Superman, Volume 4
Though Superman and his family have found a measure of peace in their adopted town of Hamilton, they’ve also sensed a sinister presence lurking beneath its idyllic rural façade—something, as a visiting Batman and Robin are about to discover, that is stripping young Jonathan Kent of his powers and pitting neighbor against neighbor, hero against hero, father against son.Soon the time will come for Jonathan to choose: Will he follow his father into the light of truth and justice? Or will this Boy of Steel be forever warped by the corrupting powers of darkness?Find out in SUPERMAN VOL. 4: BLACK DAWN, featuring the creative team of Peter J. Tomasi, Patrick Gleason, Doug Mahnke, Mick Gray and more! Collects issues #20-26.

Superman, Volume 4 Details

TitleSuperman, Volume 4
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 5th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401274689
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Superman, Comic Book

Superman, Volume 4 Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Peter Tomasi, Patrick Gleason, and Doug Mahnke deliver yet another knockout punch with this entry into the Superman mythos. All of the oddness in Hamilton County is finally explained. Something of a redux of Superman - What's So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way? (Action Comics #775) for the next generation. My one complaint would be too many inkers on a few of the issues. You can definitely see a distinct shift in the quality of the art and style. Fantastic art, fantastic story.
    more
  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    What kind of a sick sadistic fuck is Peter Tomasi? Not only did he introduce the character of Jon in his first volume of Superman by murdering a cat, not only does he keep rubbing it in every chance he gets (see also Super Sons), but now there's also this?Why do you hate cats so much, Tomasi? If you don't like them, just don't include them in your stories, you asshole.But anyway. This huge 6-part story is a continuation/rehash of Joe Kelly's famous Action Comics one-shot What's So Funny About Tr What kind of a sick sadistic fuck is Peter Tomasi? Not only did he introduce the character of Jon in his first volume of Superman by murdering a cat, not only does he keep rubbing it in every chance he gets (see also Super Sons), but now there's also this?Why do you hate cats so much, Tomasi? If you don't like them, just don't include them in your stories, you asshole.But anyway. This huge 6-part story is a continuation/rehash of Joe Kelly's famous Action Comics one-shot What's So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way?, and it's shit. The idea of The Elite as a one-off team of crazies worked fine for an issue just to make the point that Kelly was trying to make, but to base an entire story arc around that same premise only shows how little life there is in this concept beyond its original intent. Manchester Black is a pastiche character who just doesn't work on his own, his beliefs are comically wrong and villainous, and honestly, we don't need yet another story to explain how Superman is still actually a good and relevant character. The guy's got 1000 issues under his belt and trunks, of course he's still relevant! Now go and do something useful with him instead of torturing that poor cat's soul even more, Peter Tomasi YOU SICK FUCK.The volume is capped off with an issue written by Michael Moreci, and it's honestly even worse than Tomasi's story. It's a one-shot about Clark parenting Jon, and it undermines everything we've learned about Jon to date by depicting him as an insufferable ill-mannered brat more akin to Damian Wayne, who never listens to his father and does everything backwards. Looks like the only thing Michael Moreci knew about the character before writing this issue is that Jon is a teenager. Sorry, dude, but he's not THAT kind of teenager.Just as I was ready to give Tomasi another chance at redeeming himself as a writer in my eyes, he goes and does shit like Black Dawn. A useless, derivative story that desperately tries to say something meaningful about an 80-year-old character by rehashing a story that is almost 20 years old. I'm so glad that Bendis is replacing this hack, he can't possibly be worse than this.
    more
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Rebounding quite nicely from the blah Vol. 3: Multiplicity, Vol. 4 finally explains some of the oddness that has been percolating under the crust of Hamilton County since the arrival of Clark, Lois and Jon. Also, Lois has a true deus ex machina moment ("Now we're talking!" exclaims Lois . . . and the reader), courtesy of an unexpected visit to the farm from Gotham's dynamic duo, that I wished would've lasted longer than three pages. With said visit we get the amusing dialogue many other reviews Rebounding quite nicely from the blah Vol. 3: Multiplicity, Vol. 4 finally explains some of the oddness that has been percolating under the crust of Hamilton County since the arrival of Clark, Lois and Jon. Also, Lois has a true deus ex machina moment ("Now we're talking!" exclaims Lois . . . and the reader), courtesy of an unexpected visit to the farm from Gotham's dynamic duo, that I wished would've lasted longer than three pages. With said visit we get the amusing dialogue many other reviews have commented on - "Batman doesn't eat pie" - during dessert with our superheroes.Though the epilogue chapter seems sort of tacked-on, this was an otherwise really good volume that seems to get things back on track. DC's doing something right with this Rebirth title.
