian Orthodox Church with Vladimir Putin landed several of its members in p I loved this book. If you want to be inspired to take action against an oppressive political system, look no further. Alyokhina’s memoir reads like one long prose poem. Her words elicit strong emotions in the reader, outrage, a yearning for freedom, and a desire to rise up and join the revolution.Maria Alyokhina is a founding member of Pussy Riot, the punk band whose widely covered protest against the collusion of the Russian Orthodox Church with Vladimir Putin landed several of its members in prison. Alyokhina was sentenced to two years in prison for her role in the protest. While this book does cover, in a small way, the planning of and the execution of the protest, most of it is spent on the trial and her incarceration. Alyokhina seems most proud, not of the protest itself, but of the improved conditions her savvy use of Russia’s legal system, and her own notoriety, won for the women she was incarcerated with in a prison complex in the taiga.Many of the conditions she details are so horrible, it makes one wonder if the infamous Soviet gulags were ever shut down at all. From Alyokhina’s description, it appears they continued to run under the false guise of regular prisons purporting to follow a regulated penal code. In actuality, the women in the prison camps are subject to the whims of the guards and live in freezing, torturous conditions. Alyokhina butts heads with the guards in her prison for oversleeping. Prisoners are not allowed to sleep in their cells during the day and must rise immediately when the guard wakes them up a 5:20 am, even though they will then have to spend hours sitting or standing in their cell doing absolutely nothing. As a “political,” Alyokhina feels it is her duty to fight against the unjust conditions the women live in. She refuses to plead guilty to ‘violating the regimen,’ saying of her choice to fight:“Such moments of choice, made in prison, will stay with you for the rest of your life. The decisions become the most important ones you ever make. Because you can’t forget anything you do here within the prison walls. Once you betray yourself, even a single time, you can’t stop. You become another person, a stranger to yourself. You become a prisoner. And that means you have been defeated. They will have truly deprived you of your freedom.”This is the stuff teenage girls should read to feel empowered, not the Hunger Games.
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  • Rebecca Farren
    January 1, 1970
    10/10Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.Wow! This book is an incredible, riveting account of Maria 'Masha' Alyokhina's time in Pussy Riot and the events following the band's infamous protest performance in a Moscow church in 2012, including the trials of her incarceration.A mix of autobiography, poetry, song lyrics, drawings, political context and quotes from key figures, Riot Days is written in a hazy, broken up narrative but is still ultimately chronological. The section headings foreshadow and r 10/10Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.Wow! This book is an incredible, riveting account of Maria 'Masha' Alyokhina's time in Pussy Riot and the events following the band's infamous protest performance in a Moscow church in 2012, including the trials of her incarceration.A mix of autobiography, poetry, song lyrics, drawings, political context and quotes from key figures, Riot Days is written in a hazy, broken up narrative but is still ultimately chronological. The section headings foreshadow and refer back to different parts of the book very effectively. The creativity and style made it even more poetic, engaging and enjoyable to read for me. I was absolutely blown away by what Masha went through and how she dealt with everything. The book exposes the horror of the Russian justice and prison systems, from travelling for months on end between colonies in a windowless train to being forced to strip naked on demand. It is incredibly harrowing but she writes about it so beautifully, using powerful but accessible description and showing the reader her dry sense of humour. At times you feel like you are reading a dystopian piece. The fact that it's all true makes it even more impactful.Most of all I was in awe of Masha and her bandmates' incredible activism: their creativity in their protest actions, staying in Russia once they were wanted, refusing to run away and standing up for what they believed in and Masha's commitment to campaigning even once she was in prison. I could never imagine showing such bravery and resolve in such horrible circumstances, coming up against such resistance from the authorities and her fellow prisoners. She shows that protesting and complaining do work, even in a country as authoritarian as Russia. Her wins for her fellow prisoners made me so proud and inspired.I'm so glad that Masha chose to tell her story; the Pussy Riot girls are my heroes. This review doesn't do it justice. I really can't recommend this book highly enough, so go and read it!
