Suitors and Sabotage
Shy aspiring artist Imogene Chively has just had a successful Season in London, complete with a suitor of her father's approval. Imogene is ambivalent about the young gentleman until he comes to visit her at the Chively estate with his younger brother in tow. When her interest is piqued, however, it is for the wrong brother. Charming Ben Steeple has a secret: despite being an architectural apprentice, he has no drawing aptitude. When Imogene offers to teach him, Ben is soon smitten by the young lady he considers his brother's intended. But hiding their true feelings becomes the least of their problems when, after a series of "accidents," it becomes apparent that someone means Ben harm. And as their affection for each other grows—despite their efforts to remain just friends—so does the danger. . .

Suitors and Sabotage Details

TitleSuitors and Sabotage
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 17th, 2018
PublisherSwoon Reads
ISBN-139781250145659
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, Romance

Suitors and Sabotage Review

  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. Might round up to five, haven't decided!***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***Suitors and Sabotage by Cindy AnsteyPublisher: Swoon ReadsPublication Date: April 17, 2018Rating: 4 starsSource: ARC sent by the publisherSummary (from Goodreads):Shy aspiring artist Imogene Chively has just had a successful Season in London, complete with a suitor of her father's approval. Imogene is ambivalent about the young gentleman until he comes to visit her at the Chively estate with his you 4.5 stars. Might round up to five, haven't decided!***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog***Suitors and Sabotage by Cindy AnsteyPublisher: Swoon ReadsPublication Date: April 17, 2018Rating: 4 starsSource: ARC sent by the publisherSummary (from Goodreads):Shy aspiring artist Imogene Chively has just had a successful Season in London, complete with a suitor of her father's approval. Imogene is ambivalent about the young gentleman until he comes to visit her at the Chively estate with his younger brother in tow. When her interest is piqued, however, it is for the wrong brother. Charming Ben Steeple has a secret: despite being an architectural apprentice, he has no drawing aptitude. When Imogene offers to teach him, Ben is soon smitten by the young lady he considers his brother's intended. But hiding their true feelings becomes the least of their problems when, after a series of "accidents," it becomes apparent that someone means Ben harm. And as their affection for each other grows—despite their efforts to remain just friends—so does the danger. . .What I Liked:It's no secret that I love Cindy Anstey's books! YA historical romance - how delightful! I am a huge adult historical romance junkie, and these YA HR novels are giving me LIFE. Suitors and Sabotage is Anstey's third YA HR standalone (all three books are unrelated, completely standalone novels and not companion novels), and it's safe to say that her books are all fun and swoony to read. I'm very excited about this new one being printed in hardcover! Anstey deserves this and more!This story starts with Imogene's suitor Ernest Steeple arriving a day earlier than expected, with his younger brother Benjamin Steeple. Imogene is expected to accept Ernest's offer whenever the young man proposes, as he is her only suitor. She and Ernest barely know each other, hence why Ernest has arrived to visit. As Imogene gets to know Ernest, she realizes that she can't see herself sharing a life with the man. Instead, she sees Ben, the architecture apprentice, the charming, teasing young man who puts everyone at ease and makes all the ladies laugh. But someone is trying to sabotage Ben, and for what reason, Imogene and Ben can't understand. It's only a matter of time before something truly dangerous occurs... not unlike falling in love!I was actually a little nervous about this one because I figured there would be a love triangle of some sort. But there really wasn't! Ernest is doing his duty in trying to find a wife, and the more Imogene gets to know him, the more she realizes that she would grow to like him... as a friend. There was never any competition or real "love triangle", because not once did Imogene develop feelings for Ernest, and Ernest, well, he wanted a wife but I'm not certain he specifically wanted Imogene. This type of romance is always tricky, involving two brothers and a woman. But I thought Anstey navigated it perfectly. I like forbidden romance but hate it when it involves two brothers. But this romance seemed to work; Imogene was never "unfaithful" to her suitor, but her feelings for Ben grew nonetheless. And Ben never betrayed his brother, but his own feelings grew.As is Anstey's style, the romance was sweet, adorable, swoony, and very subtle. There weren't passionate kisses or steamy chemistry, but there was plenty of rising interest and subtle tension. Ben and Imogene clicked, and they began a solid friendship, which turned into more.Ben is an upstanding gentleman, and Imogene is a kind and shy lady. Their personalities worked well together, especially with Ben being so lively and fun, and Imogene being a quiet dreamer. Ben is studying to be an architect and Imogene wants to teach art - their passions are not always looked kindly upon, but they follow their dreams nonetheless.The story was full of charm, subtle swoon, and a little bit of mounting drama! The drama being all of the "incidents" that keep occurring, of which Ben was in the middle. Someone is trying to sabotage Ben and he ends up getting hurt several times. But why?Also worth noting is how Anstey's books are always subtly feminist and in a very positive but not-in-your-face way. I love that Imogene wants to follow her dreams of being an art teacher - and I love how Ben acts like this is the most normal thing in the world (remember the time period), and he can see his life with her and both of their careers. This was fantastic!All in all, this novel was a delight to read. I had nothing to be worried about, and I thoroughly enjoyed this historical fiction romp. The ending is perfectly lovely and definitely a HEA, so no worries there either. I am continuously impressed by Anstey!What I Did Not Like:I so wanted a bit of a romance for a certain character (you can guess who), but I suppose I can create one in my head. Not a huge complaint, but it would have been nice!Would I Recommend It:I highly recommend this book and any of Anstey's novels, if you like historical fiction/historical romance. Adult HR fans will LOVE this YA HR novel. It isn't full of kisses and chemistry and passion BUT it is a fun and sweet romance novel set in the 1800s. These books are simply lovely to read, and I can't get enough!Rating:4 stars. I cannot wait to read Carols and Chaos, Anstey's next YA HR novel! I'm excited that it will be publishing in September - a shorter turnaround than usual. Swoon Reads, please keep publishing Anstey's books! And keep up the good work with these A+++ covers.Pre-read squees:HOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLYYYYYYYYY GUACAMOLEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!! More Cindy Anstey????????? YAAAAAAASSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!