    more
  • Rory Wilding
    January 1, 1970
    Having read the initial three volumes of Peter J. Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s Superman run, it’s been interesting to see how DC is retconning the Man of Steel throughout the Rebirth initiative. Although I have not read Action Comics as well as the crossover event Superman Reborn, based on this fourth volume, some things have changed (with a suit with a new belt buckle) and some haven’t (failing to maintain a normal family life in Hamilton County, USA).Please click here for my full review.
    more
  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    Not my favorite choice by Tomasi and Gleason. World: The art is good, I've always liked Gleason art, it's full of character and bits and pieces. The world building is okay but it is a bit wonky and out of left field. I don't really like what they did with the town of Hamilton and I don't agree with it. Story: The pacing is fine and so is the tone and the dialog. The issue I had with this arc was the fact that it exists. I like Kathy and Farmer Cobb and I did not like what they did with these cha Not my favorite choice by Tomasi and Gleason. World: The art is good, I've always liked Gleason art, it's full of character and bits and pieces. The world building is okay but it is a bit wonky and out of left field. I don't really like what they did with the town of Hamilton and I don't agree with it. Story: The pacing is fine and so is the tone and the dialog. The issue I had with this arc was the fact that it exists. I like Kathy and Farmer Cobb and I did not like what they did with these characters. Why could there not just been this little beautiful slice of Americana in Hamilton. The villain also annoyed and the fight in the end contrived and far easily dealt with. Not a big fan of this arc at all. Characters: This is probably the first step in Rebirth that I don't agree with this creative team. I don't need a dark sinister thing brewing beneath a wholesome town. I don't need it. Kathy was a great character for Jon to be friends with and the town was a good place for Jon to learn to love humans and people and life. This was unnecessary. The villain was stupid zzz.Not my favorite arc. Onward to the next book!
    more
  • Travis Duke
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5?) I am really enjoying this superman series, I think mainly because of the strong family story they got going on. After a sidestep with volume 3, volume 4 gets back into the flow with a good twist about the town Hamilton that the Kent family has made home. We also get a great villain cameo that I wont spoil. Like I mentioned I really enjoy the family aspect that Tomasi is writing. The father and son relationship with Jon and Clark is heart warming and I love seeing how they struggle at time (3.5?) I am really enjoying this superman series, I think mainly because of the strong family story they got going on. After a sidestep with volume 3, volume 4 gets back into the flow with a good twist about the town Hamilton that the Kent family has made home. We also get a great villain cameo that I wont spoil. Like I mentioned I really enjoy the family aspect that Tomasi is writing. The father and son relationship with Jon and Clark is heart warming and I love seeing how they struggle at times but ultimately succeed. Lois isn't forgotten either, she has few nice moments too. Solid series so far.
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Pete Tomasi and Patrick Gleason are back with a vengeance in this volume of Superman, which brings a lot of the stories from the first year of the book into tight focus as Superman, Jon, and Lois are all tested to their fullest when a mysterious yet familiar threat emerges from the shadows.Black Dawn is a bit of a rehash of Whatever Happened To Truth, Justice, and the American Way?, but in a good way. It's reimagined nicely, and it brings Superboy along for the ride on the [Read as single issues]Pete Tomasi and Patrick Gleason are back with a vengeance in this volume of Superman, which brings a lot of the stories from the first year of the book into tight focus as Superman, Jon, and Lois are all tested to their fullest when a mysterious yet familiar threat emerges from the shadows.Black Dawn is a bit of a rehash of Whatever Happened To Truth, Justice, and the American Way?, but in a good way. It's reimagined nicely, and it brings Superboy along for the ride on the next step of his character arc too. There are a few quick handwavey explanations about things, but it's a decent way to close down this chapter of the Kents' lives as they move away from Hamilton and back to Metropolis where they belong. Gleason is also back on art, with Doug Mahnke tag-teaming with him for certain issues, like the extra-sized #25 that tops off the story. They have a great visual synergy that means this is the most consistent the book has looked for a while, and that really helps sell the story overall.Strong character work as ever and a decent homage to a very famous story gives us a great volume of Superman adventures.
