Sita (Ram Chandra #2)
India, 3400 BCE.India is beset with divisions, resentment and poverty. The people hate their rulers. They despise their corrupt and selfish elite. Chaos is just one spark away. Outsiders exploit these divisions. Raavan, the demon king of Lanka, grows increasingly powerful, sinking his fangs deeper into the hapless Sapt Sindhu. Two powerful tribes, the protectors of the divine land of India, decide that enough is enough. A saviour is needed. They begin their search.An abandoned baby is found in a field. Protected by a vulture from a pack of murderous wolves. She is adopted by the ruler of Mithila, a powerless kingdom, ignored by all. Nobody believes this child will amount to much. But they are wrong. For she is no ordinary girl. She is Sita.Continue the epic journey with Amish’s latest: A thrilling adventure that chronicles the rise of an orphan, who became the prime minister. And then, a Goddess. This is the second book in the Ram Chandra Series. A sequel that takes you back. Back before the beginning.

Sita (Ram Chandra #2) Details

TitleSita (Ram Chandra #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 29th, 2017
PublisherWestland Publication Limited
ISBN-139789386224583
Rating
GenreFantasy, Mythology, Fiction, Asian Literature, Indian Literature, Amish, Cultural, India, Historical, Historical Fiction, Adventure, Novels

Sita (Ram Chandra #2) Review

  • Versha
    January 1, 1970
    Okay why did i even start this book in the first place? Because, I got a free copy of this book and the cover was so tempting that i just thought of giving it a try. My Bad! Usually, I refrain from reading interpretation on our great epics but i thought with a bit of open mindedness i can at least try this out as some fantasy-fiction with no connection to the epic. I kept reminding myself throughout that the Sita in this story is just another character and not Ramayana’s Sita but i failed misera Okay why did i even start this book in the first place? Because, I got a free copy of this book and the cover was so tempting that i just thought of giving it a try. My Bad! Usually, I refrain from reading interpretation on our great epics but i thought with a bit of open mindedness i can at least try this out as some fantasy-fiction with no connection to the epic. I kept reminding myself throughout that the Sita in this story is just another character and not Ramayana’s Sita but i failed miserably. I almost gave up on this when Hanuman met Sita before Rama and gave up on this completely when Hanuman was teased as ‘Hans’ by some character...Really author? Is this your level of interpreting Ramayana ? I really don’t know why Indian authors like to spoil our mythology for the rest of the world? Why can’t they create their own world and use their creativity on that rather than ruining a great epic using their crappy imagination. I had read and enjoyed Meluha book may be because i was unaware of Lord Shiva’s story but, having known, read, watched, Ramayana N-number of times, i just could not digest this book.
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  • Vikalp Trivedi
    January 1, 1970
    I never liked Ramayan (or Ramcharitmanas). The main reason being the treatment of character of Sita . Though I have never read the original Ramayan , I have heard stories and read about Ramayan . Almost in every story Sita's character is depicted firstly as an obedient wife who follows her perspective lacking husband (Ram in my opinion is a character without his own perspective )for a fourteen years exile , than a helpless kidnapped wife waiting for her husband to rescue her , then when her husb I never liked Ramayan (or Ramcharitmanas). The main reason being the treatment of character of Sita . Though I have never read the original Ramayan , I have heard stories and read about Ramayan . Almost in every story Sita's character is depicted firstly as an obedient wife who follows her perspective lacking husband (Ram in my opinion is a character without his own perspective )for a fourteen years exile , than a helpless kidnapped wife waiting for her husband to rescue her , then when her husband rescue her she had to give agnipariksha - trial by fire to prove that she is pure , and later in the epic a woman who is abandoned by her husband to uphold his fake honour.Ironically because of all the things she suffered , Indian people consider her as "Adarsh Bhartiya Nari". The ideal Indian Woman .Indian women are always told to get inspired from Sita . But to be inspired from what - the sufferings she got from the decisions taken by her perspective lacking husband ? Yes , women should be inspired by Sita , but not by Sita characterised by Valmiki or Tulsidas but by Sita characterised by Amish . It was 2012 when Amish changed my view about Lord Shiva and he does it again in 2017 when he changed my perspective about Sita . Great character building infused with a wonderful storyline and enriched with great philosophy , 'Sita - Warrior Of Mithila' is far batter than the first book in the series . The book starts when Sunaina discovers Sita and later follows Sita's journey of becoming an empowered woman . The usage of every character is very apt and all the supporting characters were very well built . Apart from the wonderful character building what I liked most was tension building throughout the book . The internal tussles in the tribes , Raavan's economical exploitation of India , especially the way the rivalry between Vishwamitra and Vashistha used . The pace was very good and was maintained till the end . The twists were at right places some of which are still not completely revealed . The book sets a grand stage for the upcoming books in the series . Needless to say that the writing style was compelling and the new hyperlink narrative is impressive .Waiting eagerly for 'Raavan - Orphan Of Aryavarta' . Perfect 5 Stars .
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  • Aditi Dwivedi
    January 1, 1970
    Not at all impressed with this story line and narration. I did the mistake of re-reading Scion of Ikshvaku before starting this one. Half the conversations, plots , narrations are exactly the same.. word to word. Even if I ignore the replication of scenes , narrations from Ikshvaku to Sita ; given that Sita is an (alleged) sequel ; I can not ignore the superficial and unintelligent character build ups and conversations. I found myself holding the book and re-reading few lines just to understand Not at all impressed with this story line and narration. I did the mistake of re-reading Scion of Ikshvaku before starting this one. Half the conversations, plots , narrations are exactly the same.. word to word. Even if I ignore the replication of scenes , narrations from Ikshvaku to Sita ; given that Sita is an (alleged) sequel ; I can not ignore the superficial and unintelligent character build ups and conversations. I found myself holding the book and re-reading few lines just to understand author's need of accommodating them but I just could not understand the need of ingenuous conversations among our revered mythological figures. May be my cause of disappointment has to do with my expectations from the author of famous Shiva trilogy ! I still would be waiting for the other 2 books of this series , something to do with the faith in author. Fingers crossed !
