Black Panther Book 4
Where next for the Black Panther? Find out as a sensational new arc begins! Eons ago -- before Black Panthers, before Wakanda, before time itself -- there were only the Orishas! The pantheon of gods and goddesses from which the world as we know it was manifested: Asali. Ogutemeli. Bast. But now, when Wakanda burns, they are silent. When she was flooded, they were silent. While her people war amongst themselves, ever silent they remain. Where have all the gods of Wakanda gone? T'Challa means to find out... MacArthur Fellow and national correspondent for The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates (Between the World and Me) is joined by rising superstar Wilfredo Torres (Moon Knight) -- and together they set out to redefine faith and theology for the Marvel Universe! COLLECTING: BLACK PANTHER 13-18

Black Panther Book 4 Details

TitleBlack Panther Book 4
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 21st, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302906498
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Fiction, Fantasy

Black Panther Book 4 Review

  • Red Panda
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this one but there were parts that seemed a little muddled and parts that seemed a little nonsensical. Why, for example, when faced with what seemed to be a magical/mythological threat did T'Challa not go to his contacts in that area of expertise? He knows Jericho Drumm, Stephen Strange and a good few more who inhabit that world but instead went to... Storm of the X-Men.Still, I liked the last chapter reveal and am looking forward to the next volume.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I feel with this new storyline, Coates is finally getting a feel for writing comics. The art is no longer obscured by the heaps of text Coates was throwing on each page. The last arc was like reading a textbook with a few illustrations. The pacing is much better and so is the action. My one complaint is that there are WAY too many characters in the book. I can't keep them all straight. Coates would do well to label the characters as they appear in each issue like Matt Fraction used to do with Un I feel with this new storyline, Coates is finally getting a feel for writing comics. The art is no longer obscured by the heaps of text Coates was throwing on each page. The last arc was like reading a textbook with a few illustrations. The pacing is much better and so is the action. My one complaint is that there are WAY too many characters in the book. I can't keep them all straight. Coates would do well to label the characters as they appear in each issue like Matt Fraction used to do with Uncanny X-Men.
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  • Matthew Quann
    January 1, 1970
    That's more like it!This volume of Black Panther takes the story established in A Nation Under Our Feet uses it as a backdrop for some seriously good superhero storytelling. Having proven that he is playing the long game and will be writing a different type of story, Coates takes this volume to show he can play the hits too.The Wakandan Gods: the OrishaWith the introduction of the Orisha, Coates drew me in with the promise of some crazy, Kirby-like creatures and a fantastical story. Seeing T'Cha That's more like it!This volume of Black Panther takes the story established in A Nation Under Our Feet uses it as a backdrop for some seriously good superhero storytelling. Having proven that he is playing the long game and will be writing a different type of story, Coates takes this volume to show he can play the hits too.The Wakandan Gods: the OrishaWith the introduction of the Orisha, Coates drew me in with the promise of some crazy, Kirby-like creatures and a fantastical story. Seeing T'Challa and company facing off against a threat against Wakanda instead of from within it makes for a breath of fresh air after the past three volumes. What makes it really rewarding is how Coates uses his new cast and the shifting Wakanda political landscape to his advantage. The duty of a king, the fractured state, and a way for Wakanda to move forward and grow are still central themes.But man, does this volume ever feel like a lot more fun than its predecessors. Now that Coates has set the stage, you can tell he's ready to play around in the Marvel sandbox. I'm loving the multiple threats that are coming down the pipe and looking forward to the next volume in a few months.
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  • Ona
    January 1, 1970
    Can't wait for the movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vt9UZ...I feel it's gonna be EPIC!!!
