The Other Twin
When India falls to her death from a bridge over a railway, her sister Poppy returns home to Brighton for the first time in years. Unconvinced by official explanations, Poppy begins her own investigation into India’s death. But the deeper she digs, the closer she comes to uncovering deeply buried secrets. Could Matthew Temple, the boyfriend she abandoned, be involved? And what of his powerful and wealthy parents, and his twin sister, Ana? Enter the mysterious and ethereal Jenny: the girl Poppy discovers after hacking into India’s laptop. What is exactly is she hiding, and what did India find out about her? Taking the reader on a breathless ride through the winding lanes of Brighton, into its vibrant party scene and inside the homes of its well-heeled families, The Other Twin is a startling and up-to-the-minute thriller about the social-media world, where resentments and accusations are played out online, where identities are made and remade, and where there is no such thing as truth.

The Other Twin Details

TitleThe Other Twin
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 15th, 2017
PublisherOrenda Books
ISBN-139781910633786
Rating
GenreThriller, Mystery, Crime, Fiction

The Other Twin Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    If I had to describe this book with a single word it would be relevant. I found The Other Twin to be one of the most timely fictional stories I have read in 2017 due to a plethora of reasons. Somehow I was unaware that this was Lucy’s debut novel, and once I discovered that little tidbit I was blown away by the quality and complexity woven into the narrative; Hay writes like a season professional and I think this book is perfect for any reader; the more seasoned reader will find pleasure in the If I had to describe this book with a single word it would be relevant. I found The Other Twin to be one of the most timely fictional stories I have read in 2017 due to a plethora of reasons. Somehow I was unaware that this was Lucy’s debut novel, and once I discovered that little tidbit I was blown away by the quality and complexity woven into the narrative; Hay writes like a season professional and I think this book is perfect for any reader; the more seasoned reader will find pleasure in the precision laid plot with its many twists and turns while the younger reader will be drawn to it’s discussion of relevant issues and genre bending ways. No matter your age, gender, race, or sexuality, this book has something for everyone all wrapped in a 300 page binding.Without spoiling the plot, there is much discussion involving the LGBT community and the current struggles they face as a buzz worthy minority. I found myself completely drawn in by the way Hay mingled the urgent suspense of a psychological thriller with the deep emotion of a domestic drama; this was a heavily character driven book but it was never slow or boring in pacing and intrigue. Lately I’ve been pondering if I need to switch up my genres a bit to stave off burnout; The Other Twin was the perfect balance I needed to capture my attention and spice my reading habits up a bit. If you enjoy family sagas filled with suspense and diversity, you’ll want to pick up this book featuring empathetic characters who are relatable and sustainable. The kindle version is currently available and the paperback will be available from Orenda Books November 1st, 2017!*Many thanks to the publisher for providing my copy; it was a pleasure to share my honest thoughts as part of the blog tour.
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  • Miriam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    "The Other Twin" is a superbly crafted contemporary and modern book by debut author L V Hay and I'm astounded by the quality of the excellent and faultless writing for a first time novel. I was drawn into this story straight away and it held my attention throughout.Poppy receives a phone call to say her sister India has died after falling from a railway bridge. She returns to her home town of Brighton after many years and unconvinced with official explanations she starts her own investigations i "The Other Twin" is a superbly crafted contemporary and modern book by debut author L V Hay and I'm astounded by the quality of the excellent and faultless writing for a first time novel. I was drawn into this story straight away and it held my attention throughout.Poppy receives a phone call to say her sister India has died after falling from a railway bridge. She returns to her home town of Brighton after many years and unconvinced with official explanations she starts her own investigations into India's death. But is it safe to uncover long buried secrets and will her estranged family and friends still be the same? Could her ex boyfriend Matthew be involved and what will Poppy find in India's personal online blog?I found the whole plot line very interesting and entertaining, there's also a dark and disturbing storyline running simultaneously to India's death - at times this had me a little confused as to what was going on - but by the end this all came together seamlessly and you comprehend exactly what it all meant. "The Other Twin" is a very character driven novel - I'm not sure I liked Poppy but that's just my opinion - and is set in the very vibrant town of Brighton and the LGBT community. There's a very sensitive issue at the heart of this book and can imagine a lot of younger readers will enjoy this story too. I didn't see the end coming and was quite pleased as to how it turned out. I also liked the use of social media in the story - which is ever present these days in our lives - and this definitely gave the book a more realistic and up to the minute atmosphere.This book to me was less of a psychological thriller and more of a family style saga with twists and turns but I still really enjoyed it and would happily read more by this author in the future, she's talented, very polished in her writing and has a very clear and modern imagination.4 stars.
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    DNF. I thought I would love this since it's an Orenda book. Couldn't do it... nor am I going to waste anymore of my time since there are sooo many other books to read!
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Poppy hasn't been home to Brighton in years but after awakening from yet another one night stand she just can't quite remember she finds her mother has been frantically trying to call her. Fearing the worse Poppy is a bit afraid to actually pick up the phone and find out just what is going on and when she takes that step her worse fears are realized. Poppy's sister India has fallen to her death from a bridge over a railway looking like a suicide but that just doesn't sit well with Poppy and she' Poppy hasn't been home to Brighton in years but after awakening from yet another one night stand she just can't quite remember she finds her mother has been frantically trying to call her. Fearing the worse Poppy is a bit afraid to actually pick up the phone and find out just what is going on and when she takes that step her worse fears are realized. Poppy's sister India has fallen to her death from a bridge over a railway looking like a suicide but that just doesn't sit well with Poppy and she's determined to find out the truth. Poppy finds herself returning to the life she had thought she'd left behind years before but determined to get to the truth of just what had happened to India. Digging into India's life Poppy is led to a mysterious girl named Jenny after hacking into India's laptop and finds herself caught up by Matthew Temple, the boyfriend she abandoned. So many secrets to be uncovered but the deeper she digs the more questions she's left with and doesn't know who to trust. The Other Twin by L.V. Hay is one of those books that was possibly just not for me as others seem to really enjoy this one but it didn't take me long to decide that I didn't. I wanted it to pick up and drag me into the story but after a rough start to this one I never really found a rhythm and began to enjoy the characters or book at all. Poppy was a character that starts off dragging herself out the funk of a night she can't remember and immediately I hesitated on liking her but thought possibly she could be one of those characters that grows and learns and makes one come to love her, unfortunately that didn't happen. There were actions later in the book that still had me disliking her and that brought down the whole book for me. I just found it a bit slow pace and tedious from the get go with never really getting too invested. This one just turned out to not be my cup of tea but plenty of other readers are enjoying it. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.wordpress....
