Nina
A stunning picture-book biography of the High Priestess of Soul and one of the greatest voices of the 20th century.With evocative black-and-white illustrations and moving prose, readers are introduced to Nina Simone, jazz-music legend and civil-rights activist. Shared as a lullaby to her daughter, a soulful song recounts Simone's career, the trials she faced as an African American woman, and the stand she took during the Civil Rights Movement. This poignant picture book offers a melodic tale that is both a historic account of an iconic figure and an extraordinary look at how far we've come and how far we still need to go for social justice and equality. A timeless and timely message aptly appropriate for today's social and political climates. ♦ "A good introduction to Simone's life, from her early love of music to her rise to the status of legend" --Kirkus Reviews, starred review♦ "Strikingly illustrated" --Booklist, starred review♦ "Hauntingly beautiful illustrations" --Foreword Reviews, starred review"Stirring and powerful. . . " --BookPage

Nina Details

TitleNina
Author
ReleaseNov 28th, 2017
PublisherCharlesbridge Publishing
ISBN-139781580898270
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Biography, Music, Nonfiction

Nina Review

  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This book took my breath away and made my hair stand on end. The text is absolutely like nothing I've ever read before in a picture book and the illustrations were equally as powerful as the text. This book will be on my list of go-to picture books to give to Middle and high school teachers to show them that picture books are not just for little kids. In fact, some of them, like this one, are for much older and more mature readers. If you're an adult and you love Nina Simone, you'll want to read This book took my breath away and made my hair stand on end. The text is absolutely like nothing I've ever read before in a picture book and the illustrations were equally as powerful as the text. This book will be on my list of go-to picture books to give to Middle and high school teachers to show them that picture books are not just for little kids. In fact, some of them, like this one, are for much older and more mature readers. If you're an adult and you love Nina Simone, you'll want to read this book.
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  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    I wish there was an author's note explaining more about Nina Simone's life. Hard for kids to walk away with a richer understanding of who she was and her contributions.
  • Tina ( As Told By Tina )
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on As Told By TinaI received this book for free from Charlesbridge Publishing in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Our Review Nina: Jazz Legend and Civil-Rights Activist Nina Simone is honestly the most beautiful book I own and had the privilege of holding in my hand. The moment I opened my package from MCBD I was in absolute aw. The book is simply beautiful.I personally excited to learn and r This review was originally posted on As Told By TinaI received this book for free from Charlesbridge Publishing in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Our Review Nina: Jazz Legend and Civil-Rights Activist Nina Simone is honestly the most beautiful book I own and had the privilege of holding in my hand. The moment I opened my package from MCBD I was in absolute aw. The book is simply beautiful.I personally excited to learn and read about Nina Simone. I had recently seen that was nominated into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Something many had said was an honor that should’ve been given a long long time ago. I was excited to finally learn about this Jazz Legend and Civil Rights Activist and also teach my children about her.But I was a bit disappointed; the story didn’t provide much information about Nina. I know that it is impossible to put every single aspect of her life into a children’s book but I would have liked to know more about her. Maybe if you go into this book already knowing about Nina Simone it will help.I did a bit of research on my own and listened to some of her music so I could personally feel a connection to the story.I will say however that and the kids were impressed with the illustrations. The entire book is in black and white and illustrations are absolutely beautiful. So beautiful. I swear this book has to be the prettiest book I own. If you have a chance to pick this up and perhaps teach your children about an amazing Jazz singer and Civil-Rights Activist, I would recommend it.Multicultural Children’s Book Day 2017 (1/27/18) is in its 5th year and was founded by Valarie Budayr from Jump Into A Book and Mia Wenjen from PragmaticMom. Our mission is to raise awareness of the ongoing need to include kids’ books that celebrate diversity in home and school bookshelves while also working diligently to get more of these types of books into the hands of young readers, parents and educators. Current Sponsors:  MCBD 2018 is honored to have some amazing Sponsors on board. 