Comics Will Break Your Heart
Miriam's family should be rich. After all, her grandfather was the co-creator of smash-hit comics series The TomorrowMen. But he sold his rights to the series to his co-creator in the 1960s for practically nothing, and now that's what Miriam has: practically nothing. And practically nothing to look forward to either-how can she afford college when her family can barely keep a roof above their heads? As if she didn't have enough to worry about, Miriam's life gets much more complicated when a cute boy shows up in town . . . and turns out to be the grandson of the man who defrauded Miriam's grandfather, and heir to the TomorrowMen fortune.In her endearing debut novel, cartoonist Faith Erin Hicks pens a sensitive and funny Romeo and Juliet tale about modern romance, geek royalty, and what it takes to heal the long-festering scars of the past (Spoiler Alert: love).

Comics Will Break Your Heart Details

TitleComics Will Break Your Heart
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 12th, 2019
PublisherRoaring Brook Press
ISBN-139781626723641
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fiction

Comics Will Break Your Heart Review

  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    When I realized this book was going to be a kind of modern version of Romeo Juliet with conflict centering on comic book copyrights, I was thrilled. Who doesn’t enjoy a well done enemies to lovers story. This one turned out to be an okay experience though, enjoyable enough but not very remarkable or maybe I just hoped for too much.The writing was simple enough that I finished it pretty quickly. However, the conversations between the characters didn’t always feel realistic. It’s probably the firs When I realized this book was going to be a kind of modern version of Romeo Juliet with conflict centering on comic book copyrights, I was thrilled. Who doesn’t enjoy a well done enemies to lovers story. This one turned out to be an okay experience though, enjoyable enough but not very remarkable or maybe I just hoped for too much.The writing was simple enough that I finished it pretty quickly. However, the conversations between the characters didn’t always feel realistic. It’s probably the first time I actually liked the characters’ internal monologues more than the dialogues because it helped me get to know them better. It was also quite unique to see this book set in rural Canada, which I know nothing about. The small town feel, the contrast between the rich and not so rich part of the town, the helplessness of living in a place where there are not many opportunities - all of this is captured quite well. I also liked the idea of so many people, both old and young finding such joy and contentment with comics. However, the main conflict of the book is supposed to be about the TomorrowMen comics and how Mir’s grandfather was not given his due by Weldon’s and I think the whole past issue was not really explored at all. We only get small glimpses from both the families but we never get the full story and I kinda felt cheated because of that.Miriam was not an easy character to like initially. I thought she was being difficult, but it took some time for me to understand her perspective and struggles. She was just being a very confused teenager, unsure about what to do after graduation, how she would pay for university and if leaving her small town meant losing all her friendships. I obviously didn’t realize her obsession and anger about the comics, considering she never even met her grandfather, but it was nice to see her slowly realize the futility of it and let it all go. In the beginning, Weldon seemed like a spoiled teenager just doing bad things for the fun of it, but soon it was clear he wanted to be noticed and not feel so invisible in his own family. However, he too slowly realizes that isn’t the way to go and becomes slightly more responsible and confident about what he wants for his future. I also enjoyed his changing relationship with his mother and the possibility of them being closer again.There was only a slight conflict between the two of them and I thought it was resolved fairly quickly. There wasn’t much angst and perhaps I was expecting more of it. The development and progression of their friendship was very cute but I truly didn’t feel the chemistry, especially not enough to warrant the decisions towards the end of the book. Everything seemed to resolve fairly quickly and easily too, neatly wrapped up in a bow, which was okay I guess but also made me feel like the stakes were never too high.I would recommend this book if you are looking for a cute high school contemporary with nerdy characters, some fun moments and not much angst. I would suggest not going into it with too much expectations, specifically for the enemies to lovers trope. It was entertaining while I was reading it and left me feeling pleasant.
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  • Jen Ryland
    January 1, 1970
    I am really not a comics fan but I loved this!A cute Romeo and Juliet story that's also about family, about valuing art and creators of art, and, yes about comics (I'm sure I didn't appreciate that part as much as I could have.)Review on the blog Feb 13 and a giveaway on Feb 15!Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com! Check out my Bookstagram! Or check out my Jen In Ten reviews on Youtube - get the lowdown on current books in 10-30 seconds!
