The Year of the Knife
Agent -Sully- Sullivan is one of the top cops in the Imperial Bureau of Investigation. A veteran witch of the British Empire who isn't afraid to use her magical skills to crack a case. But Sully might need more than a good education and raw power to stop the string of grisly murders that have been springing up across the American Colonies. Every one of them marked by the same chilling calling card, a warning in the form of a legion of voices screaming out through the killers' mouths: -It IS tHe YEAr oF the KNife.-Sully's investigation will drag her away from the comforts of home in New Amsterdam, the beautiful but useless hyacinth macaw that used to be her boss, and the loving arms of her undead girlfriend, in a thrilling race against time, demonic forces and a shadowy conspiracy that will do anything to keep its hold on power and ensure that Sully takes their secrets to her grave, as soon as possible.G.D. Penman's imaginative The Year of the Knife is a fun, fast-paced urban fantasy mystery with an engaging set of characters, most notably Agent Sully of the Imperial Bureau of Investigation.

The Year of the Knife Details

TitleThe Year of the Knife
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 28th, 2017
PublisherMeerkat Press, LLC
ISBN-139780996626286
Rating
GenreFantasy, Urban Fantasy, Mystery, Magic

The Year of the Knife Review

  • Lex Kent
    January 1, 1970
    With it being almost Halloween, I have been craving some paranormal stories. When I saw this ARC, I was instantly interested. This is available as a Read Now option on Netgalley, so I grabbed it immediately. I am not familiar with this author, so I was not sure what to expect. Luckily, he writes well and I enjoyed this more than I hoped. Sully is a powerfully witch that works for the IBI (Imperial Bureau of investigation) for the British Empire. It is her job to deal with the worst paranormal at With it being almost Halloween, I have been craving some paranormal stories. When I saw this ARC, I was instantly interested. This is available as a Read Now option on Netgalley, so I grabbed it immediately. I am not familiar with this author, so I was not sure what to expect. Luckily, he writes well and I enjoyed this more than I hoped. Sully is a powerfully witch that works for the IBI (Imperial Bureau of investigation) for the British Empire. It is her job to deal with the worst paranormal attacks in the American colonies. When a string of mass murders continues to happen, it is up to Sully find and stop the killer. But soon Sully realizes she may be dealing with a magic never seen before. Can Sully crack the case before it is too late? This book has a ton of supernaturals which I loved. Witches, vamps, skin walkers, demons, it was a great mix and they fit into this world in ways you would not expect. For one, vampires are considered very lowly. They are banished, killed, hunted and at best ignored, pending what part of the world you are in. Humans know they are living with things that go bump in the night but the witches and other magic users keep them in line. I really got immersed in this world and thought it was well done. I don’t remember ever quite reading a book like this before, and considering all the paranormal books I have read, I’m pretty impressed.Sully has to be the biggest badass witch I have ever read about. I just loved her character. She is awesomely powerful but she is not invincible. I liked that even with all her power, her life was still on the line, it made the story more exciting.There is not really a romance in this book. Sully’s ex-girlfriend is still in the picture. They have a very complicate relationship after her ex left her at the aisle for a man. Now that Sully’s ex has “changed” they are back in each other’s life. Feelings are still involved but hurts run deep, will they be able work it out? I do have to mention one small complaint; we don’t know why Sully’s ex “changed”. It is glossed over but never explained, I hope if there is a sequel, we can find out why and how it happened.This book had a ton of paranormal action, and I ate it up. I also liked how the mystery of who the killer was evolved. Talk about a big twist. I did not ever expect who was behind all the killing. I loved how the story played out, thought it was great. This book absolutely leaves an opening for a sequel. It does not end on a cliffhanger, but you want and need to know what happens to Sully next.I am pleasantly surprised and happy how much I enjoyed this book. I easily recommend it to paranormal and urban fantasy fans. Also, there is a giveaway for this book until Nov 20, if you are in the USA. Penman, if you are reading this review, please write a book 2. I don’t want this story to be over and I need more with Sully.An ARC was given to me by Netgalley, for a honest review.
