Braving the Wilderness
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - A timely and important new book that challenges everything we think we know about cultivating true belonging in our communities, organizations, and culture, from the #1 bestselling author of Rising Strong, Daring Greatly, and The Gifts of Imperfection"True belonging doesn't require us to change who we are. It requires us to be who we are." Social scientist Brene Brown, PhD, LMSW, has sparked a global conversation about the experiences that bring meaning to our lives--experiences of courage, vulnerability, love, belonging, shame, and empathy. In Braving the Wilderness, Brown redefines what it means to truly belong in an age of increased polarization. With her trademark mix of research, storytelling, and honesty, Brown will again change the cultural conversation while mapping a clear path to true belonging.Brown argues that we're experiencing a spiritual crisis of disconnection, and introduces four practices of true belonging that challenge everything we believe about ourselves and each other. She writes, "True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary. But in a culture that's rife with perfectionism and pleasing, and with the erosion of civility, it's easy to stay quiet, hide in our ideological bunkers, or fit in rather than show up as our true selves and brave the wilderness of uncertainty and criticism. But true belonging is not something we negotiate or accomplish with others; it's a daily practice that demands integrity and authenticity. It's a personal commitment that we carry in our hearts." Brown offers us the clarity and courage we need to find our way back to ourselves and to each other. And that path cuts right through the wilderness. Brown writes, "The wilderness is an untamed, unpredictable place of solitude and searching. It is a place as dangerous as it is breathtaking, a place as sought after as it is feared. But it turns out to be the place of true belonging, and it's the bravest and most sacred place you will ever stand."Praise for Brene Brown's Rising Strong"[Brown's] research and work have given us a new vocabulary, a way to talk with each other about the ideas and feelings and fears we've all had but haven't quite known how to articulate. . . . [She] empowers us each to be a little more courageous." --The Huffington Post

Braving the Wilderness Details

TitleBraving the Wilderness
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 12th, 2017
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780812995848
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Psychology, Audiobook

Braving the Wilderness Review

  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    She phoned this one in. There's good stuff in here because she's awesome, but there's not enough to warrant a new book. I do wish she would try again to think through tribe and inclusion. Her insights are good and useful, but there is no coherent theory or story here.
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  • Lucille Zimmerman
    January 1, 1970
    I gave this book five stars because as usual Brown has done her research, and she is a masterful storyteller. These are the two passions of my life: research and storytelling.I'm a Licensed Professional Counselor and an author, so I devour Brown's books. My favorite is The Power of Vulnerability. I have watched her TED talks probably a hundred times. I tell every one of my clients to read her books and watch her videos. I'm a huge fan.However, this book wasn't fun or pleasurable the way her othe I gave this book five stars because as usual Brown has done her research, and she is a masterful storyteller. These are the two passions of my life: research and storytelling.I'm a Licensed Professional Counselor and an author, so I devour Brown's books. My favorite is The Power of Vulnerability. I have watched her TED talks probably a hundred times. I tell every one of my clients to read her books and watch her videos. I'm a huge fan.However, this book wasn't fun or pleasurable the way her other books have been. I listened on Audible and felt pained much of the time. Part of that is because I identify with the ways I've armored up after the 2016 election. I lean conservative and have tried to share my views with civility and have always encouraged people to respectfully share theirs. Yet I've been called every name you could imagine. Sadly the worst offenses came from my Christian brothers and sisters who see things differently. One of the cruelest people was an author who wrote a book (that I purchased) about how we need to listen to peoples' stories so we can understand their points of view. Oh the irony. I finally reached a place where I lumped all of them into a group of haters. I stopped listening and stopped caring what the opposing side had to say.With that as my history, I found Brown's research about dehumanization helpful. I needed her information about what helps people who are in heated debates.When I'm in the counseling setting this is easy for me to do. I love to hear all sorts of views, even ones I disagree with. I want to know how and why people see the world the way they do. But, experiencing our country so divided, I admit I had armored up and sided up.I will definitely seek to apply parts of Brown's book to my life.