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    His family had made their fortune from the TomorrowMen, while her family watched from the sidelines. Can Mir and Weldon rise above their family history and forge a relationship?• Pro: I was actually a big Weldon fan. He had quite a bit of baggage to unpack, and I was glad Nova Scotia was a hospitable place for him to do it. • Pro: The romance was very sweet. I liked how Mir's feelings for Weldon snuck up on her, while Weldon was sort of gooey from the start. • Pro: The Hendricks were such a fabu His family had made their fortune from the TomorrowMen, while her family watched from the sidelines. Can Mir and Weldon rise above their family history and forge a relationship?• Pro: I was actually a big Weldon fan. He had quite a bit of baggage to unpack, and I was glad Nova Scotia was a hospitable place for him to do it. • Pro: The romance was very sweet. I liked how Mir's feelings for Weldon snuck up on her, while Weldon was sort of gooey from the start. • Pro: The Hendricks were such a fabulous family, and Mir's household may have been physically shabby, but it was filled with love and parents, who were genuine and supportive. • Pro: Hicks has an obvious love for comics, and some definite feelings about the comic and superhero industry. There is some intriguing commentary in the book that had me nodding my head. I also really liked getting a peek at what goes into writing and illustrating a comic. We got to hear from an artist in the book, as well as tagging along as Mir and her friend attempted to write a comic script. • Con: Don't get me wrong, I really thought the ending was nice and sweet and I was rather happy with the resolutions, but it felt a little rushed to me. • Pro: This wasn't just a romance. Both Weldon and Mir were struggling with some issues relating to letting go and moving on, which were definitely themes for several characters in this book. Mir and Weldon grew over the course of the book, and it was clear in the way their approach to this issues changed. Overall: An adorable romance with a side of coming-of-age and geekery, which was fun and light and smile inducing. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Lizzy (Bent Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    ~*Check out my blog at The Bent Bookworm!*~ Comics Will Break Your Heart was an adorable story with hattips to geeks of all kinds - from the greats of British literature to, obviously, comic book fans! The plot is loosely based on Romeo and Juliet, only the two families in question are descendents of patriarchs who together birthed one of the greatest comic book franchises of all time, only to have a bitter falling out. Mir and Weldon are both likable characters, young people approaching the end ~*Check out my blog at The Bent Bookworm!*~ Comics Will Break Your Heart was an adorable story with hattips to geeks of all kinds - from the greats of British literature to, obviously, comic book fans! The plot is loosely based on Romeo and Juliet, only the two families in question are descendents of patriarchs who together birthed one of the greatest comic book franchises of all time, only to have a bitter falling out. Mir and Weldon are both likable characters, young people approaching the end of high school with the usual amount of trepidation and flailing about as they try to figure out their place in the world and what they want to do with their lives. They meet by sheer accident, when Weldon's misbehavior prompts his high-powered, fame and fortune focused father to send him away for the summer, to his aunt and uncle's house in the small town he has rarely seen. Despite his undercurrent of resentment and propensity for lying, Weldon is charismatic and charms just about everyone he meets. Mir has a work ethic to rival most adults, desperate to rise above her family's extreme economy of existence. I liked that she didn't seem embarrassed by her admittedly rather eccentric parents, but she knew that their choices were not going to be hers. I could understand her resentment of being forced to the extremes of frugal living - such as buying a second hand Monopoly and painting rocks to replace the missing pieces. The cast of side characters was endearing too, even if I felt that their stories were left unfinished. I loved Mir's friends Evan and Raleigh, and I hope maybe the author plans to write more about them at some point. Evan especially! He was just so sweet and kind and clearly cared so much about Mir. I really liked that even though he wanted to care about her in a more-than-friends way, when she said made it clear she wasn't interested he completely dropped it, but remained a great friend. A lot of guys could take a lesson! :P The Romeo/Juliet plot was a little weak, mostly because of its predictability. The adults of the two families have had some hard feelings in the past, but their reasons for estrangement sound weak, especially the way Weldon's aunt presents her case. 4/5 stars. I loved the descriptions of fandoms and comics, and Comic Con. It definitely appeals to the inner (and not so inner) nerd! Blog | Twitter | Bloglovin | Instagram | Google+
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  • Lisa Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    Comic and graphic novel writer Faith Erin Hicks makes her debut in young adult fiction with Comics Will Break Your Heart, and does it beautifully! In this sweet YA novel, two teens from families with a long-standing grudge meet and connect one summer in Nova Scotia. Miriam's grandfather co-created the TomorrowMen comics with Weldon's grandfather, but sold his rights to the brand for only $900 many decades earlier. Since then, TomorrowMen has blown up with a huge fandom and a blockbuster movie in Comic and graphic novel writer Faith Erin Hicks makes her debut in young adult fiction with Comics Will Break Your Heart, and does it beautifully! In this sweet YA novel, two teens from families with a long-standing grudge meet and connect one summer in Nova Scotia. Miriam's grandfather co-created the TomorrowMen comics with Weldon's grandfather, but sold his rights to the brand for only $900 many decades earlier. Since then, TomorrowMen has blown up with a huge fandom and a blockbuster movie in the works, and while Weldon's family stands to profit hugely, Miriam's will see not a dime, despite the 20-year lawsuit waged by her grandfather to undo the shoddy deal he unwittingly agreed to.When Miriam and Weldon meet, they each carry their families' baggage, but their mutual love of comics as well as their own personal struggles to figure out their futures draw them together and help them move past the animosity that's lingered for so long. This is a quick, fun read, with touching moments too, and has some lovely scenes that highlight the intricacies and quirks of best friendships, relationships between teens and their parents, and the heartaches and worries that come with making decisions about where to go in life.Comics Will Break Your Heart is also a terrific ode to the glories of fandom, culminating in a visit to (of course) San Diego Comic-Con. I'm sure everyone with a secret geeky obsession will relate to the characters' reactions to entering geek heaven:In a flash he saw everything as she saw it, the madness and energy but also the joyful heart of the convention."Oh, wow," she whispered. "Comics made all of this."Highly recommended!Review copy courtesy of the publisher via NetGalley. Full review at Bookshelf Fantasies.