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comOohhh The Other Twin was such an engrossing read, if you’re ever in the mood for a book that you can binge read in a weekend, this is it. It’s pacey, intricately plotted and really well written. Poppy returns home to Brighton for the first time in almost five years after her sister India dies. Even though the two were not on the best of terms, she just knows there is something off about India’s death and she starts to dig into her life, mainly All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comOohhh The Other Twin was such an engrossing read, if you’re ever in the mood for a book that you can binge read in a weekend, this is it. It’s pacey, intricately plotted and really well written. Poppy returns home to Brighton for the first time in almost five years after her sister India dies. Even though the two were not on the best of terms, she just knows there is something off about India’s death and she starts to dig into her life, mainly her online presence. As it’s such a well plotted and complicated book, I fear discussing specific details will only spoil it. It’s on the shorter side and still manages to pack a mighty punch as Hay delivers on every level. Her writing is strong and sharp, the characterization is full of depth and substance and there is a sense of uneasiness throughout the text. Hay tackles some relevant social issues in such a sensitive and delicate manner, I was so impressed by the turns this one took. It’s extremely diverse but not just for the sake of being diverse, it only adds to the superb quality of the plot and makes the reader think in a profound way. She also examines the use of social media and how it effects people in both a positive and a negative way, I really appreciated this as most of the books I’ve read recently highlight the ugly side of social media without giving any credit to the great support it can lend to so many people, it was such an intelligent point. I’ve never read an Orenda book and not been able to highly recommend it to others and this is no exception. It’s an excellent psychological thriller from an extremely talented writer with a storyline that had me holding my breath, what more could you want?!
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  • Sam (Clues and Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    I have come to know Orenda for publishing police procedural novels. Imagine my surprise when I picked up The Other Twin and found something completely different than what I was expecting. Fast paced, character-centric, diverse and binge worthy; I finished this one in a single sitting. The novel opens with Poppy receiving a call no one hopes to get; her sister, India is dead. Police deemed it to be a suicide, but Poppy is unconvinced, so, she begins her own investigation into India’s death. With I have come to know Orenda for publishing police procedural novels. Imagine my surprise when I picked up The Other Twin and found something completely different than what I was expecting. Fast paced, character-centric, diverse and binge worthy; I finished this one in a single sitting. The novel opens with Poppy receiving a call no one hopes to get; her sister, India is dead. Police deemed it to be a suicide, but Poppy is unconvinced, so, she begins her own investigation into India’s death. With nothing to turn to but her sister’s cell phone and the remnants of her online persona, mostly through a blog, Poppy shifts through India’s final days and stumbles into some deeply buried secrets. To start, I would like to say that this review is going to be extremely vague. I do not want to ruin any plot points and Hay really brings a lot to the text. Lots of intricate plot weaving and character connections take place. It really hard to speak to any part of the text without beginning to unravel the plot! But, what I can say is that from the first pages, I couldn’t help but become completely entranced by the prose of Hays. She does a brilliant job at weaving the storylines and building tension within the text. I became completely invested in the plot. I was also incredibly impressed with the amount of diversity that Hay brought into the text, especially in regards to the LGBTQ community; there is not nearly enough of this context represented in literature. I also loved the variation in the setting; taking place for the most part in Brighton, I had experienced this setting before (usually in some of my “palette cleansing” beach reads) but never in this way. Hay flips the switch in this seaside down and shows the seedy, dark side. I loved this unexpected twist. Absolutely brilliant!Overall, I couldn’t get enough of this novel and I feel like fans of K.A Tucker’s He Will Be My Ruin will absolutely love The Other Twin; it really reminded me of it. 5/5 stars. Looks like another hit for Orenda.
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  • Lisa Doherty (Rambling Lisa's Book Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, how about we take the time to look at that cover and bask in the air of mystery it brings.‘You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover!!!’How many of us have spent our lives listening to that and flashback to when you were a child and presumed that this was actually regarding books so decided, even as an adult, that you shouldn’t just books by their cover? Noone? Oh…just me then…. Anyhow, this is one book that, you can most certainly, judge by its cover!Time to break away from the cove First of all, how about we take the time to look at that cover and bask in the air of mystery it brings.‘You shouldn’t judge a book by its cover!!!’How many of us have spent our lives listening to that and flashback to when you were a child and presumed that this was actually regarding books so decided, even as an adult, that you shouldn’t just books by their cover? Noone? Oh…just me then…. Anyhow, this is one book that, you can most certainly, judge by its cover!Time to break away from the cover, in all its splendour, and move on to the actual story. Brighton was the perfect setting for this book due to the LGBTQ presence. Freedom to be who you are is exactly what one expects from Brighton, such a shame that throughout the story we find that this isn’t what people expect from their family. Poppy is called home when her sister commits suicide and discovers that her sister keeps a blog. She decides that the blog is the key to finding out what happened to India. She contacts Jenny, a friend of India’s, to learn a bit more about her sister and is not prepared for what unfolds.‘Poppy?’I wheel around. Matthew stands behind me, his face a picture a concern. The distance between us the last time we met seems to evaporate. I choke back a sob and lean against him, like my mother had against Tim; he lets me, folding his big arms around me.Something snaps deep within me.Raw grief hits me in the solar plexus, folding me over. Matthew tries to keep me upright, then gives up. He lets me squat down on my heels as I attempt to pour the grief out of myself with a low, animalistic moan, my whole body shaking. As light glints on the sparkling grass, a thought surfaces in my brain: How can the sun be shining when my only sister is dead?I adore how this shows the social media age, in which we live, and how it affects our lives. We see online bullying is common practice. The author has inserted ‘screenshots’ of India’s blog posts and the comments that follow. Each of her posts has code names for who she is talking about and leads Poppy to try and work out the code.Popping back to the statement above about judging a book by its cover, we learn the true meaning of that within this story.The outcome of this book was not what I expected, however, it is one that I can, in part, relate to. This is a deeply haunting, mind-bending roller coaster of a story, one I believe with never leave me. Well done to Lucy Hay for writing such an amazing work of art.Thank you to Orenda Books for my copy of The Other Twin for my review copy, my reviews are in no way influenced.N.B. I want to point out that I generally don’t like books with an LGBTQ theme as any that I have read have very explicit sex scenes. I do not read any erotica and this most certainly had nothing like that within it.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    4.5* --> 5Poppy returns to Brighton after her sister, India, falls to her death from a bridge over the railway. She’s not convinced her sister would just take her own life like that and sets out to investigate her death. But Poppy hasn’t seen her sister for quite a few years and really has no idea what her life was about before her untimely death.Cor! What a skilfully crafted plot this is! The Other Twin is full of suspense and intrigue as Poppy quickly becomes caught up in a web of lies and 4.5* --> 5Poppy returns to Brighton after her sister, India, falls to her death from a bridge over the railway. She’s not convinced her sister would just take her own life like that and sets out to investigate her death. But Poppy hasn’t seen her sister for quite a few years and really has no idea what her life was about before her untimely death.Cor! What a skilfully crafted plot this is! The Other Twin is full of suspense and intrigue as Poppy quickly becomes caught up in a web of lies and deceit. This story is quite dark and complex. With a multitude of realistic and complicated characters clearly hiding something or other, I soon stopped trusting anyone except Poppy herself.Even the setting in Brighton, away from the bright lights and the fun times I always hear about, added another disturbing layer and makes this stand out from the rest. I do so enjoy it when an author manages to incorporate the modern day usage of social media. Here it offered up some tantalising clues that I was desperately trying to work out.This is one tense, gripping, well-paced and utterly compelling read. As it’s fairly short, you should really try to finish it in one sitting. For the longest time, I couldn’t figure out what was going on. There are some fantastically well-placed curveballs that left me spinning! I absolutely love it when an author messes with my head so hard I feel like I was stuck in a revolving door for hours on end. It’s simply unbelievable when you realise this is the author’s debut fiction novel and it promises incredible things for the future. Well played, Lucy V. Hay!