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  • Lexxi Kitty
    January 1, 1970
    Book received from both Netgalley and Meerkat Press for an honest reviewGenres: Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Mystery, Lesbian Fiction, Alt History.I've read roughly 656 works that are lesbian fiction. 810 mysteries; 89 alt-histories; 667 fantasy; and 128 urban fantasy works. Why do I mention this? Because of those 656 lesbian fiction works I've read, the vast majority are contemporary romances, and when the books are fantasy (108 of those), they tend to be paranormal romances. You know how many tend Book received from both Netgalley and Meerkat Press for an honest reviewGenres: Fantasy, Urban Fantasy, Mystery, Lesbian Fiction, Alt History.I've read roughly 656 works that are lesbian fiction. 810 mysteries; 89 alt-histories; 667 fantasy; and 128 urban fantasy works. Why do I mention this? Because of those 656 lesbian fiction works I've read, the vast majority are contemporary romances, and when the books are fantasy (108 of those), they tend to be paranormal romances. You know how many tend to be urban fantasies? So few I have to do an off the top of my head guess . . . and come up with about five (depending on definitions of urban fantasy/paranormal fantasy), this book, two Alexis Hall books, and two Brey Willows books (actually, I also put Jae's Shape-shifter series on the urban fantasy shelf, though I'm not sure it really fits there - see, definitions are hard). Alt history? As noted, I've read 89 works in that genre. How many of them were Lesbian fiction? Two. This book here, and one by Gail Carriger (the character who is in a lesbian romance in 'Romancing the Inventor' does turn up in other Carriger books, but as a background character ). And I'd actually forgotten to put that other one on the alt history shelf.The point of all of this rambling is just that this book, from my own experience, is something of an odd ball genre wise. Though, admittedly, just because I've read 656 lesbian fiction works doesn't mean I've read them all (of course), so, for all I know, alt-history and urban fantasy might be huge in lesbian fiction.Setting: New Amsterdam (for the most part, though brief 'pop-ins' elsewhere, like Nashville).Not sure why it's 'New Amsterdam', since the city is in British control, and it got renamed in 'our' time line to New York in 1664 when the British got control of the place.story: Isobella 'Sully' Sullivan (and don't call her by her first name or she'll act all shocked you actually know it) is an Irish immigrant to 21st century New Amsterdam. New Amsterdam, in turn, is in the American Colonies, and a part of the British Empire. Sully is a Senior Agent with the IBI (think FBI, but with magic users, and agents dressing in whatever they want to dress in - so don't think FBI, since FBI agents out of a suit would probably be instantly fired) - the IBI being the Imperial Bureau of Investigation. Wait, I think Sully's title is Superior Agent? Well, whatever it is, Sully is a high level agent for the IBI.Sully has been given a case to investigate suspicious deaths - deaths where it appears someone has taken over people, and had those people commit brutal and fatal crimes. The book then proceeds to tell an interesting story. Until about 75% to 85% (or was it 91%?) when the last part of the book became an information dump. As alternate history, it's not clear what the 'pivot point' would be (since that's important in alternate history stories - pinpointing when a timeline diverged from our own), and there are certain odd things tossed in there that do not really make sense - see New Amsterdam's name (or, you know, above where I mentioned that New Amsterdam instantly became New York when taken over by the British in 1664). Sure, there's that information dump at the end of the book that 'helps' pinpoint the 'pivot point' but things were already different at that point in time. As a mystery . . . well, if you are reading the book because you like mysteries, and only for that reason, you might not specifically like this book. There is a mystery, and it is interesting, and Sully does investigate it but . . . things kind of unravel in non-mystery book like ways.As a fantasy it is good. As an urban fantasy, ditto. As a romance . . . well, there is a romance, but there's a reason I haven't even mentioned it yet - it's an urban fantasy type romance - as in, the main character vaguely feels some attraction to one of the characters in the story, they are something of a couple, and . . . stuff, but there's no real romance between the two - it's just there as a sub-plot (there were hints that a real capital R romance might break out, but no, this is just a romance sub-plot, not a Romance book). Despite what some of what I've written might suggest, I did rather enjoy this book, and if not for the information dump at the end, I'd probably have rated this a high 4.5 or so stars. Instead I rate it a solid . . . hmm . . . 3.88 stars.Rating: 3.88October 26 2017
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  • Leona Carstairs
    January 1, 1970