    more
  • Adam Spanos
    January 1, 1970
    The main six-part story here is an epic Superman family story that, despite being set in and around the farm and (under) the local town, is epic, as a villain from the ‘wrong’ timeline makes his reappearance (I had to read the Wikipedia page for his back-story), reveals the secrets of those strange neighbours, their cow, the haunted house, and even the whereabouts of Mr & (”Ex.”) Mrs Frankenstein.Despite the presence of Batman & Robin, Lois still manages to be a full-partner in the story The main six-part story here is an epic Superman family story that, despite being set in and around the farm and (under) the local town, is epic, as a villain from the ‘wrong’ timeline makes his reappearance (I had to read the Wikipedia page for his back-story), reveals the secrets of those strange neighbours, their cow, the haunted house, and even the whereabouts of Mr & (”Ex.”) Mrs Frankenstein.Despite the presence of Batman & Robin, Lois still manages to be a full-partner in the story, reminding us that she has been a strong female character in comics ever since the 1930s, surviving the forced domesticity of the 1950s to take her place as the role-model she started her career as.This has an excellent story, with humour, tragedy and epic action, and with excellent artwork, recapitulating the villain’s original raison d’etre, and also reminding us of the importance of the Superman Family to the main character and his back-story.The seventh issue is a stand alone with Superman and son doing a bit of bonding with a flashback to young Clark and Pa Kent’s similar situation back in the day.
    more
  • Steve Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Superman’s been one of the better Rebirth titles so far, for me. I’m definitely enjoying superboy, seeing the Kent’s go to the fair, and suchlike things. This volume though was a bit of a letdown. Manchester Black? Whodahell? I remember him from the New 52 Titans, but beyond that I don’t know his history. Seems pretty formidable, but they never really explained his powers. At all. I had to Wikipedia him. Well, so things in this book got all confusing after he showed up. The townspeople are all s Superman’s been one of the better Rebirth titles so far, for me. I’m definitely enjoying superboy, seeing the Kent’s go to the fair, and suchlike things. This volume though was a bit of a letdown. Manchester Black? Whodahell? I remember him from the New 52 Titans, but beyond that I don’t know his history. Seems pretty formidable, but they never really explained his powers. At all. I had to Wikipedia him. Well, so things in this book got all confusing after he showed up. The townspeople are all super powered aliens who believe in killing? Superboy may be okay with this? What just happened to Lois’ leg? Ok just about every page I was pretty damn turned around as to what was going on and why. Manchester Black took down Supes and Batman pretty easily, and then...someone got really angry and beat him? And now the aliens are going to fix the town, and Superman just lets them off the hook? And did superboy lose his powers? Or not?I thought the art was good, and I still like the Kent family, and watching Damien and Jon interact. That’s still lots of fun, but the main story got in the way, which was a shame. Thanks to DC for giving me a review copy in exchange for a review!
    more
  • Will Robinson Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    Without a doubt Tomasi & Gleason are writing one of the best comicbook series around. The bonds of the Kent family are tested as an old Superman for, Manchester Black returns to wreck the peaceful town of Hamilton. In this volume of Superman young Jon is tempted to see the life of being a hero differently than his father. I fondly remember being exposed to Manchester Black from the DC Animated film, Superman & the Elite. I never read the Superman and Justice League books that introduced Without a doubt Tomasi & Gleason are writing one of the best comicbook series around. The bonds of the Kent family are tested as an old Superman for, Manchester Black returns to wreck the peaceful town of Hamilton. In this volume of Superman young Jon is tempted to see the life of being a hero differently than his father. I fondly remember being exposed to Manchester Black from the DC Animated film, Superman & the Elite. I never read the Superman and Justice League books that introduced Black & the Elite. I did enjoy the concept of Superman confronting his ideology of trying not to kill an enemy versus the eye for eye code that Black follows. This story brings this battle of ideologies to a more personal conflict as Black tries to manipulate Superman's son into going to the dark side. There is a a lot of jaw dropping action moments in the book and the emotional moments are incredibly written and drawn. I can not express how much the family dynamic has made the Superman series both relevant and just a all around fun read. I am going to try to go back and read some of the earlier stories with Black. Superman continues to be one of the strongest series in the DC Rebirth era of DC comics.