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  • Elyse
    January 1, 1970
    Library overdrive Audiobook.... read by Breen Brown Note: I enjoyed this so much that I’m considering buying the Audiobook.There may be thousands of people around the world who are huge fans .....and even though I had read one of her books ( wasn’t all that impressed), and later listened to one of her Audiobook’s ( I was much more impressed), I still didn’t consider myself a fan of her work - and quite frankly I really didn’t really ‘get’ what her deal was in the world. In fact - I didn’t even k Library overdrive Audiobook.... read by Breen Brown Note: I enjoyed this so much that I’m considering buying the Audiobook.There may be thousands of people around the world who are huge fans .....and even though I had read one of her books ( wasn’t all that impressed), and later listened to one of her Audiobook’s ( I was much more impressed), I still didn’t consider myself a fan of her work - and quite frankly I really didn’t really ‘get’ what her deal was in the world. In fact - I didn’t even know what she looked like until I read this book which lead me to research ‘her’ a little more. A semi- famous- very successful social scientist called herself a “Research Storyteller”. It’s a perfect way to describe Brene Brown. By the way, I love her first name, Brene.I admit - after listening to this Audiobook—I’m in! I’m a fan of the work she’s doing. The way she talked about belonging - as opposed to being excluded - had me looking at this topic from an angle I hadn’t thought about. One of the early stories she shared about from her childhood had me wondering if I had ever abandoned my children in ‘spirit’ - from a look of disappointment- from my silence - from not comforting them when they needed me. It hurt to think that maybe at times I did ......and that even though 90% of the time I might not have - or even 99% of the time I didn’t .....one time - 1% could be enough to shift a child’s self. worth. Brene’s story was so powerful - I replayed the audiobook from the beginning to have Paul hear this story. Paul continued listening for a couple of hours -since he’s not done - I guess I’m just going to buy it after all. The topics & themes in “Braving the Wilderness”......are brilliant tools of gold —( she’s not preaching) —- she’s presenting years of research from SOCIAL STUDIES. Her work presented in this book is AT LEAST engaging! She has our full attention!The political issues issues she talks about - ways in which we divide - etc. are also interesting. Brene is an animated spokeswoman. I happen to agree with the benefits - the concepts she speaks of learning to be comfortable with being uncomfortable...sharing our vulnerability and being true to ourselves rather than trying to fit in. It can be very difficult to bring up uncomfortable issues in our relationships- we make mistakes - don’t always do it right - but with practice we get better. By avoiding confrontation in order to feel more comfortable- nothing gets accomplished - and ‘inside’ we really don’t feel any better. Brene details effective ways that help support tricky situations we all face in life....Not from winging a good idea...she speaks from years of THAT RESEARCH AGAIN. Paul, my husband, was equally as impressed with Brene Brown on this Audiobook as I was. Her dedication to ‘research’ shows and her authenticity is clear! Personal value isn’t instantly measurable - but it couldn’t possibly be so - instead its a little at a time. As we listen and explore the things Brene presents - we are slowly taking in alternative effective ways to support more joy, satisfaction, inspiration, empowerment, and love with ourselves and others. Brene Brown is an excellent- gifted speaker. Easy on the ears!!!
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  • Olga Tomchin
    January 1, 1970
    Huge disappointment. My partner who read the book with me pointed out that Brown mentions that she has a problem with not giving uninformed opinions on political topics but then she goes and does exactly that with much of this book. This is white liberal centrist lady kumbaya bullshit. She doesn't seem to understand how systemic violence works or oppression. There's an extreme amount of false equivalency in the book. Calling trump a pig is not at all similar to him dehumanizing women. Additional Huge disappointment. My partner who read the book with me pointed out that Brown mentions that she has a problem with not giving uninformed opinions on political topics but then she goes and does exactly that with much of this book. This is white liberal centrist lady kumbaya bullshit. She doesn't seem to understand how systemic violence works or oppression. There's an extreme amount of false equivalency in the book. Calling trump a pig is not at all similar to him dehumanizing women. Additionally, the book was extremely smug and prescriptive. For people who are actively engaged in resisting fascism and state violence, I would definitely skip this book.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    Sorry Brene Brown, you lost me on this one. I love you but all I could think throughout this was "easy for you to say, white middle class Christian lady."
  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Brene Brown’s new book “Braving The Wilderness” is her most vital and necessary book yet. The book’s subject is how to build and maintain connections and a sense of belonging while also staying true to ourselves and our beliefs. Through her research studies, personal experiences, and case studies combined with her remarkable perceptiveness and wisdom she provides essential directions through the wilderness of loneliness and disconnection. In today’s climate of divisiveness and separation, this i Brene Brown’s new book “Braving The Wilderness” is her most vital and necessary book yet. The book’s subject is how to build and maintain connections and a sense of belonging while also staying true to ourselves and our beliefs. Through her research studies, personal experiences, and case studies combined with her remarkable perceptiveness and wisdom she provides essential directions through the wilderness of loneliness and disconnection. In today’s climate of divisiveness and separation, this is a book everyone should read. But it’s not some bitter medicine to swallow. As evidenced by her massively popular TED talks and books, her writing style and the accompanying research resonate with people and feed a real hunger for understanding, hope, and healing. Highly recommended.Thank you to Random House and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    This book came to me at just the right time. I found it meaningful, heartfelt, and the themes of belonging and being brave really resonated with me. I know Brené Brown has quite the cult following, but this was the first book of hers I have seriously read. A few years ago I had The Gifts of Imperfection foisted on me at work, and I was underwhelmed by the book and ended up hate-skimming it. A few friends had loved Daring Greatly, and now that I have read and appreciated Braving the Wilderness, I This book came to me at just the right time. I found it meaningful, heartfelt, and the themes of belonging and being brave really resonated with me. I know Brené Brown has quite the cult following, but this was the first book of hers I have seriously read. A few years ago I had The Gifts of Imperfection foisted on me at work, and I was underwhelmed by the book and ended up hate-skimming it. A few friends had loved Daring Greatly, and now that I have read and appreciated Braving the Wilderness, I'm ready to give another Brown book a try.However, I will admit this isn't a perfect book. Brown tells a lot of stories, both hers and from friends and from her research in social work, but she repeats her themes a lot, and she doesn't give many specific details from her actual research. I was trying to describe this book to my husband, and struggled to accurately characterize it. It's part self-help, part memoir, part-psychology, and part inspirational. The reason this book spoke to me, however, was because the discussion about the need to belong was so impactful that I texted several friends about the book. It's a good book to read during these divisive political times, and I would recommend this book to anyone trying to survive the Trump era with their mental health intact.Favorite Quote"Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don't belong. You will always find it because you've made that your mission. Stop scouring people's faces for evidence that you're not enough. You will always find it because you've made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don't negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluation, especially our own. No one belongs here more than you."