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  • Shreya Vaid
    January 1, 1970
    Twisting the delicate fabric of an epic and then writing it down to suit the modern times is a tough task. But Amish Tripathi has always been brilliant in this genre. In his recent novel, Sita: Warrior of Mithila, he has yet again given a new life and meaning to a celebrated character of Ramayana. In the prequel of the book, Scion of Ikshvaku, Amish was not able to convince the audience that much. Has Sita done that job?Since the beginning of time, Sita has been celebrated as an ideal wife, one Twisting the delicate fabric of an epic and then writing it down to suit the modern times is a tough task. But Amish Tripathi has always been brilliant in this genre. In his recent novel, Sita: Warrior of Mithila, he has yet again given a new life and meaning to a celebrated character of Ramayana. In the prequel of the book, Scion of Ikshvaku, Amish was not able to convince the audience that much. Has Sita done that job?Since the beginning of time, Sita has been celebrated as an ideal wife, one who follows her husband, even gives a character test to the world by burning herself. We have been listening to stories about how she was kidnapped, how she kept faith in her husband. But Amish's Sita is not the typical Sita we know.She is the Princess of Mithila, and a warrior, and The Chosen Vishnu who will eradicate the world from all devilish elements, including Raavan. When I started with the book, it seemed like a regular story of Sita's background, but when it reached the point where she was chosen to lead the Vayuputras and Malayaputras in a war towards Raavan, I sat up straight in my chair, awestruck and silently applauding the genius, Amish Tripathi, for bringing out such a different side of this celebrated woman.In Sita: The Warrior of Mithila, you also get to read the background of the Ikshavaku series. How two powerful tribes, protectors of the divine land of India came together to find the one who would eradicate the land of all devils and diseases. How Guru Vishvamitra and Guru Vashishtha parted ways, and cannot see eye to eye. You get to meet a new Ram, a true Kshatriya but with a feminist point of view, who doesn't mind if Sita is the Chosen Vishnu. Even when Sita shares the secret with him, he shows trust and shares that if required, he will follow her lead towards their ultimate goal in life. You get to meet Hanuman, who is a silent protecting shadow, and Jatayu, who is entitled to Ram and Sita's protection during their exile in Dandak forest but has a dark past. There's Bali, who is hurt during a Jallikattu program when Ram and Lakshman try to save him. You also get to meet Maya, the coolest Assasin I've come across ever since I started reading mytho-fiction!For me, Sita: Warrior of Mithila started out as perfect read. But slowly and gradually as I was nearing the climax, I could feel my interest go down in the story. The magic of Amish's writing was not completely there. Something somewhere was definitely missing, maybe because I was reading the same chapters which I have read before in Scion of Ikshvaku?I understand that some of the chapters were important to be placed so that if somebody who hasn't read Scion of Ikshvaku, could pick up Sita: Warrior of Mithila and enjoy it thoroughly. But what about people who have ardently read the first part and had to go through the same chapters again?Also, the structural detail of ancient cities has always been there in Amish's writing which is important for a reader to imagine the whole background setting where the scene is taking place. However, too much of structural detail may also make the reader lose interest in the story. And that's what happened with me.I would have loved to know this new Sita more, but somehow she got lost in the narration which was generally dominated by discussion on law, governance, and morality.All in all, Sita: Warrior of Mithila is a good book that could have been great! It can definitely win a spot on your summer reading list. I had huge expectations out of it, especially after how the first part went. I won't say that I absolutely detested it, but something could have been done.Now I am really looking forward to Raavan: Orphan of Aryavarta since the first look and chapter of the book is thrilling, and I am silently praying that please let the third part be a 5* for me.
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  • Ashish Iyer
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing book. Waited so long for this book. As always book Amish's books are very interesting. Book started with a suspense which will be uncovered in Raavan (next book). I found this book better than previous one. I don't know why some readers are comparing with other version of Ramayana. This book is Amish's interpretation of Ramayana. The author has exemplary built the structure of linear story-telling, linking incidents from the 'Scion of Ikshvaku', and running both the books paralle What an amazing book. Waited so long for this book. As always book Amish's books are very interesting. Book started with a suspense which will be uncovered in Raavan (next book). I found this book better than previous one. I don't know why some readers are comparing with other version of Ramayana. This book is Amish's interpretation of Ramayana. The author has exemplary built the structure of linear story-telling, linking incidents from the 'Scion of Ikshvaku', and running both the books parallel to each other. This book might be a let down for some readers, because there is some repetition from the book 1 because both books(story) are going in parallel. The story is very interesting and the book focuses on the power of women. The portrayal of Sita, as the prime minister of Mithila, was portrayed an independent, brave and self-righteous woman. While in the previous book Scion of Ikshvaku, Amish try to explore this question: What is an ideal society? And in that case too, the answer is not so simple. Amish's point of view is so believable and practical. There are many mystery still left unanswered . Especially about Maharshi Vishistha and Vishwamitra, Nandini and Samichi.A revelation is made at the end of the book. Waiting for book 3 Raavan Orphan of Aryavarta.
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  • Avinash
    January 1, 1970
    "Below expectations" and that's not good at all as my expectations were already low after reading the first book of the series. I think the biggest drawback of this series is RAMAYANA itself. No... I am not criticizing Ramayana, in fact it’s the exact opposite. Ramayana is no doubt the most followed and most famous creation ever in INDIA but it has a definite start, certain set of characters and a definite end as well. Now in my opinion these factors probably acted as the limitations for Amish, "Below expectations" and that's not good at all as my expectations were already low after reading the first book of the series. I think the biggest drawback of this series is RAMAYANA itself. No... I am not criticizing Ramayana, in fact it’s the exact opposite. Ramayana is no doubt the most followed and most famous creation ever in INDIA but it has a definite start, certain set of characters and a definite end as well. Now in my opinion these factors probably acted as the limitations for Amish, which wasn't the case with SHIVA Trilogy.SHIVA is ETERNAL, INFINITE; He neither took birth nor does he die. He exists in every timeline so he is not limited to any one particular story arc. This gave Amish the freedom and flexibility which is almost impossible with any other mythological character. Because of this he was able to choose and develop the plot as per his ideas without much of a limitation. This also gave him the possibility to include some other well known mythological characters such as Brhaspati, Bhrigu, Kali, Parashurama etc. Plus I think the “Mytho+Fiction” concept was quite refreshing when he wrote Shiva trilogy but since then it's been explored by numerous writers so it has lost its charm quite a bit. Anyway, all the above mentioned factors collectively made Shiva trilogy what it is today. Now with this series though Amish can take the creative liberty but he is bound to follow the bigger picture, important characters and their final destiny. This not only takes away the critical surprise element but also the uniqueness or freshness a long series requires.Having said all these I think Amish still could have done a better job. The idea of putting half of the story in three different novels with different characters' perspective is okay if you have that much to elaborate, which isn't the case with these initial two parts. It stretched the series unnecessarily and few pages or sometimes the minor details felt forced and quite boring. I think it would have been much better if he had put Sita and Ram's story in a single book as they are closely linked, especially Sita's Swayamvar onwards. After that the story is same in both the books including dialogues, just the Point-Of-View is different. Thankfully there is a gap of almost 2 years between the two books so the repetitions are not that annoying. But at the same time it’s not a good thing for some small events which were kind of incomplete in the first book and got completed in this book. (view spoiler)[Such as Makrant's injury and cure, Sita and Ram's conversation about Guru Vishwamitra and next Vishu etc. (hide spoiler)]I can digest the idea of narrating the story with Ravan's POV as it will be quite different but I think Amish missed the trick by dividing Sita and Ram's story in two separate books. It made some important events boring after 1st description, for example - now we have to read Ravan's participation in Sita's Swayamvar for the third time in next book. Similarly just imagine reading the event of Sita Haran for the 5th and 6th time in next book as it was mention twice (in first and last chapters) in both the books. That's a complete waste of a lot many pages.Ironically this is not the only complain I have with this book. The book is very slow paced and there aren't enough twists and turns to keep you invested. The supposed twist in the last page was quite obvious and doesn’t make any impact. Since the timeline of this series is prior to that of SHIVA trilogy we already know some answers which could have been interesting otherwise. I literally had to force myself to finish this one and I really hope that the series would pick up from here otherwise I may have to leave it unfinished.
