Titans
Titans past, present and future collide with their eternal enemy Deathstroke in this monumental crossover from DC Rebirth TITANS: THE LAZARUS CONTRACT!When Deathstroke discovers that Wally West’s return holds the key to bringing his son back from the dead, he’ll stop at nothing to do just that. Standing in his way? Both the Teen Titans and the Titans! But will both teams kill each other before Deathstroke does? Or will the Titans and the Teen Titans be fast enough to stop him from changing the world as we know it?With a powerhouse creative team of Dan Abnett, Benjamin Percy and Christopher Priest, TITANS: THE LAZARUS CONTRACT sets the stage for the next era of Titans, Teen Titans and Deathstroke, the consequences of which will be felt for years to come! Collects TITANS #11, TEEN TITANS #8, DEATHSTROKE #19 and TEEN TITANS ANNUAL #1.

Titans Details

TitleTitans
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401276508
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics

Titans Review

  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting experience. I get why this crossover is viewed controversially, but since I was coming-off Deathstroke the story featured here worked in my favor. I know that what had originally been wanted was a retelling of The New Teen Titans: The Judas Contract, one of the most famous stories in superhero comics (for those not familiar, that's season 2 of the 2000s animated adaption of Teen Titans, at least a more kid-friendly version). Priest was over-ruled by editors (a theme of hi This was an interesting experience. I get why this crossover is viewed controversially, but since I was coming-off Deathstroke the story featured here worked in my favor. I know that what had originally been wanted was a retelling of The New Teen Titans: The Judas Contract, one of the most famous stories in superhero comics (for those not familiar, that's season 2 of the 2000s animated adaption of Teen Titans, at least a more kid-friendly version). Priest was over-ruled by editors (a theme of his career) and had to make a new story on-the-spot. I actually think it was done well-enough for what it was, and it leads into Deathstroke volume 4 perfectly.
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  • R.C. Rejino
    January 1, 1970
    There's quite a few things I can say about the Lazarus Contract event from DC. First of all, this event directly ties into the Titans, Teen Titans, and Deathstroke Rebirth series as Deathstroke aka Slade Wilson wants to use the speed force to save his son from the past.The plot itself in concept isn't bad, and while reading, I didn't find myself confused by it or left wondering "how does THAT work?" But what I did find odd was, perhaps, the pacing from the third and then the fourth (and final) i There's quite a few things I can say about the Lazarus Contract event from DC. First of all, this event directly ties into the Titans, Teen Titans, and Deathstroke Rebirth series as Deathstroke aka Slade Wilson wants to use the speed force to save his son from the past.The plot itself in concept isn't bad, and while reading, I didn't find myself confused by it or left wondering "how does THAT work?" But what I did find odd was, perhaps, the pacing from the third and then the fourth (and final) issue that tied into this arc. It's no secret that while I have been loving the Titans and Teen Titans series, I didn't care too much for the Deathstroke Rebirth series - part of this is due to the fact that I just don't care for the character of Slade Wilson (which is ironic, considering I loved him in Arrow), but I was didn't like how the Deathstroke Rebirth series was written, either. It's the issues that the writer from Deathstroke handles that I found to be where I started to lose interest/find the pacing in this arc odd. Whereas the first two issues seemed to be more of a slow burn, the last two issues go by way too fast - part of this is definitely because of how on edge the teams are and how dire the situation is in addition to Slade's own impatience to save his son, but that doesn't excuse the writing from being badly paced.There are, however, some fantastic things from this crossover that I loved. Seeing the Titans and Teen Titans come together in an attempt to work together was incredibly satisfying from how great the interactions were between members from each team. Some of my personal highlights were Damian and anyone from Dick's team or everyone on the Titan's commenting on Beast Boy's constant quips. I liked how the teams did actually function mostly well together, and I did find it funny how both teams seemed to listen more to Damian at first instead of Dick because of how Dick and Slade made a deal in the past. It was also great to see some of the team ups between characters like Starfire and Donna Troy, who both wondered if they should be leading their respective teams, as well as Tempest and Jackson Hyde's interactions to where Hyde admits he has no idea who he is or what he is, but Tempest vows that if Hyde wants help that he will