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  • Joy Matteson
    January 1, 1970
    It ended TOO SOON. *cries silently*Brown's words are life-affirming, challenging. Her books tend to re-verberate in my soul, in my mind--so I'm actively savoring them as I go about my day. I belong to myself--and I belong to no one. Speak truth to bullshit. Be civil. Pithy, perhaps--cliched, maybe. But there's simplicity in the brevity here, as one knows Brown has done an avalanche worth of data analysis to back up her simplified phrases.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    Although I like Brene Brown, I have to admit that this book was quite a bit of a letdown for me. I was looking for so much more. I don't feel that there was enough "new" information to warrant a new book, let alone a 163 page book that has a $28 price tag attached to it. In the end, Brene published a book on the backs of the numerous people that she quotes throughout the short book. I'm not impressed.
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  • ttg
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of Brown's work (and TED talk), but this was just okay. I don't think she had enough pulled together/thought through for a full release, so it feels not as complete. As if rushed for a deadline.I like the ideas of being brave with one's conviction, and willing to put yourself out there, even if you're alone to stand up for what you believe, but this still felt very *white* and from a protected, "majority" space.Two pieces that frustrated me.A) At one point, Brown tells the story of a p I'm a fan of Brown's work (and TED talk), but this was just okay. I don't think she had enough pulled together/thought through for a full release, so it feels not as complete. As if rushed for a deadline.I like the ideas of being brave with one's conviction, and willing to put yourself out there, even if you're alone to stand up for what you believe, but this still felt very *white* and from a protected, "majority" space.Two pieces that frustrated me.A) At one point, Brown tells the story of a pastor that speaks up for LGBTQ rights. This story is to help illustrate how one, even in the face of the (potentially homophobic christian) community they serve, they are will to stand up in support of others. This was described as Bravery, which it is for those who are in a community that encourages you to stay quiet in your majority comfort.What would have *also* been nice is to pair stories of people coming from majority/dominant culture along with those who have had to break out into the wilderness much much earlier, out of necessity, because they are NOT the majority. Because they are queer, or disabled, are not white, etc. The narrative around bravery is "different" when it feels less like a choice, but it's no less Brave. The focusing on the straight pastor supporting LGBTQ rights, but not including a story of an actual LGBTQ person alongside it felt more...performative for the sake of the narrative. (Not that the pastor is performative. Just how her story is being used here.) At one point, those Braving the Wilderness are likened to being at a outdoor dance party, like, "I want to go to There"- the place where people are free, dancing and Brave, but without also giving time to those that are out there dancing because For Real, they have Zero choice, and had not been given the option to go Inside. So, some are out in the Wilderness making the best of what that means, and yes, sometimes that means dancing. Some might be out in the wilderness and are sad, or lonely, or are just doing their laundry, but they're still in the Wilderness, because they are living their Non-Majority lives. It felt like for Majority people, like say, straight people, white people, abled people, they can Choose the Wilderness, and then have the cool option of touristing to the Wilderness Dance Party, but then still not really fathom the chasm the rests between those that Choose to go back Inside, like when it gets cold or really really hard, and those that still have to be outside no matter what.B) The second point that really frustrated me was the call for civility in these discussions as we Brave the Wilderness. This part felt really really White Lady Liberal Feminism. Like, "If only you told me that criticism about my behavior in a nicer tone, or if you did it in a compliment sandwich, I would more likely listen to you tell me about that racist thing I just did." I think calling for people to be civil is fine. Let's be nice to each other, sure. BUT, if it's being pushed and also it's not discussed how calls for civility are often weaponized by white people, especially White Women, as a way to control the conversation (and STILL end up oppressing others.) I feel like white people especially, and I'm a white woman, need to walk into those "Let's be civil" conversations with a full understanding of how we abuse those specific calls to action for our own favor- to protect us, make us less uncomfortable, and put the burden on others to have to adjust to what we think is Real Civil Discourse. I found Brown's call for civility without cautioning about how that argument often abuses people of color to be troubling.So, for me, as a queer disabled person, I found this book is probably "nicer" and more inspiring if you're coming from the Majority space. Where it can feel novel/scary to stand up for someone who is different than you. If you're coming from a not-majority space though, it may not feel as connected as you may wish it to be.My last point that frustrated me is that I wish Brown showed more data. Often she writes, "The data showed us that people feel like X," but never lists more concrete data. it's very general about big points, and it normally made me wish for something slightly heavier on the science part of social science. I listened to the audio version, and thought Brown did a fine job on the narration. I like her voice, so it was nice to listen to.
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  • Emily Troutman
    January 1, 1970
    I usually love Brene's books, but this one just didn't seem to move me like the others have. I don't fully understand why she felt the need to make it so political. The same points could have been made, in my opinion, without them.