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  • Avanthika
    January 1, 1970
    If thinking out of box is an art, Amish is definitely Picasso of it.Entire India idolizes Sita, and women of India are reminded time and again to be pure, devoted and all-suffering like Sita.Amish's sita has got an aura of self-respect and confidence for herself. Sita is neither a silent martyr nor she is a victim. Loved the entire plot!Looking forward to read more about the orphan of Aryavarta.
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  • Rahul Khatri
    January 1, 1970
    * Check-Out my Insta page, full of books, -> Instagram.com/FoodieBibliophileRuns with the Speed of FGFA !!!After the long wait of 2 years, finally yesterday, "Sita - Warrior Of Mithila " was delivered to me ( at 1556 hours ) and I started the book in the late evening and wrapped it in a single sitting. Like the spell bounded the first installment of the Ram Chandra Series, Sita-Warrior of Mithila "reads with the speed tantamount to any fifth-generation fighter jet. The depiction of a woman wa * Check-Out my Insta page, full of books, -> Instagram.com/FoodieBibliophileRuns with the Speed of FGFA !!!After the long wait of 2 years, finally yesterday, "Sita - Warrior Of Mithila " was delivered to me ( at 1556 hours ) and I started the book in the late evening and wrapped it in a single sitting. Like the spell bounded the first installment of the Ram Chandra Series, Sita-Warrior of Mithila "reads with the speed tantamount to any fifth-generation fighter jet. The depiction of a woman warrior justifies the title of the book.Plot launched with Sita's fighting spirit while her abduction but after the initial chapter, the story went back to the making of the Sita as the warrior princess. And before I write further, let me get one thing clear: Ram Chandra Series is delineated on the epic Ramayana and major anecdotes are taken from it but Amish, as we expect, have weaved a world of fantasy on the basis of that outline.Subsequent floods had changed the course of river Gandaki, which earlier flows from Mithila, and the rains also failed which caused huge economic damage to Mithila. But Mithila's loss was Sankashya's gain. Mithila was ruled by a devout and spiritual man named Janak who's married to a pragmatic woman Sunaina while the kingdom of Sankashya was ruled by Janak's younger brother Kushadhwaj. But the woes like rainfall-failure makes the Kushadhwaj rose in stature as the de facto representative of the clan of Mithi. After seeking the blessings of Kanyakumari , Child Goddess, Janak and Sunaina came across a quaint scene. An injured vulture was surrounded by the pack of wolves and watching this unfair act of aggression, Sunaina spurred her horse to protect the bird and from some distance that the vulture was protecting a baby from the pack of the wolves.Goading her horses into a fierce gallop, Sunaina pressed forward to protect the child and the vulture. Sunaina's arrival scared the wolves to run away and with an approval from Janak, that abandoned child was named as Sita çause she was found in a furrow in Mother Earth and raised as the princess of Mithila. Unlike other princesses, Sita was made to study not just science and philosophy but also learned the martial arts and warfare combat. Later Sita was nurtured as the person who will play a crucial role in making India as the brightest nation again. And in her quest to complete her mission, she chose Ram as her partner. Sita ruled with pragmatism while Ram sticked to the laws. In sita, Ram found an "Ardhangini ", a life-partner who wishes to bring the glory to India. As wrote above, Amish has re-introduced Sita but with highlighting evils that are dwelling in our society against the woman. For instance the following conversation between Sunaina and Janak, "Sunaina looked at her husband and smiled as she caressed the baby's head. 'How can anyone abandon a child like her ?' Janak Sighed. 'Many People are not wise enough to count life's blessing. They keep focusing instead on what the world has denied them '", depicts the unfortunate truth of Indian societies in which Girl child are abandoned. Although many women have achieved what men failed to but in some societies girl child is still considered as an ill omen and Amish has rightly depicted how a girl child is a blessing.Apart from raising the tacit issue that Woman should be treated equally, Amish has bolted anecdotes that remind the citizens of their individual duties towards the Nation. In our urban society, there is a very common myth that poor are usually bad and avaricious people but Amish has bolted some logical words that will make readers understand that why and how, many times, a poor man is forced to be indulged in crime. "The Criminals among the rich are mostly driven by greed. One can negotiate with greed. But the criminals among the poor are driven by desperation and anger. Desperation can sometimes bring out the best in a human being. That's why the poor can often be noble. But desperation can also bring out the worst. They have nothing to lose.......But we should not be blind and assume that all poor are noble. Not everyone has the spirit to keep their character strong when their stomachs are angry. " said Sunaina while giving governing lessons to her daughter, Sita. Bitter relation of Vashishta & Vishwamitra, as well, keep the plot completely gripping part from the philosophical talks that are mentioned above.
