The Collectors (The Collectors, #1)
Even the smallest wish can be dangerous.Look closely.Do you see that marble in the grass? The tiny astronaut with one arm raised? The old-fashioned key in the gutter?Van sees them. Van notices all sorts of things. But usually no one notices Van. He’s small, and always the new kid, easy to overlook. But one day he watches a mysterious girl and a silver squirrel dive into a fountain to steal a coin.And—even more strange—they notice Van.Suddenly, the world changes for Van. It becomes a place where wishes are real. A place where wishes can be collected, just like his little treasures. A place where wishes can come true.But that’s not always a good thing.Not all wishes are good, you see, and even good wishes can have unintended consequences.And Van is about to find out just how big those consequences can be.

The Collectors (The Collectors, #1) Details

TitleThe Collectors (The Collectors, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 9th, 2018
PublisherGreenwillow Books
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy

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The Collectors (The Collectors, #1) Review

  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    One of the things that I absolutely adored about The Collectors was the first chapter. The wonderful image of the spider dangling from the ceiling and our first glimpse at the premise. Such lovely descriptive passages that really capture your interest. The way the story has you questioning wishes. Whether all wishes should come true. Sure it's wonderful to wish for ice cream with dinner and have it come true, but what if a wish could be dangerous and needed to be stopped?Coming from a background One of the things that I absolutely adored about The Collectors was the first chapter. The wonderful image of the spider dangling from the ceiling and our first glimpse at the premise. Such lovely descriptive passages that really capture your interest. The way the story has you questioning wishes. Whether all wishes should come true. Sure it's wonderful to wish for ice cream with dinner and have it come true, but what if a wish could be dangerous and needed to be stopped?Coming from a background in speech-language pathology, I also really appreciated the inclusion of Van, a young boy who is hard of hearing and who wears hearing aids. West accurately describes Van's difficulties in communicating with people when they, for example, don't face him as they're speaking or when they speak too rapidly making it difficult for him to read their lips. There are many examples in the text of Van using the context of a conversation to decipher what the speaker is saying, thus giving the reader a better understanding of what it's like to have a hearing impairment. Eleven-year-old Van (short for Giovanni) currently lives in New York City with his mother, the famous opera singer, following their many travels all over the world. Van's gotten pretty good at being the new kid at school and spending time on his own, but he still would very much like a friend. Van loves to collect things that he finds, a blue glass marble, discarded toys, little things that go unnoticed by most. Van's also really observant. Like the day in the park where he was watching a man flip a coin into the fountain and a squirrel came flying out of the bushes followed closely by a girl. Drawn to the girl, Van tries to strike up a conversation, only to have the girl and squirrel disappear when his mother comes calling after him. Later Van sees the mysterious girl (Pebble) and squirrel (Barnavelt) from the park again and this time he follows them to an odd building belonging to the mysterious group called The Collectors. After being caught trespassing, Van is tasked with finding out information about another collector, Mr. Falborg and reporting back his finding to Pebble. Here's where the story gets really interesting. Mr. Falborg invites Van to his home to view his many collections. Once inside, Mr. Falborg shares one of his prized collections, his Wish Eaters, little creatures who have the power to make wishes come true by eating them. Mr. Falborg gives Van his very own Wish Eater and cautions him about the Collectors wanting to imprison all of the Wish Eaters. Now Van becomes very confused. On the one hand, there are the Collectors who maintain that Wish Eaters are dangerous whereas Mr. Falborg insists he only wants to protect them. There is lots of ambiguity regarding who's the good versus the bad guys, and whether all Wish Eaters are dangerous or not, which will hopefully be answered in the sequel. Now if only I could figure out the wording to safely make my wish for news about its release date. Guess I'll just have to be patient.** E ARC received from Edelweiss Plus **
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  • Idris
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided a physical ARC of The Collectors by Jacqueline West by HarperCollins Publishers and Greenwillow Books in exchange for an honest review.4 stars.I really enjoyed The Collectors. The writing was compulsively readable. I loved the characters and thought they were nicely defined and complex. The worldbuilding was interesting and well-distributed throughout the story. The story was clearly geared toward readers of a certain age, but despite being much older than the intended audience, I was provided a physical ARC of The Collectors by Jacqueline West by HarperCollins Publishers and Greenwillow Books in exchange for an honest review.4 stars.I really enjoyed The Collectors. The writing was compulsively readable. I loved the characters and thought they were nicely defined and complex. The worldbuilding was interesting and well-distributed throughout the story. The story was clearly geared toward readers of a certain age, but despite being much older than the intended audience, the writing didn't strike me as immature at all. It was relatively simple, straightforward storytelling that still felt clever to me. I was a little frustrated by some of the choices made by Van, our main character, but he's a young kid thrown into the center of a big adventure. Who wouldn't make a few missteps in that situation?While my hearing is only slightly below average, I quite appreciated the inclusion of a HoH (hard of hearing) person as the main character. From my admittedly limited perspective, I thought West did well in realistically depicting what limitations Van did and didn't have as a result of being HoH and using hearing aids. More of that please!