    **3.5 stars**HEY EVERYONE! This is my first ARC off of Netgalley, so I am super excited about that. This review is my honest opinion. I'm so glad I really enjoyed my first ARC, it would have sucked indeed if I hated it. It was not perfect but it was definitely an enjoyable, fast paced paranormal novel. Let me start off with the positives aka things that I liked about this book. 1. Honestly, my favorite part of this novel were the Eugene the Sailor Doll (a doll possessed by a demon) parts. I. Lov **3.5 stars**HEY EVERYONE! This is my first ARC off of Netgalley, so I am super excited about that. This review is my honest opinion. I'm so glad I really enjoyed my first ARC, it would have sucked indeed if I hated it. It was not perfect but it was definitely an enjoyable, fast paced paranormal novel. Let me start off with the positives aka things that I liked about this book. 1. Honestly, my favorite part of this novel were the Eugene the Sailor Doll (a doll possessed by a demon) parts. I. Loved. Them. So. Much. They were gold and definitely the best part for me. haha. I do not know why I loved them so much but I did. They were perfect xD.2.Sully's badassery, her attitude, and just her in general. She was kickass and irritable, and I really liked her as a MC.3. The world being ours but not quite, sort of like an alternate present? idk, I am still a little confused about that but I thought it was clever how the author used some names for the Magi (from the past) from actual history. Like Magus Lafayette, Magus Madison, Magus Burr. I liked that.Things that I did not like now:1. Info dumpiness. It felt like there was a lot of info dumping in this book, especially concerning magic or spells. Sometimes this made it hard to read. 2. No backstory for Sully. I feel like we could have used a backstory for her. 3. A little more clarity on the world would have been fine. Like what is the Empire? Who is the Empress? Just a little more explanation of how this stuff worked would have been wonderful.I definitely enjoyed this book, more over the 2nd half (it got more exciting then) and would recommend to anyone who likes kickass MCs, paranormal novels, and lesbianism mixed in with the lot.
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  • Cheryl Whitty
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed on behalf of http://bookaddict.live,Sully is a powerfully witch that works for the IBI (Imperial Bureau of investigation) for the British Empire. It is her job to deal with the worst paranormal attacks in the American colonies. When a string of mass murders continues to happen, it is up to Sully find and stop the killer. But soon Sully realizes she may be dealing with someone with magic never seen before. Can Sully crack the case before it is too late?I devoured this book, it was full o Reviewed on behalf of http://bookaddict.live,Sully is a powerfully witch that works for the IBI (Imperial Bureau of investigation) for the British Empire. It is her job to deal with the worst paranormal attacks in the American colonies. When a string of mass murders continues to happen, it is up to Sully find and stop the killer. But soon Sully realizes she may be dealing with someone with magic never seen before. Can Sully crack the case before it is too late?I devoured this book, it was full of so many different paranormals which I loved. Witches, vamps, skin walkers, demons, it was a great mix and they fit into this world in ways you would not expect. For one, vampires are considered very lowly. They are banished, killed, hunted and at best ignored, pending what part of the world you are in. Humans know they are living with things that go bump in the night but the witches and other magic users keep them in line. I really got immersed in this world and thought it was well done. I don’t remember ever quite reading a book like this before, and considering all the paranormal books I have read, I’m pretty impressed.Sully has to be the biggest badass witch I have ever read about. I just loved her character. She is awesomely powerful but she is not invincible. I liked that even with all her power, her life was still on the line, it made the story more exciting. I am not going to give anything more away, but I would love a sequel please Mr Penman. This has so many different elements in this story, that I think will appeal to a lot of readers.
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  • Christa
    January 1, 1970
    The world in, The Year Of The Knife, is one that the good guys and the bad guys are apt to be magicians with contingencies in place if the bad guy happens to be a demon to boot. Female protagonist, Agent "Sully" Sullivan, is a witch in the, male dominated, Imperial Bureau of Investigation. But in the field, being a power house of magic, it's Sully and her, not solely book learned, spell casting abilities that dominate. For that reason she is tasked with averting who or what is responsible for th The world in, The Year Of The Knife, is one that the good guys and the bad guys are apt to be magicians with contingencies in place if the bad guy happens to be a demon to boot. Female protagonist, Agent "Sully" Sullivan, is a witch in the, male dominated, Imperial Bureau of Investigation. But in the field, being a power house of magic, it's Sully and her, not solely book learned, spell casting abilities that dominate. For that reason she is tasked with averting who or what is responsible for the escalating number of murders, not only in New Amsterdam, but also dotting the American Colonies. Author G.D. Penman crafted a storyline that is immediately intriguing and the intrigue builds momentum as events unfold to a culmination you don't see coming! Personally, I think Penman has a gift for story telling. It's purely subjective, of course, but I rarely come across a book that the characters, surroundings, and action comes to mind so vividly. I remember thinking that thought specifically from the start. I could see the tunnel, Sully's eyes in the darkness, the sigils and best of all, the magic flowing! Recalling The Year Of The Knife has been like recalling scenes in a movie (I think it'd be a great movie!) I definitely recommend seeing it, I mean, reading it!