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  • JM Cabral
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 4.5 ★When I first read the synopsis for Comics Will Break Your Heart, I thought that it was just my typical romance story that was filled with angst and witty banter that comes with the trope. I mean, what was I to expect? There’s a heroine, a love interest, and an age-long conflict / tension. That, to me, screamed HATE TO LOVE. Is it just me? After a more thorough research, though, I found that it was an easy favorite for contemporary readers who are in the market for stories tha Actual rating: 4.5 ★When I first read the synopsis for Comics Will Break Your Heart, I thought that it was just my typical romance story that was filled with angst and witty banter that comes with the trope. I mean, what was I to expect? There’s a heroine, a love interest, and an age-long conflict / tension. That, to me, screamed HATE TO LOVE. Is it just me? After a more thorough research, though, I found that it was an easy favorite for contemporary readers who are in the market for stories that were equal parts sweet and savory, but all in all romantic. And that’s exactly what I thought when I read it. Read on to know my thoughts about Faith Erin Hicks’ new book.I see no point in denying that I came and stayed for the romance aspect of this book. Miriam’s grandfather, Micah Kendrick, co-created the famous, crowd-favorite comic, the TomorrowMen, with Joseph Warrick, who happens to be Weldon’s grandfather. And after a messy legal case that lasted for years, the Kendricks lost possession of the said comic, leaving Mir and her family with practically nothing. Mir had every right to avoid Weldon just because of the looming history that their families undoubtedly share, but fate obviously had other plans for them. Once they met, sparks were literally everywhere. And I very much appreciated the fact that lots of forces were driving them apart, but against all odds, they still found ways to be together. (Wow, that sounded cheesy, but I CANNOT HELP IT, I’m sorry!) I enjoyed reading this love story not just because it was sweet and romantic. The whole narrative is original, and I feel like I’ve never read anything quite like it. Their banter was also enjoyable to read, paving the way for me to fully appreciate this rom-com.The A+ family dynamics were quite noteworthy too! Mir’s parents, Stella and Henry, were supportive, resourceful, content, and frugal, and I actually felt like they were Filipino parents just because of the traits that they possessed. There’s an admirable thing in living a simple life and I can’t help but commend them for it—even though, just like Miriam, I have an undeniable need for reliable internet. And even though they weren’t fully able to pay for every single thing that Mir wanted, and yes, I’m talking about a secure college plan, they still made it a point to instill her with good values and show their love and support in what little way they can. As for Weldon, the fact that he came from a broken family added a new perspective and a lot more depth into the story. I appreciated that, even though he was practically banished to an isolated area in Canada for most of the story, he learned to accept and love it in the end, turning a punishment into a positive thing, and he even found love in the process! As for David and Emma, Weldon’s parents, they might not have lots of exposure, but I knew that they had their own battles to conquer and so I loved their presence all the same.Another thing that I loved about this novel was the fact that it tackled the hardships that come with being practical and dreaming big, especially in terms of tertiary education. Lots of students, whether they be Filipino or not, are confused as to what they want to do after high school. The future can sometimes be a scary topic for lots of people, especially for the youth, and so I very much appreciated the way that this was somehow brought to light through Miriam and her struggle in finding and honing her passion. There’s a certain part of the story that shows just how conflicted Miriam is about what she’s going to do after HS, and even though she had her heart set in studying out of province, she still didn’t have any concrete plans as to what she actually wanted to do and pursue. However, just as I predicted, she later on works things out for herself, ensuring an exciting future for herself. In my own personal way, I felt like this was the author’s way of telling her readers that we don’t need to think about stuff too far ahead and sometimes, it’s okay to go into the future without well-thought of plans. Life’s all about experiencing the ups and downs in making decisions and that’s what makes it fun and memorable.Audiobook Review:Thanks to the generosity of the people from Macmillan Audio, I was also approved to listen to the audiobook program of Comics Will Break Your Heart in advance as narrated by Carly Robins! Now what I absolutely adored about the program is that the narrator did such an amazing job at breathing life into every single character in the story. From Mir, to Weldon, to Stella… Name it and Carly Robins probably gave him / her a unique voice. I breezed through it because I easily fell in love with her parlance and diction and I was amazed at how she turned all of the confrontation scenes into such lively and tense moments.“Comics Will Break Your Heart is an awesome novel perfect to read for the summer. It features a cute, conservative, and very relatable romance, and a coming-of-age topic that I’m sure lots of teens will appreciate. Miriam and Weldon, at least to me, seemed realistic because of their problems and so I didn’t have a hard time believing in them and their story. It’s a fast-paced masterpiece that reads like a centuries-old rom-com that no doubt fans of Morgan Matson, Jenny Han, Maurene Goo, and Siobhan Vivian would certainly enjoy.”Huge thanks to my friends from Macmillan International and Fierce Reads for sending me a review copy and Macmillan Audio for letting me listen to the audiobook program of this title in exchange for an honest review. This did not, in any way, affect my overall opinion of the book and/or the story.