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    The CollectorsByJacqueline WestWhat it's all about...Van is the young son of a famous opera singer. They live wherever his mother sings. This makes Van the newest kid in his class...wherever they go. Van is also deaf and wears hearing aids but there are certain situations where he just does not hear what people are saying. Van also likes tiny things. He seems to find something odd and unique wherever he goes. He loves looking down for small discarded treasures. One day he sees a girl and her squ The CollectorsByJacqueline WestWhat it's all about...Van is the young son of a famous opera singer. They live wherever his mother sings. This makes Van the newest kid in his class...wherever they go. Van is also deaf and wears hearing aids but there are certain situations where he just does not hear what people are saying. Van also likes tiny things. He seems to find something odd and unique wherever he goes. He loves looking down for small discarded treasures. One day he sees a girl and her squirrel...that would be Pebbles and her squirrel Barnavelt. Van can both see them and hear them and this is just not supposed to happen. This also marks his entrance into the creepy world of the Collectors. Why I wanted to read it...I love middle grade books that are mixed with a healthy dose of fantasy. This book had that delightful dose. What made me truly enjoy this book...I loved this book because of its wondrous mix of good guys, bad guys and those that are in between. Van gets braver and stronger and that is something he needed. The idea of wishes coming true when you feed the Wish Eaters was fun and then just a tiny bit scary. Well...actually...a lot scary! Wait until you find out what happens when the Wish Eaters are fed! Yikes! Why you should read it, too...Middle grade readers who love a book about a boy who can become a sort of a hero and who love adventures that take place in dark and kind of creepy places...will love this book. I can’t wait to see what Van does next! I received an advance reader’s copy of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss and Amazon. It was my choice to read it and review it.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusGiovanni lives in New York City with his mother, who is an opera singer. His father was a set designer, and the one thing "Van" has kept through all of their moves to different cities is the maquette his father had- a small stage with curtains. He finds objects out on the street and uses them to reinact scenes on the stage. His frequent moves, as well as the fact that he is hard of hearing, occasionally makes it difficult for him to make friends, so when he runs into Peb E ARC from Edelweiss PlusGiovanni lives in New York City with his mother, who is an opera singer. His father was a set designer, and the one thing "Van" has kept through all of their moves to different cities is the maquette his father had- a small stage with curtains. He finds objects out on the street and uses them to reinact scenes on the stage. His frequent moves, as well as the fact that he is hard of hearing, occasionally makes it difficult for him to make friends, so when he runs into Pebble in the park, he feels a connection to her. She's a bit odd, wearing a long coat in the warm weather, but he follows her and eventually finds out that she is part of a group of Collectors who gather wishes and keeps them safe in an underground facility. He also meets Mr. Falborg, who collects a number of different things, including Wish Eaters. He claims that Pebble's group is trying to starve and abuse the Wish Eaters, who are little, tiny and cute, and he gives Van a Wish Eater of his own to keep. Since he needs to feed it wishes, he wishes for a number of things in order to feed it, but wishes are unpredictable. For example, his mother is dating the father of Peter Grey, who doesn't like Van very much, so he wishes that the two parents won't be together, and his mother gets a job at La Scala in Italy. When he then wishes to stay in New York, something happens to his mother to prevent her from traveling. The Collectors are after Van, and when they finally corral him, he finds out more information about what is going on, and decides which side he needs to be on. Strengths: The world building in this was particularly engaging, and Van is able to travel back and forth and meet with inhabitants of both worlds easily, which makes it fun. The story with Peter adds a nice dimension. Van's hearing loss is well portrayed, and his struggles with understanding speech are explained in a way that will help younger readers understand what it might be like. Having an opera singer as a mother is not something many children have, so that was interesting as well. Weaknesses: It was really hard to tell who the good guys were, and even after Van decides, I'm not entirely convinced. Mr. Falborg in particular creeped me out a bit.What I really think: If this were a stand alone, I would buy it, but I don't really need anymore fantasy series. They just are not circulating very well. I love West's The Shadows, but will encourage students to read that one.