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  • MisterHobgoblin
    January 1, 1970
    Way back in 2012, Pussy Riot hit the headlines. Doubtless assisted by their memorable name, this group of masked women interrupted a church service in Moscow to protest against Vladimir Putin. Three of the group were caught and put on trial, two of them were jailed.This is the story of Maria Alyokhina, one of the jailed women.Riot Days is a short book, covering the lead up to the protest, the protest itself, a brief spell on the run, the trial and the prison colonies. Alyokhina narrates in a som Way back in 2012, Pussy Riot hit the headlines. Doubtless assisted by their memorable name, this group of masked women interrupted a church service in Moscow to protest against Vladimir Putin. Three of the group were caught and put on trial, two of them were jailed.This is the story of Maria Alyokhina, one of the jailed women.Riot Days is a short book, covering the lead up to the protest, the protest itself, a brief spell on the run, the trial and the prison colonies. Alyokhina narrates in a somewhat clipped, jerky fashion. Especially at the start, there is a real lack of any sense of why she and her colleagues are doing what they are doing, They don't like Putin, but there is no hint of why they don't like him. It is an almost childlike push back against authority for no reason. This continues through the trial and prison. Alyokhina rebels against everything. She argues and pushes back in a system in which to do so has always been counter-productive. And always it seems to be without particular reason. A battle fought over a padlock that has been imposed because of a refusal to follow an instruction. Although this defies explanation, it lifts an otherwise ordinary retelling of the Gulag Archipelago to a new level. We see how a system manages to both live by an unbending framework of rules and make things up as it goes along. It is Kafkaesque, but very real. And there is a fascinating portrait of someone who is contrary regardless of consequence - and what happens when she takes on the monolithic system.In honesty, this is not a great piece of writing. It is clunky, linear and ends abruptly. But it is so compelling it is hard to turn away.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I was sent an uncorrected advance proof of Riot Days by Maria Alyokhin to read and review by NetGalleyBeing a supporter of Amnesty International for many years I was very interested in reading Riot Days; Maria Alyokhin’s account of her arrest and subsequent imprisonment for her involvement in political protest with the band Pussy Riot. It took me a little while to get into the rhythm of the book but I was soon hooked and couldn’t put it down. The picture painted by the author of her time on tria I was sent an uncorrected advance proof of Riot Days by Maria Alyokhin to read and review by NetGalleyBeing a supporter of Amnesty International for many years I was very interested in reading Riot Days; Maria Alyokhin’s account of her arrest and subsequent imprisonment for her involvement in political protest with the band Pussy Riot. It took me a little while to get into the rhythm of the book but I was soon hooked and couldn’t put it down. The picture painted by the author of her time on trial and in prison really only scratches the surface of what she and all the other women suffered and indeed still suffer in the penal colonies in the Urals. Maria Alyokhin can only be described as an amazing woman who is brave enough to not only stand up for what she believes in but even when incarcerated she stood up on behalf of all the women prisoners to gain better living and working conditions and to try and end the abuse thinly disguised as routine procedure. Sadly, I am sure that the appalling situation Maria encountered is echoed in numerous other colonies around the world.This book should be a lesson to us all. We all have a voice and that voice should be heard without fear of imprisonment – a luxury that many of us take for granted in our land of free speech. We should speak out against injustice and try to change the myriad of things that are so very wrong.I defy anyone to read this book and not be spurred on to try to make a difference.
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  • Kirsty Stanley
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsRiot Days by Maria AlyokhinaI picked up Riot Days as a memoir by one of the Pussy Riot group who were imprisoned in Russia for protesting. I had hoped to better understand their experience but unfortunately the structure of the book didn't work for me. Initially I was trying to read the Advanced copy via my kindle app and I wondered if the formatting was making it difficult to read so I switched to a PDF version which was easier but still strange. Each chapter was split into short secti 2.5 starsRiot Days by Maria AlyokhinaI picked up Riot Days as a memoir by one of the Pussy Riot group who were imprisoned in Russia for protesting. I had hoped to better understand their experience but unfortunately the structure of the book didn't work for me. Initially I was trying to read the Advanced copy via my kindle app and I wondered if the formatting was making it difficult to read so I switched to a PDF version which was easier but still strange. Each chapter was split into short sections with bold headings but I couldn't work out the placement of these because sometimes they seemed to relate to what had been written before and sometimes to what came next. The text itself was almost like a cross between poetry and prose with short paragraphs and a disjointed style, more like a stream of consciousness. It left me very confused about what was happening as timelines crossed. There were a few illustrations used, and I'm not sure if these were drawn by Maria but they were very childish and I don't think they added anything to the narrative. The final two chapters were the most informative and seemed to be more linearly structured. In these Maria shares with us how she challenged the injustices in the prison she was in through her legal representation and made life better for the inmates.The start didn't really help me understand exactly what the initial protest was for and so I experienced a disconnect with her plight , which was undoubtedly traumatic. To be honest it left me wanting to go back and read news items about it instead. I wonder if this is a case of lost in translation. I did spot this quote though which spoke to me. Make good choices people. "There is no certainty or predictability. There is no fate. There is a choice. My choice and yours, in each moment that demands it."I received an e-copy from the publisher via Netgalley. Opinions are my own. Review also posted on my blog.