    more
  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    With 'Superman, Volume 4: Black Dawn,' Peter J. Tomasi continues a really great run on this title. It's one I always look forward to reading.The Kents have had a pretty idyllic existence in the farm town of Hamilton, but that is about to end. It's been hinted at in other story lines. It comes to a head here. Something is not right with how Jon's powers are developing and Batman shows up with Robin to investigate. What they uncover unleashes a secret that the town holds. When one of Superman's ol With 'Superman, Volume 4: Black Dawn,' Peter J. Tomasi continues a really great run on this title. It's one I always look forward to reading.The Kents have had a pretty idyllic existence in the farm town of Hamilton, but that is about to end. It's been hinted at in other story lines. It comes to a head here. Something is not right with how Jon's powers are developing and Batman shows up with Robin to investigate. What they uncover unleashes a secret that the town holds. When one of Superman's old enemies shows up, he tries to turn Superboy toward the darkness. Will a dark Superboy find new powers or will he be able to fight it off?It was only inevitable, I guess, that this perfect town would be hiding some secret. Part of me wishes that it hadn't been so, and there is a change to a couple characters that I wish hadn't been part of the conspiracy.Overall, I did enjoy the story, and, especially, the back up story that Clark teaching Jon about decisions and responsibility while having a flashback to an episode with his own father Jonathan.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from DC Entertainment and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
    more
  • Fraser Sherman
    January 1, 1970
    The good thing about this TPB is the way it portrays Superman, Jonathan Kent and Lois. It's old-school nice-guy non-edgy Superman and family, and I like that. And I thought the reveal of what's really going on in Hamilton was going to be interesting ... only it wasn't. Manchester Black was a memorable character when he showed up as a Superman villain but his arc ended well. Reviving him as once again a hardcore You Need Me On That Wall type (and a lot less well executed than in his earlier stori The good thing about this TPB is the way it portrays Superman, Jonathan Kent and Lois. It's old-school nice-guy non-edgy Superman and family, and I like that. And I thought the reveal of what's really going on in Hamilton was going to be interesting ... only it wasn't. Manchester Black was a memorable character when he showed up as a Superman villain but his arc ended well. Reviving him as once again a hardcore You Need Me On That Wall type (and a lot less well executed than in his earlier stories) is just a waste. This would get maybe 1.5 stars, but the Super-family stuff is still pretty winning.
    more
  • L. (Super Easy. Barely An Inconvenience.)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through a GoodReads giveaway.I'm not a big fan of this kind of artwork. On practically page one I've got a nitpick. They go out of their way to show the Kents now live on a farm way out in the boondocks, yet Lois takes the trashcan out to the curb. When you live in the county you haul your own trash off. Ain't no truck gonna come pick this up. But as I said, that's just nitpicking.My true complaints contain spoilers so Spoiler Warning. Batman and Robin stop by to chit chat a I received this book through a GoodReads giveaway.I'm not a big fan of this kind of artwork. On practically page one I've got a nitpick. They go out of their way to show the Kents now live on a farm way out in the boondocks, yet Lois takes the trashcan out to the curb. When you live in the county you haul your own trash off. Ain't no truck gonna come pick this up. But as I said, that's just nitpicking.My true complaints contain spoilers so Spoiler Warning. Batman and Robin stop by to chit chat about Superboy. Immediately Robin gets on my nerves with his constant pshaw noises. Batman disappears early on and frankly has nothing to do with the story at all. Even at the end with the big boss battle he's barely in two or three panels. Heck, the Batmobile did more. Why was the Dynamic Duo even here? They were unnecessary.Another complaint has to do with Lois being severely injured during a fight scene. She's hurt bad enough for Superman to leave the fight to fly her to the hospital. Yet at the very end she shows up at the battle, her body intact, and we're given a throwaway line to explain it all away. It just pissed me off. I would have been more interested in seeing how the family dealt with her injury than be told, "Oh, it was all an illusion."
    more
  • Charity Tinnin
    January 1, 1970
    (Read as Single Issues) In a darker, more cynical age, it is perhaps more important than ever that Big Blue Boy Scouts remain so ... for they really do have the power to change the world.
  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    This starts beautifully, with the heroism and hope of the Kent family, their happy hometown, contrasted with the ludicrous posturing of the Waynes ("Batman doesn't eat pie!"). And then Batman gets taken down by a cow. Alas - and spoilers follow - it soon turns out that this lovely small town is an experiment, a lie - and at the back of it is Manchester Black, an Authority analogue who started out forced and hasn't improved with age. There follows the usual debate about whether heroes kill, and w This starts beautifully, with the heroism and hope of the Kent family, their happy hometown, contrasted with the ludicrous posturing of the Waynes ("Batman doesn't eat pie!"). And then Batman gets taken down by a cow. Alas - and spoilers follow - it soon turns out that this lovely small town is an experiment, a lie - and at the back of it is Manchester Black, an Authority analogue who started out forced and hasn't improved with age. There follows the usual debate about whether heroes kill, and when it's Superman versus this increasingly threadbare straw badass, obviously the answer is no. And yet, as tends to happen with this, the story ends up largely embodying the very dark and dreary world it rejects.