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  • Sudeep
    January 1, 1970
    This is what happens when you write for money and without passion, and surrounded by Yes men. This is a lame attempt of an age old story trying to be retold to the pop culture of today. Amish trying desperately to connect to today's youth has gone way too far and stretched the story however he wants by introducing Nirbhaya case and Jalikattu into Ramayana., which was unnecessary and is totally lazy on his part.Calling Hanuman as Hanu and Hans, calling Shurpanaka as shurpu, using the reference an This is what happens when you write for money and without passion, and surrounded by Yes men. This is a lame attempt of an age old story trying to be retold to the pop culture of today. Amish trying desperately to connect to today's youth has gone way too far and stretched the story however he wants by introducing Nirbhaya case and Jalikattu into Ramayana., which was unnecessary and is totally lazy on his part.Calling Hanuman as Hanu and Hans, calling Shurpanaka as shurpu, using the reference and stating ' Manthara is not interested in the (... wait for it) Game of thrones is way to far fetched and cringe worthy. Amish with this book is as cringe worthy as a drunk middle age uncle at a wedding dancing and talking rubbish using the teen lingo he had heard somewhere to impress his teenage nephew and nieces 😬😬😬
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  • Gowtham Sidharth
    January 1, 1970
    Too many forces are in play, forces you can't control, forces beyond your reach, the god of fire, one true God, Iraiva, the malayaputhras,vayuputhras,vaanars, kumbakarna, Raavan, ram, sita, and much more. the book opens with a shocking truth, new Vishnu had been chosen and it's not ram. Amish is back with his second installment of Ramchandra series, sita warrior of mithila, and it is brilliant. There has been many retelling of Ramayana especially sita's perspective, but all tried to make her a v Too many forces are in play, forces you can't control, forces beyond your reach, the god of fire, one true God, Iraiva, the malayaputhras,vayuputhras,vaanars, kumbakarna, Raavan, ram, sita, and much more. the book opens with a shocking truth, new Vishnu had been chosen and it's not ram. Amish is back with his second installment of Ramchandra series, sita warrior of mithila, and it is brilliant. There has been many retelling of Ramayana especially sita's perspective, but all tried to make her a victim, even those with feminist views cornered sita, giving her no choice. but this book is not about retelling the old epic, its about rewriting with common sense. The whole book is lined with strong female characters from sita's mother, her friends samichi, radika, her mother in law koushalya. there comes a time when all the characters must choose a path or make a decision that will change their life and karma. This book serves as an origin story for sita. her journey from being adopted by sunanina and Janak and her path to becoming the next Vishnu and ends in the abduction by Raavan. This is the sita, classical literature forgot to show, not as a sweet innocent damsel but a brave fierce ferocious warrior. This is Amish own version of sita, not the one you have read or seen in movies. The story has a hyperlink narrative and it doesn't matter which book you read first, each is meant to be a standalone book. as a writer Amish had evolved so much when looking back to "immortals of mehula". he carried so such stuff and storylines maintaining the balance with each other. The book has a foundation layer that is all about freedom and rules. on which Amish build Ramayan with three hyperlinked stories that conclude at one point and all these are made to fits in his Shiva trilogy universe. he reinvented many ideas in terms of scientific and logical way. there is a mystery throughout the book which made it intriguing and page-turning. Writing is nonlinear, language is simple and compelling when needs to be, I do get the feeling that one should read Shiva trilogy to understand the Ramchandra series better even though both are meant to be a separate series. many concepts has been explained in Shiva trilogy which isn't done in Ramchandra, for example, prahars I don't like the portrayal of vaali, he's a big deal in original Ramayana, but he had just a few pages and one dialogue in this book, I really hope he will return in upcoming books. Overall the book is so compelling, has so many characters, so many storylines, so many mysteries, so many questions, can't wait for next installment and I'm going to read again the scion of ikshvaku.P.S : As a tamizhan, i want to thank amish for explaining the difference between jallikattu and wester bull fight in a most elegant way possible.For more reviews : http://readersrejoice.blogspot.in/
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  • Tanvi
    January 1, 1970
    *3.25 out of 5 starsI'm pretty disappointed with this one so I'll keep it short:- It wasn't as engaging as the first book had been. - There were several times when entire paragraphs and scenes seemed to have been copy-pasted from the first book word for word - it was super annoying. - Around halfway through, I started skimming because otherwise, I would have taken another couple of days to get through it or have DNF'd it. :( - The writing was kind of juvenile, like the first one. Didn't wow me.- *3.25 out of 5 starsI'm pretty disappointed with this one so I'll keep it short:- It wasn't as engaging as the first book had been. - There were several times when entire paragraphs and scenes seemed to have been copy-pasted from the first book word for word - it was super annoying. - Around halfway through, I started skimming because otherwise, I would have taken another couple of days to get through it or have DNF'd it. :( - The writing was kind of juvenile, like the first one. Didn't wow me.- Things did pick up a bit towards the end and I'm curious about certain events and characters so I may continue on with the series but I'm not holding my breath. This might be one of my harshest reviews yet but I really had high hopes with this one and it was quite underwhelming. I also lost over 4 days of this month trying to read this book and that makes me mad because it isn't even that long and it wasn't worth spending 4 days on. :/So, anyway, I might change the rating later for both the books but for now, they were just okay. And I may read the next one but I don't expect much from it now.
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  • Rohit Sharma
    January 1, 1970
    Amish Tripathi and Ashwin Sanghi are the two guys because of whom I started reading mythological fictions big time and have actually discovered some really fantastic books (Palace of Illusions and Karna's wife). Shiva Trilogy (from Amish) was a fantastic read, no doubt, first being the best and second still was able to hold my interest unfortunately the third one didn't work (wonders) but when I heard him writing another couple of books on Ramayan, I was excited. The prequel to this one (Sita) w Amish Tripathi and Ashwin Sanghi are the two guys because of whom I started reading mythological fictions big time and have actually discovered some really fantastic books (Palace of Illusions and Karna's wife). Shiva Trilogy (from Amish) was a fantastic read, no doubt, first being the best and second still was able to hold my interest unfortunately the third one didn't work (wonders) but when I heard him writing another couple of books on Ramayan, I was excited. The prequel to this one (Sita) was "Scion of ikshvaku" was a good read I will say but the way he finished it and kept the readers hanging asking for more (a closure) which again unfortunately doesn't come in the shape of Sita as this book exactly ends at the same point where the first one ended, how sad it is. Why? because he wants to make it a trilogy or may be a fourology or something. Sita for first is a drag just because he has to write the whole book on her character - he tries his level best to make it interesting which it isn't. He has actually tempered so much with the Epic that it doesn't even works like a fiction even for someone as easy to please as me who loves fictions. This was a complete disaster, although he has tried all the tricks in the trade to shatter the image of Sita I had in my mind but no ways I am going to remember this book six months down the line nor I will recommend it to anyone. Yes, he is definitely going the Chetan Bhagat way by writing a book which can be made into a superb action movie starring Angelina Jolie (Tomb Raider minus leather plus cotton and replace guns with knives) as Sita as no one can do what his Sita does in the book, totally ROFL stuff this is. How much liberty is too much in the name of fiction? that is one question that kept coming to my mind as I kept going forward as I am one of those people who would not leave a book half read, however tuff the book could be or whatever sort of disaster it may turn out to be. But this has some serious crap that I really need to name here like using the words like "Lady Sita" as if I am reading some western epic and then the characters will be mouthing the lines like "You got to do what you got to do". Sita being five years elder then Ram was a revelation if thats true. He has actually made her a superb Warrior in his book and story, not only she is a perfect warrior but she doubles up as an Architect too. If thats not enough he actually lets her do a sort of Chariot race (Gladiator style). Vyomkesh the detective and his stories existed in the then era again was an eye opener of sorts for me (me poor unread soul). Hanuman happens to be Sita's moohn bola brother of sorts and they knew each other prior to Ram developing a connection with the great Hanuman and it doesnt end here can you believe that? Do you remember why Ram, Lakshman and Sita go for 14 years exile? Amish has a different theory for it altogether. If Draupadi can be in love with Karn in a work of fiction why cant Raavan be in love and awe with Sita? He definitely can and so does Amish's Raavan, he has feelings for Sita The Warrior. Shit just keeps getting deeper I tell you. And then they all keep calling the country "India" that was like a WHOA!! Did I read it correctly? Time was already invented as they calculate everything in hours like I will see you in half hour or may be an hour and a half later - my foot. Area names like Kerala, Mizoram, Colaba etc keep popping here there and everywhere. At one point of time imagine they actually go to a place called Mumbadevi the seven island city :) I was so looking forward that he will call it Mumbai but he doesn't. But the best was when Sita meets Ram before marriage mind it and says somethings like "you have got to be joking" I felt like this was some NRI Sita he was talking about and she even says "I love you" to Ram before even she gets married to him. Bravo Amish Tripathi, this is the height of Fiction I should call it. There is this epic line I need to mention before I forget (the entire book) there comes a moment when someone says "Manthra is not interested in game of thrones". Can you beat that? And you know what? Pushpak Viman was actually a 737 Aircraft which can bloody take 100 Lankans for a ride at a time with Raavan and his brother Kumbhakaran on board too. Amish had actually run out of the ideas I guess while writing this one as his detailing had such an uncanny resemblance to the scenic beauty of "Lord of the rings" that I just couldn't believe it. I am sure I will not be the only person pointing this out, the caves, waterfalls, mountains and palaces etc. The similarity was so much that for once I though Mr. Frodo may pop out and ask where he should go to destroy the ring :). This is I guess one of the worst botched up version of an Epic that we all have loved at one point of time. He has made it a joke but yes a thrilling ride but pointless and I am not even looking forward to the final book of the series now which will be based on Raavan. That's going to be another joke I guess as he is going to leave no stone upturned in making him a sort of a Hero. So if you have read this one already, do let me know how you liked it and if you haven't, I guess you should stay away. PS: I was furiously angry while composing the review and I unfortunately do not read again before posting, so please excuse if I have gone overboard.
