Black Panther Book 4
Where next for the Black Panther? Find out as a sensational new arc begins! Eons ago - before Black Panthers, before Wakanda, before time itself - there were only the Orishas! The pantheon of gods and goddesses from which the world as we know it was manifested: Asali. Ogutemeli. Bast. But now, when Wakanda burns, they are silent. When she was flooded, they were silent. While her people war amongst themselves, ever silent they remain. Where have all the gods of Wakanda gone? T'Challa means to find out... MacArthur Fellow and national correspondent for The Atlantic, Ta-Nehisi Coates (Between the World and Me) is joined by rising superstar Wilfredo Torres (Moon Knight) - and together they set out to redefine faith and theology for the Marvel Universe! COLLECTING: BLACK PANTHER 13-18

Black Panther Book 4 Details

TitleBlack Panther Book 4
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 21st, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN-139781302906498
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fiction, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels Comics

Black Panther Book 4 Review

  • charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    review up to #17
  •  The Black Geek
    January 1, 1970
    I am thoroughly enjoying Ta-Nehisi Coates' development of the Black Panther character and the mythical world of Wakanda. I have enjoyed being on this journey with T'challa and bearing witness to his internal dialogue and constant negotiation between power, leadership and ancestral connection.It amazes me how Coates adeptly integrates a Pan-Africanist view within the storyline that includes so much of the rich cultural history, political struggles (past and present) and religious symbolism of Afr I am thoroughly enjoying Ta-Nehisi Coates' development of the Black Panther character and the mythical world of Wakanda. I have enjoyed being on this journey with T'challa and bearing witness to his internal dialogue and constant negotiation between power, leadership and ancestral connection.It amazes me how Coates adeptly integrates a Pan-Africanist view within the storyline that includes so much of the rich cultural history, political struggles (past and present) and religious symbolism of Africans throughout the diaspora. Also, I have truly appreciated the art throughout this series, in particular, the map of the land of Wakanda has been extremely useful. At times, it feels as if Wakanda is a developing "character" in the story. In addition to the map, as a bibliophile, the drawings of the Wakandan libraries have me in my permanent geeky "feels".At this time, my only critique is that I would like for the language of science and technology in the story to be as developed as the language of spirituality. Since Wakanda is the most technologically advanced nation in the world that it inhabits, I want more information of the specific mechanisms that have made this a possibility.
    more
  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    With Wakanda's civil war finally over, Book 4 of Coates's "Black Panther" takes the story in new directions as a threat tied to Wakanda's past and rooted in their spiritual beliefs threatens their newfound way of life. This volume works as a satisfying follow-up to what Coates has done before--still recognizing some of the themes he addressed so directly in the previous arc while allowing the characters and story to find fresh life.As such, the story has a sightly different tone from the politic With Wakanda's civil war finally over, Book 4 of Coates's "Black Panther" takes the story in new directions as a threat tied to Wakanda's past and rooted in their spiritual beliefs threatens their newfound way of life. This volume works as a satisfying follow-up to what Coates has done before--still recognizing some of the themes he addressed so directly in the previous arc while allowing the characters and story to find fresh life.As such, the story has a sightly different tone from the politically-driven previous installments. The dialogue writing isn't flawless, but Coates generally tells an effective and complex story. I continue to be pleased with what this creative team develops, and its exciting to see the possibilities for what may be coming from this title.
    more
  • Avi Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    This is clearly the middle of an arc, so I won't get into it too much, but I'm liking it a lot so far. The cast of characters are interesting and engaging with each other in interesting ways, Shuri is the best, Ororo is the best, and I'm excited about where the plot is going.
    more
  • Douglass Gaking
    January 1, 1970
    As Ta-Nehisi Coates settles into this series, the flow of the story gets better and better. There is more focus on the action than there was at first, and it is all more smoothly integrated into the story. This should make it more accessible to readers who aren't as attracted to the intellectual side of the story. However, the intellectual side is running strong.While many comics these days lean toward science fiction as a source of power, Black Panther is much more mystical. Coates draws on his As Ta-Nehisi Coates settles into this series, the flow of the story gets better and better. There is more focus on the action than there was at first, and it is all more smoothly integrated into the story. This should make it more accessible to readers who aren't as attracted to the intellectual side of the story. However, the intellectual side is running strong.While many comics these days lean toward science fiction as a source of power, Black Panther is much more mystical. Coates draws on his expertise in African history to create a Wakandan mythology that frames everything happening in the story.T'Challa cannot save his country without seeking the guidance and help of their gods, ancestors, shamans, intellectuals, and fighters. It is not as simple as fighting. He has to be a great leader."The hero's path cannot be mapped. It must be walked." –T'Challa
    more
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Coates becomes A LOT more comfortable with the storytelling format of comics in this ARC. I feel uncomfortable--while I like the story line, I am unsure if some of the "tired" tropes he uses are because he's unaware the style is passe (i.e. Margaret Atwood's CatBird fell prey to this), if it's a sort of reverence, or if these are aspects of the Pan-African story-line he's trying to tell (which I admittedly know very little about the context of). Stakes still seem to be a difficult with Ta-Nehisi Coates becomes A LOT more comfortable with the storytelling format of comics in this ARC. I feel uncomfortable--while I like the story line, I am unsure if some of the "tired" tropes he uses are because he's unaware the style is passe (i.e. Margaret Atwood's CatBird fell prey to this), if it's a sort of reverence, or if these are aspects of the Pan-African story-line he's trying to tell (which I admittedly know very little about the context of). Stakes still seem to be a difficult with Ta-Nehisi (i.e. I never felt Wakanda was AT WAR in "A Nation Under Our Feet) largely due to how the direction was conveyed (this could have been more an artist failing that at Coates).
    more
  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Even though this series uses a significant amount of text, Avengers of the New World was quite possibly the best of the series. It felt like the first volume of a brand new series; the direction in which the story is heading is not jumbled or confusing was the previous three volumes have been. Maybe this is the start of a better series?
    more
  • Mitchell
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite as boring as reading about Asgard. But close. I just don't care much. Though there were bits that were more Marvel and less Wakanda. Ororo was handled pretty well. And I kind of like the implied setup of a Scooby Doo scheme of fake old gods. But at this point we don't know. Pretty art, pretty writing, just not a gripping story.
    more
  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    \_(ツ)_/(I did finally unsubscribe to this; I'm still glad Marvel hired TNC for this particular book but it's just like not for me) ¯\_(ツ)_/¯(I did finally unsubscribe to this; I'm still glad Marvel hired TNC for this particular book but it's just like not for me)
    more
  • Leonicka
    January 1, 1970
    So much Storm in this volume! Plus Sheri being amazing too. There were a few chars I didn’t recognize. I might have to see if they were introduced in Black Panther and The Crew.
Write a review