Little Sid
In this charming and accessible picture book, Ian Lendler and Xanthe Bouma offer a heart-warming account of the childhood of the Buddha.A spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what couldn’t be given ­― happiness.Join Little Sid as he sets off on a journey of discovery and encounters mysterious wise-folk, terrifying tigers, and one very annoying mouse.With Lendler’s delightful prose and Bouma’s lyrical artwork, Little Sid weaves traditional Buddhist fables into a classic new tale of mindfulness, the meaning of life, and an awakening that is as profound today as it was 2,500 years ago.

Little Sid Details

TitleLittle Sid
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626726369
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Religion, Historical, Fantasy

Little Sid Review

  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely artwork with a great message for all children, whether or not their parents are Buddhists.
  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeously illustrated biography of Siddhartha Gautama's early years.
  • Baby Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, written by Ian Lendler and illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, a story inspired by the teachings of the Gautama Buddha.Little Sid is a young boy like any young boy, with only one major difference – his parents are the king and queen. Sid is inundated with toys, gifts, treats, and entertainment every waking moment of his l This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, written by Ian Lendler and illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, a story inspired by the teachings of the Gautama Buddha.Little Sid is a young boy like any young boy, with only one major difference – his parents are the king and queen. Sid is inundated with toys, gifts, treats, and entertainment every waking moment of his life, but he is unfulfilled. What he wishes for most is to spend time with his perpetually occupied parents, but whenever he tries to, they are too busy. Sid decides to leave home in the hopes of finding the answer as to why he is unhappy, asking at the homes of each village he passes to find out. At last, he is led to a mountain where three wise ones supposedly live. Will Sid find the answers he seeks atop the mountain? Or were his answers inside him all along?This is a tough one. There are some elements that we really enjoyed here, but definitely some places where the book falters as well. The core messages of anti-materialism, perspectives, and being in the moment are universal, and can be appreciated by Buddhist and non-Buddhist readers alike. However, the representation of this being a biographical story of Siddhartha Gautama is highly inaccurate – the closest this could be considered is a “Disney-fied” account. The art has great ambition and is very cute, but relies too much on white space, making details hard to pick out and spreads feel underwhelming. The length is fine, but JJ’s attention was waning by the end. Interesting concept, lackluster execution, but still some good themes – not on our list, but you may feel different.(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    I am giving this book 5 stars. While I know that Buddhism is a practice of mindfulness and meditation in search of awakening, I never really knew how it started. Well, this book taught me a lesson. The story is simple, but one that I think will resonate with many children today. While the story is the Buddha story, it’s not a religious story, more of a family and community story. Plus the artwork is AMAZING. The color work is gorgeous. I want pages to frame and hang on my wall.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Sid is an all too familiar tale for many children. Parents would rather buy gifts and items than be present in their life. The story of Little Sid and his family was a wonderful reminder for parents to be present in the lives of their children and a reminder to children to speak up and ask for what they really want. I can't wait to share this story with my students and their families. I also appreciate the origins in the back of the book.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    Though not historically accurate, it gives a great little insight into the world of the Buddha and makes the idea of happiness a more understandable concept for younger readers. I would recommend this to parents who would like to introduce them to concepts of Buddhism at a young age.
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  • Linda V
    January 1, 1970
    Review will be posted at a future date.
  • Carol Tilley
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely illustrations and a good introduction to the early life of the Buddha.
