Little Sid
In this charming and accessible picture book, Ian Lendler and Xanthe Bouma offer a heart-warming account of the childhood of the Buddha.A spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what couldn’t be given ­― happiness.Join Little Sid as he sets off on a journey of discovery and encounters mysterious wise-folk, terrifying tigers, and one very annoying mouse.With Lendler’s delightful prose and Bouma’s lyrical artwork, Little Sid weaves traditional Buddhist fables into a classic new tale of mindfulness, the meaning of life, and an awakening that is as profound today as it was 2,500 years ago.

Little Sid Details

TitleLittle Sid
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 23rd, 2018
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626726369
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Religion, Biography

Little Sid Review

  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely artwork with a great message for all children, whether or not their parents are Buddhists.
  • Kelly Gunderman
    January 1, 1970
    Check out this, other reviews, and more fun bookish things on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings!This book, wow. I loved it. Absolutely loved it. There's so much about this book that is important, especially in today's day and age. It's the kind of book that both children and adults can learn and benefit from, and the message that it shares is both powerful and moving.Religion fascinates me. All religions - I love learning about them. Because I love learning about them, I also wan Check out this, other reviews, and more fun bookish things on my young adult book blog, Here's to Happy Endings!This book, wow. I loved it. Absolutely loved it. There's so much about this book that is important, especially in today's day and age. It's the kind of book that both children and adults can learn and benefit from, and the message that it shares is both powerful and moving.Religion fascinates me. All religions - I love learning about them. Because I love learning about them, I also want my children to grow up with an interest in religions - not only whichever religion they choose when they get older, but the religions of other people around the world. It's important to know at least a few things about them I think, and Little Sid is a great way to teach even very young children about Buddhism.I'm conflicted about what to talk about first when it comes to this book - there is so much to love about it. The artwork, the writing, the story - it's all something to be cherished and makes for great story time with children or a refreshing read for yourself.I think what drew me into Little Sid right off the bat was the colorful artwork on the cover. I know we should never judge a book by its cover, but just look at that - it's bright in terms of color, and the illustration is simply charming. Of course it would not only attract the attention of a child, but it does the same for adults, too!If you like the cover, you'll be pleased to know that the inside of the book is filled with the same beautiful and colorful illustrations on all 40 pages. The illustrations tell a story all on their own, and the artist truly captures the emotions that Sid feels throughout the book, as well as the setting, his surroundings, and the animal characters that are also in the book. They are all vivid and full of life, making this book something extra special. I read this with my daughter who is five, and she was simply captivated by the beautiful pictures in the book. While I believe the story is equally important in a picture book, I also think that it has to have illustrations that will help hold interest, and that goes above and beyond in this book.So what about the story within the pages of Little Sid? Let's talk about that now!Little Sid tells the story of Sid, a young prince who has it all - even performers who are always around to make him laugh. He is constantly showered with gifts, but there is one thing wrong - he isn't happy. He tries to talk to his parents, but they are constantly telling him that they have things to do and that he will have to wait for later, which in turn makes him even more unhappy.So, despite everything that he has that should make him happy, he turns it all away and sets off on a journey to find happiness.He deals with a few animals - such as a scary tiger and a mouse that isn't quite what it seems, and after a frightening situation arises, Sid comes to the conclusion about happiness, and decides that he must share his discovery with others.The message within the pages of this book is simple enough for a child to understand, and yet complex enough for an adult to ponder, before coming to the realization that this book is one hundred percent correct about what it is trying to say. The message is one that goes directly to the heart, as well as opens up eyes to make it quite clear what is trying to be said.No matter what, you can't buy happiness. No amount of gifts or lavish things can truly make someone happy.It's the type of message that speaks wonders in this day and age, and it's such a refreshing thing to come back to in times when you are feeling overwhelmed, sad, or just stressed. I've read this book several times now and not only do I find it comforting, but it also has sparked an interest into doing some research about Buddhism. I do admit that while I know the basic principles, I am not all that familiar with the religion's finer details.This book is perfect to share with family member, friend, or even to come home to after a long day at work and unwind, reminding yourself and others close to you of what is really important in your life.Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!
