The Water Will Come
The Water Will Come is the definitive account of the coming water, why and how this will happen, and what it will all mean. As he travels across twelve countries and reports from the front lines, acclaimed journalist Jeff Goodell employs fact, science, and first-person, on-the-ground journalism to show vivid scenes from what already is becoming a water world.Across the globe, scientists and civilians alike are noticing rapidly rising sea levels, and higher and higher tides pushing more water directly into the places we live, from our most vibrant, historic cities to our last remaining traditional coastal villages. With each crack in the great ice sheets of the Arctic and Antarctica, and each tick upwards of Earth's thermometer, we are moving closer to the brink of broad disaster.By century's end, hundreds of millions of people will be retreating from the world's shores as our coasts become inundated and our landscapes transformed. From island nations to the world's major cities, coastal regions will disappear. Engineering projects to hold back the water are bold and may buy some time. Yet despite international efforts and tireless research, there is no permanent solution-no barriers to erect or walls to build-that will protect us in the end from the drowning of the world as we know it.A New York Times Critics' Top Book of 2017 One of Washington Post's 50 Notable Works of Nonfiction in 2017 One of Booklist's Top 10 Science Books of 2017 "An immersive, mildly gonzo and depressingly well-timed book about the drenching effects of global warming, and a powerful reminder that we can bury our heads in the sand about climate change for only so long before the sand itself disappears." (Jennifer Senior, New York Times) What if Atlantis wasn't a myth, but an early precursor to a new age of great flooding?

The Water Will Come Details

TitleThe Water Will Come
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 24th, 2017
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN-139780316260244
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Science, Environment, Nature, Climate Change, Politics

The Water Will Come Review

  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    The water will come. Anyone who has ever lived near water knows that water will find its way in if it has a mind to. This book is largely about rising sea levels caused by climate change and melting glaciers and its impact on our society, for the truth is our climate is changing and causing unusual weather patterns and problems around the world. Personal experiences: Our midwest home has been flooded twice by creek water in the last ten years after torrential rain storms. And while we were in Ar The water will come. Anyone who has ever lived near water knows that water will find its way in if it has a mind to. This book is largely about rising sea levels caused by climate change and melting glaciers and its impact on our society, for the truth is our climate is changing and causing unusual weather patterns and problems around the world. Personal experiences: Our midwest home has been flooded twice by creek water in the last ten years after torrential rain storms. And while we were in Aruba recently, which has a desert climate, the area was hit by a thunderstorm that dumped three inches of rain in about an hour, blowing the manhole covers off sewers and flooding the streets with a foot of water. The local residents were amazed--they NEVER get rains like that. Whatever happened to nice, gentle, soaking rains? Do you know what it's like to be scared when it rains? Even as a child growing up in suburban Detroit, I remember sitting on the upper steps of our basement watching sewer water backing up and wondering how high it would come. That problem was later solved by a twelve-town drain system but the frightening memories still linger. The National Flood Insurance Program is $23 billion in debt. Who is paying for flood insurance claims? The taxpayer, of course. We are building where we shouldn't be. We are building in floodplains, on reclaimed swamps, on the oceanfronts even though higher sea levels are being predicted and hurricanes happen frequently. Jeff Goodell is a journalist who has interviewed scientists, climate experts, city planners, politicians, flood victims, architects, geo-engineers, etc. to further his understanding of what the situation is and what might be done to solve the problems. For the water will come."If we want to minimize the impact of sea-level rise in the next century, here's how we do it: stop burning fossil fuels and move to higher ground. We wouldn't even have to stop burning fossil fuels tomorrow--if we did it by 2050, that would be good enough. It wouldn't entirely halt sea-level rise, but it would avoid the worst of it." Thank you to NetGalley, the author and publisher for providing me with an arc of this important new book for an honest review.