    more
  • Adam Graham
    January 1, 1970
    This book collects Issues 20-26 of Superman.The six-part Black Dawn story brings the Kent family's time in Hamilton County as mysteries are unfurled that have been raised throughout the run. The story features the return of an old enemy and also features highlights like Batman and Robin sitting around the dinner table where we learn that Batman doesn't like pie Also, Lois Lane drives the Batmobile. As usual, there's a lot of cool art in the book and the Kent family shines through.The final issue This book collects Issues 20-26 of Superman.The six-part Black Dawn story brings the Kent family's time in Hamilton County as mysteries are unfurled that have been raised throughout the run. The story features the return of an old enemy and also features highlights like Batman and Robin sitting around the dinner table where we learn that Batman doesn't like pie Also, Lois Lane drives the Batmobile. As usual, there's a lot of cool art in the book and the Kent family shines through.The final issue is the one part, "Brains v Brawn" which finds the Superman-Superboy team running into conflict about how Jon uses his powers. It's a good story with a mostly true but somewhat flawed moral that brings up the importance of respect.Overall, I found this another strong Superman book by Peter Tomasi.
    more
  • Koen
    January 1, 1970
    Quite liked this story! The ending was rather dull/sappy though :/
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    In the fourth volume of Tomasi and Gleason's run on Superman a lot of the plot threads they had been building up are finally paid off. It begins with relative calm, as Clark and his family enjoy a pleasant evening. Then Batman shows up Damien, questioning why Superboy's powers have not developed further. Because of his unique Kryptonian/human physiology, Batman believes that Jon should be on his way to becoming even more powerful then his father, yet his development seems to have stalled. The re In the fourth volume of Tomasi and Gleason's run on Superman a lot of the plot threads they had been building up are finally paid off. It begins with relative calm, as Clark and his family enjoy a pleasant evening. Then Batman shows up Damien, questioning why Superboy's powers have not developed further. Because of his unique Kryptonian/human physiology, Batman believes that Jon should be on his way to becoming even more powerful then his father, yet his development seems to have stalled. The reason for this is revealed in this arc.Batman believes that environmental factors may be contributing to Jon's issue. He decides to investigate their neighbor Cobb's cow, to see if her milk may not be what it seems. He is proven right as milk turns into black goo and envelops him. Clark, wondering what Bruce has gotten up to, decides to investigate himself, taking Damien and Jon along to find him. Their search is interrupted when a giant alien monster attacks Hamilton. After a fierce battle, Jon kills the monster, much to his father's chagrin.Damien then inadvertently informs Superman that Jon and Kathy's adventure in the Dead Man's Swamp (back in Volume 3). Clark is disappointed to find out that Jon disobeyed him and then hid it from him. He goes to search the Dead Man's Swamp for Batman on his own, leaving Jon and Damien behind. Damien urges Jon to continue the search on their own, leading to a fight between the two super-sons. Kathy shows up to break it up and revels that she has telepathic powers, strangling Damien with her mind.Continue reading on my blog:http://davethecaveman.blogspot.com/20...
    more
  • M
    January 1, 1970
    Peter J. Tomasi and a crew of artists continue the Rebirth era of Superman with their fourth volume of the Man of Steel. The Kents are enjoying the quiet life of the small town of Hamilton. That peace is shattered after a visit from the Dynamic Duo, who have come to check up on young Jon's growing power set. Concerned over the lack of abilities shown by the boy, Batman goes to investigate - and promptly disappears. This leads the Super Sons to get involved, as they discover that Hamilton itself Peter J. Tomasi and a crew of artists continue the Rebirth era of Superman with their fourth volume of the Man of Steel. The Kents are enjoying the quiet life of the small town of Hamilton. That peace is shattered after a visit from the Dynamic Duo, who have come to check up on young Jon's growing power set. Concerned over the lack of abilities shown by the boy, Batman goes to investigate - and promptly disappears. This leads the Super Sons to get involved, as they discover that Hamilton itself holds a disturbing secret of its own. When they too drop off the radar, Superman himself goes digging - literally - into the vanishings. Uncovering an alien cadre and and old foe returned from the dead, the Man of Steel finds himself facing off against his own mind-controlled son. The book concludes with both father and son learning a little more about their family dynamics during a day of patrol. Tomasi mixes heart, humor, horror, and heroics wonderfully in this collection. The Kents actually feel like well-rounded characters, the threat is classic but unique, and the additional guest stars help rather than hinder the storyline. The distraction comes from the jarring jumps between issues by the art crew, each one featuring their own styles. As such, the tale becomes disjointed and frustrating as it reaches its climax. Superman: Black Dawn is a bright spot in the Rebirth setting of Superman, hinting at even sunnier days ahead.