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  • Kate Moore
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book as an advanced reading copy. The truth of this tale is astonishing. The book itself is written in a fragmented, 'diary-style' narrative. A lot of what Alyokhina says is actually quite beautiful (clearly, her keen interest in poetry shows through her writing style), which was very enjoyable for me. The author chose to mention her son only twice and so briefly as though not at all, to focus solely on the politics of Russia and her specific situation as a political prisoner. Th I received this book as an advanced reading copy. The truth of this tale is astonishing. The book itself is written in a fragmented, 'diary-style' narrative. A lot of what Alyokhina says is actually quite beautiful (clearly, her keen interest in poetry shows through her writing style), which was very enjoyable for me. The author chose to mention her son only twice and so briefly as though not at all, to focus solely on the politics of Russia and her specific situation as a political prisoner. This works in the context of the book, although personally, I would have liked a little more on that front. Initially, the apparent 'headings' that precede each entry are related to the entries but not repeating lines within them. Quite quickly, however, the headings seem only to be repeating the sentences directly before or after them. This got a little irritating for me (I saw it as superfluous) and the entries also became shorter and messier.Overall, it's a very personal, heroic and philosophical account of an unwavering desire to change the way Russia views itself and its people.
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  • Nicholas Masters
    January 1, 1970
    All in all, that was a very insightful read.I had no idea of the oppressive political landscape, the political entanglement with religion, and the ongoing fight for freedom and a revolution that Russians like Maria Alyokhina and Nadya Tolokno engage in.“A narrow sliver of light in a huge field of injustice and mistreatment”The story itself is imbedded with engaging poetry excerpts, song lyrics, and quotes.And although I believe Maria achieved what she set out to achieve, namely documenting her o All in all, that was a very insightful read.I had no idea of the oppressive political landscape, the political entanglement with religion, and the ongoing fight for freedom and a revolution that Russians like Maria Alyokhina and Nadya Tolokno engage in.“A narrow sliver of light in a huge field of injustice and mistreatment”The story itself is imbedded with engaging poetry excerpts, song lyrics, and quotes.And although I believe Maria achieved what she set out to achieve, namely documenting her ordeals and ideals whilst portraying her strong desire to make change happen and her unwillingness to waiver from her believes, I would have loved for the story to be a little more emotional. To really understand what was going through Maria’s mind, to better appreciate the sacrifices she continually made and the risks she took with the decisions she stuck to.“If you dream alone, the dream remains only a dream, but if you dream with others, you create reality”Great and quick read. Thanks for opening my eyes.Thanks NetGalley and Penguin Books for a review copy.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t know what to make of this book when I requested it to read from NetGalley. Then leave an honest review after you have read it. But I am glad I did. After hearing Maria Alyokhina on the Jeremy Vine show I checked my kindle downloads and started to read Riot Days by Maria Alyokhina. This book may only have a few pages but it gives you a strong account of the Pussy Riot that happened in Russia in 2012. This book is raw, gripping and contains Maria’s personal account of what happened to her I didn’t know what to make of this book when I requested it to read from NetGalley. Then leave an honest review after you have read it. But I am glad I did. After hearing Maria Alyokhina on the Jeremy Vine show I checked my kindle downloads and started to read Riot Days by Maria Alyokhina. This book may only have a few pages but it gives you a strong account of the Pussy Riot that happened in Russia in 2012. This book is raw, gripping and contains Maria’s personal account of what happened to her. Three of the group were caught and then put on trial. Two of them were jailed. Maria served 2 years sentence and started a bitter struggle against the Russian prison system and an iron-willed refusal to be deprived of her humanity. Maria is a very strong young lady and I wish her all the best for her future.It is a shocking book and contains some shocking language but Please don’t be put off! This account of history of what happened in 2012 in Russia need to be heard. 5 Star read.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    [I received an advance reading copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review]In this exceptional memoir, former Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina recounts the run up to and aftermath of the performance that had her arrested for "hooliganism" in 2012, documenting her time on the run, her arrest, trial and subsequent incarceration in a number of human-rights flouting prisons and penal colonies. Writing in stark and yet intensely poetic prose, she explores her experiences as an [I received an advance reading copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review]In this exceptional memoir, former Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina recounts the run up to and aftermath of the performance that had her arrested for "hooliganism" in 2012, documenting her time on the run, her arrest, trial and subsequent incarceration in a number of human-rights flouting prisons and penal colonies. Writing in stark and yet intensely poetic prose, she explores her experiences as an uncompromising dissident, a member of a collective, a fierce human rights activist, a friend, a mother. Strength and sheer will permeate this text and it is impossible not to be moved, impressed, downright astounded by Alyokhina's resilience, fortitude and clarity in the face of oppressive adversity. You really need to read this.