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  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    I was shown this book by the artist a while back, but just got around to reading it. I was fascinated, but I'm still having trouble deciding who it is written for.The format, of a picture book biography, is potentially interesting, because it puts some of the traditional tales of the life of the Buddha into the form of a story for young kids, but...the story that it tells may be a little odd for that audience.For instance, the traditional tale of facing death while enjoying the taste of a strawb I was shown this book by the artist a while back, but just got around to reading it. I was fascinated, but I'm still having trouble deciding who it is written for.The format, of a picture book biography, is potentially interesting, because it puts some of the traditional tales of the life of the Buddha into the form of a story for young kids, but...the story that it tells may be a little odd for that audience.For instance, the traditional tale of facing death while enjoying the taste of a strawberry is included, but in an odd context that doesn't quite lead to what is shown to follow. Also, the method that "Little Sid" uses to get the attention of his parents is interesting, but in what world would it work?I think that an older child interested in the life of the Buddha would find the stories interesting, but I'm not sure they'd like the format.Still, for workmanship and artistry, rather than for clever marketing, I give this four stars.
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  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    Good way to start explaining Buddhist philosophy to littles.
  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeously illustrated biography of Siddhartha Gautama's early years.
  • Debbie Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Synopsis:“A spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what couldn’t be given - - happiness.” As a child Sid leaves the castle in pursuit of happiness. Walking to the nearest village he goes from house to house asking where he can find happiness. He eventually goes up the mountain of the Three Wise Ones and asks one man who is fishing where he can find happiness. He is told it will pass. He then comes to a tree-woman who is blocking his path. He asks th Synopsis:“A spoiled young prince, Siddhartha got everything he ever asked for, until he asked for what couldn’t be given - - happiness.” As a child Sid leaves the castle in pursuit of happiness. Walking to the nearest village he goes from house to house asking where he can find happiness. He eventually goes up the mountain of the Three Wise Ones and asks one man who is fishing where he can find happiness. He is told it will pass. He then comes to a tree-woman who is blocking his path. He asks the same question and is told, “You are already on the other side.” Eventually Sid is chased by a tiger and falls off a cliff. As he clings to a vine a mouse appears and begins to nibble the vine. As it’s about to break Sid declares, “I hate this mountain.” And that’s when he notices a strawberry growing on the vine. Since this could be his last meal, he takes a bite. The mouse speaks, “How does it taste?” Sid tells him it’s delicious. At that time a fishing line appears and the old man who was fishing earlier pulls him to safety. “Did you find what you were searching for?” he asks. Sid tells him he is now happy. “That too will pass,” says the fisherman. Sid then walks down the mountain a different person. That evening at dinner he decides to make some changes; he saws the table in half. His parents wonder what is wrong with him and ask if he wants a new toy. He declares that he wants, "no things." He then demands his parents to just, "be . . . here. . . now." And there is where the story ends except for four paragraphs, more for adults, regarding the real Buddha's life.Cons: The few things I've read about Buddha's teachings seemed interesting, maybe that's why this book caused me to do some further research. When I did a very quick search for details about Buddha's early life, this book disappointed me even more. If children and adults think they are reading a biography, which they could if they miss one sentence on the front flap copy or the recommendation by Gene Luen Yang on the back cover, it would be a real shame.  I have read several postings including Buddha/Biography by Donald S. Lopez,    Ancient  History Encyclopedia, and History.com  “Although he had an easy life, Gautama was moved by suffering in the world. He decided to give up his lavish lifestyle and endure poverty." (From History.com)  "By the time he was 29, he abandoned his home and began to live as a homeless ascetic. Even though it is normally held that Siddhartha left home in secret, this legend is a later addition; early scriptures explicitly agree that he abandoned his home, “though his parents did not conscent [sic] and wept full of affliction”. (Ancient History Encyclopedia.)And while the book Little Sid is supposed to be a modern-day retelling that weaves traditional Buddhist "fables" into a classic new tale, the only real Buddha-facts I found were completely vague.The book left me very disappointed since it could have been so much more.Pros:  This is a first for me: none :-(
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  • Baby Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, written by Ian Lendler and illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, a story inspired by the teachings of the Gautama Buddha.Little Sid is a young boy like any young boy, with only one major difference – his parents are the king and queen. Sid is inundated with toys, gifts, treats, and entertainment every waking moment of his l This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Our book today is Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, written by Ian Lendler and illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, a story inspired by the teachings of the Gautama Buddha.Little Sid is a young boy like any young boy, with only one major difference – his parents are the king and queen. Sid is inundated with toys, gifts, treats, and entertainment every waking moment of his life, but he is unfulfilled. What he wishes for most is to spend time with his perpetually