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  • Anie
    January 1, 1970
    Received from Expresso Book Tour in exchange for honest reviewI was hooked after first few paragraphs, this book is soo good. The story starts in the middle of the action. She is called in to investigate weird case - Agent Sully works for IBI, she is magic practitioner and uses her skills to catch bad people. When people all over all murdered in weird way, she will have to use all she got, to solve it. She is one my favourite female characters in urban fantasy. Sully is the definition of kick-as Received from Expresso Book Tour in exchange for honest reviewI was hooked after first few paragraphs, this book is soo good. The story starts in the middle of the action. She is called in to investigate weird case - Agent Sully works for IBI, she is magic practitioner and uses her skills to catch bad people. When people all over all murdered in weird way, she will have to use all she got, to solve it. She is one my favourite female characters in urban fantasy. Sully is the definition of kick-ass heroin. She is funny and powerful. [ I imagine her going about as female version of Blade or Neo (from Matrix). :) ]Sully gave her a gentle kiss on the neck, just below her ear and then whispered one of the few words of Spanish that she knew, “No. Not police. Brujah. Witch.” Sully pulled back from the girl, who stood stock still, staring at her with big eyes, now clouded with doubt. With a tiny thunderclap, Sully vanished.The book is set in kind of alternative world. She lives in New Amsterdam (New York) and the Americas are colonies of British Empire. The story is fast paced, there is no dull moments, non stop action and writing is really good. Story grabs you from the first moment and you can't put the book down till the very last pages.
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  • Ying
    January 1, 1970
    I would describe this book as a mystery novel set in a magical alternate Earth. You could say it is magical realism. The Earth that this book is set in is not quite our Earth. Even though the book is set in 2015, in this world the city of New Amsterdam is a colony of the British Empire, and the main character is an agent of that government. It still has phones and computers. I liked this parallel world. My main complaint about the world is that (view spoiler)[the Native Americans have this very I would describe this book as a mystery novel set in a magical alternate Earth. You could say it is magical realism. The Earth that this book is set in is not quite our Earth. Even though the book is set in 2015, in this world the city of New Amsterdam is a colony of the British Empire, and the main character is an agent of that government. It still has phones and computers. I liked this parallel world. My main complaint about the world is that (view spoiler)[the Native Americans have this very stereotypical ability of shapeshifting. This seems to be one of the go-tos for indigenous people??? (hide spoiler)]I liked how the novel threw you right into the universe. No slowpaced build up where the rules of the universe are explained to us. Instead we learn tidbits about the world throughout the novel, which I loved. The main character Sully was the typical reluctant badass lone wolf agent of the government. She has the typical vices of these kinds of characters in that she loves alcohol and loves women. Sully could easily have been a male character, but the author has evidently chosen to write a female lead, which I think was a good choice. I think of all the other side characters in the novel were great additions. They were good characters for Sully to bounce off. I enjoyed Eugene, the creepiest demon doll ever, and Raavi.. Probably of the the creepiest but kind hearted doctors ever. I do wish that (view spoiler)[Marie had a bigger role. I would have liked to know if she had any powers or special knowledge. Surely Marie could have helped Sully a bit more? (hide spoiler)]The ending of the novel was definitely unexpected. It kind of came out of no where but in a way that eventually made sense. (view spoiler)[I liked that this book solved the mystery of the Year of the Knife, but left enough stuff open for a sequel. (hide spoiler)]I'm very happy to read a sequel. I also think this would make a great TV show.. Maybe like a Jessica Jones with magic kind of show. I obtained a copy of this book through Netgalley.com
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  • J.D. Dehart
    January 1, 1970
    Writing like Philip K. Dick in the fantasy genre, Penman provides a story that grips from the beginning and features a fantasy world. The writing does not shy away from some vivid details, and the book is descriptive to point of being literary.I was interested both by the cover and synopsis of this book, and was not disappointed in what I found. Recommended for fantasy and science fiction readers.