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  • Pranav Srivatsav
    January 1, 1970
    A major letdown. But the series still keeps me invested Scion of ikshvaku hit a major chord with me, a chord that stood apart from those hit by the shiva trilogy. Because the philosophy had a softer, and a broader tone to it as opposed to the sharper and radical tone adopted in the shiva trilogy. It was the injection of serene flow of themes more than the fantasized storyline that made it satisfying. So naturally I had expected more of the same and much more from the second book of the series. A A major letdown. But the series still keeps me invested Scion of ikshvaku hit a major chord with me, a chord that stood apart from those hit by the shiva trilogy. Because the philosophy had a softer, and a broader tone to it as opposed to the sharper and radical tone adopted in the shiva trilogy. It was the injection of serene flow of themes more than the fantasized storyline that made it satisfying. So naturally I had expected more of the same and much more from the second book of the series. All the broad philosophical themes are still there, the epic vision and imagination still exists but they don't work in harmony. They seem like individual set pieces that don't quite fill up the final storyboard, thus the attempted emotional mileage fell short most of the times and there are supposedly times when Amish dives more into the details, which is fine but you can't help but feel like he is pondering over these details to keep the pieces stitched together, in more straightforward terms, it felt draggy, especially the latter half of the book. But I'm still going to pick up the third book with almost the same enthusiasm, as I like the idea of providing a backdoor to all the three main characters before assembling the final showdown, and I'm genuinely interested in how Amish will be handling the extremely strong and enigmatic character of ravana in the next book, and i think he has thrown in a major clue right at the end with regards to what will be coming between raavana and sita.
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  • Amrutha Pemmaraju
    January 1, 1970
    Sita The warrior of MithilaAmish TripathiGenre- Mythological FictionI have read Amish tripathi’s Shiva Triology 6 years ago. I was quite mesmerised with the first two parts of the series – Meluha and Nagas. Long after, Amish comes up with this Ramachandra series, in which the book sita was hyped by the public as well as the celebrities. I wasn’t sure if I would love his books after 6 years. But the book cover and the title of Sita had attracted and coerced me to snatch the book, read it. The con Sita The warrior of MithilaAmish TripathiGenre- Mythological FictionI have read Amish tripathi’s Shiva Triology 6 years ago. I was quite mesmerised with the first two parts of the series – Meluha and Nagas. Long after, Amish comes up with this Ramachandra series, in which the book sita was hyped by the public as well as the celebrities. I wasn’t sure if I would love his books after 6 years. But the book cover and the title of Sita had attracted and coerced me to snatch the book, read it. The concept of portraying Sita as a warrior and powerful on par with Ram is the most appealing point in this book. The story line seems quite basic. Raavan had already defeated the great Kosala and the kingdom needs revival. The malayaputras and Vayuputras, two major clans should choose a leader and saviour, the ultimate protector of India. Ram and Sita, individually, had been trained for this purpose. I would say that this book doubtlessly, is not a page turner. Few parts of the book got so dull and prolonging. My most cherished part of the book is when Sita meets Ram for the first time. Of course, the characterization of Ram, even in bits and pieces was described to the mark. That moment when Sita realises her love for Ram leaves you splendid. The Indian Geography and the social issues were well depicted. Most importantly, the jallikattu festival, which was so much in news (a controversy) was very well explained. Over all it was mediocre read.
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  • Sankalpita (bookGeeks India)
    January 1, 1970
    Amish has certainly redefined the way India will look at its beloved Goddess. This according to me is the most fascinating and unparalleled achievement of this book.Read the detailed review here - http://www.bookgeeks.in/sita-warrior-...
  • Shifad
    January 1, 1970
    The second instalment in Ram chandra series has sweetened plot. This was a riveting read for me. The potrayal of Sita as a warrior is one of the least surprise the book has to offer. Eventhough the time line of this book is same as that of the first book, it was still a thrill to watch these forming a complimentary pair. This book was the viewpoint of sacred faminine incarnate. I certainly enjoyed the hyperlink story telling technique and am transfixed at the ease with the author handles the st The second instalment in Ram chandra series has sweetened plot. This was a riveting read for me. The potrayal of Sita as a warrior is one of the least surprise the book has to offer. Eventhough the time line of this book is same as that of the first book, it was still a thrill to watch these forming a complimentary pair. This book was the viewpoint of sacred faminine incarnate. I certainly enjoyed the hyperlink story telling technique and am transfixed at the ease with the author handles the story.I am eagerly waiting for the next instalment - Raavan, The orphan of aryavartha. The title has already animated my interest. Eagerly waiting!Jai Lord Rudra!Jai Lord Parashuram!
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  • Swagat Siddhartha
    January 1, 1970
    Reading the most famous stories of Hindu mythology from a female perspective can be fun, unfortunately Sita:Warrior of Mithila is only the second one I have come across (Palace of Illusion being the first one). The writing is simple and some pages explore the theme of philosophy just like Amish's other books. The story telling is better than the first book but for the obvious reason that we do not know much about Sita so every page breathes a new perspectiveHe once again devotes an entire chapte Reading the most famous stories of Hindu mythology from a female perspective can be fun, unfortunately Sita:Warrior of Mithila is only the second one I have come across (Palace of Illusion being the first one). The writing is simple and some pages explore the theme of philosophy just like Amish's other books. The story telling is better than the first book but for the obvious reason that we do not know much about Sita so every page breathes a new perspectiveHe once again devotes an entire chapter to highlight one of the most debated issue in India last year (Last book in the series has the Nirbhaya incident ) which I am not a fan off, he becomes too direct and almost writes a story within a story just show his stance on the issue!Overall a good and a quick read 4/5.