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    It's October and in theory I should be reading something scary. Then again, this is pretty scary. Jeff Goodell, a journalist and a climate expert, creates a hauntingly vivid picture of a very wet world to come. Traveling the world, visiting coastal cities across the globe that can potentially become the next Atlantis, he talks to experts and locals to gain a well rounded perspective of the threats they are facing and the realities of their lives. This isn't a mere alarmist reporting, it's a thor It's October and in theory I should be reading something scary. Then again, this is pretty scary. Jeff Goodell, a journalist and a climate expert, creates a hauntingly vivid picture of a very wet world to come. Traveling the world, visiting coastal cities across the globe that can potentially become the next Atlantis, he talks to experts and locals to gain a well rounded perspective of the threats they are facing and the realities of their lives. This isn't a mere alarmist reporting, it's a thoroughly researched and compelling account of a very serious and fairly imminent danger, it doesn't just raise questions, it offers solutions or possibilities thereof by showing how it's being addressed around the world. It's very well written and reads at an almost thriller like pace (no small feat for nonfiction), depressing, of course, but it inspires thinking and certainly a conversation starter, ever so timely and then at the same time...ever so frustrating, because this is precisely the sort of thing the majority of population dismisses either due to their inability to intellectually grasp the concept or greed or a combination of both. Climate change deniers would label this book as sensationalist journalism. And those who know the score don't need further proof or convincing. So that's the frustrating angle...the message will not reach the target audience, nothing will improve, it fact recent politics have done such a tragic backslide, that alone will probably take ages to undo. It may not be too late yet, but for anyone of reasonable intelligence following the news it's difficult to stay optimistic. It may very well be aquaapocalypse after all. Why not read this smart informative account of some play by play international water action and then sit back and maybe rethink a Miami condo purchase. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Julie Christine
    January 1, 1970
    I read The Water Will Come under hazy yellow skies, with the scent of woodsmoke hanging heavy in hot air, my car dusted with a light coating of ash. It took effort to breathe, the air thick and sickly. Forest fires all around me: searing British Columbia to the north, racing through the Cascades Mountains to the east, Olympics to the west, Oregon to the south. We endure damp and dreary winters for the glory that is summer in the Pacific Northwest; months of blue skies, gentle warmth and sunshine I read The Water Will Come under hazy yellow skies, with the scent of woodsmoke hanging heavy in hot air, my car dusted with a light coating of ash. It took effort to breathe, the air thick and sickly. Forest fires all around me: searing British Columbia to the north, racing through the Cascades Mountains to the east, Olympics to the west, Oregon to the south. We endure damp and dreary winters for the glory that is summer in the Pacific Northwest; months of blue skies, gentle warmth and sunshine. But I fear this is the new norm for summers in this pristine place of sea and mountains. The world is on fire and at the same time, sinking fast into the sea. And we're not even close to being ready. Sea-level rise is one of the central facts of our time, as real as gravity. It will reshape our world in ways most of us can only dimly imagine.What do forest fires in the West have to do with melting ice sheets and rising oceans? I hadn't put the two together until reading this urgent, devastating, vital read. A backpacker’s campfire (in the Western United States) throws out a spark, a tree ignites, and soon the mountainside is burning and the soot is drifting up, some of it lifted into the jet stream and settling into Greenland, darkening the snow and accelerating the transformation of ice into water, which runs down into the North Atlantic and eventually into Miami, Shanghai, New York, Venice, Mumbai, Lagos, and deeper still.Goodell, a longtime editor for Rolling Stone, concentrates much of his narrative in Miami and Miami Beach, exposing the folly and corruption that built these sand castle communities, the naïvete and stupidity and ostrich-head-burying that will eventually wash them away. But Goodell also takes us to Manhattan and the Jersey Shore to view