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  • Abby (Crime by the Book)
    January 1, 1970
    Read my full review here: http://crimebythebook.com/blog/2017/7...THE OTHER TWIN is both an engaging psychological thriller and a book with a strong social conscience. An addictive read with an important message at its core, this book genuinely surprised me with the sensitive issues it tackles. Readers who want a book that will leave them thinking even after the resolution of the book's central mystery will enjoy this one!!
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    It is hard to know where to start with The Other Twin. The Other Twin is billed as a psychological thriller. In some ways, it works as a dark tale of complicated families and secrets. In other ways, it feels like it should have been a teenage novel with a completely different setting.The story itself focuses on a rather immature thirty year old woman, who returns to her home town of Brighton. Poppy hears that her younger sister has died, in somewhat tragic circumstances. Poppy suffers a kind of It is hard to know where to start with The Other Twin. The Other Twin is billed as a psychological thriller. In some ways, it works as a dark tale of complicated families and secrets. In other ways, it feels like it should have been a teenage novel with a completely different setting.The story itself focuses on a rather immature thirty year old woman, who returns to her home town of Brighton. Poppy hears that her younger sister has died, in somewhat tragic circumstances. Poppy suffers a kind of ‘Survivor’s Guilt’, as she starts to reflect on the little sister she lost contact with. Her gut feeling is that India would not have committed suicide. She needs to find the truth. She starts to investigate all of India’s social media profiles, her strange blog and look into her sister’s friends. The mystery of India’s death seems to be linked to a girl named Jenny. Who is Jenny? And what do India’s cryptic blog posts mean?I tried to like The Other Twin. I came to the conclusion that that I had too many quibbles with it. I did not really connect with any of the characters, which I am sure did not help. I would have liked to have heard far more from India and Jenny. The central character, Poppy, is supposed to be a teacher. Yet she seems to behave like a teenager, time and time again. She runs away from London, leaving her possessions. We find out that in the past, she left her boyfriend when he was ill. She doesn’t even wash her clothes. Terrible for an adult. I think I could have believed in Poppy more, had she been a good ten years or so younger. I did understand her need to make sense of the past and of her relationship with her sister. That had a ring of truth about it.There is an incredibly strong sense of place. Brighton is very much known for its thriving LGBT scene; plus its many pubs and clubs scattered across the city. I felt that Lucy V. Hay did Brighton justice and gave the Lanes and central Brighton prominence. Anyone who knows Brighton will recognise the vivid descriptions.However the story itself did not ring true. Without giving too much away, this is a story about intolerance and identity. It is very much up to date. I can’t say more without spoilers. Brighton was the wrong place to set this tale. Brighton is the most laid back place in the UK. It is completely accepting of differences, including those of sexuality and gender. Someone could walk down North Street naked and no one would bat an eyelid. It is that kind of place.Controversial thoughts here, maybe. I think this would have worked better as a young adult novel, with the sisters as teenagers and having a setting in some kind of tight knit community.Worth a read, if you enjoy a mystery with bang up to date themes. You might get on with The Other Twin better than I did.
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  • Abbie
    January 1, 1970
    This is going to be a very difficult review to write as there is so much I want to say but I’m fearful of giving away the plot. With The Other Twin Hay has written a topical thriller that is written with great skill and understanding.When Poppy Wade’s half-sister India falls to her death from a railway bridge, Poppy returns to her home town of Brighton to be with her family. Poppy questions the initial verdict of suicide and sets out to find out the truth behind her sister’s death. Poppy has tha This is going to be a very difficult review to write as there is so much I want to say but I’m fearful of giving away the plot. With The Other Twin Hay has written a topical thriller that is written with great skill and understanding.When Poppy Wade’s half-sister India falls to her death from a railway bridge, Poppy returns to her home town of Brighton to be with her family. Poppy questions the initial verdict of suicide and sets out to find out the truth behind her sister’s death. Poppy has that underlying feeling that something isn’t right regarding the death and the more she looks into it the more she discovers that she barely knows those she grew up with.The Other Twin uses social media to great effect. Hay plays on all my likes and dislikes of social media – the way in which you never really know who is behind the keyboard, the way in which grudges and arguments can be played out in public, but also the support it can give to people who would otherwise feel alone. This is a book ultimately about identity and the use of social media works perfectly with this. As Poppy discovers things about her sister she didn’t know via her laptop, the reader is constantly left guessing as to what the truth is.This is also a book about the secrets that hide within families and the lengths they will go to to keep them concealed. The question is raised as to how much we ever really know anyone. I always enjoy secrets and lies within a book and I adored this aspect of The Other Twin. I was gripped from the start and raced through the book to the ending.The tone sits perfectly with the subject matter and the sense of grief that is displayed by the protagonist. It has a subtle grittiness to it that leaves you feeling unnerved throughout. Hay’s writing makes you feel unsettled as you take the journey with Poppy to discover the truth about India.Hay weaves a twisting, turning tale in which the sense of unease never leaves you. The ending pretty much blew me away with events that I didn’t see coming at all! It will probably be the book of 2017 that delivers the ultimate shock factor, and any books that come after are going to be hard pushed to surprise me as much as The Other Twin did. A cracking debut novel!