help him figure out who and what he is (and tbh I may lowkey ship it).However, Pre-New 52 Wally West and New 52 Wally West meeting was something I had been wanting for a long time and to see it finally happen while they were both kidnapped and being manipulated by Deathstroke was genius. I could go on and on about how much I loved the team's interactions, but I won't. It was what did really work for me in this event, even in the back half of the arc, but despite how fun that was and how sound the plot seemed, the pacing really did make the arc feel like it was falling apart incredibly fast. Overall, the Lazarus Contract isn't a bad arc, and I definitely think if you like the Titans series as well as the Teen Titans series that it is worth the read, as it does have major repercussions for the plots of those two series, but it's not an event that I imagine I'll find myself ever really wanting to revisit.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]I'm a fan of the Rebirth Titans, Teen Titans, and Deathstroke series. They're all very different, and the characters all share a lot of history, so a crossover between them makes a lot of sense. So the fact that it's a little lacklustre is a shame.The set-up's good enough - Deathstroke wants to use the Speed Force to go back in time and save his son, Grant, from becoming the Ravager and dying. Enter Kid Flash, and Wally West Flash, pursued by bears/Teen Titans & Titans [Read as single issues]I'm a fan of the Rebirth Titans, Teen Titans, and Deathstroke series. They're all very different, and the characters all share a lot of history, so a crossover between them makes a lot of sense. So the fact that it's a little lacklustre is a shame.The set-up's good enough - Deathstroke wants to use the Speed Force to go back in time and save his son, Grant, from becoming the Ravager and dying. Enter Kid Flash, and Wally West Flash, pursued by bears/Teen Titans & Titans. When it turns out that Nightwing has a brutal secret from his past that ties him to Deathstroke himself, things get very, very tense. And then it kind of ends on a whimper rather than a bang.The fallout from this event is a lot more interesting than how the event ended, really. There are huge changes for both Wally Wests, and Slade himself, so it's worth the journey, but it feels a bit cheap to have this story act just as a springboard for those rather than being complete in itself. I think I mentioned something similar about another story earlier, but I can't remember which one it was. The usual suspects from the regular series pencil the crossover, which is a nice change - I always feel like if you're having a crossover, you'd want your issue to be indicative of the series, so people who don't usually read one of the series can look and react accordingly. I'm much more likely to carry on with a series if I know what the quality is like in a crossover than if it's a guest writer/artist. So we get Brett Booth on Titans, Khoi Pham on Teen Titans, and Carlo Pagulayan on Deathstroke, while the versatile Paul Pelletier pencils the special to finish it off. That's a good line-up of artists right there.So close, and yet so far.
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    Usually I'm not fond of what seems to be forced crossovers. What sells this tale are the Deathstroke, and his supporting cast bits, especially in the epilogue. Writer Christopher Priest has discussed, a little, on line some of the creative freedom he has been given, which really comes to frution, again in the last chapter.Publisher DC Comics delivers on that freedom in the epilogue. Priest permits Deathstroke to use the Bible and religion as weapons to obtain cooperation from those he is recruit Usually I'm not fond of what seems to be forced crossovers. What sells this tale are the Deathstroke, and his supporting cast bits, especially in the epilogue. Writer Christopher Priest has discussed, a little, on line some of the creative freedom he has been given, which really comes to frution, again in the last chapter.Publisher DC Comics delivers on that freedom in the epilogue. Priest permits Deathstroke to use the Bible and religion as weapons to obtain cooperation from those he is recruiting. Deathstroke may no longer be a villain after the revelations he experienced earlier in the book, but I don't think he is a hero either. Much like Vic Mackey in the television show The Shield, Deathstroke is an engrossing amoral character whose story I end up being drawn into, and even rooting for him when I think I shouldn't.The story's basic concept is that Deathstroke hits upon a way to time travel with the goal of saving his deceased son (really the dead son I don;t think is a spoiler for anyone who knows anything about Deathstroke). The whole Lazarus Contract is a nice concept, but in many ways is a MacGuffin in this story. The Teen Titans, and Titans were uninteresting characters for me.If you have ever watched the The Shield, begin reading this title with the start of the Christopher Priest run. I think you'll like it.