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  • Maittri
    January 1, 1970
    A retelling of one of the greatest Indian Epics and with a feminist spin. What could go wrong? I thought that too but this book failed to stir anything stronger than luke-warm feelings. The novel started out great and Sita's character was dealt with finesse. She is portrayed as smart and skilled with weapons. The ultimate heroine. As the story progressed, I just lost interest with all the unnecessary explanations and sermons regarding politics. The story came to a standstill and only started mov A retelling of one of the greatest Indian Epics and with a feminist spin. What could go wrong? I thought that too but this book failed to stir anything stronger than luke-warm feelings. The novel started out great and Sita's character was dealt with finesse. She is portrayed as smart and skilled with weapons. The ultimate heroine. As the story progressed, I just lost interest with all the unnecessary explanations and sermons regarding politics. The story came to a standstill and only started moving with the swayamavara. I loved reading about Ram's perspective when he met Sita but this time, it just felt... boring. I appreciated Sita's intelligence and how she handled the exile and the ending was a strong four-star. But overall, this book just disappointed me.I have high hopes for its sequel, with the perspective being Raavan's, "the villain". (I think I know where the story will go).3 stars.
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  • Gayatri, eine Leseratte
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating- 3.5 starsRTC
  • Guttu
    January 1, 1970
    I am utterly disappointed after reading this book. There is absolutely nothing new to this book other than the first and last chapter. The major twists as the author says. There is a sense of Deja Vu throughout reading this book. If you have read the Shiva Trilogy, Then a lot from those book has been put into this Ramchandra series. And this book, You feel like you are reading the first part. To get the exact sense of this, Try reading the books back to back. One of the laughable things is that I am utterly disappointed after reading this book. There is absolutely nothing new to this book other than the first and last chapter. The major twists as the author says. There is a sense of Deja Vu throughout reading this book. If you have read the Shiva Trilogy, Then a lot from those book has been put into this Ramchandra series. And this book, You feel like you are reading the first part. To get the exact sense of this, Try reading the books back to back. One of the laughable things is that author has tried to put the current burning issues in the book as if they would happen in that era. The repeated conversations on caste system, love of Indians to break the laws, freedom of speech, taking a dig at Modi(the leadership) , the hunger for war... Etc.. You aren't writing a contemporary novel but a retelling of an epic. He forgot this while writing the book. I did not expect this from the author. I hope he brings some novelty in next books. The 2 stars are only because of the writing style which keeps you engaged irrespective of the weak storyline.
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  • Uttara Srinivasan
    January 1, 1970
    As a nation, we don’t hold our superstars responsible or accountable for their craft. Movie stars, politicians, cricketers – name your hero and see how much you have allowed him or her to get away with. What is specifically of import here is his/her complete dismissal of his/her audience’s intelligence. Amish Tripathi – one of our literary superstars – is just as fortunate if not more. I am but one individual and probably not even the demographic that Amish caters to. But the power of expression As a nation, we don’t hold our superstars responsible or accountable for their craft. Movie stars, politicians, cricketers – name your hero and see how much you have allowed him or her to get away with. What is specifically of import here is his/her complete dismissal of his/her audience’s intelligence. Amish Tripathi – one of our literary superstars – is just as fortunate if not more. I am but one individual and probably not even the demographic that Amish caters to. But the power of expression (can’t call it freedom, that’s risky) is well, a powerful tool. And I am about to use it to the best of my ability.The retelling of Indian mythology through a fictionalized account germinating from the author’s imagination is a difficult journey. And no one, not even a disillusioned supporter of a brilliant first book, can deny the creativity, imagination and conceptualization that the author of the Shiva trilogy and the Ram Chandra quartet (?) has leveraged, even effectively for the most part. I am not even going to lament the fact that the Ram Chandra books leverage a lot more of the Shiva trilogy universe than they seem to build up to it. I even laud the fact that there is an undeniable thread of feminism that runs through this story and it is naïve but oh so heartening to see someone who can, make a difference in the best way he can.But how do I ignore anymore (this is his fifth!) the fact that the man won’t even try to stay true to the era that he so pointedly states at the beginning of the book. 3400 B.C. we are told, is when this story unfolds. And if we were to believe Mr. Tripathi, 3400 B.C. folklore had detective characters who apparently inspired TV detectives in late 1900 A.D.! (“One doesn’t need to be Vyomkesh to figure out…” – I quote/unquote almost verbatim) The lead protagonist of this book, we are ready to believe was no demure Goddess – more power to you, Author, for creating a strong woman who is never viewed from the compass of beauty – traditional or otherwise. But she does, so easily, call another key character Hanu Bhaiyya (I wish I was joking.) Hanu Bhaiyya to his credit also spouts fridge magnet wisdom of the late twentieth century with Vayuputra depth (It is better to have loved and lost than to have never loved at all). And then there is the attempt to weave current affairs to the narrative and to offer perspective, even solutions – what is this – PK? 3 Idiots?Someone who read the lines above says I nitpick. Perhaps I do. But I am not content sitting back and sighing with phrases like “Well, as a bestselling Indian author, at least he doesn’t make grammatical errors and spin ridiculously stereotypical stories like another we love to hate”Give us some credit, Amish. Your readership, even if smaller by a few hundreds. will laud you for taking the worlds of your own imagination seriously. If that means a few rupees lesser in the bank, are you sure it is not worth it?All said and done though, I will still pick up Book 3 and 4 after this. My reviews of those, I hope are more about the joy of his imagination and his re-telling.