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to preface this by saying that if you haven't read West's Books of Elsewhere series, get on that STAT and make sure you have those in your arsenal. They are wonderful, and they should tide you over until this book comes out in October. You do not need to have read The Books of Elsewhere to enjoy this - they are not related to this at all - but they are excellent.So. Onward with our current read:This was an adventure! I mean, you didn't know which way it was going to go from one page to I'm going to preface this by saying that if you haven't read West's Books of Elsewhere series, get on that STAT and make sure you have those in your arsenal. They are wonderful, and they should tide you over until this book comes out in October. You do not need to have read The Books of Elsewhere to enjoy this - they are not related to this at all - but they are excellent.So. Onward with our current read:This was an adventure! I mean, you didn't know which way it was going to go from one page to the next. And certainly our main character, Van, a delightfully lovable, capable, yet underdog misunderstood, hard-of-hearing kid, didn't know! And it was his decision. So we were all on the edge of our seats.What if any wish could come true? What if ridiculous wishes or dangerous wishes could come true? Can a wish be dangerous? What if you could collect wishes? Why would anyone want to collect wishes? And oh my, these are just a few of the questions that Van ends up asking himself as he ricochets from one situation to the next. Wishes don't always turn out the way you had planned, and sometimes, you are better off leaving things unfold as they should. And who is this mysterious girl? And why is there a squirrel on her shoulder? And when Van finds out, he finds there are a lot more dangerous things than simply walking alone through the city. Things I loved: how he notices things. Finds little treasures. How he plays with them in his room. His relationship with his mother. That description of how he feels when he sees her as he exits the school building. The mysterious girl and a gent who seems harmless at first. The variables of collecting. How West has portrayed someone who is hard of hearing who yet manages to get along and thrives. And who may be who he is *because* of his disability, and not in spite of it.The world of wishes. So complicated. So fraught with perils.Wonderful characters. Oh my gosh. West does create such fine characters, you will fall in love. I loved Van and our mystery girl (and I'm not going to say her name because I just loved that reveal), and I even loved his mother the opera singer, and snidely Peter, because we all need a bit of a villain even though he is really not such a bad villain. Who is the villain? Hehehe you shall have to wait and see.I am a bit miffed that I have to wait so long now for the second book. But that's okay. That will give me time to reread this one. I ate it up, and it was sooooo good. I need seconds.I received an ARC of this from Jacqueline West in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    What if your wishes could come true? Best-selling middle-grade author Jacqueline West explores this idea in this delightful fantasy novel that will appeal even to older readers and adults. Van Markson, the story’s reluctant preteen protagonist, travels far and wide with his globetrotting mother, a rising opera singer. Because he never settles in one place for very long and has a hearing impairment, Van mostly keeps to himself. What he enjoys more than anything, besides the company of his mother, What if your wishes could come true? Best-selling middle-grade author Jacqueline West explores this idea in this delightful fantasy novel that will appeal even to older readers and adults. Van Markson, the story’s reluctant preteen protagonist, travels far and wide with his globetrotting mother, a rising opera singer. Because he never settles in one place for very long and has a hearing impairment, Van mostly keeps to himself. What he enjoys more than anything, besides the company of his mother, is adding found objects (small discarded or lost items, such as toy cars and figurines) to his collection. With these “treasures,” he happily re-enacts various scenes in which he becomes the heroic “Super Van.” One day, Van’s carefully ordered world of make-believe becomes astonishingly real, and his life is turned inside out. He notices a spider at a restaurant celebration oddly stealing wisps of smoke from a candle and then scurrying off. Soon thereafter, Van sees a silver squirrel and a coppery-haired girl around his age making a dash for a tossed coin in the public fountain. Not only does the girl baffle Van with her strange, frantic actions, but he discovers that the squirrel can talk! Van secretly follows them to a shabby-looking storefront that houses the City Collection Agency, sneaks in, and discovers an underground world filled with robed figures and even more talking animals engaged in a mysterious enterprise. So begins what becomes a dangerous quest for the main character, as Van tries to figure out what this group of collectors is up to. Along the way, he meets still more clusters of collectors and learns that nothing is as it appears, and that wishes have consequences—both good and bad. The author creates a richly atmospheric story filled with moments of subtle humor and many likable characters that we eagerly follow along the surprising twists and turns of the plot. Just when we think we have things figured out, the story plunges readers into even deeper and darker mysteries. West’s beautiful figurative language will delight readers of all ages. This is such an imaginative, original book that it will certainly be in demand. And those of us who enjoyed this author for the first time can look forward to reading more of her work—including her bestselling series, The Books of Elsewhere, and the planned sequel to The Collectors. This review is based on an Advance Reader’s Edition provided by the publisher.