the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy (2012), the heartbreaking plunge of Venice, the water ghettos of Lagos, and the immediate peril in the Marshall Islands, Alaska, and Greenland. As intensively studied as global warming and climate change have been in recent years, not even the most dire predictions anticipated the rate at which the seas are rising. The 2015 Paris Agreement was predicated on studies that assumed the sea would rise, at the most three feet by 2100. Goodell introduces us to the current models that indicate the rise may be well over SIX feet. We're going down, quite literally.For anyone living in Miami Beach or South Brooklyn or Boston’s Back Bay or any other low-lying coastal neighborhood the difference between three feet of sea level rise by 2100 and six feet is the difference between a wet but livable city and a submerged city.What can we do? We have two choices: work immediately toward slowing the temperature rise of our air by ending our use of and reliance on fossil fuels, which we can replace with clean, renewable sources of energy: wind and solar. This is happening, of course, on a small scale, but hardly at the rate needed to slow the rise of temperatures and seas. And with a Congress and White House in denial about climate change, the United States is complicit in making this planet more unsustainable by the minute.The other tact is to adapt. Goodell highlights several innovative and not a few harebrained ideas to live with or withstand rising seas or the flooding that accompanies hurricanes and typhoons. Of course, millions around the world live in communities perched on the edge of disaster, and not just the entitled who claim South Beach; from Bangladesh to Boston, poor communities are vulnerable to the inevitable. Climate change leads directly to conflict and war-Syria is the most immediate example. The International Organization for Migration estimates there will be 200 million climate refugees by 2050.I couldn't put this down, as upsetting a read as it is. Goodell made the facts accessible and fascinating- he is as superb a storyteller as he is insightful a journalist. This is essential reading. I'm grateful for today's rain, not the least for those battling these fires on the front line. But the rain can't wash away the truth. We're going down, quite literally.
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  • William Liggett
    January 1, 1970
    I just returned from a Christmas break in the South Bay part of Los Angeles where multimillion-dollar houses have been built along the strand next to the beach. I was curious why no one seems to be concerned about sea level rise. On the East Coast, and southern Florida in particular, the sea is already encroaching with every storm and high tide. Jeff Goodell's book, The Water Will Come, provides some answers. He describes how many parts of Florida were swamplands before they were drained and sol I just returned from a Christmas break in the South Bay part of Los Angeles where multimillion-dollar houses have been built along the strand next to the beach. I was curious why no one seems to be concerned about sea level rise. On the East Coast, and southern Florida in particular, the sea is already encroaching with every storm and high tide. Jeff Goodell's book, The Water Will Come, provides some answers. He describes how many parts of Florida were swamplands before they were drained and sold as valuable real estate. Other neighborhoods were created by dredging sand from the seafloor and pumping it onto the shore. In spite of this history all shorelines and seaside cities around the world are at significant risk due to the melting ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica. Goodell describes the plight of Venice, Italy and the efforts taken to postpone the ultimate fate of these places so important in human history.This book is nonfiction and yet describes a future that sounds dystopian. It is no longer a question of if the water will rise, but rather when and how much. Goodell describes a time he spent interviewing President Obama on his trip to Alaska to draw attention to the melting glaciers and villages threatened by sea level rise. My impression is that the message of the book is not to frighten or discourage, but to paint a realistic picture of what our world will be like if we ignore the signs and continue spewing greenhouse gases unabated.
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  • Emma Sea
    January 1, 1970
    A very easy read that focuses on the upcoming consequences of sea level rise and does not attempt to convince with hard science. If you're not convinced now, no book will do it. Many elegant and poignant parts that wrenched my soul.