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Personally, I thought The Other Twin was a really refreshing debut novel by LV Hay. So what’s it about? Poppy is called home because her sister, India, has committed suicide. Once close, the sisters have not seen each in four years. While returning to home, Poppy just can’t wrap her head around the suicide. India was happy and full of life. Poppy then decides to pursue her own investigation by talking to old friends and snooping through India’s laptop.During Poppy’s search, she is becoming more Personally, I thought The Other Twin was a really refreshing debut novel by LV Hay. So what’s it about? Poppy is called home because her sister, India, has committed suicide. Once close, the sisters have not seen each in four years. While returning to home, Poppy just can’t wrap her head around the suicide. India was happy and full of life. Poppy then decides to pursue her own investigation by talking to old friends and snooping through India’s laptop.During Poppy’s search, she is becoming more aware that things are not adding up. Not only that, the people she thought she knew aren’t as trustworthy as they once seemed. Poppy is determined to find out what happened with India, and why she would do such a thing. With many twists and turns, The Other Twin was a real page turner for me. It was told in Poppy’s POV and “his POV”. Like I said, I thought The Other Twin was really refreshing. 4.5 Stars.I received an advanced copy from the publisher via Netgalley. Many thanks
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    The Other Twin – Simply Mind Blowing.I am not often short of words to sum up a book, but I think I cannot do this debut by LV Hay enough justice, The Other Twin is simply mind blowing! From the setting in Brighton Lucy Hay delivers a contemporary thriller, that is inventive, current, a book that can at the same time delight and disorientate the reader. If you are a fan of inventive, gripping psychological thriller then The Other Twin is the book you need to read.In two hundred and sixty pages, H The Other Twin – Simply Mind Blowing.I am not often short of words to sum up a book, but I think I cannot do this debut by LV Hay enough justice, The Other Twin is simply mind blowing! From the setting in Brighton Lucy Hay delivers a contemporary thriller, that is inventive, current, a book that can at the same time delight and disorientate the reader. If you are a fan of inventive, gripping psychological thriller then The Other Twin is the book you need to read.In two hundred and sixty pages, Hay delivers a story that packs a punch, that is disturbing while being packed full of tension. What the reader gets is a multi-layered story, fantastic characters, some wonderful twists, an English Channel full of emotions. This is a beautifully written story dealing with very current issues and shows the diversity and prejudices of many people and you do ask yourself, what would I do? This is a book that will keep you gripped from beginning to end.Poppy wakes up in her flat in London, D has left her a message, problem is she cannot remember who D is or was, when she looks at her phone she sees she has lot of missed phone calls from her mother. Ringing her mother back expecting to be told off for something, she hears news she never thought she would hear, her sister India is dead, committed suicide.Poppy in a daze heads home to Brighton to her mother’s house and Tim her step father is trying to hold everything together. Poppy cannot believe that her sister has committed suicide and tries to dig deeper and find the truth, whatever the truth maybe. At the same time as going home she must face up to her past, and Matthew whom she had left behind when she left Brighton, when he had cancer.As she digs deeper she seems to keep hitting a brick wall and she knows people are avoiding her or outright telling lies to her face. She keeps ending up with Matthew, either in his bar or in his apartment, she just cannot help herself. He mother has been committed to hospital as she has not taken the death of her daughter well. Tim, the family’s tower of strength seems to be holding it all together, somehow, but for how much longer she does not know.As the story dips and weaves its web, the reader is caught in the middle, not sure of who is the person orchestrating the stream of lies that is blocking the way for Poppy. Lucy Hay is like a magician and their use of illusion and sleight of hand, she has you looking in one direction when something comes from another direction and slaps you in the face.A Mind Blowing Debut Thriller that I cannot recommend highly enough.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    3.5*When Poppy is told that her younger sister India has committed suicide by jumping off a railway bridge, she returns to the family home in Brighton in a state of shock. Some five years before, something happened in Poppy’s life which made family relationships difficult but India’s death has totally floored her and disbelief mixed with feelings of guilt, make her determined to discover the truth. India had an online blog and her blog posts have an unsettling feel to them and it’s these, togeth 3.5*When Poppy is told that her younger sister India has committed suicide by jumping off a railway bridge, she returns to the family home in Brighton in a state of shock. Some five years before, something happened in Poppy’s life which made family relationships difficult but India’s death has totally floored her and disbelief mixed with feelings of guilt, make her determined to discover the truth. India had an online blog and her blog posts have an unsettling feel to them and it’s these, together with some accompanying comments, which give Poppy cause for concern.There are a lot of characters here to be suspicious of – both family and friends. A separate and, rather concerning, strand interrupts the chapters. How this fits into the story does become clear but this adds weight to Poppy’s belief that there is some other explanation behind her sister’s death.Both personal and family relationships are under the spotlight and it seems that almost everyone has something to hide. Poppy’s investigations lead her into Brighton’s LGBT community as well as having to come to terms with her own actions in the past.The Other Twin is a very complex and confidently written debut and the subject nature of the story certainly gives it an edgy and relevant feel. The short chapters (which I am always a huge fan of) make for a fast read. The author clearly knows Brighton well and was able to provide an atmospheric sense of place both for the well known and also the seedier parts of town. Whilst I found the first part of the story to have a slower pace, it does pick up and becomes an intriguing and twisted read that surprises with each new revelation. I was really excited to read this especially after reading the blurb and the cover is stunning but I have to admit that I didn’t love it as much as I expected to. It has received many enthusiastic and positive reviews and I can understand why as the writing is very good. I think for me part of the issue was that I didn’t feel there was enough information about India to make me really care about her and for me she seemed a rather shadowy figure. I would have liked to have known more about her as a person and about her life. My other problem was with Poppy. For some reason I just didn’t gel with her and for much of the story I felt she was an immature and at times annoying character; acting more like a truculent teenager than a grown woman, although I did start to revise my opinion of her at the end. I’m sure the Other Twin is going to be a huge success and deservedly so. I just think that here it’s a case of its not you, it’s me!