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  • TJ Burns
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Maddison
    January 1, 1970
    I saw this book a few months ago, and was excited by the premise of the book, and ready to spend my hard-earned cash on it – but, boy, am I glad that I didn’t spend money on this book. Sully is an unsympathetic, and in my mind, often unredeemable character. The book opens with Sully liquefying a perpetrator who she has tracked into the subway, cackling the entire time. Even when she accidentally kills possessed civilians she shows no remorse for her behaviours. And veering away from the issues I I saw this book a few months ago, and was excited by the premise of the book, and ready to spend my hard-earned cash on it – but, boy, am I glad that I didn’t spend money on this book. Sully is an unsympathetic, and in my mind, often unredeemable character. The book opens with Sully liquefying a perpetrator who she has tracked into the subway, cackling the entire time. Even when she accidentally kills possessed civilians she shows no remorse for her behaviours. And veering away from the issues I take with the protagonist of the book, the author inserts some racist, classist, sexist, and otherwise problematic elements.For one, Sully is treated as if she is the most oppressed character in the book because she is Irish. This is despite the fact that we meet multiple characters from India and Africa, who are arguably worse off in this British imperialist alternate reality. Some prize quotes that further the issues of racism include “in all of Sully’s limited dealing with the Native Americans, she had never met one that wasn’t beautiful”, and “He was a tiny Oriental man, known as the Eternal Emperor.” And as if describing the man as ‘oriental’ wasn’t bad enough, the man’s translator was previously a sumo wrestler – because, you know, what else do Japanese people do?Despite Sully being one of the poor and oppressed in this book, and one who hates the British Empire and what it stands for, we still never see her having sympathy for other oppressed parties. In fact, the author gives us this gem, “Malcontent poor people who blamed the empire for every tiny problem in their life,” which entirely ignores and dismisses the problems that poor and oppressed peoples struggle with. And finally, on to the sexism. Sully is an almost forty year old woman who the author refers to as a “not bad for a girl pushy forty.” This unfortunate turn of phrase that infantilizes women, is only one example of issues with sexism in this book. Many of these also operate within the intersection of her being a woman and a lesbian. Sully is presented as the predatory lesbian stereotype, with this quote really exemplifying the stereotype “Thursday night was student night at many of the nightclubs in the city, and Sully had always had her pick of the presumably legal and fairly experimental art students. She liked to think of herself as a formative experience for a lot of girls out there in the world.”I also take issue with the way the antagonist is forgiven for his acts. The antagonist possesses and kills hundreds of innocent civilians, but because he was doing it for a greater cause, his actions are forgiven and he is rewarded for them. I can’t go into too many details, without majorly spoiling the plot. I wish I had only taken issues with these elements of the book, but the writing, and plot are both amateur. There are references to past cases, and past events that are never explained as if this were a latter book in a series, which it is not. When demons shout, their speech is written in all capital letters, which I am blaming the editor for because that should have been changed. The plot is convoluted and uninspiring. The ending is rushed and unrealistic within the canon of the story, and the romance between Sully and Marie leaves a lot to be desired. Would I recommend The Year of The Knife? No.
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  • Barb Fischer
    January 1, 1970
    Here is the first line of the book:"New Amsterdam was a city the way decapitation was a paper cut."I mean, what a first line, right? If that doesn't grab your attention then I don't know what will.I really enjoyed this book. A LOT. It starts from that stunning first line, grabs you and does not let you go. I could not put it down.This is a fantasy mystery novel. So if you aren't into that sort of thing, then this might not be your bag. However, if you like Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell - then I th Here is the first line of the book:"New Amsterdam was a city the way decapitation was a paper cut."I mean, what a first line, right? If that doesn't grab your attention then I don't know what will.I really enjoyed this book. A LOT. It starts from that stunning first line, grabs you and does not let you go. I could not put it down.This is a fantasy mystery novel. So if you aren't into that sort of thing, then this might not be your bag. However, if you like Neil Gaiman, David Mitchell - then I think you will really enjoy this.The story focuses on Agent "Sully" Sullivan, of Imperial Bureau of Investigation. She is basically trying to solve the mystery as to what is behind the mass killings known by 'The Year of the Knife". I am 100% underselling it here because I don't want to spoil it for you.I am always in awe of authors who create a universe and build on things that already exist. This book focuses on magic - Sully is of the able to perform magic persuasion. In the book, the author makes it about math and formulas and not just something one is born with.Sully is also a lesbian. I mention it because I think it actually makes the book more interesting. She is a complex character - who happens to be in a relationship with a vampire. This adds a layer to the book and makes it not your run-of-the-mill fantasy type story.The author did a great job of keeping the suspense up. There are lots of twists and turns, and you really can't figure out 'whodunit'.It was a highly enjoyable book, and I am very glad that I read it.Full disclosure: I received this eARC from NetGalley for a fair and honest review. (Thanks NetGalley!)