    more
  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I’m still trying to get used to the whole DC Rebirth line going on. It feels like if you miss an issue or collection though that you’ll find yourself lost trying to figure out the changes that have been made which makes it difficult to follow along with the story being told.This time around Superman and Lois are now living in a town called Hamilton. There they are raising their son Jon, the new Superboy. With new powers changing from time to time it concerns Batman and he arrives with his own so I’m still trying to get used to the whole DC Rebirth line going on. It feels like if you miss an issue or collection though that you’ll find yourself lost trying to figure out the changes that have been made which makes it difficult to follow along with the story being told.This time around Superman and Lois are now living in a town called Hamilton. There they are raising their son Jon, the new Superboy. With new powers changing from time to time it concerns Batman and he arrives with his own son Damian in tow. Of course the two young boys don’t see eye to eye and are not quite the same friendly pair that Batman and Superman were decades ago.Batman begins to investigate the town and strange things occurring there he disappears. As Superman tries to find out what happened a giant squid invades the town and wreaks havoc along with a black formless goo. An old foe of Superman has returned with evil intentions for Jon. Whether he can achieve this goal or not will depend on Jon as much as it does the other heroes.The change of location from Metropolis of Smallville took a bit of getting used to for me but I got there eventually. The town of Hamilton itself becomes an integral part of the story. The artwork here is among the better of the DC Rebirth titles going on. In the end it was entertaining, well thought out, well drawn and enough to hold my interest. Rebirth fans will want to add this one to their collection.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    "This Superman doesn't work in this day and age. The kids outgrew you. You're a much better example as a living embarrassment."Peter Tomasi continues to write a really interesting family for Clark, Lois and Jon. There's a real sense of belonging for these characters. They are exactly where they're supposed to be.I know by next volume they'll be in Metropolis and Hamilton County will be a distant memory, but it's not the location, it's the dynamic. It's suprising it's taken so long for DC to give "This Superman doesn't work in this day and age. The kids outgrew you. You're a much better example as a living embarrassment."Peter Tomasi continues to write a really interesting family for Clark, Lois and Jon. There's a real sense of belonging for these characters. They are exactly where they're supposed to be.I know by next volume they'll be in Metropolis and Hamilton County will be a distant memory, but it's not the location, it's the dynamic. It's suprising it's taken so long for DC to give Lois and Clark a child, but I'm glad it's Jon. The differences in Clark and Jon's upbringing is addressed as well as Clark's struggles to train his son, as well as the potential for conflict. But we are talking about a kid who owns an action figure of his own father so it's never going to be a major breaking point for the characters... all just part of their growth.Once again a character, a surrogate for the modern comic book movie viewer voices an opinion that this version of Superman doesn't work. And once again the writer, in this case Peter Tomasi proves them dead wrong.Oh, I should also mention how adorable Damian looks wearing Jon's too-big shirt during their impromptu sleepover.
    more
  • Scott Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This one was pretty good. A four in most aspects. However, there was clearly a past here that I didn't understand. I've been reading comics for a long time, and although I haven't read all that much Superman in that time, I'm pretty familiar with DC and have been actively following DC at least equally with--and at times more than--Marvel for the past fifteen or so. That said, I have never heard of Manchester Black. And Clearly he's some big deal, and this wasn't his first appearance or anything, This one was pretty good. A four in most aspects. However, there was clearly a past here that I didn't understand. I've been reading comics for a long time, and although I haven't read all that much Superman in that time, I'm pretty familiar with DC and have been actively following DC at least equally with--and at times more than--Marvel for the past fifteen or so. That said, I have never heard of Manchester Black. And Clearly he's some big deal, and this wasn't his first appearance or anything, but I found the whole thing lacking the specifics that I needed to follow along. I don't get caught wondering what's going on like that very often, it put the shoe on the other foot as far as deep continuity story telling a little bit and kind of killed it for me. Otherwise, there's some interesting development to the relationship between Jon and Superdaddy, and we find out a bunch of people we've met in Hamilton are a lot more interesting than we realized. If I hadn't been so thrown off by not getting the villain I think this could easily have been a four. Oh, and Batman and Damian visit, but they serve very little purpose except to re-emphasize that Batman's scared of Jonathon. Yep. They're pretty much wasted.