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  • Shelley Sackier
    January 1, 1970
    Many of us take our senses for granted--at least the ones that are fully functional. But when one of them is on the blink, we're suddenly hyper aware of the detrimental deficit. In Jacqueline West's cleverly penned middle-grade fantasy, The Collectors, she expertly holds our hand and leads us through the 'hard of hearing' world of her young character Van (Giovanni Carlos Gaugez-Garcia Markson--a name given to him by his world-touring, opera singing mother), effortfully working to hear life as ev Many of us take our senses for granted--at least the ones that are fully functional. But when one of them is on the blink, we're suddenly hyper aware of the detrimental deficit. In Jacqueline West's cleverly penned middle-grade fantasy, The Collectors, she expertly holds our hand and leads us through the 'hard of hearing' world of her young character Van (Giovanni Carlos Gaugez-Garcia Markson--a name given to him by his world-touring, opera singing mother), effortfully working to hear life as everyone automatically assumes he does, and often dismisses him because he doesn't.But, as is true for many who experience a sensory impairment, other senses often ramp up their efforts to assist where a call for help is needed. Van finds his level of attention to detail far surpasses the ordinary in all of us. He observes, detects, sees, and discovers the tiny things most often overlooked--like a world in which wishes are collected, coveted, eaten, and most important, consequential. We move through Van's magical world filled with characters both delightful and horrifying, wondering, like Van, who is trustworthy, whose ambitions are honest and credible--much in the same way we are forced to rely upon our senses to gather dependable information to help discern right from wrong, and good from evil. No doubt, countless readers would love to find themselves in Van's mysterious world, and chances are, we have all been in a position where we'd give nearly anything for a bucketful of wishes, but beware of the aftermath, the ripple-effect, the results you never saw coming.West's writing in The Collectors, much like that in her incredibly engaging series, The Books of Elsewhere, will capture you within her spellbinding story and lyrical, dulcet words. Even if you cannot hear them, you will wish to see many, many more.
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  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*
    January 1, 1970
    The Collectors by Jacqueline West, 384 pages. Greenwillow, October 2018. $17.Content: G (some danger)BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLEAUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGEVan, 12, has been pretty content following his opera diva mother around the world for her profession. One day, however, he runs into an abrasive girl, accompanied by a squirrel of all things, stealing coins from a fountain. The next day he sees the same girl and squirrel – this time they seem to be working with a spider to steal a wish fr The Collectors by Jacqueline West, 384 pages. Greenwillow, October 2018. $17.Content: G (some danger)BUYING ADVISORY: EL, MS - ADVISABLEAUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGEVan, 12, has been pretty content following his opera diva mother around the world for her profession. One day, however, he runs into an abrasive girl, accompanied by a squirrel of all things, stealing coins from a fountain. The next day he sees the same girl and squirrel – this time they seem to be working with a spider to steal a wish from a birthday party. How can Van even see that wish? He makes the quick choice to follow them and find out exactly what’s what. He doesn’t realize, unfortunately, that he is entangling himself in life and death circumstances. There are two sides to this particular quandary and neither side wishes to give Van all of the information that he needs in order to make good choices – choices that will either save the world or doom it.Welcome Van to the list of reasonable heroic young boy main characters. He’s no Alfred Kropp, but he compares favorably to Wayne Batson’s Door Within series or Jacqueline West’s Books of Elsewhere series.Cindy, Middle School Librarianhttps://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2018...