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    This adorably illustrated story of the Buddha's childhood is both a nice introduction to Buddhism for younger readers, and a meaningful fable about valuing connections over possessions.Little Sid is Siddhartha, a little prince who gets everything he could ever want, except for time with his parents. They're always running off to some grand event or monarch duty, leaving Sid to be raised by an army of handlers who all fawn over him. He isn't happy. He takes off to find the secret to happiness and This adorably illustrated story of the Buddha's childhood is both a nice introduction to Buddhism for younger readers, and a meaningful fable about valuing connections over possessions.Little Sid is Siddhartha, a little prince who gets everything he could ever want, except for time with his parents. They're always running off to some grand event or monarch duty, leaving Sid to be raised by an army of handlers who all fawn over him. He isn't happy. He takes off to find the secret to happiness and meets a wise man who confuses him, a tiger who terrifies him, and a mouse who makes it all come together for him. When he comes back, he's a changed kid, ready to put what he's learned into practice: starting with his parents.Xanthe Bouma's artwork is adorable and bright, lively and bold. Sid's face is filled with expression, whether he's happily greeting readers on the opening page or reveling in the joy of a ripe strawberry. Ian Lendler's text weaves a story of a child who has everything he could want, but wants only his parents' time. It's a story of mindfulness and gratitude, and that's something every child should know and every family should embrace. My favorite lesson? That being happy isn't permanent, but neither is being sad. It teaches kids that life comes in ebbs and flows, and to go with those ups and downs. A brief biography of Siddhartha Gautama closes out this volume.Booktalk or display Little Sid with one of my favorite books, Ganesha's Sweet Tooth; together, the two books present a starting point to discover different cultures and faiths, all while delivering solid messages about awareness and resilience. Talk about the religions that inspire these tales; introduce your readers to Buddhism and Hinduism. It's a great way to make their worlds a little bigger.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
  • Jesica DeHart
    January 1, 1970
    Little Sid brings the story of the Buddha to life with colorful, engaging and delightful illustrations!
  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this picture book. Children will especially enjoy the illustrations and “Little Sid” will expose them to world religions if they are not already familiar with Buddhism.
  • Sharon Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    Little Sid: the Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha written by Ian Lendlerand illustrated by Kanthe Bouma is a picturebook which is currently scheduled for release on January 23 2018. As a spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what could not be given, happiness. Join Little Sid as he sets off on a journey of discovery and encounters mysterious wise-folk, terrifying tigers, and one very annoying mouse.Little Sid: the Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha is the o Little Sid: the Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha written by Ian Lendlerand illustrated by Kanthe Bouma is a picturebook which is currently scheduled for release on January 23 2018. As a spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what could not be given, happiness. Join Little Sid as he sets off on a journey of discovery and encounters mysterious wise-folk, terrifying tigers, and one very annoying mouse.Little Sid: the Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha is the origin story of Buddhism, and one I did not know. I am glad to get a better understanding of the practice, and think the idea of being present is so important in a time when so many equate stuff and being busy with being happy or successful. I think that many young readers will be able to relate to Sid, in his desire of time rather than things, from his parents. So often adults are too worried about work, cleaning the house, activities, and everything else to just be with the children in their lives. I found the artwork to be beautiful, alternating between muted tones and more vibrant ones, making the mindfulness of the story more evident to the reader. I think this book is a wonderful way to introduce the ideas of mindfulness, minimalism, and the practice of Buddhism to readers of all ages and religious backgrounds.
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  • Magy
    January 1, 1970
    As a prince, Little Sid can have anything he wants--feasts, cakes, presents, parades, entertainment of all kinds--but what he really wants is to be happy. Since Little Sid can't find happiness in his castle, he sets out to discover it himself. His journey leads him to a mountain in search of three wise men and after several encounters along the way, Little Sid learns that to be happy, he wants to be present: be here now. Little Sid is both a simplified version of the Buddha's tale and an introdu As a prince, Little Sid can have anything he wants--feasts, cakes, presents, parades, entertainment of all kinds--but what he really wants is to be happy. Since Little Sid can't find happiness in his castle, he sets out to discover it himself. His journey leads him to a mountain in search of three wise men and after several encounters along the way, Little Sid learns that to be happy, he wants to be present: be here now. Little Sid is both a simplified version of the Buddha's tale and an introduction to mindfulness. It's a great way to present the idea that happiness comes from being present in the moment rather than from material objects.
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