  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    The best description I have for Brene' Browns' books is she is constantly dropping truth bombs on my head and Braving the Wilderness is no exception. Navigating issues like shame, the persisting feeling of loneliness that people feel in a world that is more connected than ever, and how to humanize people who believe differently than ourselves, are not easy issues to tackle. Brown does so with research backed data and stories from her own life with ease. "But the more we're willing to to seek out The best description I have for Brene' Browns' books is she is constantly dropping truth bombs on my head and Braving the Wilderness is no exception. Navigating issues like shame, the persisting feeling of loneliness that people feel in a world that is more connected than ever, and how to humanize people who believe differently than ourselves, are not easy issues to tackle. Brown does so with research backed data and stories from her own life with ease. "But the more we're willing to to seek out moments of collective joy and show up for experiences of collective pain-for real, in person, not online-the more difficult it becomes to deny our human connection, even with people we may disagree with. Not only do moments of collective emotion remind us of what is possible between people, but they also remind us of what is true about the human spirit. We are wired for connection. But the key is that, in any given moment of it, it has to be real."
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    “Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don’t belong. You will always find it because you’ve made that your mission. Stop scouring people’s faces for evidence that you’re not enough. You will always find it because you’ve made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don’t negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluations, especially o “Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don’t belong. You will always find it because you’ve made that your mission. Stop scouring people’s faces for evidence that you’re not enough. You will always find it because you’ve made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don’t negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluations, especially our own. No one belongs here more than you.”This was my first time reading anything by Brené Brown, but I can envision myself reading more of her work in the future. Brown provides useful insight into the the increasing disconnect between people, especially political polarization. Even if you find yourself disagreeing with some of her opinions, there’s a lot of food for thought here.
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  • Liza Fireman
    January 1, 1970
    I will never get tired from listening to Brene Brown. She is so awesome, so authentic, so vulnerable. And on audio, she is even better. She is funny, witty and amazing. In this book, Brene is talking much more about belonging, or the feeling of not belonging. A tough feeling. And the small tiny incidents are the ones that create sometimes the largest scars of are souls. Here is one such example, soul crusher one.The list was in numeric order. If your number was there, you’d made the team. If you I will never get tired from listening to Brene Brown. She is so awesome, so authentic, so vulnerable. And on audio, she is even better. She is funny, witty and amazing. In this book, Brene is talking much more about belonging, or the feeling of not belonging. A tough feeling. And the small tiny incidents are the ones that create sometimes the largest scars of are souls. Here is one such example, soul crusher one.The list was in numeric order. If your number was there, you’d made the team. If your number wasn’t there, you were out. I was number 62. My eye went straight for the 60s: 59, 61, 64, 65. I looked again. I just couldn’t process it. I thought if I stared hard enough and the universe knew how much was on the line, the number might magically appear. I was ripped out of my negotiation with the universe by Kris’s screaming. She was jumping up and down, and before I could make sense of what was happening, her dad had jumped out of the car, run up to her, grabbed her, and twirled her around, just like in the movies. I would later hear through the grapevine that I was a solid dancer but not really Bearkadette material. No bows. No shine. No group. No friends. Nowhere to belong.I was alone. And it felt devastating. I walked back to our station wagon and got in the backseat, and my dad drove away. My parents didn’t say one word. Not a single word. The silence cut into me like a knife to the heart. They were ashamed of me and for me. My dad had been captain of the football team. My mom had been head of her drill team. I was nothing. My parents, especially my father, valued being cool and fitting in above all else. I was not cool. I didn’t fit in.And now, for the first time, I didn’t belong to my family either.Brene is talking about the importance of belonging. not belonging in our families is still one of the most dangerous hurts. That’s because it has the power to break our heart, our spirit, and our sense of self-worth. It broke all three for me. And then there is one Maya Angelou's quote that she can't understand. She refuses to contain. And she does feel like there is some explanation to it, that should make sense. But there was one quote from Maya Angelou that I deeply disagreed with. It was a quote on belonging, which I came across when I was teaching a course on race and class at the University of Houston. In an interview with Bill Moyers that aired on public television in 1973, Dr. Angelou said:You are only free when you realize you belong no place—you belong every place—no place at all. The price is high. The reward is great.I love Brene's courage of being herself, not compromising on what she present. She talked about it also in The Power of Vulnerability: Teachings of Authenticity, Connections and Courage. When people ask her: can you leave shame out, we want the inspirational parts only. Just courage, not shame. Or being asked he’d like me to not curse. Brene is brave, authentic and awesome (I said that already, but it should be said many times). She says:Bull. Shit. This is total bullshit. I’m not doing this. I’d rather never speak again. I am done moving.I love her standing for who she is. And I wish more books like Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, who are extremely weak on the likability points, would learn this: There are lots of great teachers and speakers—you’ll just need to find one who will dress up, clean up, and shut up. That’s not me. Not anymore.I shall not be moved.Of course, I shall not be moved sounds a bit strong. But no one shall be tried to be moved to a place where they don't feel themselves anymore. And too many people, and too many places give the impression that they want us to be moved. Sometimes it's our imagination and fears (aka learn to try not to be liked by everyone, or else you will be a wall flower), and sometimes it is actually true (and terrible, and feels terrible). Brene, keep going! And be your amazing self! And help others be their amazing selves! 4 stars. Brene is always great to listen to, she has a comic moments, and her painful/funny/great stories.