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  • Suswati
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for my copy.This is an intriguing diary of political activist and Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina. It is heartfelt and almost despairing at times when Alyokhina describes the squalid conditions that she has to be imprisoned in after protesting in a church in Russia. However, her heroic efforts in jail even allowed her to gain some small victories, which makes her an activist through and through. From hunger strikes to taking prison guards to court, her determination shou Thank you to Netgalley for my copy.This is an intriguing diary of political activist and Pussy Riot member Maria Alyokhina. It is heartfelt and almost despairing at times when Alyokhina describes the squalid conditions that she has to be imprisoned in after protesting in a church in Russia. However, her heroic efforts in jail even allowed her to gain some small victories, which makes her an activist through and through. From hunger strikes to taking prison guards to court, her determination should be lauded.The copy that I received was unformatted making it a little difficult to follow new threads, but reading it as a journal definitely makes more sense as there are small blocks of personal day to day meanderings and quotes.
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  • Aisling
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this- I've been following the actions of Pussy Riot for years so was anxious to read this and it's certainly worth it. The lack of efficiency in the system, the barrage of human rights abuses in prisons, the breadth of travel across Russia to be dropped in awful conditions for the sake of singing a jokey tune in a church is an overt exercise of power. Masha's story is built on her own feminism and her determination to criticise a church and government that work hand in hand to red I really liked this- I've been following the actions of Pussy Riot for years so was anxious to read this and it's certainly worth it. The lack of efficiency in the system, the barrage of human rights abuses in prisons, the breadth of travel across Russia to be dropped in awful conditions for the sake of singing a jokey tune in a church is an overt exercise of power. Masha's story is built on her own feminism and her determination to criticise a church and government that work hand in hand to reduce the rights of others. This is really worth the read, notably because Masha continued, while in prison, to fight for her fellow prisoners using her own 'political' status to improve their rights- even when it made her unpopular. Her spirit of resistance is monumental.
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  • Nicki Southwell
    January 1, 1970
    This is an account of Maria Alyokhina's time in the Russian Criminal system.In 2013, she and other members, performed a “punk prayer” challenging the Orthodox Church and its support of Putin. As a result all three were put on trial with two being sent to prison, Maria Alyokhina was one of them.This is her story.I found, at times, that this was difficult to follow. Maybe it had lost its way when translated. Otherwise, the descriptions were vivid and it is an interesting story.I chose to read this This is an account of Maria Alyokhina's time in the Russian Criminal system.In 2013, she and other members, performed a “punk prayer” challenging the Orthodox Church and its support of Putin. As a result all three were put on trial with two being sent to prison, Maria Alyokhina was one of them.This is her story.I found, at times, that this was difficult to follow. Maybe it had lost its way when translated. Otherwise, the descriptions were vivid and it is an interesting story.I chose to read this book and all opinions in this review are all my own and completely unbiased. My thanks to NetGalley for this opportunity.
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  • Larisa
    January 1, 1970
    This is nothing like a conventional memoir "Once upon a time I was a revolutionary... ", with detailed descriptions of events and full of self-admiration. This book is a bold statement - I am who I am. I have voice, I have rights, I am ready to fight for them. Don't dare to take them away from me. Alyokhina's writing is brisk, witty and smart.Maria Alyokhina doesn't try to explain or justify her views or actions. Her life is a protest. And the protest should be "desperate, sudden, and joyous". A This is nothing like a conventional memoir "Once upon a time I was a revolutionary... ", with detailed descriptions of events and full of self-admiration. This book is a bold statement - I am who I am. I have voice, I have rights, I am ready to fight for them. Don't dare to take them away from me. Alyokhina's writing is brisk, witty and smart.Maria Alyokhina doesn't try to explain or justify her views or actions. Her life is a protest. And the protest should be "desperate, sudden, and joyous". After reading this book you will be probably left with more questions than answers, but you will come to appreciate the holy act of protest.
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  • Kate Dansette
    January 1, 1970
    Alyokhina is not a writer but has a strong voice and describes her experiences with humour and anger. This short memoir describes the protest she went to prison for, her trial and life in prison. She inspires with her defiant politics in the face of grinding bureaucracy and arbitrary abuse.
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  • Leah
    January 1, 1970
    Visceral, poignant, and sharp. It may take some readers time to get into the compositional style, but having seen the theatrical production of the same story, the rhythm resonated easily with me. And though fairly short, there is a lot to be found in this book. I'll be carrying it in my thoughts.
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  • Adrian
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible account of how 40 seconds of musical protest can send you to a penal colony for 2 years. Living in an absurd dystopian state and never giving in - we are all Pussy Riot!
  • frites
    January 1, 1970
    Unrelenting, breathtaking, political poetry.
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