  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Jeff Goodell traveled the world to report on how rising sea levels are impacting human society across the globe. His new book The Water Will Come takes readers to shrinking Alaskan glaciers with President Obama and into the flood-prone homes of impoverished people living in Lagos, Nigeria."By that time, I'll be dead, so what does it matter?" Quote from a Florida real estate developer, The Water Will Come I long wondered how bad it would get before people broke down and changed how we live and do Jeff Goodell traveled the world to report on how rising sea levels are impacting human society across the globe. His new book The Water Will Come takes readers to shrinking Alaskan glaciers with President Obama and into the flood-prone homes of impoverished people living in Lagos, Nigeria."By that time, I'll be dead, so what does it matter?" Quote from a Florida real estate developer, The Water Will Come I long wondered how bad it would get before people broke down and changed how we live and do things. I consider how Americans gave up comforts during WWII rationing, all pulling together for a great cause we all believed in. I don't see that happening today. As Goodell points out, "fossil fuel empire" Koch industries money has swayed government. Private citizens can recycle and lower the heat and ride bicycles but the impact is small. As long as governments are more worried about big business than national security endangered by climate change we can't alter what is coming.What? you ask; national security?Well, consider that military bases across the nation and world are located in areas that WILL FLOOD. Like the Norfolk Naval Base, the Langley Air Force Base, and NASA's Wallops Flight Facility! Along with the financial district of New York City and expensive Florida beach front homes, we will be losing the Ronald Reagan Ballistic Missile Defense Test Site in the Marshall Islands, where 12,000 Americans operate space weapons programs and track NASA research.So if the loss of Arctic ice and habitat and the Inuit way of life doesn't concern you, perhaps this information will.So many issues are raised in the book. Consider: We have not established how to deal with climate change refugees. Where are these people going to go? Countries in Europe, along with the U.S., are closing borders--the same countries whose fossil energy use is the primary cause of climate change behind rising sea levels! What is their responsibility?There are a lot of ideas of how to deal with rising sea levels, including the building of walls and raising cities. It seems, though, that people are more interested in coping with the change than addressing the root cause of climate change. We just don't want to give up fossil fuels.The book is highly readable for the general public. Although the cover photo made me think of an action disaster movie, the books is a well-researched presentation of "fact, science, and first-person, on-the-ground journalism."I received a free book from the publisher through Goodreads.
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  • Tony
    January 1, 1970
    THE WATER WILL COME. (2017). Jeff Goodell. *****.This is an excellent review of climate change as it is recognized by the scientific community today. It takes a good look at the data, and projects events into the future to describe likely scenarios for our world when it is faced with water levels much higher than today’s. The author is a contributing editor for “The Rolling Stone,” and the author of five previous books. He makes his points by establishing current conditions on Earth and what has THE WATER WILL COME. (2017). Jeff Goodell. *****.This is an excellent review of climate change as it is recognized by the scientific community today. It takes a good look at the data, and projects events into the future to describe likely scenarios for our world when it is faced with water levels much higher than today’s. The author is a contributing editor for “The Rolling Stone,” and the author of five previous books. He makes his points by establishing current conditions on Earth and what has happened in the recent past as a result of temperature rise. He mainly focuses on two major cities, Miami and New York City. He does include conditions in other countries to illustrate some of the steps being taken by those countries to meet the danger. It is a scary scenario that he comes up with, after weighing in the politics and economics of a variety of plans of attack against the global threat. This is a terrific review of where we are at and of some of the alternative plans out there to meet mankind’s needs. Recommended.
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Little, Brown and Company via NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It has not influenced my thoughts or opinions about this book.Throughout this book, Goodell explores geographic regions and innovative technologies to see what can be done to reduce the impact of rising water. Ultimately, there are some questions that emerge:- How can we depoliticize climate change and show the real and impending impact on human civilization?- How will governments address buy-outs Thanks to Little, Brown and Company via NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It has not influenced my thoughts or opinions about this book.Throughout this book, Goodell explores geographic regions and innovative technologies to see what can be done to reduce the impact of rising water. Ultimately, there are some questions that emerge:- How can we depoliticize climate change and show the real and impending impact on human civilization?- How will governments address buy-outs, flood damage, and relocation of peoples, towns, and cities?- How will governments and societies address climate refugees, whose numbers may swell far above and beyond political refugees?- How can we stop being so short-sighted with our thinking about investment defending communities against climate change?- Will the Arctic be a new battleground in the fight for fossil fuels and developmental resources?Overall, this is a well-researched book. I was pleased that Goodell explored not only Western (primarily American) concerns, but also those of the Marshallese and Nigerian. I did feel like the chapters dealing with Miami real estate developers and the role of nuclear and military facilities on the Eastern Seaboard to be a bit of a slog, but worth it to get to the other chapters.