  •  The Black Geek
    January 1, 1970
    I am thoroughly enjoying Ta-Nehisi Coates' development of the Black Panther character and the mythical world of Wakanda. I have enjoyed being on this journey with T'challa and bearing witness to his internal dialogue and constant negotiation between power, leadership and ancestral connection.It amazes me how Coates adeptly integrates a Pan-Africanist view within the storyline that includes so much of the rich cultural history, political struggles (past and present) and religious symbolism of Afr I am thoroughly enjoying Ta-Nehisi Coates' development of the Black Panther character and the mythical world of Wakanda. I have enjoyed being on this journey with T'challa and bearing witness to his internal dialogue and constant negotiation between power, leadership and ancestral connection.It amazes me how Coates adeptly integrates a Pan-Africanist view within the storyline that includes so much of the rich cultural history, political struggles (past and present) and religious symbolism of Africans throughout the diaspora. Also, I have truly appreciated the art throughout this series, in particular, the map of the land of Wakanda has been extremely useful. At times, it feels as if Wakanda is a developing "character" in the story. In addition to the map, as a bibliophile, the drawings of the Wakandan libraries have me in my permanent geeky "feels".At this time, my only critique is that I would like for the language of science and technology in the story to be as developed as the language of spirituality. Since Wakanda is the most technologically advanced nation in the world that it inhabits, I want more information of the specific mechanisms that have made this a possibility.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    With Wakanda's civil war finally over, Book 4 of Coates's "Black Panther" takes the story in new directions as a threat tied to Wakanda's past and rooted in their spiritual beliefs threatens their newfound way of life. This volume works as a satisfying follow-up to what Coates has done before--still recognizing some of the themes he addressed so directly in the previous arc while allowing the characters and story to find fresh life.As such, the story has a sightly different tone from the politic With Wakanda's civil war finally over, Book 4 of Coates's "Black Panther" takes the story in new directions as a threat tied to Wakanda's past and rooted in their spiritual beliefs threatens their newfound way of life. This volume works as a satisfying follow-up to what Coates has done before--still recognizing some of the themes he addressed so directly in the previous arc while allowing the characters and story to find fresh life.As such, the story has a sightly different tone from the politically-driven previous installments. The dialogue writing isn't flawless, but Coates generally tells an effective and complex story. I continue to be pleased with what this creative team develops, and its exciting to see the possibilities for what may be coming from this title.
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    It ends on a cliffhanger (ugh) but is otherwise a good read. The Oromo/Storm dynamic with T’Challa is, for my money, the best part of this particular volume. There was less concern for the nature of power and authority in this volume, and more focus on the personal — as well as some major, ancient developments — and it was still an engrossing read. I’ll certainly keep reading the series at least through the next volume, not simply for resolution of the cliffhanger.
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  • Sadaf
    January 1, 1970
    This was hands down my favorite volume in this series, I'm glad the whole civil war business is over and we can now focus on important things like Storm, yeah I'm a tad biased, storm is legit my favorite character in MCU and I'm team T'challa and Storm forever, not even sorry.
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  • Lekeisha The Booknerd
    January 1, 1970
    Love the dialogue between characters; I actually found myself laughing a lot, despite the challenges they faced. Plus, T'Challa and Ororo together had me swooning. African mythology plays a big role in this story, so I can't wait to read the next installment.
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  • Anders
    January 1, 1970
    Cool.
  • Nicole Westen
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading stories that have African mythology in them. There isn't nearly enough of that in literature today.
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Love this, love the artwork, love the strong women, I just couldn’t follow the whole story.
  • k
    January 1, 1970
    YASSSSS
  • Sarospice
    January 1, 1970
    After so much political intrigue it's nice to see Tchalla and co. just use Wakanda tech and panther powers to fight something even if this volume is just a build-up for the return of Klaw!
  • Avi Grundner
    January 1, 1970
    This is clearly the middle of an arc, so I won't get into it too much, but I'm liking it a lot so far. The cast of characters are interesting and engaging with each other in interesting ways, Shuri is the best, Ororo is the best, and I'm excited about where the plot is going.
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  • David Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    I wish this were interesting at all, but it leaves much to be desired. Maybe the next volume will make good on some of the promises introduced here, but that just makes this entire thing filler that could have been summed up in one panel.
  • Ma'Belle
    January 1, 1970
    I'm SO glad Ta-Nehisi Coates is writing Black Panther, and that he keeps getting better at handling the medium. Granted, the first two volumes were difficult, but vols. 3 and 4 are both fantastic.My only complaint is of the lack of a comprehensive prologue explaining the many major events that are continuously referenced but would involve digging up years of back issues that probably haven't even been collected into trades. There's the war with Doom, the time Namor destroyed much of the country, I'm SO glad Ta-Nehisi Coates is writing Black Panther, and that he keeps getting better at handling the medium. Granted, the first two volumes were difficult, but vols. 3 and 4 are both fantastic.My only complaint is of the lack of a comprehensive prologue explaining the many major events that are continuously referenced but would involve digging up years of back issues that probably haven't even been collected into trades. There's the war with Doom, the time Namor destroyed much of the country, and some other thing involving Thanos scouring Wakanda. At some point I guess the Avengers were in hiding in Wakanda? I don't know about ANY of this shit, and my Google searches keep resulting in media preview hype pieces. That over-arcing complaint that's more aimed at Marvel than this particular title aside though, this is a really enjoyable, solid book.