    more
  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    Since moving to Hamilton, the Kents have enjoyed a much more peaceful existence. Yet, they still continue to sense something below the surface, something sinister that will show its face before too long. They are right.... but before they begin to investigate, Batman and Robin show up, wanting to discuss the potential future threat of Superboy's growing powers. Not long after the meeting, Batman disappears...Robin vanishes...Jon's friend Kathy appears to have very strong mental powers... Jon van Since moving to Hamilton, the Kents have enjoyed a much more peaceful existence. Yet, they still continue to sense something below the surface, something sinister that will show its face before too long. They are right.... but before they begin to investigate, Batman and Robin show up, wanting to discuss the potential future threat of Superboy's growing powers. Not long after the meeting, Batman disappears...Robin vanishes...Jon's friend Kathy appears to have very strong mental powers... Jon vanishes... What is going on?Chaos and lies are all over when a very strong Telepath named Manchester Black shows up. (After Superman's crazy reaction, I knew this was a character I hadn't heard of, so I looked him up) Using the townspeople of Hamilton, who are really aliens in disguise, Black is using all this craziness to try to unlock Jon's full powers, hoping that son with surpass father and Jon can be controlled. Moral and physical battles go all out, but will Jon choose the light or the dark?This book continues to impress. Wish they could lock down a consistent artist, but good overall. Recommend.
    more
  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    He's always been a source of trouble, has Superbrat - able to diminish generations of comics history by being, well, shit. But here he is a different kind of trouble, as is a panoply of oddsville characters that aren't what they seem, and a weird Venom-styled gloop. It's a hokum story, padded out to an inordinate six episodes, and still managing to leave some bits of key explanation on the cutting room floor. You'll like as not have to look for a wiki on the big bad when he turns up, too. A one- He's always been a source of trouble, has Superbrat - able to diminish generations of comics history by being, well, shit. But here he is a different kind of trouble, as is a panoply of oddsville characters that aren't what they seem, and a weird Venom-styled gloop. It's a hokum story, padded out to an inordinate six episodes, and still managing to leave some bits of key explanation on the cutting room floor. You'll like as not have to look for a wiki on the big bad when he turns up, too. A one-shot to close, where Supes decides not to be a moral teacher for Superbrat because that's just too much hard work, and allegedly disrespectful (??!!), is also naff. After a year of these books, I think we're just going to have to suffer the Brat and all the dodgy decisions that DC have taken about Superman, and wait for something better to come along and write Rebirth off the page of history. This volume isn't as sinfully bad as some of the Supertitles have been in 2017, but it's still not exactly coherent, well put together, or engaging enough. As long as the wife, the Brat and the bloody dog are all the creators can be bothered to care about, this looks like being forever Supermeh.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Seriously... wow. Jon Kent is quickly becoming one of my favorite characters, and this volume had him right at it's center. I love the familial themes that inherently come with him, as well as the foils created whenever he's teamed up with Robin (Damian). And this comic was grounded in both of those elements. I also really enjoyed that call-back to (I believe) the iconic story "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way?" (I haven't actually read this story yet, but I've heard en Seriously... wow. Jon Kent is quickly becoming one of my favorite characters, and this volume had him right at it's center. I love the familial themes that inherently come with him, as well as the foils created whenever he's teamed up with Robin (Damian). And this comic was grounded in both of those elements. I also really enjoyed that call-back to (I believe) the iconic story "What's So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way?" (I haven't actually read this story yet, but I've heard enough about it to be pretty sure that's what inspired the central conflict was in this graphic novel.) The subsequent themes were compelling: about family, about what's right v. what's easy, about the value of all life... I mean, wow. There's literally nothing else I could ask for from a Superman Rebirth graphic novel.
    more
  • Norman Cook
    January 1, 1970
    It's tough to come up with real threats to Superman, and this one isn't an exception, so instead we get more emphasis on Superman's relationships. This volume is an interesting look at Clark Kent's family and how Superman will do anything to keep them safe. The weird townspeople and Kent neighbors aren't what they seem to be, and put Lois and Jon into some real danger. When the big-bad finally appears, it's a mixed bag: on the one hand, he is powerful enough to battle Superman on an even level ( It's tough to come up with real threats to Superman, and this one isn't an exception, so instead we get more emphasis on Superman's relationships. This volume is an interesting look at Clark Kent's family and how Superman will do anything to keep them safe. The weird townspeople and Kent neighbors aren't what they seem to be, and put Lois and Jon into some real danger. When the big-bad finally appears, it's a mixed bag: on the one hand, he is powerful enough to battle Superman on an even level (perhaps some magic involved?), but on the other hand is defeated kind of easily and without a lot of serious repercussions (despite some seemingly awful things happening to some of the good guys). The artwork is good, if at times inconsistent.