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  • Taryn Pierson
    January 1, 1970
    I have been aware of Brené Brown’s work for a while now but had put off reading her because sometimes self-help seems a little too...something for me. I’m very committed to the idea that I am perfect in every way and therefore need no help of any kind. I’m also cynical and get squicky when venturing too far into feelings territory. Of course, since Brown has made a career of studying vulnerability and shame, reading her book challenged me a lot and made me consider some uncomfortable ideas. The I have been aware of Brené Brown’s work for a while now but had put off reading her because sometimes self-help seems a little too...something for me. I’m very committed to the idea that I am perfect in every way and therefore need no help of any kind. I’m also cynical and get squicky when venturing too far into feelings territory. Of course, since Brown has made a career of studying vulnerability and shame, reading her book challenged me a lot and made me consider some uncomfortable ideas. The themes of Braving the Wilderness are seemingly contradictory: finding belonging and gaining the courage to stand alone. But Brown explains how the two are inextricably tied together. While I’m still wrestling with some of her claims, and I’m not sure I’ll ever fully agree with her on everything, I did take away one tidbit that for me was worth the cost of the book all on its own. She talks about how when we’re afraid, we want to cover the entire world with leather so that when we run up against things, they won’t hurt us. But of course that’s bound to fail because we can’t control everything about the world. Instead, we should put our shoes on. It’s a simple metaphor to express a simple idea, that we can only control ourselves and not the people or systems around us, but I realized I had been wasting a godawful lot of energy trying to bend and contort and force my world to be more accommodating of me, when what I should have been doing was armoring myself up a little bit.
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  • Elise Cripe
    January 1, 1970
    quick and easy read that gave me some solid things to work on and think about. perfect book for me right now.
  • Laurie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Three stars instead of four because the book is very short; it felt like she was just starting to get into the good stuff when it ended, much to my disappointment.
  • Laura Noggle
    January 1, 1970
    “Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don’t belong. You will always find it because you’ve made that your mission. Stop scouring people’s faces for evidence that you’re not enough. You will always find it because you’ve made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don’t negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluation, especially ou “Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don’t belong. You will always find it because you’ve made that your mission. Stop scouring people’s faces for evidence that you’re not enough. You will always find it because you’ve made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don’t negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluation, especially our own. No one belongs here more than you.”This book is beautiful and so worth your time - also, it's very short.Brené Brown is gifted with words, and guaranteed to make you think.“True belonging is the spiritual practice of believing in and belonging to yourself so deeply that you can share your most authentic self with the world and find sacredness in both being a part of something and standing alone in the wilderness. True belonging doesn’t require you to change who you are; it requires you to be who you are.”
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I won't go into too much detail as to why I liked the book. The book is short and to the point. Many, many sections stood out to me. I will highlight some of my favorites. "Today we are edging closer and closer to a world where political and ideological discourse has become an exercise in dehumanization. And social media are the primary platforms for our dehumanizing behavior. On Twitter and Facebook we can rapidly push the people with whom we disagree into the dangerous territory of moral excl I won't go into too much detail as to why I liked the book. The book is short and to the point. Many, many sections stood out to me. I will highlight some of my favorites. "Today we are edging closer and closer to a world where political and ideological discourse has become an exercise in dehumanization. And social media are the primary platforms for our dehumanizing behavior. On Twitter and Facebook we can rapidly push the people with whom we disagree into the dangerous territory of moral exclusion, with little to no accountability, and often in complete anonymity." THIS "...shouldn't the rallying cry just be All Lives Matter? No. Because the humanity wasn't stripped from all the lives the way it was stripped from the lives of black citizens. In order for slavery to work, in order for us to buy, sell, beat, and trade people like animals, Americans had to completely dehumanize slaves. And whether we directly participated in that or were simply a member of a culture that at one time normalized that behavior, it shaped us." pg. 90 Pretty much the entire section titled "BULLSHIT"My favorite quotes of all: "The goal is to get to the place where we can think, I am aware of whats happening, the part I play, and how I can make it better, and that doesn't mean I have to deny the joy in my life." "Stop walking through the world looking for confirmation that you don't belong. You will always find it because you made that your mission. Stop scouring people's faces for evidence that you're not enough. You will always find it because you've made that your goal. True belonging and self-worth are not goods; we don't negotiate their value with the world. The truth about who we are lives in our hearts. Our call to courage is to protect our wild heart against constant evaluation, especially our own. No one belongs here more than you."