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  • SUZAN C.
    January 1, 1970
    Set somewhere in a mystical world, The Year of the Knife, by author G.D. Penman weaves an intricate and gripping tale about magic, aliens, and the macabre. British Agent Sullivan of the Imperial Bureau of Investigation investigates anything of the paranormal and supernatural. Going about her usual business of catching bad guys, she inadvertently gets thrust into the biggest mystery of the century. As one of the best agents of the Bureau, Agent Sully suddenly finds herself using her magical abili Set somewhere in a mystical world, The Year of the Knife, by author G.D. Penman weaves an intricate and gripping tale about magic, aliens, and the macabre. British Agent Sullivan of the Imperial Bureau of Investigation investigates anything of the paranormal and supernatural. Going about her usual business of catching bad guys, she inadvertently gets thrust into the biggest mystery of the century. As one of the best agents of the Bureau, Agent Sully suddenly finds herself using her magical abilities to the limit all the while playing a dangerous cat and mouse game with the constant phrase of "It is The Year of the Knife" taunting her. Does she eventually catch this bad guy (or guys) who is hell bent on getting revenge and killing anyone who gets in the way? You'll have to pick up the book to find out what the surprise ending has in tail for you.The Year of the Knife is a compelling tale of magic and monsters and a hold-onto-your-seat kind of story. The book isn't for the faint of heart and each descriptive scenario is well thought out. Full of magic and comical moments, The Year of the Knife is fun and compelling read with a very surprise twist at the climatic ending.
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  • TheReadingLawyer
    January 1, 1970
    Sully is book smart and street smart, but her street smarts save her more than once in The Year of the Knife. G.D. Penman has provided us with a plot that is instantly captivating. The story slowly unfolds as Sully narrowly escapes with her life, seeks out demons for advice and fights till the death when need be. Penman has a knack for speculative fiction, especially involving certain aspets of magic, necromany and colonialism. The characters are well-developed and have a life to them, whether t Sully is book smart and street smart, but her street smarts save her more than once in The Year of the Knife. G.D. Penman has provided us with a plot that is instantly captivating. The story slowly unfolds as Sully narrowly escapes with her life, seeks out demons for advice and fights till the death when need be. Penman has a knack for speculative fiction, especially involving certain aspets of magic, necromany and colonialism. The characters are well-developed and have a life to them, whether they be the undead, like vampires or demons, or a commonplace witch like Sully. I enjoyed the juxtaposition of a magical universe intertwined with one that involves the "history" of the United States and British colonialism. There's a lot to enjoy about this book and it's one of those reads that can appeal to many different readers.
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  • Cassandra
    January 1, 1970
    Agent Sully works for the IBI, the Imperial Beaure of Investigation in New Amsterdam. Based on what I gathered, New Amsterdam is in an alternate reality? I found this part of the storyline hard to figure out which made the entire story a bit difficult for me to read and enjoy. She uses her magic to help her solve IBI cases. Currently, she is trying to murders in which the killers seem to be possessed by something, but she is not sure if that something is a demon or something else. Along the way, Agent Sully works for the IBI, the Imperial Beaure of Investigation in New Amsterdam. Based on what I gathered, New Amsterdam is in an alternate reality? I found this part of the storyline hard to figure out which made the entire story a bit difficult for me to read and enjoy. She uses her magic to help her solve IBI cases. Currently, she is trying to murders in which the killers seem to be possessed by something, but she is not sure if that something is a demon or something else. Along the way, we meet her past/current lover and vampire, Marie. We also meet her superior IBI agents, one who has been turned into a bird and resides in a cage in his previous office. I found this book easy to put down, mostly because it was difficult for me to follow. I am giving it a 2,5 star rounding up to 3.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    ARC from NetgalleyIt was not what I expected but I still gave it a change but did not enjoy it.
  • CorrieGM
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful heroine, lots of blood, lesbian sex thrown in, lots of magic and strange, strange surroundings.I liked the book very much. For a long time it is not clear what is happening, so you keep thinking of all sorts of solutions.I did not like the solution in the end.But before that, I just kept on reading.
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