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  • Luis
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this crossover and to some extent I did, but on the other side, It was a disappointment. This is called The Lazarus Contract so it's riding off the coat tail of the Judas Contract. I know some other reviewers are saying that this isn't a retelling of that event and that we shouldn't be expecting that, but with a title like The Lazarus Contract, what else am I suppose to expect? I don't even think they explained what a Lazarus Contract even is and if they did could someone I really wanted to like this crossover and to some extent I did, but on the other side, It was a disappointment. This is called The Lazarus Contract so it's riding off the coat tail of the Judas Contract. I know some other reviewers are saying that this isn't a retelling of that event and that we shouldn't be expecting that, but with a title like The Lazarus Contract, what else am I suppose to expect? I don't even think they explained what a Lazarus Contract even is and if they did could someone explain it to me. I don't even think it falls into the main storyline of the crossover. Essentially this book is all about how Deathstroke wants to access the Speedforce so he can go back in time to save his son, which is a call back to the New Teen Titans, where that event took place. BUT Cyborg's origin is no longer tied to the Teen Titans and Raven and Beast are in the current Teen Titans team as teens. So when they go back to show what happened, guess who the teen titan team was? The current Titans team when they were the Teen Titans.That's not what bothered me about this crossover. I understand Retcons happen. The thing that does bother me about it is the fact that they spent like three issues building up to something then the fourth issue felt the rush. It would have probably been better if it were a 6 issue crossover. Nonetheless, this collection essentially sets up what is to come in the future Teen Titans, Deathstroke and Titans issues.
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  • Fernando Gálvez
    January 1, 1970
    Una historia entretenida que, mediante la retrocontinuidad del universo DC luego del evento Rebirth, nos presenta al mercenario Deathstroke que hará hasta lo imposible por corregir un error de su pasado que no lo deja vivir en paz. Para conseguirlo, tendrá que enfrentar a sus enemigos de siempre, los Titanes.Este crossover entre los títulos Titans, Teen Titans y Deathstroke tiene varios momentos interesantes pero, si no se conocen las referencias, o información previa de los personajes involucra Una historia entretenida que, mediante la retrocontinuidad del universo DC luego del evento Rebirth, nos presenta al mercenario Deathstroke que hará hasta lo imposible por corregir un error de su pasado que no lo deja vivir en paz. Para conseguirlo, tendrá que enfrentar a sus enemigos de siempre, los Titanes.Este crossover entre los títulos Titans, Teen Titans y Deathstroke tiene varios momentos interesantes pero, si no se conocen las referencias, o información previa de los personajes involucrados la historia, puede que no tenga el mismo valor agregado cuando se lea.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Just under nine hours to go in the 24in48 readathon and finished The Lazarus Contract. Definitely pales in comparison to the original classic Wolfman/Perez The Judas Contract. Honestly, I'd prefer them to leave classic storylines alone and just try something new with the teams as they are now. It probably doesn't help that I had no emotional ties to either Titans team unlike the Titans of my youth. 3⭐'s out of 5. Just under nine hours to go in the 24in48 readathon and finished The Lazarus Contract. Definitely pales in comparison to the original classic Wolfman/Perez The Judas Contract. Honestly, I'd prefer them to leave classic storylines alone and just try something new with the teams as they are now. It probably doesn't help that I had no emotional ties to either Titans team unlike the Titans of my youth. 3⭐️'s out of 5.
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  • Phillip Murrell
    January 1, 1970
    In the Dc world, Nightwing is my favorite hero. I looked forward to this book. I wasn’t as thrilled as I had hoped. I’m not a big fan of the speed force and that was a big component of this story. Also I mostly just read crossover events, so I wasn’t abreast of all the back story. It did not work too well as a stand alone story. Still, the artwork was amazing and I had fun with both Titans teams.
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  • Iris Nevers
    January 1, 1970
    This crossover was TONS OF FUN but I really don't like how everything was changed because of how selfish Deathstroke is. Not a fan of that but 100% looking forward to seeing the repercussions of this event and how they pan out
  • Diego López Ocón
    January 1, 1970
    This was so bad, I can't start explaining where I begin to be dissapointed.
  • Dave Sammath
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed the first three issues of this event, however, the final Teen Titans Special released today was a lackluster delivery for the ending of the event.
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