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  • Morgan Dhu
    January 1, 1970
    Black Panther Book 4: Avengers of the New World, Part One is the beginning of a new narrative arc in the Black Panther comic written by Ta-Nehisi Coates. The rebellion is ended in Wakanda. A new constitution, a new, more representational form of government is being forged. But T’Challa and his people face a new crisis - the disappearance of the Orishas, the gods of Wakanda, who have until the recent rebellion been an active force in Wakandan life. But now prayers and entreaties go unheard, and n Black Panther Book 4: Avengers of the New World, Part One is the beginning of a new narrative arc in the Black Panther comic written by Ta-Nehisi Coates. The rebellion is ended in Wakanda. A new constitution, a new, more representational form of government is being forged. But T’Challa and his people face a new crisis - the disappearance of the Orishas, the gods of Wakanda, who have until the recent rebellion been an active force in Wakandan life. But now prayers and entreaties go unheard, and not even the Black Panther can commune with his patron orisha, Bast, as he has in the past. But there are other threats. Strange, violent reptilian beings have begun appearing, entering Wakanda through portals that Wakandan science cannot control, and Wakanda’s shamans cannot close without facing their own deaths. All that is known is that these Simbi are ancient enemies from Wakanda’s far-distant past. And the Simbi are not alone. Other creatures appear, giant ape-like creatures called Vanyan, the spider-men known as the Anansi, and other dooms from the past. Guided by the spirits of former Black Panthers, T’Challa seeks out a potential ally, the ancient sorcerer Zawavari, who appears to know something about what is going on. He manages to close a gate, killing a troop of invading Vanyan, but falls into a coma - first uttering the chilling words that the gods are dead, and predicting that the Originators will return. With Zawavari unable - temporarily, they hope - to help, Shuri persuades T’Challa to seek the help of his former wife Oromo, the warrior goddess known as Storm. As the crisis worsens, news is brought to T’Challa of a new religious cult - in the name of the “twice-risen” god Sefako - sweeping the land, filling in the gap left by the disappearance of the orishas. And there are other enemies circling Wakanda as well - Zeke Stane, Doctor Faustus, Fenris, and the rebel Zenzi are planning to take advantage of Wakanada’s unrest. The first dign of their involvement comes when T’Challa learns that Fenris has kidnapped T’Challa’s old friend Asira and given her to Wakanda’s enemies, the Azanians. Aneka and Ayo of the Dora Milaje are sent to rescue her, but are taken prisoner by Doctor Faustus and Klaw. It’s an action-filled, tense beginning to the next Black Panther adventure. I find the missing orisha plotline more engaging at the moment, but that’s probably because I lack context for all these villains and their history with the Black Panther. I’m certainly enjoying the fact that in Black Panther, we have a hero surrounded by women without whom he would be quite lost. And I find the idea of Wakanda, an uncolonised African nation, ever resisting, very powerful.
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  • M
    January 1, 1970
    Ta-Nehisi Coates and a slew of artists join forces to present the fourth volume of the Black Panther saga. Having quelled the rebellion within Wakanda, T'Challa discovers a disturbing report of new enemies appearing across his nation. The arrival of snake men, snow beasts, and spider warriors heralds an ancient threat. Aided by Manifold, Storm, and Shuri, the Panther protects the physical realm from the invasions while seeking answers from the realm of the dead. Discovering the old gods are miss Ta-Nehisi Coates and a slew of artists join forces to present the fourth volume of the Black Panther saga. Having quelled the rebellion within Wakanda, T'Challa discovers a disturbing report of new enemies appearing across his nation. The arrival of snake men, snow beasts, and spider warriors heralds an ancient threat. Aided by Manifold, Storm, and Shuri, the Panther protects the physical realm from the invasions while seeking answers from the realm of the dead. Discovering the old gods are missing, T'Challa must embark on a quest to locate the absent deities. Behind the scenes, Doctor Faustus is gathering some old enemies in order to take a run at Wakanda itself. Ta-Nehisi Coates has done a marvelous job at reinvigorating Black Panther with a modern twist. His blending of mythology, spirituality, dual natures, and sense of honor have all driven T-Challa to new and uncharted heights that have helped flesh out the hero for today's multicultural audiences. However, the this volume seems to be a little distracted from trying to jam too much into too few pages. A new York trek, a nightclub battle with Fenris, hints at old foes and new friends, and the return of Storm are juggled too quickly for such a terse collection. The art chores are also handled by a myriad of artists, which crafts a disjointed effect among the storytelling medium. Black Panther: Avengers of the New World sets up for a greater payoff, but does little else to build upon its revolutionary status.