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  • Shelby
    January 1, 1970
    “Comics Will Break Your Heart” was a book I got at YALLFest and was really looking forward to. The premise of two teenagers—who have an ongoing “family feud”— meeting and potentially falling in love (with the addition of comic books) sounded like so much fun! I was super excited to jump into the book, but I was sadly disappointed. I didn’t love this book nearly as much as I was hoping to.I do stand by the fact that this was a very original plot, what with the comic book writing and all, but it w “Comics Will Break Your Heart” was a book I got at YALLFest and was really looking forward to. The premise of two teenagers—who have an ongoing “family feud”— meeting and potentially falling in love (with the addition of comic books) sounded like so much fun! I was super excited to jump into the book, but I was sadly disappointed. I didn’t love this book nearly as much as I was hoping to.I do stand by the fact that this was a very original plot, what with the comic book writing and all, but it was handled in a very common way. We’ve got the hate-to-love trope thrown into the mix, which wasn’t done exceptionally well. I personally thought that a lot of the plot changes didn’t have good transitions. If an event occurred, something would change, but the author didn’t make it very clear what caused things to change. I noticed this in many different circumstances throughout the book. I also felt that the dialogue didn’t flow with the book— it felt very scripted and stiff. Dialogue between characters is one of my favorite elements in any book, and the enjoyment factor wasn’t there for me with this book’s dialogue. Another thing I think could have been improved upon was the timeline. We get a lot of history about the Warrick/Kendrick comic feud, but the times aren’t clear. However, this is an ARC, so this is subject to change. I just noticed that, in this copy, there were lots of contradictions in terms of when comics were made, when people were alive, etc.My final critique for this book is the pacing. I wasn’t enthralled with the book. In fact, I unfortunately found it pretty boring for the most part. It’s a 340 page book, but I think it could’ve been condensed to around 300, if not less than that. There were a lot of periods in the book where nothing happened. While I didn’t expect lots of action, considering this is a contemporary novel, I expected more overall.I did quite like how Miriam, a main character, struggled with a variety of different issues, relationship, friendship, and future wise. She was struggling with losing a friend, what she wanted to do in the future—stay home or go away to a university— and what she wanted with Weldon. This part of the book was handled very well, although there were some elements they didn’t quite wrap up at the end.I love the setting in Canada. I don’t read much Canadian fiction, whether the author is Canadian or the book is set there, but I liked reading this book. I believe it is set in Nova Scotia.Finally, I thought the characters were developed really well. Miriam and Weldon were both very fleshed out and they were written to seem very real. While their dialogue was uncomfortably stiff, other than that their relationship and their individual personalities were done well.
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  • Jessie_Book
    January 1, 1970
    This book is perfect for fans of Geekerella. Its cute, light hearted, and full of geekery. Though it does take about half the book till it gets really good, after that the book practically drowns in adorable cuteness.
  • Melissa (YA Book Shelf)
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute story with a hate to love vibe and comic book characters a-plenty. Miriam has a great family and a group of friends that cause frustration and an interesting character arch. However, the Romeo and Juliet style vibes between Miriam and Weldon make for a great, slow burn romance that readers will get behind.Fellow Canadians will also get a kick out of the Canadian setting and must-be-a-Canadian style jokes.
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  • Jane (It'sJaneLindsey)
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. This book felt way too surface level, and the romance was on the boring side.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars - Cute read but there was one nagging question that was never answered and OCD-me needed it answered (view spoiler)[How much was the settlement paid to Stella and where the heck did it go??? (hide spoiler)] . It stayed true to the comic genre and never appeared fake so major props for that :)
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I won a ARC of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway!I read this novel in two days because it's such a quick and easy read, which I appreciate once in a while. The problem with quick and easy reads are that they can be forgettable. Unfortunately, Comics Will Break Your Heart falls into this category of being easy to read and then forgetting about it, making you wonder why you even read it in the first place.The main characters, Miriam and Weldon, have family members that are each against their relat I won a ARC of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway!I read this novel in two days because it's such a quick and easy read, which I appreciate once in a while. The problem with quick and easy reads are that they can be forgettable. Unfortunately, Comics Will Break Your Heart falls into this category of being easy to read and then forgetting about it, making you wonder why you even read it in the first place.The main characters, Miriam and Weldon, have family members that are each against their relationship with each other because of their families' history with gaining the rights to a certain comic book series. Weldon and Mir's grandfathers were the co-creators of The TomorrowMen, an ultra-famous comic book series that is soon getting a movie. The only problem? Mir's family doesn't get any sales revenue from the franchise. Did I also mention that neither family approves of them seeing each other?Comics Will Break Your Heart is sold as a modern-day Romeo and Juliet. This is where my main problem with this book comes into play; there is literally no good reason for the families to disapprove of Weldon and Mir's relationship. At the time the book takes place, the settlement for the rights to The TomorrowMen franchise is over, and all that's left is some hard feelings. But why? Neither Weldon nor Miriam had anything to do with their parent's issues. I think that these negative feelings were played out in an unrealistic way, especially since the novel takes place in modern times, and not the era of Romeo and Juliet. I have to give this book some credit for making the main conflict just as childish as Shakespeare's original play.I also didn't care for the ending, but maybe that's because I didn't like Mir and Weldon's relationship in general. There's also a scene in which the couple fights towards the end; again, I thought it was juvenile and just didn't make sense, even for supposedly immature 16-year-olds.So that's my beef with Comics Will Break Your Heart. I didn't like it that much. The fact that I read it may have even broken my heart.