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  • Reem A
    January 1, 1970
    I kinda hated it. I don’t understand why she chose to talk about American politics for half the book. I’m not American, and as much as am aware of what’s happening on that side of the world, I have no interest in reading about it. I felt like it was shoved down my throat. It started out really well. But I didn’t really learn anything new. Also, I think I might’ve confused this book for something else. I thought she was working on a book called wholehearted living. I have no idea why I thought th I kinda hated it. I don’t understand why she chose to talk about American politics for half the book. I’m not American, and as much as am aware of what’s happening on that side of the world, I have no interest in reading about it. I felt like it was shoved down my throat. It started out really well. But I didn’t really learn anything new. Also, I think I might’ve confused this book for something else. I thought she was working on a book called wholehearted living. I have no idea why I thought that but I assumed this book was going to be about that.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I read some of the reviews that fall perfectly into what it is Brown points out in the book: you either decide "for" or "against," without letting yourself wade in the uncomfortable middle. Perhaps someone calls bullshit on that but, as much as I wish this book had been longer, it really hit hard on some stuff I've been thinking about relating to connection, to discourse, and to how divided we have become as a people (I already see people reading this review and stopping here because they're rea I read some of the reviews that fall perfectly into what it is Brown points out in the book: you either decide "for" or "against," without letting yourself wade in the uncomfortable middle. Perhaps someone calls bullshit on that but, as much as I wish this book had been longer, it really hit hard on some stuff I've been thinking about relating to connection, to discourse, and to how divided we have become as a people (I already see people reading this review and stopping here because they're ready to call me a hippie white liberal living on cloud nine -- sure, I fit a few of those, but I'm also deeply devoted to change, to equality, to compassion, to empathy, and to putting my money where my mouth is in order to enact change toward this...I'm doing what I can to ensure I'm less of an asshole than I could be. Imperfect, messy, privileged because of a million reasons, and yet not allowing myself to be ignorant of any of those things). This book hits home an idea that we've seen again and again on social media especially. That we're all too willing to put people into the "in" or the "out," without recognizing there's a lot of depth and nuance to each of us. Brown gives a lot of examples, and she talks about how we can have collective moments of joy or grief that really show us that middle ground, where people aren't quick to put you in or out (think: concerts, global tragedies, funerals). She doesn't call for ending divisions or everyone agreeing. In fact, that's the problem. What she calls for is for everyone to slow the hell down, be patient, be willing to call out the bullshit (so, all of those people who have An Opinion but literally know nothing on the topic), be willing to be uncomfortable and strong in what you believe in and do, and to set and respect boundaries. It's a call to get comfortable being uncomfortable. About belonging to yourself, rather than trying to fit in. Does this book address some really meaty stuff it could have (think: systems of oppression)? Nope. There are weak spots. It's not big or deep enough. But it's a start. It's stepping out into that uncomfortable wilderness to begin a much-needed dialog and action toward letting go of the destructive "us" vs "them" dynamics. The book isn't about changing the world. It's about changing yourself to be a better member of the world.
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  • Monica Kim
    January 1, 1970
    True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary. But in a culture that's rife with perfectionism and pleasing, and with the erosion of civility, it's easy to stay quiet, hide in our ideological bunkers, or fit in rather than show up as our true selves and brave the wilderness of uncertainty and criticism. But true belonging is not something we negotiate or accomplish with True belonging requires us to believe in and belong to ourselves so fully that we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary. But in a culture that's rife with perfectionism and pleasing, and with the erosion of civility, it's easy to stay quiet, hide in our ideological bunkers, or fit in rather than show up as our true selves and brave the wilderness of uncertainty and criticism. But true belonging is not something we negotiate or accomplish with others; it's a daily practice that demands integrity and authenticity. It's a personal commitment that we carry in our hearts. — Brené Brown, Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone..When “Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone” by Brené Brown came out last year, I didn’t want to read it. I am huge fan of Brown & her work and have read all her books, “Rising Strong,” “Daring Greatly,” and “The Gifts of Imperfection” and watched her wildly popular TED talk several times. But when you read ton of self-help/personal development/social research books, they all start to sound the same. Especially truer when you’ve read all the books by the same authors, redundant messages, and sometimes, it feels like new book is just new only by a title change. By a friend’s plea, I am so glad I gave this book a try!.Ending July on a high note! DAYUM, Brené Brown’s “Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone” is so good, important, and timely. After finishing this book, I can understand why she felt compelled to write another book, and why this book was absolutely necessary & needed to be written. The last chapter, “Strong Back. Soft Front. Wild Heart” is the best chapter of the book, and it hit me really hard, straight to my heart. The last chapter of the book is going to be guiding my heart going in August. I have read all her books, but hands down this is my absolute favorite! This may be her most important book yet because of how important & timely the messages, lessons, and principles covered in the book are to our ever-increasing disconnected, curated social media lifestyle, uncivil, and downright mean society. I dogged-eared & highlighted the hell out of this book. I’m going to take her message to my heart and incorporate & practice what she preaches into my life. I am so grateful for Brown for writing this book & sharing it with us. I know so much has been said about this book already, so I’ll keep it high level. .This book is like culmination of all her core messages & books. It feels like everything she’s done has naturally led her to write this book, which also happens to be pertinent & oh so timely to how