2018 MCBD Medallion SponsorsHONORARY: Children’s Book Council, Junior Library GuildPLATINUM:Scholastic Book ClubsGOLD:Audrey Press, Candlewick Press, Loving Lion Books, Second Story Press, Star Bright Books, Worldwide BuddiesSILVER:Capstone Publishing, Author Charlotte Riggle, Child’s Play USA, KidLit TV, Pack-n-Go Girls, Plum Street PressBRONZE: Barefoot Books, Carole P. Roman, Charlesbridge Publishing, Dr. Crystal Bowe, Gokul! World, Green Kids Club, Gwen Jackson, Jacqueline Woodson, Juan J. Guerra, Language Lizard, Lee & Low Books, RhymeTime Storybooks, Sanya Whittaker Gragg, TimTimTom Books, WaterBrook & Multnomah, Wisdom Tales Press 2018 Author SponsorsHonorary Author Sponsors: Author/Illustrator Aram Kim and Author/Illustrator Juana MedinaAuthor Janet Balletta, Author Susan Bernardo, Author Carmen Bernier-Grand, Author Tasheba Berry-McLaren and Space2Launch, Bollywood Groove Books, Author Anne Broyles, Author Kathleen Burkinshaw, Author Eugenia Chu, Author Lesa Cline-Ransome, Author Medeia Cohan and Shade 7 Publishing, Desi Babies, Author Dani Dixon and Tumble Creek Press, Author Judy Dodge Cummings, Author D.G. Driver, Author Nicole Fenner and Sister Girl Publishing, Debbi Michiko Florence, Author Josh Funk, Author Maria Gianferrari, Author Daphnie Glenn, Globe Smart Kids, Author Kimberly Gordon Biddle, Author Quentin Holmes, Author Esther Iverem, Jennifer Joseph: Alphabet Oddities, Author Kizzie Jones, Author Faith L Justice , Author P.J. LaRue and MysticPrincesses.com, Author Karen Leggett Abouraya, Author Sylvia Liu, Author Sherri Maret, Author Melissa Martin Ph.D., Author Lesli Mitchell, Pinky Mukhi and We Are One, Author Miranda Paul, Author Carlotta Penn, Real Dads Read, Greg Ransom, Author Sandra L. Richards, RealMVPKids Author Andrea Scott, Alva Sachs and Three Wishes Publishing, Shelly Bean the Sports Queen, Author Sarah Stevenson, Author Gayle H. Swift Author Elsa Takaoka, Author Christine Taylor-Butler, Nicholette Thomas and  MFL Publishing Author Andrea Y. Wang, Author Jane Whittingham Author Natasha YimWe’d like to also give a shout-out to MCBD’s impressive CoHost Team who not only hosts the book review link-up on celebration day, but who also works tirelessly to spread the word of this event. View our CoHosts HERE.TWITTER PARTY Sponsored by Scholastic Book Clubs: MCBD’s super-popular (and crazy-fun) annual Twitter Party will be held 1/27/18 at 9:00pm.Join the conversation and win one of 12-5 book bundles and one Grand Prize Book Bundle (12 books) that will be given away at the party! http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/twitter-party-great-conversations-fun-prizes-chance-readyourworld-1-27-18/Free Multicultural Books for Teachers: http://bit.ly/1kGZrtaFree Empathy Classroom Kit for Homeschoolers, Organizations, Librarians and Educators: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/teacher-classroom-empathy-kit/Hashtag: Don’t forget to connect with us on social media and be sure and look for/use our official hashtag #ReadYourWorld. A special thank you to all those that put together Multicultural Children's Book Day! And for allowing me and my little ones to be apart of it.
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  • Becki Iverson
    January 1, 1970
    I am a HUGE Nina Simone fan and when I learned there was a children's book about her I knew I had to read it. The narrative of this book is a little bit lacking - the ending feels unfinished, and if you don't already know a fair amount about Nina Simone you might be a bit confused - but the black and white illustrations are really gorgeous, and it still manages to incorporate a lot of civil rights knowledge in a way that is easily digestible by kids or people of any age. Nina Simone has such an I am a HUGE Nina Simone fan and when I learned there was a children's book about her I knew I had to read it. The narrative of this book is a little bit lacking - the ending feels unfinished, and if you don't already know a fair amount about Nina Simone you might be a bit confused - but the black and white illustrations are really gorgeous, and it still manages to incorporate a lot of civil rights knowledge in a way that is easily digestible by kids or people of any age. Nina Simone has such an amazing story and it deserves to be better known, especially amid the turbulent times we live in. This is another good addition to lists of children's books that tell stories of women and people of color (which are harder to find than you might think).