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  • Vikas Singh
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another masterpiece from Amish and a completely different take on Sita. Amish has worked on the historical background, combined it with geographical facts and cultural traditions to give this blockbuster
  • Aishwary Mehta (The_Fugitive_Biker)
    January 1, 1970
    Quote from the Book I Liked - The best laid plans always have a tendancy to get spoiled. There have always been surprises. (Para 5 , Page 335) Stars - 3.5/5 Synopsis - India, 3400 BCE.India is beset with divisions, resentment and poverty. The people hate their rulers. They despise their corrupt and selfish elite. Chaos is just one spark away. Outsiders exploit these divisions. Raavan, the demon king of Lanka, grows increasingly powerful, sinking his fangs deeper into the hapless Sa Quote from the Book I Liked - The best laid plans always have a tendancy to get spoiled. There have always been surprises. (Para 5 , Page 335) Stars - 3.5/5 Synopsis - India, 3400 BCE.India is beset with divisions, resentment and poverty. The people hate their rulers. They despise their corrupt and selfish elite. Chaos is just one spark away. Outsiders exploit these divisions. Raavan, the demon king of Lanka, grows increasingly powerful, sinking his fangs deeper into the hapless Sapt Sindhu. Two powerful tribes, the protectors of the divine land of India, decide that enough is enough. A saviour is needed. They begin their search.An abandoned baby is found in a field. Protected by a vulture from a pack of murderous wolves. She is adopted by the ruler of Mithila, a powerless kingdom, ignored by all. Nobody believes this child will amount to much. But they are wrong. For she is no ordinary girl. She is Sita.Continue the epic journey with Amish’s latest: A thrilling adventure that chronicles the rise of an orphan, who became the prime minister. And then, a Goddess. This is the second book in the Ram Chandra Series. A sequel that takes you back. Back before the beginning. About The Book - So finally after a wait of 2 Year, Author Amish has come up with the 2nd Instalment of The Ram Chandra Series, 'Sita - Warrior of Mithila'. The Book starts with Discovery of an abandoned Child Deep in the Forest by Queen Sunaina and King Janak. The Story revolves around the same plot as that of the 1st book 'Scion of Ikshvaku'. Many of the Story felt the same as that told in the 1st Book, which was indeed Good as it refreshed the Memory and Old Storyline but was at the same time felt like rereading the 1st part (You Don't have to Re-Read the first part in order to refresh the Storyline just Grab the Copy of 2nd Book and Read On). There were a lot many Plot and Side stories left Untold which made me excited more for the 3rd Part of the book like The Relation between Vishwamitra and Raavan, The Original Reason for the Sourness between Vishvamitra and Vashishtha. The Major plot twist was left untold in the last line of the 2nd Book which made me wonder WHY? I also felt that the Upcoming Books must be written in a way that the 3rd Book Depicts the Life of Raavan, 4th Part should tell the Story till the Death of Raavan and 5th Should be about what happens after the death of Raavan, as the part after the Death of Raavan is often left untold in Other Books and Movies. The whole book delivered Quiet a Great Adventure and Insights from the Life of Sita and the Best part was the way Amish Portrayed the character of Sita as a Fierce Warrior which is essential for the present context of Time. Amish is back again with another Epic Retelling of The Great Ramayan with a New Perspective required for the current time.Eagerly waiting for the 3rd Instalment, 'Raavan - Orphan of Aryavarta' to Release in 2018. Verdict - The 2nd Installment of 'The Ram Chandra Series' is as Epic as the 1st Part, with Sita depicted as a warrior in 2nd Part. A Must read for all Amish's Fan and also a Nice and Interesting read for all The Mythological-Fiction Lovers out There.
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  • Rishabh Karwayun
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps the most widespread interpretation of Ramayana today looks at the characters as ideals. Protagonists are ideal "whites" and antagonists are ideal "black". Ram is an ideal son, brother, husband, king and most of all an ideal human being (or God). Here all the actions of the protagonists are justified/explained by their divine nature.While I have nothing against this view of Ramayana, it is not the only way. Another attempt looks at the characters as shades of grey, and the fact that Ramay Perhaps the most widespread interpretation of Ramayana today looks at the characters as ideals. Protagonists are ideal "whites" and antagonists are ideal "black". Ram is an ideal son, brother, husband, king and most of all an ideal human being (or God). Here all the actions of the protagonists are justified/explained by their divine nature.While I have nothing against this view of Ramayana, it is not the only way. Another attempt looks at the characters as shades of grey, and the fact that Ramayana is much more than about a crowned price, who was banished from his own house, looking to get his wife back from an evil king. No, it is not that simple. There is much more to Ramayana.I really like the way Amish is retelling this epic. The first three books will tell the story till Sita's abduction through the POV of the three main characters: Ram, Sita and Ravan. This is a very unconventional way, and Amish really deserves praise for that. But, he also has a tendency to resort to very cliched situations quite a few times throughout the book. Overall, this book is an average experience.There is a reason to me calling it an average experience. The best work on Ramayana that I have ever read, and I think will ever read, is Narendra Kohli's Ramayana. Presently, it comes in two parts: Abhudaya Part 1 and 2 (Earlier it used to come in 7 parts each having a unique title: Diksha, Avsar, Sangharsh Ki Or, Sakshatkar, Prishthabhoomi, Abhiyaan and Yudh). It is the most natural and scientific and as close to reality as it could be interpretation of Ramayana. And for anyone who can read Hindi, I feel it is absolutely necessary that they read it at least once in their lifetime.Coming back, I think it is not second book of the series, I somehow feel its the fifth book, with Shiva Trilogy being the first three. They all seem to be in continuation.I felt that The Secret of The Nagas was Amish's best work till date. It all went downhill after that, up until the first one third of this book. After that, the book really picked up, and in the end I felt that it was much better than its predecessor (Scion of Ikshvaku). I am looking forward to the next installment which will come next year.
