Inside the Business of Illustration
This guide to the ins and outs of today's dynamic illustration business tells budding illustrators everything that their teacher didn't know or their art director didn't tell them. Using an entertaining, running narrative format to look at key concerns every illustrator must face today, this book covers finding one's unique style and establishing a balance between art and commerce; tackling issues of authorship and promotion; and more. In-depth perspectives are offered by illustrators, art directors, and art buyers from various industries and professional levels on such issues as quality, price negotiation, and illustrator-client relationships.• Includes an afterword by Milton Glaser, well-known designer/illustrator• From the authors of The Education of an Illustrator (1-58115-075-x)

Inside the Business of Illustration Details

TitleInside the Business of Illustration
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 1st, 2004
PublisherAllworth Press
ISBN1581153864
ISBN-139781581153866
Number of pages229 pages
Rating
GenreArt, Design, Business, Reference, Nonfiction

Inside the Business of Illustration Review

  • Nathalia
    October 22, 2013
    The back and forth narration between Heller and Arisman was unnecessary, repetitive and at times very arrogant. Must the reader be constantly reminded that one of the men is an art director thirty times by the end of the introduction? The message both men tried to portray within the introduction could have tied nicely within the first chapter instead of taking such a large chunk from the novel. An introduction is an introduction, used to introduce the reader to the book without getting into too The back and forth narration between Heller and Arisman was unnecessary, repetitive and at times very arrogant. Must the reader be constantly reminded that one of the men is an art director thirty times by the end of the introduction? The message both men tried to portray within the introduction could have tied nicely within the first chapter instead of taking such a large chunk from the novel. An introduction is an introduction, used to introduce the reader to the book without getting into too many details. Perhaps someone should have provided both men with a dictionary before allowing this to publish.Once you get past the terrible conversation between both men, the information describing the business portion of Illustration is certainly helpful. If you're short on time, I highly recommend the "Do's and Don'ts" section located at the end of each chapter. However, please keep in mind that the writing itself is clipped, fragmented in many areas, infested with typos and full of formatting issues (Kindle edition). If you can get past all the errors, this would make for a great guide for Illustrators who need a push in the right direction.
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  • Michael Grills
    August 11, 2011
    I needed this book when I was in school. All those conversations regarding style, trends, business, within art and illustration are succinctly covered by the joint efforts of one Illustrator and one Art Director. Much of the discussion covers the decline in the usage of illustration in modern print and how those of us who just “have to draw” are supposed to cope.What really impressed me though is that they got into some mindsets that might be required for the modern illustrator. Understanding th I needed this book when I was in school. All those conversations regarding style, trends, business, within art and illustration are succinctly covered by the joint efforts of one Illustrator and one Art Director. Much of the discussion covers the decline in the usage of illustration in modern print and how those of us who just “have to draw” are supposed to cope.What really impressed me though is that they got into some mindsets that might be required for the modern illustrator. Understanding that success may no longer be defined by how much you get paid or whether you even get paid for illustrating.If your paying attention, especially any of you older illustrators, you will notice a trend in the interviews. It seems that many illustrators seem to come into realization of their career when certain epiphanies occur. Very similar to myself and other people I know.
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  • Litos
    September 20, 2016
    Tras una larga diatriba sobre la historia de la ilustración norteamericana en el siglo XX, se suceden artículos de cuatro o cinco páginas sobre temas poco relacionados con el título como el estilo o la diferencia entre arte e ilustración, seguidos de conversaciones entre los autores, que se dedican a demostrar lo fantásticos que uno y otro son. Y luego tenemos "entrevistas" con ilustradores y directores de arte con preguntas sonrojantes (¿por qué te dedicas a la ilustración? ¿qué es lo mejor y l Tras una larga diatriba sobre la historia de la ilustración norteamericana en el siglo XX, se suceden artículos de cuatro o cinco páginas sobre temas poco relacionados con el título como el estilo o la diferencia entre arte e ilustración, seguidos de conversaciones entre los autores, que se dedican a demostrar lo fantásticos que uno y otro son. Y luego tenemos "entrevistas" con ilustradores y directores de arte con preguntas sonrojantes (¿por qué te dedicas a la ilustración? ¿qué es lo mejor y lo peor de ser director de arte?) que parecen escritas por un becario en la menos informada de las publicaciones generalistas.Todo lo que puedes aprender de este libro lo puedes sacar de cuatro artículos en webs especializadas como ArtPACT, y guardarte el dinero para comer, porque el negocio de la ilustración está muy malito, que es la conclusión más sólida del libro.
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  • Mandy
    February 10, 2008
    So far I've learned:Style is not a certain medium. Your style as an artist will transcend all mediums. Style comes from your worldview...how you see the world will come out in your art, and that is what will make your art unique.It's okay to have artists that inspire you. It's even okay for your work to start to look like theirs. A good artist will work through that and emerge on the other side with "their take" on that type of art. Your style (your voice) will come and out and you'll make it yo So far I've learned:Style is not a certain medium. Your style as an artist will transcend all mediums. Style comes from your worldview...how you see the world will come out in your art, and that is what will make your art unique.It's okay to have artists that inspire you. It's even okay for your work to start to look like theirs. A good artist will work through that and emerge on the other side with "their take" on that type of art. Your style (your voice) will come and out and you'll make it your own.Don't try and create a portfolio. Just create *a lot* and let a portfolio emerge from that. Forcing a portfolio often squelches your style.
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