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    Nina Simone was a classically trained pianist & vocalist who turned to jazz music when she was unable to make a career as a classical musician due to her race. She used her music as a medium for activism and proved to be an incredibly resilient & talented woman. This beautiful biography takes the reader through her story, highlighting the themes that music is for all people and even the best dreams need taking care of.
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  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    A biography which is an autobiography framed as a bed-time story. Lyrical and powerful imagery. Gorgeously illustrated. I had high hopes to add this to my picture book biography unit, but lack of backmatter or further details about the subject's life will limit its use for this project. It is a lovely book though.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Art is compelling, the story is interesting, but written in a way that I think would be confusing for a picture book audience. For example, the text makes statements that ultimately the narrator doesn't agree with, but it's not very clear and requires some sophisticated knowledge of storytelling and context to get.
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  • Earl
    January 1, 1970
    Framed as a lullaby, this lyrical biography of musician and activist evokes powerful images. I would have appreciated back matter to flesh things out because I did feel it ended abruptly.
  • Vanessa Dioses
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a biography intended for children 4 to 8 years of age and Nina Simone was recently memorized in an Academy Award nominated documentary for "What happened, Miss Simone?" A summary of the book is about Nina reading to her daughter and recapping her life in a lullaby. I rated the book so well because i loved this book. I think me being a Baltimore native i can relate to some things with Nina. She was an iconic figure, and accomplished so much throughout her lifetime. The book was just This book is a biography intended for children 4 to 8 years of age and Nina Simone was recently memorized in an Academy Award nominated documentary for "What happened, Miss Simone?" A summary of the book is about Nina reading to her daughter and recapping her life in a lullaby. I rated the book so well because i loved this book. I think me being a Baltimore native i can relate to some things with Nina. She was an iconic figure, and accomplished so much throughout her lifetime. The book was just so inspirational. The characters included herself and her family and certain people she met throughout her lifetime she will never forget. The colors are black and white, but the illustrations have a sense of boldness to them, which i really enjoyed. The pictures are strong and powerful. I actually thought the book was going to be boring at first but i was definitely wrong, it was one of my favorites so far! The emphasis on the objects on each page are wonderful. I got this warm but empowering feeling after reading this book. I do not think this book could appeal to young readers. I think the age group should be a little older to appreciate the book. I could use this inspirational book in many ways in a classroom setting. I really did love this book!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful illustrations and important. However, there didn't seem to be enough information for me to consider this a true biography. You really couldn't use this as a source for a biography report on Nina Simone.
  • Jessica Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous illustrations, beautifully written story about Nina Simone, but I wish it had just a little more info on her in the story itself.
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    She is a legend in music and civil rights history. Author Alice Brière-Haquet and illustrator Bruno Liance introduce Nina Simone to new audiences with this beautifully written and illustrated book. Written as a story to Simone's daughter, who's having trouble falling asleep, Alice Brière-Haquet weaves a tale of achievement in the face of racism, using stunning imagery: the 52 white teeth "trapping" the 36 black teeth in the keyboard, and the white keys being whole notes while the black keys are She is a legend in music and civil rights history. Author Alice Brière-Haquet and illustrator Bruno Liance introduce Nina Simone to new audiences with this beautifully written and illustrated book. Written as a story to Simone's daughter, who's having trouble falling asleep, Alice Brière-Haquet weaves a tale of achievement in the face of racism, using stunning imagery: the 52 white teeth "trapping" the 36 black teeth in the keyboard, and the white keys being whole notes while the black keys are half notes: "White was whole. Black was half. It was that way everywhere and for everyone." Music was made by "important men in powdered wigs from past centuries". Simone recalls her anger during a recital, when her mother was expected to give up her seat in the front, to white people who came to see her play; Simone refused to play until her mother resumed her rightful spot in the front row. She speaks of Martin Luther King, and his dream being her symphony - but the dream is fragile.This book is gorgeous. The words are beautiful and strong, and using piano keys as an illustration of endemic racism is simply brilliant. Bruno Liance's black and white illustrations are soft, dreamlike, beautiful. Do kids know who Nina Simone is? Probably not, unless their parents are fans. Does that matter? Absolutely not - this is a gorgeous introduction to Nina Simone, and to activism, for all ages. This book is going on my shelves, in my storytimes, and in displays for social conscience, activism, and African-American history. If you're so inclined, you can play Simone's lullaby, "Hush Little Baby", in your storytime or for your little one.Nina was originally published in France in 2015. You can find more of Bruno Liance's artwork at his (French/English) website, Pirate des Caramels, and you can follow Alice Brière-Haquet at her (French) blog, Alice in Wonderblog. Nina has starred reviews from Foreword Reviews and Booklist.