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  • Devika Ramadoss
    January 1, 1970
    I was not much impressed with Scion Of Ikshvaku when compared to Shiva trilogy.It was because of Amish work I started to explore mythology books.Now that I have finished Sita and it was good and far way better than Scion Of Ikshvaku. The book cover is indeed the best one. It’s more of muscles rather than flesh.Well the content too went with the same sort.Women characters always takes a special top note in Amish’s books.As I was aware that this is a fiction work , I was able to enjoy the characte I was not much impressed with Scion Of Ikshvaku when compared to Shiva trilogy.It was because of Amish work I started to explore mythology books.Now that I have finished Sita and it was good and far way better than Scion Of Ikshvaku. The book cover is indeed the best one. It’s more of muscles rather than flesh.Well the content too went with the same sort.Women characters always takes a special top note in Amish’s books.As I was aware that this is a fiction work , I was able to enjoy the characters part, especially Sita. Sita ,the Vishnu? and not Ram. Amish got me into the story from there itself. The narration was only with Sita and author managed it by not involving Ram much in this book. The way author described Sita through Ram’s eyes in Scion Of Ikshvaku was terribly lost in this book.Author couldn’t bring that magic with his narration while he is directly handling Sita here. And I felt the conversation part was missing and there were more of political and governance of Sita( which we already know through Scion Of Ikshvaku).It would have been interesting if there were pages of Sita’s Vishnu training part. But with author’s simple narration and choice of phrases made me to read the book without hanging back.I liked Jatayu role and the way author narrated his character. He was magnificent. Hanuman being with Sita was totally unexpected and waiting to see how his character will be portrayed in the last book. Last 100 pages were dragging as the plot became compulsive towards the endI wouldn’t say that the book disappointed me but definitely the cup could have been filled with little more of actions as its being a fiction.Visit my blog https://reachthroughwords.wordpress.com/ for other reviews
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  • Taanya Ahuja
    January 1, 1970
    SHE IS THE WARRIOR WE NEED.THE GODDESS WE AWAIT.SHE WILL DEFEND DHARMA.SHE WILL PROTECT US. Sita Warrior Of Mithila by Amish Tripathi is the second book of The Ram Chandra Series. It is a fiction mythology book. It was published on 29th May 2017 by the Westland Ltd. The cover page of the book is very beautiful designed by Sideways having an image of Devi Sita in action holding a stick and attacking someone. The colours orange and yellow are very amazingly used, making the cover look very nice an SHE IS THE WARRIOR WE NEED.THE GODDESS WE AWAIT.SHE WILL DEFEND DHARMA.SHE WILL PROTECT US. Sita Warrior Of Mithila by Amish Tripathi is the second book of The Ram Chandra Series. It is a fiction mythology book. It was published on 29th May 2017 by the Westland Ltd. The cover page of the book is very beautiful designed by Sideways having an image of Devi Sita in action holding a stick and attacking someone. The colours orange and yellow are very amazingly used, making the cover look very nice and attractive.Sita Warrior of Mithila deals with the point of view of Devi Sita. It takes a reader to a journey starting from in what circumstances Sita met Raja Janak, her life in Gurukul, becoming a warrior, identified as Vishnu, marrying Lord Rama and getting kidnapped by Raavan. A very interesting storyline focusing on Devi Sita. Author has introduced various characters and tribes in the beginning of the book.As Scion Of Ikshvaku was the starting of Modern Day Ramayana, Amish Tripathi continued the trend. The book is very beautifully penned down. The strong character of Devi Sita , Prime Minister of Mithila is shown as a brave, righteous woman.There are various relationships shown which are very heartwarming such as the mother daughter relationship between Sita and Sunaina, the relationship of friendship between Sita and Radhika etc. All the characters are very well described and I liked the emphasis given on Jatayu's character. There are few examples of the current happenings of India also in the book. The narration is very linear and is linked with Scion of Ikshvaku. There is also repetition of few instances from the first book, Scion of Ikshvaku connecting the two books. but overall the focus of the book is on women power. The book is still left with mystery about various characters. Amish Tripathi has given a modern eye to Ramayana. Overall, a very strong book having elements of bravery, women power, feminism etc. A total blend of modern society into an epic. I would highly recommend this book to everyone.
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  • Pratip Vijayakumar
    January 1, 1970
    Well.. Well... A long wait indeed and I Pre-ordered this book for two reasons. Reason One I thought Amish would have done enough research because of the 2 damn years? Duh! and the Reason two being its Sita and in his Shiva Trilogy he kept Parvathy in a high pedestal and the character was narrated in a much better way. I really felt the narrative style to be way too sloppy with this book. Initially, I admired this guy for bringing in a perspective for the so-called Indian way of life to Mythologi Well.. Well... A long wait indeed and I Pre-ordered this book for two reasons. Reason One I thought Amish would have done enough research because of the 2 damn years? Duh! and the Reason two being its Sita and in his Shiva Trilogy he kept Parvathy in a high pedestal and the character was narrated in a much better way. I really felt the narrative style to be way too sloppy with this book. Initially, I admired this guy for bringing in a perspective for the so-called Indian way of life to Mythologies but he is royally screwing it up for the sake of it and I also feel that he dragged the plot for some 200+ pages and took up speed in the last 160 or so pages and following the same template.I am still looking forward to the Third book in this series and I may not pre-order and waste my money but will wait and read it later. I started feeling that he has also gone into the popular tag and started writing for money instead of passion or telling stories. I couldn't tolerate the Lingo's he brought in with this series and atleast it was not much evident in his previous Series. Grow up Amish and do more research and produce good books for the goodness sake. ufff!
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  • Swathi Kiranmayee Manchili
    January 1, 1970
    The master storyteller, Amish Tripathi, continues the story, this time through Sita's perspective. I loved the way Sita is portrayed-as a strong, independent woman who handles the kingdom and also trains to be the next Vishnu. I felt the events like searching for a leader to lead a chaotic country is relevant in today's world. The concept of sharing the responsibility of Vishnu is something I liked in this book. Jallikattu was a bit of a surprise I should say. Also the intellectual conversations The master storyteller, Amish Tripathi, continues the story, this time through Sita's perspective. I loved the way Sita is portrayed-as a strong, independent woman who handles the kingdom and also trains to be the next Vishnu. I felt the events like searching for a leader to lead a chaotic country is relevant in today's world. The concept of sharing the responsibility of Vishnu is something I liked in this book. Jallikattu was a bit of a surprise I should say. Also the intellectual conversations between the characters about what is right and wrong, freedom, rule of the land were interesting. I go with a 4 instead of 5 is because I felt that the book got a bit boring towards the end as there is some repetition of events from Scion of Ikshvaku. LOOKING FORWARD FOR RAAVAN
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  • Pooja Banga
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book ..Though some things were surprising for me ..My mom narrated me differently how Sita maa was born ..I am totally confused about it ..Overall the story is awesome we all know..I haven't read the epic Ramayana but have heard a lot of stories about it from my parents and grandparents ..Sita maa has always been courageous and ambitious..Mithila under her rule had developed a lot due to her administrative policies. State of Mithila could be well compared to Plato's mechanical state I loved this book ..Though some things were surprising for me ..My mom narrated me differently how Sita maa was born ..I am totally confused about it ..Overall the story is awesome we all know..I haven't read the epic Ramayana but have heard a lot of stories about it from my parents and grandparents ..Sita maa has always been courageous and ambitious..Mithila under her rule had developed a lot due to her administrative policies. State of Mithila could be well compared to Plato's mechanical state where children will be living under the control of state and not in families, education would be state controlled and so on and so forth ..Overall this series is too good I would recommend everyone to read it once ...
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  • Eshwar
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 Stars. I have expected that I'd read a better book than the Book #1(Scion of Ikshvaku) in Rama Chandra series or at least a good one, but this one turned out to be the just okay-good type. Except for a few(very few) segments, Amish couldn't deliver a proper book.There was no emotional feel to it as the first book had. The Characters, dialogues, seemed rushed and incomplete and at times repeated. But the discussion b/w Ram-Sita, Sita-Bharat for a better society and the way it can be done, the 2.5 Stars. I have expected that I'd read a better book than the Book #1(Scion of Ikshvaku) in Rama Chandra series or at least a good one, but this one turned out to be the just okay-good type. Except for a few(very few) segments, Amish couldn't deliver a proper book.There was no emotional feel to it as the first book had. The Characters, dialogues, seemed rushed and incomplete and at times repeated. But the discussion b/w Ram-Sita, Sita-Bharat for a better society and the way it can be done, the passion they had, the changes they want to do to the society, for making a better nation, was shown & written beautifully. Amish also changed some stuff(a bit too much) from 'Ramayana', which is good and also bad for this follow up.
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