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  • Nicole Wagner
    January 1, 1970
    I love so many things about this novel!! First, it's book one in a two-book series. I love two-book series. This one is the perfect blend of wrapped-up and open-ended. I'm greatly looking forward to book 2 as I have plenty of questions, but I am also happy with the ending.Second, it's a chapter book appropriate for all readers, from precocious grade-schoolers all the way up to grownups with imagination (I'm 32 and adored it). Third, it's SO original! There are some really tired, if well-loved, k I love so many things about this novel!! First, it's book one in a two-book series. I love two-book series. This one is the perfect blend of wrapped-up and open-ended. I'm greatly looking forward to book 2 as I have plenty of questions, but I am also happy with the ending.Second, it's a chapter book appropriate for all readers, from precocious grade-schoolers all the way up to grownups with imagination (I'm 32 and adored it). Third, it's SO original! There are some really tired, if well-loved, kids' fantasy tropes out there, and this book diverges from them all. The last kids' fantasy that really captured my imagination this way is The Golden Compass. Fourth, the protagonist is the introverted son of an opera singer. He's also hard of hearing and uses hearing aids. His being differently abled is handled realistically, without fuss, but also without tokenizing him. I was completely rooting for this kid, and am so happy to see the hard of hearing community well represented here. Fifth, it handles moral ambiguity really well. Sometimes the answer isn't black and white. Sometimes you have to do something unpleasant because it's the right thing to do. Sometimes we can't indulge our desires because doing so is the wrong thing to do. Highly recommended!!!
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  • Carrie ReadingtoKnow
    January 1, 1970
    I launched into this read hoping for the best. It had a "Secret Keepers" vibe about it, ala Trenton Lee Stewart. I did think the story was clever and unique at the beginning but I didn't find West to be a riveting story teller and I have to confess boredom by the middle of the story. As the book was wrapping up I was trying to ascertain the main message that the author wanted me to take away and, for the life of me, I couldn't discover what it was. There seemed to be no clear purpose or point in I launched into this read hoping for the best. It had a "Secret Keepers" vibe about it, ala Trenton Lee Stewart. I did think the story was clever and unique at the beginning but I didn't find West to be a riveting story teller and I have to confess boredom by the middle of the story. As the book was wrapping up I was trying to ascertain the main message that the author wanted me to take away and, for the life of me, I couldn't discover what it was. There seemed to be no clear purpose or point in the story being told and without a clear purpose, my use for a book is fairly eliminated. I want to know why I'm being engaged with as a reader. I want to know what the author wants me to think about or believe in and I just could not say what the main idea is behind "The Collectors". West was unclear and vague. It definitely feels like a sequel is in the works, but for my part I'm not engaged enough to want to seek it out and so I probably won't. I can't say that I'm necessarily sorry to have read this particular title but I will say that I'm more likely to forget it as not.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    I highly recommend this fantasy for children. Although aspects of the protagonist and plot feel familiar, West creates a story that is engaging and spot on for children. Van is a likeable and believable character and I loved the talking animals, especially Barnevelt the squirrel. There is humor, mystery, real-life family issues, magic, and just the right amount of scary. I would recommend this for fans of Narnia, Wonderstruck, the Borrowers, and Harry Potter (but less dark/scary). That being sai I highly recommend this fantasy for children. Although aspects of the protagonist and plot feel familiar, West creates a story that is engaging and spot on for children. Van is a likeable and believable character and I loved the talking animals, especially Barnevelt the squirrel. There is humor, mystery, real-life family issues, magic, and just the right amount of scary. I would recommend this for fans of Narnia, Wonderstruck, the Borrowers, and Harry Potter (but less dark/scary). That being said, at 384 pages, its length may discourage younger readers. This is part one of a planned two-volume set, but does have a satisfying ending. Cannot wait for the concluding volume. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher.