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  • Meggy
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever heard of cover love? Take a look at The Other Twin and fall in love. I am used to judging books by their covers, let's face it, but this particular cover is a review of the book in itself. I'd like to thank and congratulate the cover designer for capturing the essence of Lucy V. Hay's work into a mesmerizing and eye-catching masterpiece.Now, I'll admit it once again, I'm fascinated by twins. They all say there is a special bound reuniting two people from the same egg. Here, we do h Have you ever heard of cover love? Take a look at The Other Twin and fall in love. I am used to judging books by their covers, let's face it, but this particular cover is a review of the book in itself. I'd like to thank and congratulate the cover designer for capturing the essence of Lucy V. Hay's work into a mesmerizing and eye-catching masterpiece.Now, I'll admit it once again, I'm fascinated by twins. They all say there is a special bound reuniting two people from the same egg. Here, we do have twins in the story, and we get a pretty good idea of what it means to have a better half, or rather, an other-half. Matthew and Ana Temple were a great example of this special link and I adored trying to uncover their feelings, to imagine how far you'd go for someone so close to you. I'm an only child so I can only live vicariously through books what it is like to have siblings. In The Other Twin, the author puts a strong emphasis on this subject and I fell for Poppy and her sister, I was intrigued by their different personalities and their relationship. It amazes me how two people who grow up under the same roof can be so different. I experienced this thanks to the book, as well as so many other explorations of relationships in this complex and thrilling tale of a fight for the truth. Women are so obvious in their crusades to find a man, mould him and call it “true love”. Poppy had left behind a family, an ex, a background of rich families sure that the world belonged to them, and she's not sure she wants to be back. Every interaction was dutifully scrutinized by my hazel eyes, and boy does that town have a lot to say! If you're like me, you'll appreciate the depth and veil the author has carefully put all around this little world.Looking for the truth, now, eh? Well, in The Other Twin, you will have to work to get it! In this story, truth and emotions are mixed, one leading the other, one hiding the other. I felt as though I was in the middle of a rounded room, facing a million doors. That is the effect this book had on me. So many questions but all were enveloped in feelings, every character acting on them, and the author has a wonderful and cutting knack for making those emotions crawl under your skin until you are part of the equation. I am being extremely vague, even more than usual, because The Other Twin is a ball of thread, you tug at one and it slowly comes your way, but it gets tangled with other pieces of thread and when you think you catch a glimpse of the Truth with a big T, you end up discovering more lies, more paths, more questions. I understand, perhaps too late, how pain makes people desperate. The characterization is absolutely spot-on and, along with Poppy, your opinion on everyone will change as events unfolds. Poppy doesn't believe her sister killed herself. But what does Poppy know? They haven't been close for so long. From the beginning, you're treading on unsteady ground, and it only becomes more and more unstable as the tension grows. People who ask questions are never very welcome, are they? And people who find clues when no one wants to see them are very annoying, aren't they? I felt claustrophobic in this town where the past is heavy, the families seemingly close-knit, the rich are being rich. And no one is willing to disturb the quietness of the place for a young girl who acted stupidly. Lucy V. Hay's cleverness lies in how she immerses her story into a pool of emotions, capturing every event and painting it with feelings, leaving hints and hiding them in a blanket of lies, allowing the tension to creep closer to you with every page, until the curtain is drawn and everything comes to light, a blinding, surprising, and extraordinarily painful light. The icy fingers of anxiety tear inside his ribcage, like a tiny creature clawing its way out of his chest. The Other Twin is a terrifying mirror reflecting a portray of our society and revealing its flaws through our own favorite tools: social media, perfect families, money, and lies, a portray through which a magnificent and emotional writing cuts and frees the truth, and truths of life. My rating was rounded up from 4.5 to 5 stars on Goodreads and other sites. This unbiased review is my thank you to Orenda Books and the author for providing me with a copy of this book and for offering me a place on the blog tour.
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  • Joanne Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    I’m always one for a book with “twin” in the title so getting a copy of this book was a bit of a no brainer for me! And I have to say that it was so much better than I had been expecting! The twin relationship between Ana and Matthew wasn’t the central focus here but was one perspective used in a multitude of layers that mold together, giving shape and direction to this dark and gritty thriller. Using the back drop of two very different sides of Brighton, we see Poppy search for answers about he I’m always one for a book with “twin” in the title so getting a copy of this book was a bit of a no brainer for me! And I have to say that it was so much better than I had been expecting! The twin relationship between Ana and Matthew wasn’t the central focus here but was one perspective used in a multitude of layers that mold together, giving shape and direction to this dark and gritty thriller. Using the back drop of two very different sides of Brighton, we see Poppy search for answers about her sister India’s death beneath the surface of lies told by her friends and family.This book!!!! Yep it’s a good one! I suggest putting some time away for it as you will not want to put it down. Told in a very current form in places and relying on social media to help progress the narrative, it has a dark and claustrophobic atmosphere right from the start which is very much in contrast to the sunny side of Brighton seen by the tourists and daytrippers. Once I became  used to the uniquely stylish storytelling, I became fascinated by the mystery of what had happened to India and why. I loved that Poppy was a flawed individual who made mistakes but had a strength and determination due to her loyalty to her dead sister. And even though we never see the grown up Poppy and India together we are able to get an insight into their relationship in flashbacks and we then get to see a darker side of India through her blog entries, a side that Poppy wasn’t aware of.The Other Twin proved to be rather unsettling at times, and some of the themes covered were utterly heartbreaking, but it was an engrossing and addictive read with a distinctive style that should appeal to a younger audience especially. A thought provoking and perceptive psychological thriller for the social media age.
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  • Janel
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly, I’d like to thank Hay for writing a novel that is so different from the crime/psychological thrillers that are currently flooding the market – the diversity was very much appreciated!Poppy returns to Brighton to find out the mysterious circumstances surrounding her sister’s death; Poppy is a likeable and relatable character, flaws and all, she comes across as a real person and that’s important because it draws you into the story – alongside Poppy, you want to know if India’s death was a Firstly, I’d like to thank Hay for writing a novel that is so different from the crime/psychological thrillers that are currently flooding the market – the diversity was very much appreciated!Poppy returns to Brighton to find out the mysterious circumstances surrounding her sister’s death; Poppy is a likeable and relatable character, flaws and all, she comes across as a real person and that’s important because it draws you into the story – alongside Poppy, you want to know if India’s death was accidental or intentional. Not only was Poppy portrayed as a real character but so was her family and the family dynamics – this element of realism kept me interested in the story because it felt so real, rather than written just to shock the reader.But shock me, this novel did! Hay rooted suspense so deep in this novel, I just couldn’t figure out where the plot was going! The use of social media did indeed make this novel “up-to-the-minute” – it wasn’t overdone, instead cleverly done to build even more suspense. Hay also used vivid descriptions of Brighton to bring this book to life – a producer would have no problem turning this into a film. I was engaged throughout this novel, it featured a twist I haven’t come across before and that means a lot coming from someone has read approximately 92 books this year alone!I have no reservation recommending The Other Twin.*My thanks to Orenda Books for providing me with a copy of this book*