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book filled with symbolism and imagery. While that makes for a beautiful book, it also makes it confusing for younger readers, which is why I would recommend this book for older children. It would even make a great addition to units on the Civil Rights movement, that continues today. The book starts with Nina, a mother, singing a lullaby to her own child, and telling the story (very briefly) of some of her early experiences with music and racism. The comparison of black and white lives This is a book filled with symbolism and imagery. While that makes for a beautiful book, it also makes it confusing for younger readers, which is why I would recommend this book for older children. It would even make a great addition to units on the Civil Rights movement, that continues today. The book starts with Nina, a mother, singing a lullaby to her own child, and telling the story (very briefly) of some of her early experiences with music and racism. The comparison of black and white lives to the keys on the keyboard (whites are whole and more numerous, blacks are 'half' and limited in number) is brilliant and thought-provoking, especially when the illustration on the next page shows whites and blacks sitting and standing in order like a piano keyboard. The lyrical language makes references to taking wing and flying which the illustrations also show as well as flying dandelions symbolizing Nina's and other civil rights activists dreams for a better life. While additional information about Nina and her life and work would have been appreciated, the book makes for a powerful introduction to the issues involved in the civil rights movement as well as the experiences of one young girl.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    The black and white pictures with their soft edges, their drama, their playful perspectives that are alternately heart-breaking, are what make this book compelling. I wish there was more back matter to make it more a true biography instead of just an impressionistic rendering of a life. Yet it packs a punch about inequality, about talent, about perseverance.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This frustrated me because I wanted to know SO MUCH more and felt like the author barely dipped into Simone's amazing life. Bumped it up a star for the terrific illustrations. BLARGH. FRUSTRATION.
  • Alia
    January 1, 1970
    Let me down. Big Time. I wanted much much more.
  • Children's Literature Centre at FSU
    January 1, 1970
    This story immediately drew me in with the vivid black and white portraits and shading on each page. When reading this story, I became entranced by the illustrations. The way that the illustrator creates shadows and shape is breathtaking.The symbolism of the piano representing white and black culture is very powerful. Nina tells her story of overcoming adversity through the beauty of music and the strength in her character’s history. Not only does the language and feel of the story portray segre This story immediately drew me in with the vivid black and white portraits and shading on each page. When reading this story, I became entranced by the illustrations. The way that the illustrator creates shadows and shape is breathtaking.The symbolism of the piano representing white and black culture is very powerful. Nina tells her story of overcoming adversity through the beauty of music and the strength in her character’s history. Not only does the language and feel of the story portray segregation and hate but also the illustrations give that indication too. This story evokes sad thoughts of what struggles this family had gone through just to see this little girl play piano. This story not only tells a heartfelt and powerful story about the character Nina, but also sheds light on a period of history that is so relevant to today’s political atmosphere. It is so crucial to give background on such an important era of American history and describe figures that helped to create change during that time. This is a wonderful story that has so many layers to peel back and think deeply about. This biographical story is much needed for our current students and is one that needs to be told. Review written by Melissa Shank
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  • Tasha
    January 1, 1970
    This picture book is a completely engrossing look at the life of Nina Simone. Done in a way that welcomes even small children to hear her story, the book opens with a greeting and a lullaby. Using piano keys as an allegory for race, the book looks at the keys through the eyes of a young Nina, who notices that white keys are whole notes while black keys are half notes. She sees something similar in society as well. Nina used music as a way to unite and to protest. Inspired by Martin Luther King, This picture book is a completely engrossing look at the life of Nina Simone. Done in a way that welcomes even small children to hear her story, the book opens with a greeting and a lullaby. Using piano keys as an allegory for race, the book looks at the keys through the eyes of a young Nina, who notices that white keys are whole notes while black keys are half notes. She sees something similar in society as well. Nina used music as a way to unite and to protest. Inspired by Martin Luther King, Jr., her music spoke to people of all color and united them. While the story follows a linear path in time, the information shared focuses on important events in Nina’s life rather than feeling like a chronological list of accomplishments or dates. Instead readers get to see what influenced her and how she grew into her voice as an activist. The illustrations are particularly compelling. Done in black and white, the image of people who arranged as piano keys and the one of dandelion seeds floating downward are particularly compelling. Smart and beautifully designed. Appropriate for ages 4-7.