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  • Tiff at Mostly YA Lit
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. A very solid YA debut for comic book writer and artist Faith Erin Hicks. The best part about this book is how alive and honest it was about this family feud over comic book rights - and how that resentment and fight trickled down to Miriam and Weldon, the two protagonists caught in a Romeo and Juliet situation. I completely understood Mir’s resentment and bitterness, Weldon’s guilt, and how much they had to get past just to fight for a beginning together. Like a comic book, I also lik 3.5 stars. A very solid YA debut for comic book writer and artist Faith Erin Hicks. The best part about this book is how alive and honest it was about this family feud over comic book rights - and how that resentment and fight trickled down to Miriam and Weldon, the two protagonists caught in a Romeo and Juliet situation. I completely understood Mir’s resentment and bitterness, Weldon’s guilt, and how much they had to get past just to fight for a beginning together. Like a comic book, I also liked how this book focused on so many other aspects of Miriam’s life as well, like her slowly changing friendship dynamics, and the class and overtly struggles in small town Canada. Weldon’s family dynamics were a bit more typical for YA but done well. The romance was cute, but maybe a bit too young for my liking. And for the life of me, I couldn’t quite get into Mir and Weldon’s headspaces enough. I wanted to be there, but it felt like we were only scratching the surface of who they were. A good book that got me thinking a lot about the commercialization of art, but I wish it had gotten me more invested with the characters.
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  • Stacie
    January 1, 1970
    RTC closer to release date
  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I could happily read comic book/con related stories and nothing else and be totally happy. Full RTC
  • Mikayla Tewksbury
    January 1, 1970
    This contemporary YA story is a Romeo and Juliet-esque story filled with geekery and comics. Miriam is the granddaughter of Micah Kendrick, who was the original artist for and co-creator of the TomorrowMen comic book entity. Weldon is the grandson of Joseph Warrick, the other co-creator of the TomorrowMen comics. Legal battles over the rights of the company have led to the Kendricks and Warricks filled with animosity toward each other, much to the chagrin of Mir and Weldon. The only thing I felt This contemporary YA story is a Romeo and Juliet-esque story filled with geekery and comics. Miriam is the granddaughter of Micah Kendrick, who was the original artist for and co-creator of the TomorrowMen comic book entity. Weldon is the grandson of Joseph Warrick, the other co-creator of the TomorrowMen comics. Legal battles over the rights of the company have led to the Kendricks and Warricks filled with animosity toward each other, much to the chagrin of Mir and Weldon. The only thing I felt the story lacked was more character development. I would have liked to see a bit more depth within the characters in the story, however, I felt like the atmosphere and plot made up for it. I recommend this story to anyone who enjoyed Geekerella or Queens of Geek!*I received an ARC of this story from NetGalley, all opinions are entirely my own.*
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  • Haileyreads
    January 1, 1970
    Mir’s grandfather sold the rights to the comic he co-created for next to nothing. Now the comic is mega popular and Mir feels cheated.Weldon’s grandfather also co-created that comic and created Warrick Studio’s. But Weldon after some trouble at school gets shipped off to his aunt and uncles for the summer.I really loved this one! Possibly because I’ve slowly been getting into comics and this heavily involved comics. The relationships we great in this I felt like they were very authentic. And I l Mir’s grandfather sold the rights to the comic he co-created for next to nothing. Now the comic is mega popular and Mir feels cheated.Weldon’s grandfather also co-created that comic and created Warrick Studio’s. But Weldon after some trouble at school gets shipped off to his aunt and uncles for the summer.I really loved this one! Possibly because I’ve slowly been getting into comics and this heavily involved comics. The relationships we great in this I felt like they were very authentic. And I love that the budding relationship between MC’s went slowly.I definitely recommend if you’re getting into comics like me or if you’re interested in a Romeo and Juliet contemporary retelling.
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  • Annamae
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley for an E-ARC copy of Comics Will Break your Heart in exchange for an honest review. Comics Will Break Your Heart by Faith Erin HIcks is an enjoyable contemporary YA Romance. It's small town Canadian setting along with the relevant topics covered that are applicable to all adolescents such as first love, changing friendships, forgiveness, and leaving home. The characters are likable, each with their own faults. I recommend it for readers who love the Marvel Universe.