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  • Mairead Hearne (swirlandthread.com)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘I awake, ravenous, in the early evening. Winter darkness forms at the window. Head banging, I sit up. I’m in a tangle of sheets on the floor; I’ve rolled off my grubby futon. As I reach for my phone, a sharp pain shoots down my neck and through my shoulders. Getting too old for this shit’This is the day that life changes for Poppy. Somewhat estranged from her family for a number of years, Poppy awakes, severely hung-over, in a shabby flat in London to an alarming number of missed messages on he ‘I awake, ravenous, in the early evening. Winter darkness forms at the window. Head banging, I sit up. I’m in a tangle of sheets on the floor; I’ve rolled off my grubby futon. As I reach for my phone, a sharp pain shoots down my neck and through my shoulders. Getting too old for this shit’This is the day that life changes for Poppy. Somewhat estranged from her family for a number of years, Poppy awakes, severely hung-over, in a shabby flat in London to an alarming number of missed messages on her mobile. It’s her mother, with the life-shattering news that India, Poppy’s younger sister, is dead.Poppy immediately returns home to Brighton, a place she hasn’t ventured to for a number of years. Brighton holds many memories for Poppy. She left under circumstances that don’t become clear until the book progresses. From the beginning, Poppy is unwilling to accept the verdict for India’s death. The official line is that India chose to jump off a bridge, committing suicide but Poppy knows her sister and is convinced that there is something more sinister involved.Poppy makes the decision to search out for herself the reason for India’s untimely death, which leads her into a different world, the underbelly of a Brighton she no longer recognises.There is a very menacing element to The Other Twin, with the ever present narrative of a male character whose story is slowly revealed. He appears to be dominated by a very strong, dare I say, frightening woman. Their relationship is very unclear throughout the book until the latter pages and, to be honest, I had absolutely no idea where that story was heading. Lucy V Hay introduces a very strong psychological aspect to the book through the use of this narrative. There is slow build up to quite a shocking climax, unveiling some very twisted personalities, with a disquieting story to tell.Brighton has changed for Poppy. India was a blogger and Poppy soon starts to unravel clues from recent blog posts that India had published in the lead up to her tragic death. As Poppy searches for answers she comes in contact with people with very sad stories to tell, people who feel constantly challenged by the world we now live in. The harmful impact of social media is a very relevant topic today, making The Other Twin a very pertinent read. The book is laid out in short snappy chapters, making it a fast paced novel, with online conversations played out on the pages.I really wanted to be by Poppy’s side as she figured out what happened to India, but I just found myself getting a little irritated by her actions and attitude. There was an immaturity in some of her behaviour that belied her age. As she is the main character in the novel, my lack of connection with her affected my overall view of the book. I do honestly think that this is a book I would position in the Young Adult genre, with the very relevant themes of social media and identity/gender/sexuality running throughout the storyline.The Other Twin is a book garnering very positive reviews across the reading and writing world, with crime writer Peter James quoted as saying ~ ‘Sharp, confident writing, as dark and twisty as the Brighton Lanes.’ With a multitude of 4* and 5* reviews notched up, I have no doubt that this is a novel that will do very well indeed.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    The Other Twin is a fairly short novel at 250 pages, but it is perfectly formed. The incredibly well created characters lead the reader through an intense, dark and sometimes complicated plot. It’s unsettling at times, it’s dark, it’s tantalising, and it’s complex. It’s also one of those books that raises questions within each chapter.Set in Brighton, away from the bright, glittery sea-side town that is all too familiar in other novels, The Other Twin exposes the darker, seedier, underbelly of t The Other Twin is a fairly short novel at 250 pages, but it is perfectly formed. The incredibly well created characters lead the reader through an intense, dark and sometimes complicated plot. It’s unsettling at times, it’s dark, it’s tantalising, and it’s complex. It’s also one of those books that raises questions within each chapter.Set in Brighton, away from the bright, glittery sea-side town that is all too familiar in other novels, The Other Twin exposes the darker, seedier, underbelly of the town.When Poppy returns to her hometown after the death of her sister India, she is distraught, and confused. Whilst she and India were estranged for the past few years; the girl that she remembers would never have taken her own life. As she digs deeper into India’s recent past, Poppy begins to uncover secrets and untruths that have been hidden, but are threatening to be exposed, and to ruin two of the most important families in town.Lucy V Hay has used her knowledge and expertise of social media to enhance her story, and the darkest, most sinister side to the internet is finely and horrifyingly detailed within the plot.The Other Twin is slick and compulsive. Lucy V Hay’s writing is fluid and to the point, sometimes frantic, and often chilling. Her characterisation is confident with a rich understanding of human nature, that can be uncomfortably real at times.A welcome new voice in the genre, The Other Twin is unique and compelling. Deliciously tense, and clever.http://randomthingsthroughmyletterbox...
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  • Susan Hampson
    January 1, 1970
    When you are estranged from your family and get a phone out of the blue you know it isn’t going to be goods news you are going to hear. What Poppy heard was the last thing she could have ever imagined happening, her sister India was dead and how she died was even more unbelievable. It is enough to compel her to return to her home town of Brighton no matter who it upsets.Poppy can’t believe that the sister she left behind could have killed herself no matter how many years had past she knew the es When you are estranged from your family and get a phone out of the blue you know it isn’t going to be goods news you are going to hear. What Poppy heard was the last thing she could have ever imagined happening, her sister India was dead and how she died was even more unbelievable. It is enough to compel her to return to her home town of Brighton no matter who it upsets.Poppy can’t believe that the sister she left behind could have killed herself no matter how many years had past she knew the essence of her and ending her life would never have been an option. If no-one else was prepared to find out the real truth, not just take a surface conclusions, then she would find out. Watch out Brighton because this lady is unstoppable.This is quite a complex story with chapters that appeared out of the blue with little voices whispering in my mind then disappearing again as if they were never there.  Then I was unsure whether the coldness that some people had was due to their past involvement with Poppy or because of some sort of cover up. It is a story of mind games and I was now playing too.This is a very modern themed story with old fashioned values and attitudes, such a cleverly written intricate and devastatingly tragic story that revolves round social media and social acceptance. Lies, cover ups and scandal.This is Lucy V Halls debut novel, however can she top this!I wish to thank Anne Cater and Orenda Books for an ARC of this novel that I have reviewed honestly.
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  • I read novels
    January 1, 1970
    The Other Twin was a really pleasure to read with the unexpected twists that appeared that I was not expecting at all which gave me thrill to read. Every one that likes reading a psychological thriller I recommend this book to you. It's Christmas and death takes no time off during the holiday season. Poppy's sister is dead. India Rutledge was running away from Brighton Station she fell from a bridge onto a rail track. Poppy hacks into her sisters Facebook and blog in hope that she could find out The Other Twin was a really pleasure to read with the unexpected twists that appeared that I was not expecting at all which gave me thrill to read. Every one that likes reading a psychological thriller I recommend this book to you. It's Christmas and death takes no time off during the holiday season. Poppy's sister is dead. India Rutledge was running away from Brighton Station she fell from a bridge onto a rail track. Poppy hacks into her sisters Facebook and blog in hope that she could find out why her sister died. She digs deeper into who were India's friends then starts to make her own investigations into what they knew about India. A good list of reasons to read The Other Twin its full of twists mixed with scenes about sexuality.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I think the key to a good audio book is a clear and concise narrator, which The Other Twin has with Kate Rawson. Ms Rawson is very careful to keep up with the ever changing voices of the characters. Next of course is having a meaty storyline to keep you engaged. Again that box is ticked, Lucy V Hay works wonders at leading the reader down a dark, gritty and heart thumping road. It’s incredible that this is Lucy’s debut novel, it has a mature and extremely well-written style and is creatively cle I think the key to a good audio book is a clear and concise narrator, which The Other Twin has with Kate Rawson. Ms Rawson is very careful to keep up with the ever changing voices of the characters. Next of course is having a meaty storyline to keep you engaged. Again that box is ticked, Lucy V Hay works wonders at leading the reader down a dark, gritty and heart thumping road. It’s incredible that this is Lucy’s debut novel, it has a mature and extremely well-written style and is creatively clever.I enjoyed the characters, Poppy is certainly memorable. My tiny niggle was that I would have liked to learn more about India. I wish we had a longer prologue with a hint of an emotional connection with Poppy and India. But that is purely a personal preference.We spend time with Poppy as she fights to find out if and why India committed suicide, not a spoiler, it’s on the book jacket. It’s nice to have a strong female as the main protagonist. Poppy is no push over and you will enjoy her journey.I wouldn’t delay in buying this for a friend. Orenda has a knack for finding top notch writers with the ability to take us on haunting, terrifying and bare knuckle adventures and with The Other Twin and Lucy V Hay they have done it again.
