Science Comics
In factories! In the sky! In your cars and phones! In your own home! Robots are everywhere! And they have been for a lot longer than you might realize.From tea-serving robots in feudal Japan to modern rovers exploring Mars, robots have been humanity's partners, helpers, and protectors for centuries! Join one of the world's earliest robots, a mechanical bird named Pouli, as he explores where robots came from, how they work, and where they’re going in this informative and hilarious new book! Ever dreamt of building your own best friend? It might be easier than you think!Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

Science Comics Details

TitleScience Comics
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 27th, 2018
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626727939
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels

Science Comics Review

  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    The Future Is Now!This volume is part of the "Science Comics" series. The series started with some predictable topics - dinosaurs, volcanoes, and so on - but it seems to be expanding to cover less obvious and more "scientific" topics. Upcoming titles address rockets, sharks, and trees, (not all in one book of course, although that could be a good book), which seems to cast the net fairly wide. I mention the series mostly because this "Robots and Drones" book was intriguing and rewarding enough t The Future Is Now!This volume is part of the "Science Comics" series. The series started with some predictable topics - dinosaurs, volcanoes, and so on - but it seems to be expanding to cover less obvious and more "scientific" topics. Upcoming titles address rockets, sharks, and trees, (not all in one book of course, although that could be a good book), which seems to cast the net fairly wide. I mention the series mostly because this "Robots and Drones" book was intriguing and rewarding enough to make the entire series potentially interesting.This book struck me as awfully ambitious. It isn't just photos, drawings and snappy patter. Unusual for a book like this, it has serious and substantive content first and jokey asides later. The tone is an engaging combination of earnest, gung-ho, and into-the-future!, which makes the book, (intentionally I think), both informative and inspirational.The layout is comic book style. There are generally three to six full color panels per page. Drawings are comics/realistic and usually illustrate or act out whatever fact or principle is being introduced. Our host/narrator is a bird named Pouli that is modeled after an ancient mechanical bird circa 350 BCE. This amiable guide leads the reader through the history of robotics and drones. Along the way we define what a "robot" is, (which is trickier and more subtle than you might imagine). We look at early robots, simple robots from day-to-day life, (i.e., arguably your coffeemaker and certainly your Roomba vacuum cleaner). We consider the differences among a remote controlled toy car, a computer, and a true robot. From there we take a side trip to simple machines of which a robot is constructed, (screw, lever, pulley), and consider automata, (say, the Jacquard loom). This is fairly sophisticated stuff, but it is presented and illustrated clearly. And so it goes - functional components, on-board intelligence, even different levels of programming and language are addressed. Artificial intelligence, robots in popular culture, do-it-yourself robot building, drone racing, "intelligent" houses, Asimov's rules of robotics - the list of topics goes on and on.It seems to me that any kid interested in robots, computers, engineering, drones, and the like would find a lot to like in this book. It is kid friendly, what with cheerful Pouli and its clear narrative, but the book is never patronizing. Some jokey/Dummies-style books can be overloaded with dumb jokes and puns and the like, but this book just has occasional "funny" bits that the reader can take or leave depending on his or her taste.So, this book was instructive, accessible, and entertaining, and covered a topic that you usually don't see that much, (compared to, say, sharks). I'd feel good about handing this to any budding scientist, or really to any kid interested in how things work. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Science Comics: Robots and Drones is a scientific graphic novel (non-fiction) that explores and illustrates the development of and daily use of robots and prototypes in our modern daily life. A robotic bird, is introduced, and it is the character that carries you throughout each page of the book, along with a bit of story telling and humor to capture interest along the way. This makes higher level learning possible, fun, and easy to absorb, as it explains concepts in entertaining ways. This is a Science Comics: Robots and Drones is a scientific graphic novel (non-fiction) that explores and illustrates the development of and daily use of robots and prototypes in our modern daily life. A robotic bird, is introduced, and it is the character that carries you throughout each page of the book, along with a bit of story telling and humor to capture interest along the way. This makes higher level learning possible, fun, and easy to absorb, as it explains concepts in entertaining ways. This is a high tech topic that will have high interest for avid readers, and even kids who struggle or need more visuals to stimulate their learning process. Expect anything from coffeemakers and robotic vacuum cleaners to drones. Easy to read, scientific information about this significant field is delivered in a non-threatening fun way. This will make scientific geeks out of anyone. The Get to Know Your Universe Science Comics series, especially Science Comics: Robots and Drones is highly recommended for school and public libraries, home education and for gifts. This review was for a pre-pub NetGalley edition for review.
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  • Stacey M
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting graphic novel about robts and drones. I really like this series for kids. It has a lot of great information and the art is pretty good. This wasn't my favorite of the series, but if you have a kid interested in technology this may be a good fit for them. I recieved a free copy this book from Net Galley in exchange for a review. This title is scheduled to be released at the end of March.
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