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  • Stephen Selbst
    January 1, 1970
    This is a journalist's book posing as serious writing. The potential for coastal flooding caused by rapidly rising sea levels is genuine and acute.This is a superficial look at the problem, unnecessarily padded with character sketches of some of the politicians, engineers, scientists and activists involved. Their lives may be more or less interesting, but their individual stories are nearly irrelevant to the issues the book half-heartedly addresses. This is a topic worthy of a more serious and s This is a journalist's book posing as serious writing. The potential for coastal flooding caused by rapidly rising sea levels is genuine and acute.This is a superficial look at the problem, unnecessarily padded with character sketches of some of the politicians, engineers, scientists and activists involved. Their lives may be more or less interesting, but their individual stories are nearly irrelevant to the issues the book half-heartedly addresses. This is a topic worthy of a more serious and sophisticated analysis than this book presents. I was disappointed; it had generally good reviews and I cannot imagine why.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    The Austin Public Library just recommended this to me so I am leaning into my tinfoil hat
  • Radiantflux
    January 1, 1970
    67th book for 2017.A disappointingly superficial account of an important topic. Each chapter seems to involve Goodell meeting some important person who isn't aware/doesn't care about sea-level rise, and at some point Goodell will be wading through water at some high-tide here or there (New York, Miami, Venice etc). There was way too much emphasis on Miami and not enough of a global perspective. If you haven't read any other book on global warming this book would be OK, but there are much better 67th book for 2017.A disappointingly superficial account of an important topic. Each chapter seems to involve Goodell meeting some important person who isn't aware/doesn't care about sea-level rise, and at some point Goodell will be wading through water at some high-tide here or there (New York, Miami, Venice etc). There was way too much emphasis on Miami and not enough of a global perspective. If you haven't read any other book on global warming this book would be OK, but there are much better ones already published and cover the topic in a richer fashion.
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  • Amanda Van Parys
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that was scary. As a person who lives in FL and within 5 miles of the shore, this is horrifying. During the hurricane season of 2017, I was talking to my dad after Irma barely missed a direct hit on us in the Tampa Bay area saying some of the exact things outlined in this book, and I quote: "FL is f*cked, we need to get out of here." And I'm completely fine leaving the godforsaken land of FL, in fact, I want to. But I'll tell you one thing, it's hard to just pack up your life and move away Well, that was scary. As a person who lives in FL and within 5 miles of the shore, this is horrifying. During the hurricane season of 2017, I was talking to my dad after Irma barely missed a direct hit on us in the Tampa Bay area saying some of the exact things outlined in this book, and I quote: "FL is f*cked, we need to get out of here." And I'm completely fine leaving the godforsaken land of FL, in fact, I want to. But I'll tell you one thing, it's hard to just pack up your life and move away; it's hard financially and emotionally, and for millions of people, it just isn't an option until there's no options left. The Water Will Come outlines not only economic implications we're facing from global warming but also the social and cultural. There's so much at stake since so much of the world's population lives on shore or very close to them -- and even if you don't believe, THE WATER WILL COME. It will come for us whether you believe in global warming or not!Read for the 2018 Book Riot Read Harder Challenge: A book about nature
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  • August Is Azathoth The Haunted Reading Room
    January 1, 1970
    Review: THE WATER WILL COME by Jeff GoodellAn articulate and thoroughly-considered explication of sea level rise, THE WATER WILL COME is scientific journalism as it ought to be, explaining science, geological history and engineering in an understandable fashion. Mr. Goodell never resorts to scare tactics; his understated and factual approach to climate change, global warming, melting of ice sheets, and consequent inescapable rise of sea level is frightening in itself, and should serve as a wake- Review: THE WATER WILL COME by Jeff GoodellAn articulate and thoroughly-considered explication of sea level rise, THE WATER WILL COME is scientific journalism as it ought to be, explaining science, geological history and engineering in an understandable fashion. Mr. Goodell never resorts to scare tactics; his understated and factual approach to climate change, global warming, melting of ice sheets, and consequent inescapable rise of sea level is frightening in itself, and should serve as a wake-up call across the globe.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Goodell's book The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World should convince those climate change nay sayers that we all need to be concerned about rising seas as the result of melting glaciers. What makes Goodell's book interesting is the amount of time and travel that he has invested in investigating his facts. He has spoken to many experts in the fields of building, weather, geology, and climate. He has also visited with people living in the areas m Goodell's book The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World should convince those climate change nay sayers that we all need to be concerned about rising seas as the result of melting glaciers. What makes Goodell's book interesting is the amount of time and travel that he has invested in investigating his facts. He has spoken to many experts in the fields of building, weather, geology, and climate. He has also visited with people living in the areas most likely to be floating or drowning if the predictions come to pass. He offers a chapter on cities like Miami and Venice who have water ways incorporated into their current city structure. He also talks with people in New York where hurricane Sandy caused heavy flooding in low lying areas and much of the coast line would be in danger from sea level rise. He interviews architects and engineers and examines proposed solutions. But what it comes down to is who will be saved. How much money will cities, counties, states, and the federal government spend to remedy the problems like raising streets, buildings, bridges, etc and how will they decided where to spend the money.