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  • Tracy Fenton
    January 1, 1970
    The Other Twin is an impressive debut novel which has had some great reviews and lots of talk amongst bloggers and readers, so I was delighted to receive an early copy from the publisher.The central character Poppy, who is estranged from her family heads home to Brighton when her younger sister India falls from a bridge in what appears to be a suicide. Despite having almost no contact with her family over the past five years Poppy believes her sister was murdered and starts her own investigation The Other Twin is an impressive debut novel which has had some great reviews and lots of talk amongst bloggers and readers, so I was delighted to receive an early copy from the publisher.The central character Poppy, who is estranged from her family heads home to Brighton when her younger sister India falls from a bridge in what appears to be a suicide. Despite having almost no contact with her family over the past five years Poppy believes her sister was murdered and starts her own investigation.Whilst this is happening, a parallel story featuring an unnamed women and man who are obviously rather disturbed and twisted is running throughout the story and towards the end all begins to make sense.There were some really interesting characters that personally I would have liked to read more of and perhaps understand their actions including Jenny and India. The story left me with more questions than answers unfortunately but overall I enjoyed it and definitely would read more from this author.3.5 stars from me.
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  • Carol Peace
    January 1, 1970
    Poppy is travelling home to her sisters funeral, her mum had finally got hold of her to let her know that India had fallen from a railway bridge. The concensus was that India had committed suicide but Poppy just cannot understand why that would happen and she is determined to get to the bottom of her sisters death but where does she start? She tries to connect with old friends and her slightly disjointed family but it seems people are lying to her but why? After hacking her sisters laptop she kn Poppy is travelling home to her sisters funeral, her mum had finally got hold of her to let her know that India had fallen from a railway bridge. The concensus was that India had committed suicide but Poppy just cannot understand why that would happen and she is determined to get to the bottom of her sisters death but where does she start? She tries to connect with old friends and her slightly disjointed family but it seems people are lying to her but why? After hacking her sisters laptop she knows that 'Jenny' was a friend but it seems no one knows her but Poppy is going nowhere and is determined to find out what happened.Thank you to https://www.lovereading.co.uk/ for my copy of this very good debut book.
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  • Emma Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    My full review will be on my blog, www.emmathelittlebookworm.wordpress.com on the 1st July I have been a fan of Lucy V Hay's Bang2Write website for AGES! She offers the most amazing advice to authors and script writes and she is one of the nicest people I have met in this bookish world, so when I heard that she was writing a book, I was so bloody excited!!!! I could not wait!!!And then it arrived on my kindle at around 10.30 p.m. one evening.I dropped everything, got myself settled in bed with a My full review will be on my blog, www.emmathelittlebookworm.wordpress.com on the 1st July I have been a fan of Lucy V Hay's Bang2Write website for AGES! She offers the most amazing advice to authors and script writes and she is one of the nicest people I have met in this bookish world, so when I heard that she was writing a book, I was so bloody excited!!!! I could not wait!!!And then it arrived on my kindle at around 10.30 p.m. one evening.I dropped everything, got myself settled in bed with a brew and some bourbon creams and I started.Five hours later I was still there, quite literally holding my eyes open with one hand and holding my kindle in the other!!!The Other Twin is one of the most amazing books you will ever read, the characters will stay with me forever. They are perfectly written, completely engaging and the whole book is just a work of such perfection, its hard to believe it's Hay's first novel.I needed a ciggie when I finally finished! It is a complete SLEEP STEALER!!!You will not be able to so ANYTHING once you have started so make sure you don't have any plans/responsibilities when you start it!Now, I'm kicking the blog tour off for this one on the 1st July but it is available and I just needed to share a little of my thoughts on it now, my full review will be posted on the tour!GO AND BUY THIS BOOK NOW!!!!!!!!!!
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    To read all my book reviews, plus author interviews, guest posts and book extracts, visit my blog: https://whatcathyreadnext.wordpress.com/The apparent suicide of her younger sister, India, forces Poppy to return to her hometown of Brighton to support her devastated family. Despite what everyone else says, Poppy is convinced India would never have committed suicide. Embarking on her own private investigation, Poppy attempts to piece together the events in the months leading up to her sister’s de To read all my book reviews, plus author interviews, guest posts and book extracts, visit my blog: https://whatcathyreadnext.wordpress.com/The apparent suicide of her younger sister, India, forces Poppy to return to her hometown of Brighton to support her devastated family. Despite what everyone else says, Poppy is convinced India would never have committed suicide. Embarking on her own private investigation, Poppy attempts to piece together the events in the months leading up to her sister’s death using posts from India’s blog, online chat exchanges and social media contacts. Alongside these very contemporary sources, Poppy also tries to question the people who knew India – including the mysterious Jenny – but comes up against either obfuscation or downright hostility.‘Confusion clouds my mind. Every time I think I have the thread of a revelation, it unravels on me again and pulls me even deeper into its tangled web.’As events unfold and Poppy gets closer to the truth of what happened – uncomfortably close from the point of view of those involved – she realises she may be placing herself in danger as well as she begins to wonder whether there is anyone she can trust.‘And now, it’s as if I’m standing back, taking in the entire picture, comprehending, at last, how each piece fits together.’It turns out there are some family secrets that people will do anything to keep hidden. The reader gets a sense of this early on as the story of Poppy’s investigation is interspersed with scenes between an unidentified man and woman that have a disturbing undercurrent of aggression, misogyny and coercion. The backdrop to the story is Brighton with the pristine houses of the well-to-do juxtaposed with the much seedier, rundown side of the town. It’s a far cry from Poppy’s childhood memories of arcades and funfairs.The standout element of the book for me was not so much the unravelling of the mystery of what happened to India, although this was well-plotted and satisfyingly resolved, but the character of Poppy. Not that she’s easy to like with her messy personal life of alcohol-fuelled one night stands and failed relationships, untidy flat and money worries following redundancy from what was only a supply teaching contract not a permanent job. (I would have to say the one wrong note is that Poppy seems a very unlikely teacher.) The author skilfully creates a believable picture of a troubled young woman with her own personal demons. Whereas India comes across as a free spirit, Poppy seems more like a lost soul, still acting like she’s eighteen although she’s actually thirty-one.As we learn more about Poppy’s past it appears her obsession with finding out the truth about her sister’s death is partly driven by guilt – guilt at her estrangement from her family, guilt at abandoning her ex-boyfriend, Matthew, at a time when he needed her most. In her move to London, it seems not only did Poppy attempt to separate herself geographically from her unhappy memories but psychologically as well. Ironically, as Poppy delves deeper into the circumstances around her sister’s death, the family she relied on to be a refuge is revealed to be much less secure and cohesive than first appeared. Secrets and lies are everywhere and Poppy is finally forced to confront the bad decisions of the past.I received a review copy courtesy of publishers, Orenda Books, in return for an honest and unbiased review.