occupied parents, but whenever he tries to, they are too busy. Sid decides to leave home in the hopes of finding the answer as to why he is unhappy, asking at the homes of each village he passes to find out. At last, he is led to a mountain where three wise ones supposedly live. Will Sid find the answers he seeks atop the mountain? Or were his answers inside him all along?This is a tough one. There are some elements that we really enjoyed here, but definitely some places where the book falters as well. The core messages of anti-materialism, perspectives, and being in the moment are universal, and can be appreciated by Buddhist and non-Buddhist readers alike. However, the representation of this being a biographical story of Siddhartha Gautama is highly inaccurate – the closest this could be considered is a “Disney-fied” account. The art has great ambition and is very cute, but relies too much on white space, making details hard to pick out and spreads feel underwhelming. The length is fine, but JJ’s attention was waning by the end. Interesting concept, lackluster execution, but still some good themes – not on our list, but you may feel different.(Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.)Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    It isn't often that picture books these days feature religious figures much less one about the Buddha. But in a charming and relatable fashion this one introduces young readers to Siddhartha Gautama, the boy who became the Buddha. The colorful illustrations, created digitally and then using Adobe Photoshop and a gouache brush for coloring, highlight the story of a boy born to extreme riches in Nepal. He has everything a young boy could want except for the attention of his very busy parents. His It isn't often that picture books these days feature religious figures much less one about the Buddha. But in a charming and relatable fashion this one introduces young readers to Siddhartha Gautama, the boy who became the Buddha. The colorful illustrations, created digitally and then using Adobe Photoshop and a gouache brush for coloring, highlight the story of a boy born to extreme riches in Nepal. He has everything a young boy could want except for the attention of his very busy parents. His unhappiness prompts him to take a journey to see if there is more to life than what he's been experiencing. As he searches for happiness, he encounters others who offer him tidbits of advice, most of them seemingly useless. A near-death experience leads to his enlightenment, and Sid returns home a changed boy. This time he knows exactly how to get his parents' attention and does so with the admonition to "BE HERE NOW," and savor the joys each moment has in store for them. Back matter includes a snippet about the real Buddha and the popularity of his approach to life, leading to 500 million individuals who call themselves Buddhists today. Even adults can find something of value in this book and the prince's journey to enlightenment.
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  • Cindy Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    Before Siddhartha Gautama became the Buddha, he was a spoiled young prince that everyone wanted to please. People gave him everything he could possibly wish for, but it didn’t make him happy. So he set out to seek happiness in places throughout the countryside. Along the way he discovered the truths that would guide him for the rest of his life.Ian Lendler’s picture book, Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, draws upon traditional Buddhist fables to create a children’s story about what Before Siddhartha Gautama became the Buddha, he was a spoiled young prince that everyone wanted to please. People gave him everything he could possibly wish for, but it didn’t make him happy. So he set out to seek happiness in places throughout the countryside. Along the way he discovered the truths that would guide him for the rest of his life.Ian Lendler’s picture book, Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Became Buddha, draws upon traditional Buddhist fables to create a children’s story about what is truly important in life: relationships and recognizing that while happiness will come and go it’s important to be present in the moment.It also contains a message that may resonate with parents today, as Little Sid reminds his parents that instead of always being preoccupied with many other things they sometimes need to give him their full attention.Xanthe Bouma’s illustrations add a touch of whimsy to the story, and they change color to depict Little Sid’s mood as he searches for happiness. It’s a look that keeps the story moving along while encouraging readers to notice the details.For those interested to know more, a note at the back gives a short bio of Siddhartha Gautama.The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    I am giving this book 5 stars. While I know that Buddhism is a practice of mindfulness and meditation in search of awakening, I never really knew how it started. Well, this book taught me a lesson. The story is simple, but one that I think will resonate with many children today. While the story is the Buddha story, it’s not a religious story, more of a family and community story. Plus the artwork is AMAZING. The color work is gorgeous. I want pages to frame and hang on my wall.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Sid is an all too familiar tale for many children. Parents would rather buy gifts and items than be present in their life. The story of Little Sid and his family was a wonderful reminder for parents to be present in the lives of their children and a reminder to children to speak up and ask for what they really want. I can't wait to share this story with my students and their families. I also appreciate the origins in the back of the book.
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  • Raven Black
    January 1, 1970
    I think I would have liked this better with less of a contemporary take on it/more realistic presentation. While I do not know for sure he didn't have stuffed animals, somehow I don't think he would have them or called them that. However, I understand that the text is for a younger, modern audience and Lendler wants to capture their attention. I love the illustrations. They are bright and fun to read more than the text.