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  • Douglass Gaking
    January 1, 1970
    As Ta-Nehisi Coates settles into this series, the flow of the story gets better and better. There is more focus on the action than there was at first, and it is all more smoothly integrated into the story. This should make it more accessible to readers who aren't as attracted to the intellectual side of the story. However, the intellectual side is running strong.While many comics these days lean toward science fiction as a source of power, Black Panther is much more mystical. Coates draws on his As Ta-Nehisi Coates settles into this series, the flow of the story gets better and better. There is more focus on the action than there was at first, and it is all more smoothly integrated into the story. This should make it more accessible to readers who aren't as attracted to the intellectual side of the story. However, the intellectual side is running strong.While many comics these days lean toward science fiction as a source of power, Black Panther is much more mystical. Coates draws on his expertise in African history to create a Wakandan mythology that frames everything happening in the story.T'Challa cannot save his country without seeking the guidance and help of their gods, ancestors, shamans, intellectuals, and fighters. It is not as simple as fighting. He has to be a great leader."The hero's path cannot be mapped. It must be walked." –T'Challa
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  • B
    January 1, 1970
    I'm starting to feel like the weight of the mythology is crushing me a little bit. It's excellent world-building, but when it's read as a serial, it can be hard to remember the five regions and the five gods and the new/revamped secondary characters. Here, a new character of cosmic significance is introduced and sidelined in about five pages. It's a good book. If it were streamlined, it would be great. Then, it might not accomplish what the author might want. I get the feeling like this world is I'm starting to feel like the weight of the mythology is crushing me a little bit. It's excellent world-building, but when it's read as a serial, it can be hard to remember the five regions and the five gods and the new/revamped secondary characters. Here, a new character of cosmic significance is introduced and sidelined in about five pages. It's a good book. If it were streamlined, it would be great. Then, it might not accomplish what the author might want. I get the feeling like this world is being built to take up space in the universe and allow for, e.g., World of Wakanda. But most of these books tend to create stories where a few characters play real roles. Wouldn't you say the War of Jokes and Riddles only really had four characters? And virtually no mythology?
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  • Dakota Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    After the busy and confusing storyline that took up the first three Black Panther volumes under Coates' watch, this fourth volume feels like a strong reboot. Wakanda struggles to recover from civil war while new outside threats arise. Adding to the misery and mystery, the pantheon of Wakandan gods appears to have disappeared. Black Panther investigates! It's a moderately less action-packed volume, but I feel like it does an excellent job of fleshing out the world of Wakanda. And even though I ha After the busy and confusing storyline that took up the first three Black Panther volumes under Coates' watch, this fourth volume feels like a strong reboot. Wakanda struggles to recover from civil war while new outside threats arise. Adding to the misery and mystery, the pantheon of Wakandan gods appears to have disappeared. Black Panther investigates! It's a moderately less action-packed volume, but I feel like it does an excellent job of fleshing out the world of Wakanda. And even though I had never heard of these gods before, the stakes feel real in that their departure is a Big Deal. Plus, people start worshiping Storm as a new god, which makes perfect sense and can only lead to very good things.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Coates becomes A LOT more comfortable with the storytelling format of comics in this ARC. I feel uncomfortable--while I like the story line, I am unsure if some of the "tired" tropes he uses are because he's unaware the style is passe (i.e. Margaret Atwood's CatBird fell prey to this), if it's a sort of reverence, or if these are aspects of the Pan-African story-line he's trying to tell (which I admittedly know very little about the context of). Stakes still seem to be a difficult with Ta-Nehisi Coates becomes A LOT more comfortable with the storytelling format of comics in this ARC. I feel uncomfortable--while I like the story line, I am unsure if some of the "tired" tropes he uses are because he's unaware the style is passe (i.e. Margaret Atwood's CatBird fell prey to this), if it's a sort of reverence, or if these are aspects of the Pan-African story-line he's trying to tell (which I admittedly know very little about the context of). Stakes still seem to be a difficult with Ta-Nehisi (i.e. I never felt Wakanda was AT WAR in "A Nation Under Our Feet) largely due to how the direction was conveyed (this could have been more an artist failing that at Coates).