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    Now it’s been a while since I have enthused about a book to the degree that seems relevant for The Other Twin. I could simply say the entire story is freakin’ awesome and leave it there but that would be an injustice to an incredibly well crafted tale.Lucy has written a novel that will lure you in and keep you guessing until the end, there are so many angles to trace that I found it impossible to reach a conclusion and the end when you finally reach it blew me away.Poppy gets a call (after many Now it’s been a while since I have enthused about a book to the degree that seems relevant for The Other Twin. I could simply say the entire story is freakin’ awesome and leave it there but that would be an injustice to an incredibly well crafted tale.Lucy has written a novel that will lure you in and keep you guessing until the end, there are so many angles to trace that I found it impossible to reach a conclusion and the end when you finally reach it blew me away.Poppy gets a call (after many missed calls, texts etc) from her mother who simply says it’s your sister. India is the younger sister of Poppy, the two haven’t kept in touch too much since Poppy moved away and now she gets the news India is dead, she has fallen from a bridge, suicide?While that is the consensus of opinion Poppy dismisses it as crap .. India wouldn’t take her own life, so Poppy embarks on a trail of discovery to prove it.This journey includes gaining access to India’s laptop, finding her blog and trying to decipher the cryptic messages and users. There appears to be a whole side of India that Poppy and the family have no clue about. Set in the dark, edgy side of Brighton the location gives the perfect backdrop for the LGBT influences. I know the area well and Lucy really gets under the skin of the atmosphere. I could read it and instinctively picture where she was describing.The crushing truths that are uncovered amongst the families involved, so many secrets that threaten to destroy lives is intense. This explores how far a person will really go to protect another. If you want dysfunctional family circumstances then this book has it in spades!I am fascinated by the twin aspect and at first I couldn’t make a connection with the information available but as time goes on all becomes clear. The immediacy of the social media action makes it feel as though the story is evolving ‘real-time’ and is another genius addition to the writing. While there are mentions throughout of ‘suicide’ and LGBT I don’t think I need to raise any *trigger* warnings because it is an integral part of the story and in no way explicit.There are so many elements to The Other Twin but I don’t want to spoil the enjoyment or sense of realisation for anyone .. all I will say is get a copy today and find out for yourself you really won’t regret it! Packed full of tension, emotion, diversity it is like a breath of fresh air and it’s fair to say the complexity of this book will haunt me for quite some time. Absolutely stunning!Yet again Orenda have given me something new and exciting and I thank them and Lucy for my copy which I reviewed voluntarily. I cannot wait to see what comes next from this author.
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  • Noelle
    January 1, 1970
    Starting in London, but mainly set in Brighton, The Other Twin is a book of manipulation; mind-games; anger; regrets; deceit;the before & after; betrayal; loss; grief; lies; destruction and family dynamics/relationships.Oh man! When I started this book I was immediately hooked – my brain was buzzing with the who? what? where? when and why’s?! I then got a little confused – my poor wee brain – but once I found my bearings… wow….what a ride! I read this book in one sitting as I just could not Starting in London, but mainly set in Brighton, The Other Twin is a book of manipulation; mind-games; anger; regrets; deceit;the before & after; betrayal; loss; grief; lies; destruction and family dynamics/relationships.Oh man! When I started this book I was immediately hooked – my brain was buzzing with the who? what? where? when and why’s?! I then got a little confused – my poor wee brain – but once I found my bearings… wow….what a ride! I read this book in one sitting as I just could not put it down. The story-line was brilliant and really kept me on my toes.This book was rich with some superb characters. The main character- Poppy, returns to her home town after learning her sister killed herself. Poppy is carefree with a reckless twist, clever and more than determined to find out the truths that others are refusing to see.Matthew- what the heck is his game? I was left wondering where and how he fit into the story; he’s Poppy’s ex and we learn a lot about their relationship as the story unfolds. I honestly did not know what to make of him! Jenny was an extraordinary character-deep, strong, vibrant but full of secrets. I really was drawn to her. Matthew’s parents – Maggie & Alan- were a bit freaky. I wasn’t sure how I felt about them either! It is difficult to talk about the characters, for fear of giving some of this intense story away. I wish I could deconstruct and go through each one of them with you all!I had my own theory about what the story would evolve into – I was wrong and totally off track! The twists were riveting and really added suspense to this book. Would I recommend it? HELL YEAH, I would! If you are looking for an emotive, sexy, sinister, dark and twisted read….you’ll find it in The Other Twin.
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  • Tracy Shephard
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike most readers it took me a while to get into this book..I loved the cover and this is mainly what drew me to it. The Other Twin has some fabulous characters,  Poppy gets a phone call to say her sister India is dead. The Police tell Poppy it was a suicide but Poppy is not convinced so she starts to look at the facts herself. A plot that involves India's online activity is very of the moment, and what proceeds is a very fast paced thriller. There are aspects of this book that I didn't like, Unlike most readers it took me a while to get into this book..I loved the cover and this is mainly what drew me to it. The Other Twin has some fabulous characters,  Poppy gets a phone call to say her sister India is dead. The Police tell Poppy it was a suicide but Poppy is not convinced so she starts to look at the facts herself. A plot that involves India's online activity is very of the moment, and what proceeds is a very fast paced thriller. There are aspects of this book that I didn't like, but that's just me. I really dislike stories that don't feel like escapism, and this is one such book. While it is a good tale, the 'real' life of India, with it's very topical presence didn't really appeal. It's very dark, and shows the seedy side of it's setting in Brighton. The ruination of families with the uncovering of certain secrets kept me reading to the end.Lucy Hay is a good writer and the flow of this book was quite addictive. I really want to see what she has up her sleeve next, but this book wasn't for me unfortunately.
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  • Bibliophile Book Club
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow as part of the blog tour!
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