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  • Stephanie Bange
    January 1, 1970
    An intriguing introduction to Nina Simone's life.One night when Nina's baby is having a hard time getting to sleep, she sings a lullaby and tells the story about some of her civil rights activities.I really wanted to like this more. Briere-Haquet's text was originally written in French. Unfortunately, this translation lies kinda flat on the page. It has a very negative tone about it -- anger, perhaps? I wanted to know more about Nina. Backmatter would have been appreciated.The black and white ar An intriguing introduction to Nina Simone's life.One night when Nina's baby is having a hard time getting to sleep, she sings a lullaby and tells the story about some of her civil rights activities.I really wanted to like this more. Briere-Haquet's text was originally written in French. Unfortunately, this translation lies kinda flat on the page. It has a very negative tone about it -- anger, perhaps? I wanted to know more about Nina. Backmatter would have been appreciated.The black and white artwork is imaginative and stunning, doing its job of drawing in the reader. I can tell that illustrator Bruno Liance did some research on this topic, however there are some flaws. The musicians resemble their likeness, however they are not in the order mentioned in the text. Dr. King is not quite right; his face is stretched out, rather than full. Several faces look familiar in the civil rights spread. Do I see Malcolm X in the back of the group of civil rights protesters?For grades K-3.
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  • Lorie
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published in France for the French Market, this first U.S. edition picture book biography recounts the life of musician and activist Nina Simone. Written in first person as if Nina herself was recounting her life story to her daughter as a lullaby, we see Nina’s early influences as classical pianist as she was trained in childhood. Woven through the narrative is the struggle for civil rights as seen through her eyes as musician and activist. Stunning black and white pen and ink illust Originally published in France for the French Market, this first U.S. edition picture book biography recounts the life of musician and activist Nina Simone. Written in first person as if Nina herself was recounting her life story to her daughter as a lullaby, we see Nina’s early influences as classical pianist as she was trained in childhood. Woven through the narrative is the struggle for civil rights as seen through her eyes as musician and activist. Stunning black and white pen and ink illustrations breathe visual life to the observations on civil rights and the English translation is done well enough that it makes it a good choice for a read aloud picture book. I would recommend this book for purchase by any school or public library.This book was provided by the publisher for professional review by SWON Libraries.
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  • Viviane Elbee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is based on Nina Simone, jazz legend and activist. The black and white illustrations are sophisticated and incredibly textured.It seems aimed at a somewhat older audience (older preschoolers, elementary students - middle grade), though even older fans of Nina Simone would probably also enjoy it. This book could be used in discussions about music & civil rights movements in the USA. It could also be used as a bedtime story, since it starts and ends with putting a child to bed.The ki This book is based on Nina Simone, jazz legend and activist. The black and white illustrations are sophisticated and incredibly textured.It seems aimed at a somewhat older audience (older preschoolers, elementary students - middle grade), though even older fans of Nina Simone would probably also enjoy it. This book could be used in discussions about music & civil rights movements in the USA. It could also be used as a bedtime story, since it starts and ends with putting a child to bed.The kids enjoyed it.I felt this book was lacking a back-matter page, so if you are using this book to learn about Nina Simone, it would help to pair this book's reading with additional books or information from other sources.
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  • Christine Irvin
    January 1, 1970
    Author Alice Brière-Haquet present the story of Nina Simone, a singer of soul music who made her mark in both music and civil rights. Nina was black, and because of the color of her skin, she lived in a world where she was discriminated against. She was a talented singer who longed to bring the world together through her music. This book celebrates Nina's life and her accomplishments. It also shows how much we have accomplished in terms or civil rights as well as how far we still have to go befo Author Alice Brière-Haquet present the story of Nina Simone, a singer of soul music who made her mark in both music and civil rights. Nina was black, and because of the color of her skin, she lived in a world where she was discriminated against. She was a talented singer who longed to bring the world together through her music. This book celebrates Nina's life and her accomplishments. It also shows how much we have accomplished in terms or civil rights as well as how far we still have to go before all people are treated equally. The book is done all in black and white as a statement to how Nina saw her world.