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  • K Whatsherface
    January 1, 1970
    I should probably write something. This book came out the 12th. I finished late the 13th. I may like this book a little bit. This is the fluffy goodness I love. Mir did annoy me at points, so did Weldon. Weldon's mom is weird. Evan is a saint. Raleigh...I'm not sure what to say about her. Jamie is a half a character at best. And what happened to berg? We stop seeing him like halfway through the book. You think we would at least hear about a family friend again. I wish we got more of the side cha I should probably write something. This book came out the 12th. I finished late the 13th. I may like this book a little bit. This is the fluffy goodness I love. Mir did annoy me at points, so did Weldon. Weldon's mom is weird. Evan is a saint. Raleigh...I'm not sure what to say about her. Jamie is a half a character at best. And what happened to berg? We stop seeing him like halfway through the book. You think we would at least hear about a family friend again. I wish we got more of the side characters because it would have been nice knowing more about the people that are suppose to be important to Mir's life.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like the book but it didn't grab me at the beginning and the fact that there wasn't much going on in the story didn't lend itself to keeping me interested. There was a thin plot thrown in there but not even a ooey-gooey insta-romance swooniness nor super awesome geek humor to get me laughing-- there wasn't anything there unfortunately.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    A paradox of a book - I wanted to read it quickly to find out how it ends but I didn't want it to end. A sweet and gentle slow burn romance that made my heart happy. As with most comics, it was a self contained story but I closed it hoping for a sequel.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Two houses, each alike in dignity... and with surnames that have great meaning to the geeks of the world.This is a story about growing up, finding your place, and following your heart. The story begins with Mir, who lives in the small town of Sandford in Nova Scotia, Canada; she is diligent and hard working, doing her best to get into university, putting every cent into a savings account. Then enters Weldon Warrick into her life. I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Two houses, each alike in dignity... and with surnames that have great meaning to the geeks of the world.This is a story about growing up, finding your place, and following your heart. The story begins with Mir, who lives in the small town of Sandford in Nova Scotia, Canada; she is diligent and hard working, doing her best to get into university, putting every cent into a savings account. Then enters Weldon Warrick into her life. Yeah, that Warrick. As in the Warricks who run Warrick Studios. The Warrick Studios that publish the Tomorrowmen comics. The Warrick Studios that is debuting the trailer for the Tomorrowmen movie at Comic Con.The Tomorrowmen that Mir's grandfather co-created with Weldon Warrick's grandfather.Wealthy Weldon represents everything that Mir's family lost and doesn't have and she is resentful for that. But, as she soon learns, she and her family represent everything that money can't buy and all that Weldon wants. It'll be more than Skylord that flies this summer...I really enjoyed this novel, and loved both narrators, who have great voices. Neither are perfect, making them all the more real and makes you want to root for them even more. There's no insta-love, but there is definitely insta-curiosity, which leads both Mir and Weldon to seek the other out and learn more, developing feelings slowly, which I love.
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still not sure whether to give this a 2 or a 3 star rating so I'm leaving it blank for now. Anyway, full review to come soon, I guess. Sigh.
  • Morgan (The Bookish Beagle)
    January 1, 1970
    This wasn't a bad book but personally I was disappointed. It wasn't nearly as shippy or feelsy as I hoped and I didn't think Miriam's friend group was very strong either. I did like that it was set in Canada and seemed very Canadian (to this American at least). I haven't read many books set in Canada and I found the slight cultural differences interesting. I don't need a lot of plot to enjoy a book but I do need to feel connected to the characters and I didn't, which made the story drag. It also This wasn't a bad book but personally I was disappointed. It wasn't nearly as shippy or feelsy as I hoped and I didn't think Miriam's friend group was very strong either. I did like that it was set in Canada and seemed very Canadian (to this American at least). I haven't read many books set in Canada and I found the slight cultural differences interesting. I don't need a lot of plot to enjoy a book but I do need to feel connected to the characters and I didn't, which made the story drag. It also felt like there was a lot of nerd bashing ironically. Lots of gatekeeping- many characters make it clear that they think the only real nerds and real comic book fans are the ones who have read comics from the beginning and know every little thing. As someone who loves comic book movies and definitely appreciates but doesn't read a lot of comic books, it felt really exclusionary. "Fake Geeks", rose tinted glasses for Comic Con before it became all "Hollywood" and the like. There was a lot of good story content about Miriam being unsure what to do with her future, and the myriad of paths people can take after graduation from high school. I think that's always really valuable and relatable in young adult books. But yeah, unfortunately I'm walking away with more of a negative feeling than a positive one.
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  • Jaclyn
    January 1, 1970
    Sweet, coming of age story, about being a teen and figuring out what you want to do in life beyond your parents' expectations. A bit of romance. A lot of Canadian and comic book references. Not quite as geekily awesome or romantic as I expected, but I think teens will really relate to the characters. 3.5 stars.
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  • Sierra
    January 1, 1970
    There isn’t a whole lot of plot to this one, but man I sure did gel with the writing and characters.