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  • Tori
    January 1, 1970
    The story of Buddha, made simple for a younger audience. Children will easily understand Little Sid's feelings of being left out and ignored by his busy parents. Beautiful, colorful pictures bring the tale to life. Caveat: There are many speech bubbles and asides that make this one a little complicated for a straight reading during storytime. Smaller audiences of older children will get more out of it.
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  • LoveLearningEveryday
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5 starsI think it beautifully captures the essence of Siddhartha in a kid friendly way. The illustrations and colors are beautiful, I am just not sure a kid would fully understand ALL the messages. Although I do love the ending where he just wants his parents to be present. This book makes me want to reread Siddhartha for myself.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    Though not historically accurate, it gives a great little insight into the world of the Buddha and makes the idea of happiness a more understandable concept for younger readers. I would recommend this to parents who would like to introduce them to concepts of Buddhism at a young age.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    A relevant picture book for our times. Little Sid learns early on that money can't buy happiness, and he goes off on his own to find Happiness with a capital H. I found the telling interesting and direct, without being sticky sweet. And the illustrations are dreamlike and beautiful.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    A very nice little story about what's most important in life. The art was very beautiful and so colorful! One of the best children's books I've had the pleasure of reading.
  • Linda V
    January 1, 1970
    Review will be posted at a future date.
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    More modernized/fictionalized version of the story of the Buddha, will connect to modern readers and give them a sense of how the Buddha became who he was.
  • Rainey
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful.
  • Carol Tilley
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely illustrations and a good introduction to the early life of the Buddha.
  • Rosemary
    January 1, 1970
    This adorably illustrated story of the Buddha's childhood is both a nice introduction to Buddhism for younger readers, and a meaningful fable about valuing connections over possessions.Little Sid is Siddhartha, a little prince who gets everything he could ever want, except for time with his parents. They're always running off to some grand event or monarch duty, leaving Sid to be raised by an army of handlers who all fawn over him. He isn't happy. He takes off to find the secret to happiness and This adorably illustrated story of the Buddha's childhood is both a nice introduction to Buddhism for younger readers, and a meaningful fable about valuing connections over possessions.Little Sid is Siddhartha, a little prince who gets everything he could ever want, except for time with his parents. They're always running off to some grand event or monarch duty, leaving Sid to be raised by an army of handlers who all fawn over him. He isn't happy. He takes off to find the secret to happiness and meets a wise man who confuses him, a tiger who terrifies him, and a mouse who makes it all come together for him. When he comes back, he's a changed kid, ready to put what he's learned into practice: starting with his parents.Xanthe Bouma's artwork is adorable and bright, lively and bold. Sid's face is filled with expression, whether he's happily greeting readers on the opening page or reveling in the joy of a ripe strawberry. Ian Lendler's text weaves a story of a child who has everything he could want, but wants only his parents' time. It's a story of mindfulness and gratitude, and that's something every child should know and every family should embrace. My favorite lesson? That being happy isn't permanent, but neither is being sad. It teaches kids that life comes in ebbs and flows, and to go with those ups and downs. A brief biography of Siddhartha Gautama closes out this volume.Booktalk or display Little Sid with one of my favorite books, Ganesha's Sweet Tooth; together, the two books present a starting point to discover different cultures and faiths, all while delivering solid messages about awareness and resilience. Talk about the religions that inspire these tales; introduce your readers to Buddhism and Hinduism. It's a great way to make their worlds a little bigger.
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  • LouLou
    January 1, 1970
    Please read the review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev...Whether you're Christian, Atheist, Buddhist, or anything in-between, author Ian Lendler demonstrates a beautiful reminder that love is spelled t-i-m-e, in his latest book, Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Become Buddha. Third person narrative with sweet illustrations of pastel watercolors dotted with pops of bold color lends light to the innocent portrayal of a real-life venture taken on by Indian royal Siddhartha G Please read the review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev...Whether you're Christian, Atheist, Buddhist, or anything in-between, author Ian Lendler demonstrates a beautiful reminder that love is spelled t-i-m-e, in his latest book, Little Sid: The Tiny Prince Who Become Buddha. Third person narrative with sweet illustrations of pastel watercolors dotted with pops of bold color lends light to the innocent portrayal of a real-life venture taken on by Indian royal Siddhartha Gautama that became a religious movement known as Buddhism. Instead of focusing on what would become a dogma, the author takes the quest from a child-like point of view simplifying the overall journey of what brought little Sid to leave his kingdom in search of happiness and how he ultimately found it in unexpected place and circumstance.A lovely picture book with a heartwarming message to add to your nursery or pre-k child's nightly reading.
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
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