The Trunk Dripped Blood
A trunk dripping blood, discovered at a railway station in Stockton in 1906, launched one of the most famous murder investigations in California history--still debated by crime historians. In 1913, the dismembered body of a young pregnant woman, found in the East River, was traced back to her killer and husband, who remains the only priest ever executed for homicide in the U.S. In 1916, a successful dentist, recently married into a prestigious family, poisoned his in-laws--first with deadly bacteria, then with arsenic--claiming the real murderer was an Egyptian incubus who took control of his body. Drawing on court transcripts, newspaper coverage and other contemporary sources, this collection of historical American true crime stories chronicles five murder cases that became media sensations of their day, making headlines across the country in the decades before radio or television.

The Trunk Dripped Blood Details

TitleThe Trunk Dripped Blood
Author
ReleaseNov 30th, 2017
PublisherExposit Books
ISBN-139781476670393
Rating
GenreCrime, True Crime, Nonfiction

The Trunk Dripped Blood Review

  • Bettye McKee
    January 1, 1970
    True crime from the pastThis volume contains five stories of crime and punishment. Some of the cases are clear cut while others leave the reader with unanswered questions. I still can't figure out quite how Louise Beattie was murdered.Then there's the dismembered body, the real estate swindle, the body in the trunk, and the poisoned in-laws. Justice was much swifter in those days: two months from crime to trial; two months from verdict to gallows. Not always that swift, but the courts didn't mes True crime from the pastThis volume contains five stories of crime and punishment. Some of the cases are clear cut while others leave the reader with unanswered questions. I still can't figure out quite how Louise Beattie was murdered.Then there's the dismembered body, the real estate swindle, the body in the trunk, and the poisoned in-laws. Justice was much swifter in those days: two months from crime to trial; two months from verdict to gallows. Not always that swift, but the courts didn't mess around.32
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