people in our society is functioning today.The wilderness is an untamed, unpredictable place of solitude and searching. It is a place as dangerous as it is breathtaking, a place as sought after as it is feared. But it turns out to be the place of true belonging, and it's the bravest and most sacred place you will ever stand." — Brené Brown, Braving the Wilderness: The Quest for True Belonging and the Courage to Stand Alone.Brené’s inspiration for writing this book was the following Maya Angelou quote: “You are only free when you realize you belong no place – you belong every place – no place at all. The price is high. The reward is great.” At the beginning, Brené shares how she struggled with the quote as belonging was always something important to her, this quote just didn’t make sense to her. That quote and Brené’s struggle resulted in her going into research mode to really understand what true belonging was, and this book is the end result. With her predictable trademark mix of research, storytelling, honesty, and core teachings — courage, vulnerability, shame, and empathy, Brown explains what “true belonging” looks like while mapping a clear path to it by introducing four practices of “true belonging” and few other principles to follow. The synopsis of the book best encapsulates the core message of the book, so I’ll leave it to you to read that on your own. I can not recommend this book enough. If you don’t want to read yet another Brown book, at least read the last chapter, please! I felt the same too, but I’m glad I decided to give it a chance. I’m sure there will be something that resonates with you & touches your heart, like it has for me. 🤓✌️📖
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I used to be obsessed with politics. Every Sunday morning would be spent with "Meet the Press" and "Face the Nation." But somewhere in the ensuing years, things changed. While I talk with my friends face to face every Friday evening about the past week's news, I have made a vow never to discuss or post anything online about politics. Nope, never again. I made a comment on Facebook regarding my views on the Electoral College soon after last fall's election and slunk away after I felt I was taken I used to be obsessed with politics. Every Sunday morning would be spent with "Meet the Press" and "Face the Nation." But somewhere in the ensuing years, things changed. While I talk with my friends face to face every Friday evening about the past week's news, I have made a vow never to discuss or post anything online about politics. Nope, never again. I made a comment on Facebook regarding my views on the Electoral College soon after last fall's election and slunk away after I felt I was taken to task publicly. The painful feelings of being spoken to (written to?) that way still smart and have yet to disappear. I believe a level of civility has disappeared with the advent of social media; people are much more apt to hide behind a computer screen and spout off opinions, not caring what someone else thinks or feels. Sadly, even friends. As Brown writes, "Today we are edging closer and closer to a world where political and ideological discourse has become an exercise in dehumanization." Facebook has become such a volatile place, that I spend most of my time on Instagram. Lovely photos don't get political. I was familiar with Brown, but had never read one of her books. I actually wasn't even going to write a review. But this morning, something clicked in me. As Oprah would say, it was my "aha moment." I actually thought this was a self-help book about loneliness, and it is, but not in that way. Being in Brene Brown's wilderness, to me, is a metaphor for being "out there," in public, on social media, being vulnerable and open with your beliefs and truth. And yes, sometimes that is lonely. True belonging and fitting in sometimes is lonely. Finding the courage to speak your truth is sometimes lonely. This isn't a book about Democrats, Republicans, liberals, or conservative. It is about humans and how can we all get along. "People are hard to hate close up. Move in." "Speak truth to BS. Be Civil.""Hold hands. With strangers.""Strong back. Soft front. Wild heart."As the wise Maya Angelou writes and is quoted several times in the book, "You are only free when you realize you belong no place—you belong every place—no place at all. The price is high. The reward is great."
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Oh. My. Gosh. Amazing. I didn't think it was possible for Brene to raise the bar even more, but she did. Everything I needed to hear and have felt. A MUST read!
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Still 5 stars after my re-read. She has a great message that seems relevant in today's world. I especially loved the part about having integrity and what that looks like. We need more of that especially in the political arena.------------------------------------------I can see how people either love this book or hate it. I, for one, loved it. I could relate to her message and at the same time, I felt I was learning something. Both of those together, gets 5 stars and I would read this again.We ar Still 5 stars after my re-read. She has a great message that seems relevant in today's world. I especially loved the part about having integrity and what that looks like. We need more of that especially in the political arena.------------------------------------------I can see how people either love this book or hate it. I, for one, loved it. I could relate to her message and at the same time, I felt I was learning something. Both of those together, gets 5 stars and I would read this again.We are definitely in different camps on some of the topics she mentioned, but she wasn't hostile or pointing fingers. The world, especially when considering the current political climate, could use more of that. I wasn't familiar with who the author was before reading this. I've read some of the other reviews and found out she was more books.....so woohoo....I need to log into my library and see what they have. I really did LOVE this one.
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  • Michael Britt
    January 1, 1970
    Brené Brown is probably my favorite non-fiction writer. Her stuff is always so good!! This one was so short that after reading it, I bought the audiobook and listened to it. So good both times!! I love when she narrates her own stuff. While after a reading everything she's put out, most of her stuff does get a tad repetitive, this was the exception. Everything here feels so fresh and new. Highly recommend this book and just about anything else she has put out.
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  • Leanne
    January 1, 1970
    Not my favorite of Brown's work, but there are some good points throughout and much to debate and discuss. A bit too political for my taste, I mean can we have a break please?
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Update Jan 2018:I read this back in September of last year and forgot to update my review. It was fantastic as always!July 2017:Can't wait to read this!!