  • Deanna (Deanna Reads Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books I think I first heard about this book last summer, and I immediately put it on my TBR. As a huge fan of comics and geek culture in general, this seemed like a book that was right up my alley. I also LOVE ya contemporary novels that are heavy on two characters falling in love. It's kind of my jam. So I have to say that this one did not disappoint me!If you know anything about Marvel comics or the relationship between Stan Lee This review was originally posted on my review blog Deanna Reads Books I think I first heard about this book last summer, and I immediately put it on my TBR. As a huge fan of comics and geek culture in general, this seemed like a book that was right up my alley. I also LOVE ya contemporary novels that are heavy on two characters falling in love. It's kind of my jam. So I have to say that this one did not disappoint me!If you know anything about Marvel comics or the relationship between Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, then the conflict between Mir and Weldon's families in this story might sound very familiar. Although, I do find it interesting in the world of this book, the big two of comics, Marvel and DC also exist. Just the TomorrowMen franchise and the publisher they are from are also a big deal.I really liked Weldon and I really felt for him. His parents just seemed like the typical absent YA parents, but I think that is kind of the point here. I honestly didn't like either of his parents. His dad just cared about his business, and his mom seemed really sad, but I also couldn't stand how she keep talking about "fake geeks". I think the intention is that she is joking, but there were a couple time in this book that I felt like she was a real gate-keeper when it came to comics and geek culture. I don't think Weldon ever calls her on this, but there is a point at the end of the book where he comments on the idea of a "fake geek" to a stranger. I just really wished he would have called his mom on her BS.I was really glad to see Mir's parents so involved in her life. I did think it was odd that she refers to her parents by their first names, but I think that might just be how her parents are. They are a little odd, but definitely interesting characters on their own. A lot of the conflict in the novel are because of her mom settling the court case between the Warricks and the Kendricks. I think Stella was just tired of it and wanted to move on to do her own art. I also liked that she calls Mir out for being so angry with Weldon just because of his last name. It feels like the Warricks have way more animosity about it than the Kendricks do, so it made me really not like any of Weldon's family, except his Uncle. Mostly because his Uncle is over it and wants everyone else to just move on too.I really liked that this book also discusses the pressures of what to do after high school, and really hammers in the problems with college and both the emotional and financial strain it puts on kids. There is also a little bit of side-plot in this novel about how this affect Mir's friendship. While also dealing with how dating someone can also affect your friendships.I liked the romance in this one a lot because it didn't feel insta-love to me, but rather a slow burn. Weldon and Mir just start hanging out with each other, and it takes them awhile to figure out if they actually like each other. I really liked that about this one.I do think that the conflict between the two families is not really resolved at the end of the book, and it did feel a little bit rushed. I do think it's still a cute YA romance book, so I would still recommend it. I think it you like Geekerealla or Chaotic Good, this is a book for you.*I received an eARC via Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Nasty Lady MJ
    January 1, 1970
    To see review with gif click here.I haven’t read a much as I’d like this year. TBH, I’ve been too busy and in my introvert down time I’ve just been too exhausted to read. However, last weekend was a long weekend and I did get some precious reading time in and decided to read Comics Will Break Your Heart.In theory, this is a book I should’ve loved. It has a lot of things going for it: geek culture, romance, Canada, comic book legal woes.Yes, the legal woes aspect of the novel interested me. I’m a To see review with gif click here.I haven’t read a much as I’d like this year. TBH, I’ve been too busy and in my introvert down time I’ve just been too exhausted to read. However, last weekend was a long weekend and I did get some precious reading time in and decided to read Comics Will Break Your Heart.In theory, this is a book I should’ve loved. It has a lot of things going for it: geek culture, romance, Canada, comic book legal woes.Yes, the legal woes aspect of the novel interested me. I’m a law nerd, so what? Also, it sort of reminded me of the whole legal mess swirling around Superman for years. But rather than being an ongoing lawsuit here, it had been settled for years. Yes, settled. Which means no nasty drawn out court battle or appeal process, just cut a check and that’s it. And quite honestly we didn’t know anything really about the comic in question apart for how the costumes looked and some of the characters’ names…Yeah, the comic aspect of the book was fairly weak. I really wished that more time would’ve been spent exploring its mythos a little more. Also, having the lawsuit resolved definitely made the supposed Romeo and Juliet forbidden love trope a little more laughable. Honestly, it was pretty non-existent for the most part. And got to say, I really hated the one character who just sort of threw the lawsuit out in the wind and sold her art for dirt cheap. I get there’s artist like behavior. But then again, there’s artist like behavior and stupid. And this character’s behavior was just plain stupid.To be fair, I really didn’t connect with any of the characters in this book and maybe that was my biggest issue with it. The leads were annoying and stupid and I didn’t really feel any chemistry between them. Both were self centered (and yes, I know they’re teenagers but there’s self centered and then there’s self centered) and other than Miriam wooing about her mother’s stupidity and pretty much being used as slave labor for a comic book store that goes out of business halfway through the book I know nothing about her.Side note, yes I said slave labor. The character is not paid a few weeks wages and it’s completely blown off as the nice guy couldn’t afford to pay her. It’s not nice. She worked those hours, damn it, and should be paid. But I digress….The male lead isn’t much better than Miriam. Arrogant, self-absorbed, and stupid describe Weldon to a T.God, just writing this makes me realize how much I hate the people in this book. And I think that’s where my problem ultimately resided with this one. How little I cared for the characters.Maybe it was in part because it was in third person?In general, I find with YA contemporaries I prefer first person. It’s just a personal preference, but generally first person works for me in these types of novels. Of course, there’s exceptions but Comics Will Break Your Heart is not one of these books.If you’re really into geek culture books and don’t care about the quality so much this one might be worth something. If you’re choosey probably skip this one, I really can’t recommend it that much unless you want to read everything with this trope/topic.