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  • Liz Edelbrock
    January 1, 1970
    This contemporary fantasy by Jacqueline West was a wonderful read. The world building is well done, the writing lyrical but not overly fussy, and the characters believeable. The story does a nice job of showing how "good" and "right" choices aren't always straightforward or obvious. I loved that the main character wears hearing aids, and his hearing difference is what allows him to notice small and fantastical things. There was humor, action, adventure, and heart. Highly recommend for any middle This contemporary fantasy by Jacqueline West was a wonderful read. The world building is well done, the writing lyrical but not overly fussy, and the characters believeable. The story does a nice job of showing how "good" and "right" choices aren't always straightforward or obvious. I loved that the main character wears hearing aids, and his hearing difference is what allows him to notice small and fantastical things. There was humor, action, adventure, and heart. Highly recommend for any middle grade reader (and middle grade readers at heart!)*I received an ARC of this book from the publisher.
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  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Greenwillow/Harper Collins for the advance reader’s edition of this book. This is a fantasy novel for middle grades (ages 8 - 12). I’m way beyond that age, and I’m not usually a fan of fantasy novels, but I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The main character Van accidentally enters a world where dreams can come true, but also finds you have to be careful what you wish for. The wishes may not always be granted in the way that you wished.This would be an excellent book to use as a teachi Thank you to Greenwillow/Harper Collins for the advance reader’s edition of this book. This is a fantasy novel for middle grades (ages 8 - 12). I’m way beyond that age, and I’m not usually a fan of fantasy novels, but I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The main character Van accidentally enters a world where dreams can come true, but also finds you have to be careful what you wish for. The wishes may not always be granted in the way that you wished.This would be an excellent book to use as a teaching tool to show how your actions may not always have the expected result.
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  • Kelly Risser
    January 1, 1970
    Jacqueline West writes the perfect middle grade novel. This story held the right amount of humor, mystery, and magic to keep me speeding through the pages. Van is a very likable main character. I loved that he wears hearing aids and doesn’t want to be changed. He likes himself as he is. He is brave and smart. The imagery and descriptions were so beautiful. This is a fun book for all ages!
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  • Lisa Wright
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever made a wish on a star, or a coin, or candle? Did you ever think about how badly wrong that wish could go? Van, who is deaf without his hearing aids, finds himself caught between those who capture wishes to keep them "safe" and those who want them set "free." Fabulous concept, fast-paced plot, unusual characters. I loved this!
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  • Shae McDaniel
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book so much. I love the nuance. I love that the protagonist is Deaf. I love that the plot goes beyond the surface "be careful what you wish for" trope into something deeply interesting. I've already read it twice and can't wait to make it thrice.
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  • Cathleen
    January 1, 1970
    My kids and I are looking forward to the opportunity to review,"The Collectors" by Jacqueline West.
  • Ann N.
    January 1, 1970
    Suspenseful, funny, and just scary enough. I can’t wait to read the second book in this series!
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    This reminded me of faeries and genies and how you have to be careful how you phrase your wish. I particularly like how neither side is all good or all bad.
  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful and scary and exciting adventure. I love little Van, and I love the world he lives in, and each chapter made me as curious as he is - finding treasures everywhere.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this story of secrets and wishes, magic and friendship, big treasures and small ones.
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Magic, beasts, clashing between right and wrong, what happens when one person has too much power?
  • Allison Ruth
    January 1, 1970
    The Collectors is a wonderfully imagined book! It's well written with characters you can root for. It would make a great family read-aloud, but is definitely a thrilling page turner even for young readers on their own. Full review on my blog
  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    Just like her “Elsewhere” series, author Jacqueline West has created a unique fantasy world that will mystify, give readers the creeps, as well as something/someone to cheer for. Van is a hard of hearing, short of confidence boy who travels the world and from show to show with his opera singing mother. He is unnoticed by nearly everyone, but misses very little himself. In fact, he even sees a young girl and her squirrel when they shouldn’t be visible. Thus, Van enters the world of Wish Collector Just like her “Elsewhere” series, author Jacqueline West has created a unique fantasy world that will mystify, give readers the creeps, as well as something/someone to cheer for. Van is a hard of hearing, short of confidence boy who travels the world and from show to show with his opera singing mother. He is unnoticed by nearly everyone, but misses very little himself. In fact, he even sees a young girl and her squirrel when they shouldn’t be visible. Thus, Van enters the world of Wish Collectors, Wish Eaters and those who would control them. Fantasy-loving students in grades 4-8 who are looking for a book that does not just rehash the usual magical creatures will enjoy this one. No notes on possible problematic content needed. Thanks for the dARC, Edelweiss.
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