  • Northpapers
    January 1, 1970
    I live and work in a beautiful but troubled neighborhood. In a given week, I work to build community under the shadow of racism, deportations, child abuse, poverty, and violence. Each Monday, on my day off from work, I choose one short book that I hope will be restorative or nourishing in some way, and I read it from cover to cover. I call this my "Sabbath book." I've spent a few wonderful Mondays in the company of books like Jesus and Nonviolence by Walter Wink, Strength to Love by Dr. Martin L I live and work in a beautiful but troubled neighborhood. In a given week, I work to build community under the shadow of racism, deportations, child abuse, poverty, and violence. Each Monday, on my day off from work, I choose one short book that I hope will be restorative or nourishing in some way, and I read it from cover to cover. I call this my "Sabbath book." I've spent a few wonderful Mondays in the company of books like Jesus and Nonviolence by Walter Wink, Strength to Love by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and The Lime Tree by Cesar Aira.This Monday, as I finished the last page and closed the back cover of Brené Brown's Braving the Wilderness in the early afternoon, I felt a deep sense of loss. With a week of crises looming, I wasted my day of rest on a shallow book.Self-help books form the inverse of Tolstoy's maxim about families. Each good self-help book is good in its own way, but bad ones tend to be bad in the same way. They name a widely-felt need. Then they roam across the fields of science, poetry, art, celebrity biography, autobiography, and famous speeches, ripping thoughts out of context and placing them in a skin-deep narrative that soothes its readers.I will not be soothed.This book is packed full of dramatic stories and worthwhile ideas, but they're spread too thin to be nourishing. It lacks real development.I agreed with much of what Brown says here, with three tensions. Had she developed her thoughts a little more, I might have either directly disagreed or come around to her way of thinking. But she didn't, so here are my problems. I don't believe in what I think she means by "standing alone." Realization of our gifting and identity doesn't happen apart from community. In my experience in the difficult world of community development and activism, rugged individualists burn bright and burn out quickly. I believe that we are inevitably members of communities, and that in large part, we are who we are within and because of community, even if we live in tension with those communities in some ways. She suggests this line of thinking, but she does so in fragmented ways that seem more like contradiction than development.Also, I don't feel like everyone can or should reach the shiny levels of self-realization from which Brown writes. It's good to be yourself, but your self relates to a bunch of other selves, and for each bestselling, articulate, self-actualized voice, there are a bunch of number-crunchers and manufacturers and janitors and nurses and teachers and landscapers and whoever else has to make the world work for iconoclasts. This is where the emphasis on her autobiography feels more alienating than inspiring. Again, I'm not directly contradicting anything she says, but I did find it somewhat unmoving.Her "research," which I'm told is very good, isn't really presented in a compelling way. I don't need to know all the information, but the sparse little fragments here are more illustrative than convincing. Pretty much all she reveals about her method is that she interviews a lot of people, which is cool I guess.In general, I like what Brown has to say. And people I trust have been moved by her books. But I found this one to be a thin and uninspiring waste of my Monday. And I'll admit that I'm probably angrier about that than I should be.
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  • Patience Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    There's SO many points to touch on. Impossible to. Instead, I'll list a few favorite parts. Knowing this is different for everyone who reads. When Brene' storytells the moment she recognized not 'belonging' to her family. Tears well up. Turned off the audio book. Visited her Instagram page sifting for comfort where others would vibe similar. Left a message for her and the page. Feeling less alone. Start listing to the book againWrapping myself around self incrimination and wanting to feel ashame There's SO many points to touch on. Impossible to. Instead, I'll list a few favorite parts. Knowing this is different for everyone who reads. When Brene' storytells the moment she recognized not 'belonging' to her family. Tears well up. Turned off the audio book. Visited her Instagram page sifting for comfort where others would vibe similar. Left a message for her and the page. Feeling less alone. Start listing to the book againWrapping myself around self incrimination and wanting to feel ashamed of truth I recognize throughout the book. Hearing her ask me, 'why?' Resembles how she hears the voices of others. Like, Maya Angelo. This is why I like audio books. Especially with her. I hear her voice. Overlap my fears and tears. This comforts meHer epiphany of what the Maya Angelo quote means for herself is awesome! Proves the journey may have twists and turns. Full of all sorts of happenstances. Some our own doing when we did what we thought would work. If we keep searching for the truth of something that conflicts with our sense of self we eventually find the 'wilderness' and belonging to ourselves. You'll have to read the book to relate The interview with Viola Davis meant another click of the book off. Tears welling up. Visiting Viola's Instagram page. Leaving a heart felt thank you for her courage and appreciation for lighting the path a little brighter for meThe interview of junior high students at the end. Fitting in verses belonging and their take on not belonging at home ... AGAIN, tearing up. Turn off the book. Reflect. By this point, after immersing myself for a couple of days I felt more secure in where I am. Understanding the wilderness a lot better. My place in it Showing up in the world will never be the same 'practicing being in the wilderness' every day from now on. Especially, 'not searching for confirmation I don't belong' any longer My whole life timelines itself reading this book. I could see where moments of my life helped set the course. Eventually, becoming my doing. No more The VA is helping me sort through how the events of my military service caused a disability my brain struggles with. After hearing this book I feel confident these struggles won't keep me from belonging to myself and 'You only are free when you realize you belong no place — you belong every place — no place at all.' Maya Angelo
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