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  • Leahbh
    January 1, 1970
    So disturbing. He spells it all out using a few examples: Miami, Greater NY area, Venice, Lagos. Seasteading by the uber rich - I keep wondering what is the End Game for these oligarchs who do nothing to promote solutions for the earth's problems and in fact, actively work against those who are trying to address climate change and environmental justice. What do they think will happen as seas rise, coastlines are inundated and become uninhabitable and millions (billions?) of climate refugees are So disturbing. He spells it all out using a few examples: Miami, Greater NY area, Venice, Lagos. Seasteading by the uber rich - I keep wondering what is the End Game for these oligarchs who do nothing to promote solutions for the earth's problems and in fact, actively work against those who are trying to address climate change and environmental justice. What do they think will happen as seas rise, coastlines are inundated and become uninhabitable and millions (billions?) of climate refugees are created, these links, if you can stand to read them provide a little info:https://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...Too much? The book references the case won by wealthy residents of Summer Haven who sued to have their continuously damaged road (old A1A) continuously repaired by the county at a cost of 25x the money spent on road maintenance for the entire rest of the county. They won.
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  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    This is a compelling (though not too deep) look at climate change and its implications in the all-too-near term. Goodell writes in an accessible way about a threat that grows more urgent by the day. 200 million climate-change refugees by 2050 is a stat that should get the attention of the deniers. Not holding my breath, though.
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  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    A really important book to read to understand the rising seas of climate change and the struggle and needed focus to save our coastal communities.
  • David Flaugher
    January 1, 1970
    It is coming sooner than you probably think.Riveting (mostly)!! If you can believe in your voice traveling wirelessly. If you believe that the little box over your kitchen range can HEAT things without a heating element. IF you can believe that sunlight can make electricity. IF IF IF -> you believe in science. And IF you BELIEVE in science, then you have to believe on anthropomorphic climate change. It is simply undeniable. To NOT believe is to live in a vacuum of suspended reality.So, after It is coming sooner than you probably think.Riveting (mostly)!! If you can believe in your voice traveling wirelessly. If you believe that the little box over your kitchen range can HEAT things without a heating element. IF you can believe that sunlight can make electricity. IF IF IF -> you believe in science. And IF you BELIEVE in science, then you have to believe on anthropomorphic climate change. It is simply undeniable. To NOT believe is to live in a vacuum of suspended reality.So, after you come to terms with reality, you will be astonished at just how soon massive changes to our world are to our current day. They are on our doorstep, and our politicians are holding invisible imaginary shields (paid for by big oil) and dizzily repeating, "Climate change is a myth, climate change is a myth". If you believe, you will insist upon change.