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    As a musician, a parent, and a huge fan of Nina Simone, I was really excited to read this with my children. Ugh. So disappointed. "The white keys are whole notes" and "in music there is only one rhythm" - um, no. Is this supposed to be poetic? It's inaccurate, sloppy writing. (I haven't read the French version; perhaps it makes more sense?) As general rules, white people don't need to be writing in first person as black icons, and in this instance a piano lesson or two would have been helpful. N As a musician, a parent, and a huge fan of Nina Simone, I was really excited to read this with my children. Ugh. So disappointed. "The white keys are whole notes" and "in music there is only one rhythm" - um, no. Is this supposed to be poetic? It's inaccurate, sloppy writing. (I haven't read the French version; perhaps it makes more sense?) As general rules, white people don't need to be writing in first person as black icons, and in this instance a piano lesson or two would have been helpful. Nina Simone's story deserves at least that.
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful. My favorite lines are:“Music has no color. In music there is only one rhythm. Only one heart.”I love how as a twelve year old, Nina took a stand for black rights. I love how she noticed as a three year old the unfairness is white and black keys on the piano. The black and white illustrations are superb.I wish this book had a biography page of Nina Simone in the back as I see done with many picture Books based on real events or a real person. I would love to know even more about Nina Si Powerful. My favorite lines are:“Music has no color. In music there is only one rhythm. Only one heart.”I love how as a twelve year old, Nina took a stand for black rights. I love how she noticed as a three year old the unfairness is white and black keys on the piano. The black and white illustrations are superb.I wish this book had a biography page of Nina Simone in the back as I see done with many picture Books based on real events or a real person. I would love to know even more about Nina Simone. “Dream, my baby, dream,”until you spread your wings...
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  • Jason Hood
    January 1, 1970
    This beautiful biography of Nina Simone weaves an evening lullaby and moments from the Civil Rights movement into a message of hope. With black and white illustrations, seemingly inspired by the keys of a piano, illustrate the systemic nature of racism. “‘The white keys are whole notes and the black keys are flats, or half notes,’ my teacher explained. I asked why. ‘Because that’s just the way it is.’ Yes that’s the way it was. White was whole. Black was half. It was that way everywhere and for This beautiful biography of Nina Simone weaves an evening lullaby and moments from the Civil Rights movement into a message of hope. With black and white illustrations, seemingly inspired by the keys of a piano, illustrate the systemic nature of racism. “‘The white keys are whole notes and the black keys are flats, or half notes,’ my teacher explained. I asked why. ‘Because that’s just the way it is.’ Yes that’s the way it was. White was whole. Black was half. It was that way everywhere and for everyone.”
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    I love Nina Simone and was excited to read this with my (12 yo) daughter. But the story felt disjointed, and I couldn’t find a rhythm with the text. We were even confused about whose point of view the story was being told from at first. A high point was the keeping alive the moment of Nina’s refusing to sing when her mother was asked to give up her seat. Even the illustrations there were captivating.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written with lovely parallels drawn between Nina Simone's brave action in the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s dream. There's lyrical language and a deeply moving message, yet I felt this story was lacking somehow. Perhaps it was the abruptness of the ending or the absence of backmatter about Nina's life and musical career. Still well worth reading! And be sure to take in all the beauty of the illustrations.
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  • Amanda Sanders
    January 1, 1970
    "Nina" tells the story of a young musician who stood up for herself during her 12-year-old church performance. Apparently, she went on to become a civil rights activist, but the story does not go into any more detail of her life and there is no section at the back of the book to tell more and recommend more books on the subject. I like when non fiction that barely skims the surface of a subject gives more details at the back of a book.
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    A brief look back at Nina Simone's life, as told to her daughter.It is illustrated in black and white by French illustrator, Bruno Liance. Alice Briere-Haquet, the author, is also French. It is a beautiful book, but I would have appreciated a note with more details about her life.
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  • Jami Good
    January 1, 1970
    This Nina Simone biography for children had lovely artwork that really made me think. I kept going back to the page with people on the bus, since that illustration moved me deeply. I'd recommend this as a book source out of many, for learning more about Nina Simone, jazz, Civil Rights, and racism in the US.
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