    more
  • Jason Stanley
    January 1, 1970
    This was a solid and enjoyable read. It reintroduces the Manchester Black character, who turns out to have a greater role in what has been happening to the Kent family in the Rebirth series. Black intends to corrupt Jon (Superboy) as he had intended to do to Superman. Clark was able to resist Black's persuasive powers. But will Superboy? Batman and Robin come to the Kent Farm because Batman is convinced something is out of order. Which is classic Batman. The superhero with no superpowers trusts This was a solid and enjoyable read. It reintroduces the Manchester Black character, who turns out to have a greater role in what has been happening to the Kent family in the Rebirth series. Black intends to corrupt Jon (Superboy) as he had intended to do to Superman. Clark was able to resist Black's persuasive powers. But will Superboy? Batman and Robin come to the Kent Farm because Batman is convinced something is out of order. Which is classic Batman. The superhero with no superpowers trusts his gut. He is right, of course, something is amidst with Jon and Manchester Black is connected. One of the chapters allows Lois Lane to be the lead, which after including Bats, is a great move by Tomasi. As is the scene with the Kents and Waynes sitting down to eat pie together. It is a sense of normalcy in the midst of the abnormal. And it is oddly comforting. As is the manifesto of Superman of the value of life, anyone's life. Black encourages taking the lives of others in the name of justice. Superman rejects this teaching. There are times when the story lags. And perhaps too complicated. It may have benefited the larger story arc if there was a bit more background to Black in the Rebirth-verse.
    more
  • Nick D
    January 1, 1970
    The humble small town of Hamilton that the Kent's call home turn out to be a sinister ruse full of powerful beings from another dimension. Young Jonathan's powers have been dampened by Kent's neighbor Cobb, who captures Frankenstein and his bride, Batman, Damian, and finally Jon. It's revealed these beings are being manipulated by Manchester Black, a telepath that is dedicated to bringing out the darkness in everything. Manchester is trying to turn Superboy dark by convincing him that Superman i The humble small town of Hamilton that the Kent's call home turn out to be a sinister ruse full of powerful beings from another dimension. Young Jonathan's powers have been dampened by Kent's neighbor Cobb, who captures Frankenstein and his bride, Batman, Damian, and finally Jon. It's revealed these beings are being manipulated by Manchester Black, a telepath that is dedicated to bringing out the darkness in everything. Manchester is trying to turn Superboy dark by convincing him that Superman is not strong enough to do what must be done to save people. Also he uses mind control. Probably could have just used the mind control.Anywho, Superman wins the day after Manchester gets his consciousness literally blasted out of his body.
    more
  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    ARC via Netgalley. The art feels a little less polished in this volume -- I can't tell if they changed artists, there's so many people credited on this series, but I missed the beautiful lines from the first two volumes. The storyline is still kind of the kitchen sink of plots and I wish it had focused more on Jon, Damian and Kathy, because that seemed like a really cute story unfolding... maybe there will be another Superboy & Robin teamup in our future. But I appreciated that Lois got some ARC via Netgalley. The art feels a little less polished in this volume -- I can't tell if they changed artists, there's so many people credited on this series, but I missed the beautiful lines from the first two volumes. The storyline is still kind of the kitchen sink of plots and I wish it had focused more on Jon, Damian and Kathy, because that seemed like a really cute story unfolding... maybe there will be another Superboy & Robin teamup in our future. But I appreciated that Lois got some time to shine and the heart of the story returned to the Kent-Lois family rather than Clark wandering off on his own.
    more
  • Nicola Mansfield
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really not feeling this run at all. There seems to be more Superboy here than Superman which is getting old. Damien, of course, shows up for quite some time too. I don't like this crossing of the Bat and Supe families. So the story, the bad guys go after John so they can turn him to the dark side and help them in their cause. New found friends turn out to be enemy spies and boy and father end up having to fight each other. Not feeling it. Give me old Superman who doesn't have his kid hanging I'm really not feeling this run at all. There seems to be more Superboy here than Superman which is getting old. Damien, of course, shows up for quite some time too. I don't like this crossing of the Bat and Supe families. So the story, the bad guys go after John so they can turn him to the dark side and help them in their cause. New found friends turn out to be enemy spies and boy and father end up having to fight each other. Not feeling it. Give me old Superman who doesn't have his kid hanging around all the time.
    more
Write a review