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  • Richard Gray
    January 1, 1970
    While the title references an occasionally misattributed Jack Kirby quote, his allegedly oft-repeated advice for people trying to break into the industry, Comics Will Break Your Heart is not strictly about comics. Writer Faith Erin Hicks, who has been in the industry for a few years now, uses it as background to write a romance around two families divided by a comic book history.The setup draws from a classic bit of comic book history. Protagonist Miriam (or Mir) is the inheritor of no wealth, While the title references an occasionally misattributed Jack Kirby quote, his allegedly oft-repeated advice for people trying to break into the industry, Comics Will Break Your Heart is not strictly about comics. Writer Faith Erin Hicks, who has been in the industry for a few years now, uses it as background to write a romance around two families divided by a comic book history.The setup draws from a classic bit of comic book history. Protagonist Miriam (or Mir) is the inheritor of no wealth, thanks to her artist grandfather selling the rights to the The TomorrowMen comic in the 1960s. Her family has always had a bit of a rivalry with the Warricks, the original writer of the series. To quote a 2017 tweet from Hicks, “The rest of the book is about teenage feelings, American and Canadian interactions, small Nova Scotian towns, dads who think they're funny, working turf at a golf course, and people who love comics a little too much.”That last line was unquestionably the hook for me, being a person who has spend much of his adolescence, youth, and adult life reading and writing about the funnybooks. It’s a fairly straightforward piece of YA romance: a (frequently referenced) Romeo & Juliet archetype if the Capulets and Montagues were closer in dignity to Batman creators Bob Kane and Bill Finger’s families. (Of course, there’s countless stories from the Golden Age of comics about creators signing their rights away, not least of which is the infamous and decades-long battle between DC Comics and Superman creators Siegel and Shuster).The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Klay this ain’t, so Hicks doesn’t hit the comic book references too hard for the uninitiated. Some of the geek chatter comes out in conversations between the comics-obsessed characters, but there’s nothing in here that will send you scrambling for Wikipedia. Like the climactic scenes at the San Diego Comic-Con, comics are merely the language by which this particular group of teens converse. It kind of makes sense when comic book characters have represented the biggest box office hits for over a decade.It’s incredibly comforting to see a YA book that doesn’t take Harry Potter and John Hughes movies as the only pop-cultural references in existence. Underlying Hicks’ tale is message of inclusivity and accessibility to the comics medium. As one character puts it more succinctly: “There’s no such thing as a fake geek.” Comic books need new younger readers to survive into the next generation, and this book goes some way to acknowledging the future of creators and fandom. After all, what is a comic without a reader?
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    When I saw this advanced reader’s copy on Net Galley, I knew I had to snag it! I was already familiar with the author, Faith Erin Hicks, through some of her graphic novels, Friends With Boys and Brain Camp. Even though this one was not a graphic novel, I was excited to see her take on a modern-day Romeo & Juliet story revolving around…comic books.Miriam lives in the small Canadian town of Sandford, a place that feels small yet familiar to Miriam. She dreams of leaving to go off to college bu When I saw this advanced reader’s copy on Net Galley, I knew I had to snag it! I was already familiar with the author, Faith Erin Hicks, through some of her graphic novels, Friends With Boys and Brain Camp. Even though this one was not a graphic novel, I was excited to see her take on a modern-day Romeo & Juliet story revolving around…comic books.Miriam lives in the small Canadian town of Sandford, a place that feels small yet familiar to Miriam. She dreams of leaving to go off to college but is afraid because all her friends will be staying behind. On top of her college worries, her best friend Raleigh is becoming more distant the more she spends with her hard-edged boyfriend. One comfort is working at the Emporium of Wonders, a book and comics shop. Not only can she save money for college, but she can also feel connected to her grandfather, the illustrator of the original TomorrowMen comic books who signed away his half of the TomorrowMen fortune to his business partner.Weldon is new to Sandford and is living with his aunt and uncle for the summer because of his poor decisions that keep getting him suspended from school. His father, the owner of the TomorrowMen comic characters, is also busy overseeing the new TomorrowMen action movie and has no time to control his out-of-control son. Weldon, bored, finds the Emporium of Wonders and by chance meets Miriam. His interest is peaked, however, once hearing his name Miriam visibly goes cold towards him. Time and time again, the two find themselves thrown together, but can they get over generations of hostilities between the two families?I loved just about everything about this YA novel. Miriam’s uncertainty about leaving her hometown, family, and friends to pursue her college dreams and her troubles navigating her changing friendships. Weldon’s complicated family relationships (divorced parents who both won’t take him in for the summer or find the time to stop his rebellious antics) and his public facade that many people can’t—or are unwilling—to see through. They all felt very real and applicable to students today. Then there’s the who idea of putting aside prejudices against people just because of who their family is.Yes, it’s Romeo & Juliet, star-crossed lovers, but it also has heart and strength and vulnerability.
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