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  • Matthew Erao
    January 1, 1970
    This was easily the best arc of Coates' run so far. The early volumes had a lot of good stuff in them but they were forced to catch up and reset the world of Black Panther. This is the first story that felt firmly rooted in Coates' work and he proved just as deft at handling the spiritual and mythological as the social and political. It's also clear that a Black Panther story is at its best when Storm is involved, so hopefully Ororo isn't going anywhere. Only complaint is that the arrival of Kla This was easily the best arc of Coates' run so far. The early volumes had a lot of good stuff in them but they were forced to catch up and reset the world of Black Panther. This is the first story that felt firmly rooted in Coates' work and he proved just as deft at handling the spiritual and mythological as the social and political. It's also clear that a Black Panther story is at its best when Storm is involved, so hopefully Ororo isn't going anywhere. Only complaint is that the arrival of Klaw saw him in his utterly ridiculous classic costume. He desperately needs an update and I'm surprised he hasn't moved more in line with the MCU.
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  • William Maxwell
    January 1, 1970
    In a (Marvel) universe where gods are just a 'thing' (like super-aliens, 'beyonders' and incarnations of the universe itself), Black Panther has made them incredibly relevant. I'm genuinely interested in the gods' relationship with the people, as set forth in this plotline in Black Panther and I want to see where the story ends up. Riveting plotting that puts divinity in a personal perspective but doesn't shy away from people (like Black Panther) who have fought among the stars asking pertinent In a (Marvel) universe where gods are just a 'thing' (like super-aliens, 'beyonders' and incarnations of the universe itself), Black Panther has made them incredibly relevant. I'm genuinely interested in the gods' relationship with the people, as set forth in this plotline in Black Panther and I want to see where the story ends up. Riveting plotting that puts divinity in a personal perspective but doesn't shy away from people (like Black Panther) who have fought among the stars asking pertinent and often painful questions.
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    I think finally this series is moving toward a strong story line in the Marvel Universe. Although Wakanda is outside of the USA, Black Panther really is a part of the MU. I loved the power of the struggle of the nation of Wakanda, but at last it feels like that struggle will not be neglected, but will fight within the MU. A stronger, clearer plot line to achieve the power of what nations, people, beliefs, power, and more in telling a story of people trying to do the right thing for everyone.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    What makes a god? The Orisha have vanished and Black Panther is cut off from Bast. Wakanda is cut off from their protective pantheon and ancient foes rise bringing chaos to the land. Fortunately, T'Challa knows another goddess. This is one of the most interesting explorations of Storm's former deity-hood that I have ever read. The power of belief is fascinating in its ambiguity and parallels the greater themes of the story very nicely. I highly recommend this book to comic readers.
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  • ribbonknight
    January 1, 1970
    Really feel like the series hit its stride here. If you finished the 'Nation Under Our Feet' arc and felt unsure, I highly recommend picking up this volume to see if it grabs you.The writing sometimes invokes Claremont in the best of ways [to me], particularly when Storm is on the page.It is very clear that Coates is a talented comics-writer, in addition to being a talented non-fiction writer. Very pleased!
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  • Juan
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pretty solid story that was capable of making us ask why have God or gods not have answered our prayers? By the end, I had some questions forming as to the origin of these physical threats, not to give away the ending of the volume but it does definitely require some explaining. It was also neat to see Coats and crew include a variety of characters from the entire legacy of Black Panther. Now on to Legacy!
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this series uses a significant amount of text, Avengers of the New World was quite possibly the best of the series. It felt like the first volume of a brand new series; the direction in which the story is heading is not jumbled or confusing was the previous three volumes have been. Maybe this is the start of a better series?
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