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  • Ruthanne Davis
    January 1, 1970
    I was riveted by it at first with a smudge on of skepticism. That faded quickly.This book is not about global warming. This book is about only one side-effect of that on-going process and that is the present rising of our oceans and the future devastation they will cause. He emphasizes the eastern seaboard, particularly NYC and Miami. These will be the earliest sufferers of the tragedy, if and when it does happen, and I now believe it’s underway.Surprisingly, NYC is planning on taking action bu I was riveted by it at first with a smudge on of skepticism. That faded quickly.This book is not about global warming. This book is about only one side-effect of that on-going process and that is the present rising of our oceans and the future devastation they will cause. He emphasizes the eastern seaboard, particularly NYC and Miami. These will be the earliest sufferers of the tragedy, if and when it does happen, and I now believe it’s underway.Surprisingly, NYC is planning on taking action bu building “the Big U.” Not familiar with this plan. It’s to be a 10 foot high wall around lower Manhattan! Fascinating, horrendously expensive, and it will put other sections of NYC at high risk for flooding and destruction. You cannot divert water and not know it will just go somewhere else.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Very alarming, in the sense that I didn’t realize how bad things already were in some places. I thought we had more time. But this book drives home the point that we don’t. Miami is toast. Venice for sure, and probably also New York. And half of the Netherlands. Forget Louisiana. Bye bye, Marshall Islands. And the rest of us are all getting millions of climate refugees. Very readable style, more anecdotal and atmospheric than comprehensively rigorous. It meanders from chapter to chapt 3.5 stars. Very alarming, in the sense that I didn’t realize how bad things already were in some places. I thought we had more time. But this book drives home the point that we don’t. Miami is toast. Venice for sure, and probably also New York. And half of the Netherlands. Forget Louisiana. Bye bye, Marshall Islands. And the rest of us are all getting millions of climate refugees. Very readable style, more anecdotal and atmospheric than comprehensively rigorous. It meanders from chapter to chapter, but not unpleasantly; structure is non existent. A quick read (I skimmed a lot of the color commentary about his various interlocutors), and very accessible. I learned a lot.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 An excellent look at the effects of climate change on rising water levels through floods and hurricanes. Goodell looks at Miami, California, Venice, New York and New Jersey, and paints a dire picture of the future of these cities and surrounding areas. Many people interviewed are trying to make a difference, either through scientific innovation or through ecological fixes. I was disturbed by the number of people who were either in denial, or figured that they would be dead by the time things 4.5 An excellent look at the effects of climate change on rising water levels through floods and hurricanes. Goodell looks at Miami, California, Venice, New York and New Jersey, and paints a dire picture of the future of these cities and surrounding areas. Many people interviewed are trying to make a difference, either through scientific innovation or through ecological fixes. I was disturbed by the number of people who were either in denial, or figured that they would be dead by the time things got out of control, so didn't care. My favorite section highlighted the author traveling to Kotzebue, Alaska, where he met with President Obama to speak about the effects of climate change in this area and what it meant to the poor villagers who have lived there all their lives. The interview lasted 45 minutes, and the author was not pre-screened with his questions. Can you imagine such a thing happening in this administration?
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    This book visits several locations around the world that are at risk of rising sea levels and what those places plan (or don't) to do about it. There was not much "science" in the book, so it was quite readable, if a bit dull in places. Sadly, the people that should really read this book (climate deniers) are highly unlikely to read it. And if they do, they will likely remain unconvinced. Not a great future to look forward to for those coastal areas.
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  • John Spiller
    January 1, 1970
    "The Water Will Come" examines the numerous global implications of climate change. While Goodell identifies the numerous catastrophic implications of rising waters, he provides limited insights as to what can be done. I commend to you Stephen Selbst's review below, which accurately summarizes the shortcomings of this book.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    A sobering, detailed examination of the global impact of global warming. As the ice begins to melt, certain areas will be most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Goodell explores the risk faced by Miami, New York City, Lagos, the Maldives, and other cities and countries that are woefully underprepared for the impending inundation.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Eye-opening book about the startling and far reaching effects of the world's oceans rising as the climate changes. Impacts I'd never thought about are explored. It really brings home the point that we are mostly unprepared and are viewing the problem, if at all, through nearsighted eyes.
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  • Angelique Simonsen
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting reading
  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    Summary: Don't buy property in Miami or New Orleans.
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Read the two other extensive 2 star reviews. You'll see where I'm coming from.
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, this is a super-scary book. I am glad I read it, but it's going to give me nightmares.
  • Angel
    January 1, 1970
    so informational & well researched! a must read for sure! definitely engaging as well.
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