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  • Stacee
    January 1, 1970
    I have loved all of Cindy’s previous books, so I was beyond eager to start reading this one. I loved Imogene and Ben. She’s smart and he’s charming and together they’re really good people with the most chemistry you could have during this time period. I’m a sucker for the longing filled glances from across a room and while we do get a bit of banter from them, the pesky fact that Imogene is nearly engaged to Ben’s brother is quite a fun snag. Plot wise, it was delightful. There was a big group of I have loved all of Cindy’s previous books, so I was beyond eager to start reading this one. I loved Imogene and Ben. She’s smart and he’s charming and together they’re really good people with the most chemistry you could have during this time period. I’m a sucker for the longing filled glances from across a room and while we do get a bit of banter from them, the pesky fact that Imogene is nearly engaged to Ben’s brother is quite a fun snag. Plot wise, it was delightful. There was a big group of characters and some of the reveals felt a bit convoluted; however, I was in it for Imogene and Ben and found I didn’t quite care. Of course there isn’t kissing until the end, but it completely works and I was so satisfied with the last few chapters. Overall, it was a fun story with a great group of characters. I can’t wait to see what Cindy writes next. **Huge thanks to Swoon Reads for providing the arc free of charge**
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  • mith
    January 1, 1970
    hello friends, you can read this review on my blog as well!---I am a bit unsure about Suitors and Sabotage. One the one hand, I did like the growing attraction between Ben and Imogene. On the other, it was really messy and complicated between the two.This third novel by Anstey is probably the most worrying historical rom-com she’s written, or at least, that’s how it felt like to me. It’s almost like that one Shakespeare play! Imogene is gearing up for a potential engagement to Ernest, Benjamin’s hello friends, you can read this review on my blog as well!---I am a bit unsure about Suitors and Sabotage. One the one hand, I did like the growing attraction between Ben and Imogene. On the other, it was really messy and complicated between the two.This third novel by Anstey is probably the most worrying historical rom-com she’s written, or at least, that’s how it felt like to me. It’s almost like that one Shakespeare play! Imogene is gearing up for a potential engagement to Ernest, Benjamin’s brother. But Imogene is smitten with Benjamin, and vice versa. But, Imogene’s best friend, Emily, is completely head over heels for Benjamin. It’s… definitely complicated. A really strange love… square? of sorts.I did like it though, because it’s not like Imogene was torn between the brothers. I liked her interactions with Ben, even though the both of them knew they shouldn’t be feeling the way they did for each other. Still, their company was just easy. Imogene wasn’t shy or awkward around him, like she was with his brother. She was able to talk to him easily about anything.I really loved the brothers! They constantly joked around and teased each other without abandon and it was just the most endearing thing! It was clear that Ernest and Benjamin are super close and I’m so happy that Anstey wrote them to be friendly towards each other. I also liked Emily and Imogene’s relationship! They tell each other almost everything and it’s clear they’re very important to one another.Overall, I thought this book was okay! Love, Lies, and Spies still holds the cake for my favourite Anstey novel, but it’s pretty clear that I’ll basically read anything she writes! 3.5 stars.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge Jane Austen and Regency-era fan this book seemed right up my ally, but unfortunately I was just so incredibly….. bored and uninterested that I decided it just wasn’t worth it when I could be reading something I actually want to read, you know? You feel? You get me?First off, the characters were kind of, like, boring. And flat. And two-dimensional. And I just didn’t really care about any of them. I want to be able to like my characters, or, at the very least, have them be interesting to As a huge Jane Austen and Regency-era fan this book seemed right up my ally, but unfortunately I was just so incredibly….. bored and uninterested that I decided it just wasn’t worth it when I could be reading something I actually want to read, you know? You feel? You get me?First off, the characters were kind of, like, boring. And flat. And two-dimensional. And I just didn’t really care about any of them. I want to be able to like my characters, or, at the very least, have them be interesting to read about, but everyone here was cookie cutter and boring and just so,,,,,, I don’t want to say too Regency because this is legit a Regency novel, but they were all characters I have read time and time again in every single Regency-era romance. I thought that this book would have something new in the character department and it just didn’t.Second, the plot. Uhhhh idk if I should put spoiler warnings but honestly I only made it a quarter of the way through this one so I guess don’t read this paragraph if you don’t want spoilers for anything. (view spoiler)[ The pacing in this novel was jilted and choppy, at least up until what I read. Half of the time I was just sitting there thinking What?? What? because everything was just kind of weird and it didn’t run very smoothly. There’s one part near the beginning where Benjamin is carrying this giant dog (described as “3 and a half stones” which is, like, 50 pounds (and looking back on that, I realize that the dog isn’t truly giant but that would be huge to me, seeing as how I can hardly do one push up without collapsing, and I’m not saying that Benjamin isn’t stronger than me, which he probably is, but 50 pounds is still nothing to call home about)), and then the cast of the novel……. has an entire five to ten minute conversation….. and the dog is never mentioned again…….. and the whole time I’m sitting there thinking ???? where is the dog???? Is he okay???? and then everyone is like “Oh wait!!! Haha I completely forgot about the dog!! Oops we better take care of that!” and I’m like…… the dog is big and Benjamin is carrying it and it’s pretty injured……. so can someone explain to me how this is plausible?? Lol (hide spoiler)]Okay, so here’s the deal. I feel weird calling a book I read only one-fourth of out for lack of diversity, but I mean, come on. After the popularity of The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue, I never again want to see a historical fiction novel with no diversity. There’s no excuse. POC and lgbt, disabled people have been around forever, and it annoys me when authors just decide to not include them. And another thing – one of the secondary character’s names is “Matt,” and, you know, the name Matthew really wasn’t a popular name back in the 19th century. It was popular during the middle ages, and then came back into popularity, seemingly randomly, in 1960, but between those two times, it was rare to see someone named Matthew in a primarily English-speaking country. That kind of annoyed me and every time Matt was mentioned I was just sitting there like I also thought that this book would be about Benjamin and Imogene falling in love, but it kind of wasn’t???? I got maybe, like, twenty pages in and Imogene is already full-fledged crushing on Benjamin and I was like where is the slow burn I wanted? Why does insta-love exist?? wtf????So, honestly, I would probably skip this one. It wasn’t super good as a romance novel, or a historical fiction novel, or a historical romance novel. It took me like four days to get a quarter of the way through. Bleh.
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  • Nadhira Satria
    January 1, 1970
    I mean when do I ever say no to historical fiction?
  • Aimee (Aimee, Always)
    January 1, 1970
    Added to my TBR because of Alyssa's very convincing review @ The Eater of Books!
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Cindy Anstey has done it again! Another adorable, swoon worthy story set in the Regency era had me hooked from the first chapter. Don't even get me started on how amazing and charming Benjamin Steeple is....I think he is by far my new favorite leading man from Anstey! Imogen is pretty amazing as well; I loved her quiet determination to do what she loved no matter how others perceived her. Thanks to MacMillan for the ARC!
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  • Riddhi Mazumder
    January 1, 1970
    Another book by Cindy Anstey.Pinch me, please.
  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    This book has such a nice cover and, as a fan of both Jane Austen and mysteries, I was hype to read Suitors and Sabotage. Reading the other reviews here has got me a little disquieted, because most of them are full of praise, and the one word I came away with to describe this book was "trash."I thought it would be both a mystery, and a Regency social drama type romance. The mystery aspect is barely there at all -- mildly odd things happen occasionally, and no one even acknowledges that there's a This book has such a nice cover and, as a fan of both Jane Austen and mysteries, I was hype to read Suitors and Sabotage. Reading the other reviews here has got me a little disquieted, because most of them are full of praise, and the one word I came away with to describe this book was "trash."I thought it would be both a mystery, and a Regency social drama type romance. The mystery aspect is barely there at all -- mildly odd things happen occasionally, and no one even acknowledges that there's a mystery up until almost the last chapter, when it is also solved. The romance aspect was... there? But it didn't make me care about any of the characters, or their romance, even a little. It's like a love triangle/quadrangle thing (ugh) between all four of the main characters, and three of them are POV characters, alternating every so often (ugh). It was hard to invest in any of the four mains, and outside of that the rest of the cast was one-dimensional. There was mutual pining, so I would have thought I could find at least one thing to like, but there just wasn't any tension outside of "I like this guy ok but I LOVE his brother what do I do" type tension, which is just pulpy and unpleasant. Suitors and Sabotage disappointed me a lot, and I'm sad. It reminded me neither of Jane Austen nor of any good mystery, but rather of something to be read in desperate lack of other reading material and then immediately thrown away and forgotten.
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  • Aditi ~ •A Thousand Words A Million Books
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Rating 2.5 StarsAS SEEN ON: A THOUSAND WORDS A MILLION BOOKS I received an ARC from Macmillan Intl in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own. Over the last few months, I’ve been reading more romance books than ever before. I absolutely love awkward encounters, chemistry filled moments and the eventual realisation that the two protagonists have been in love all along.I had HIGH hopes for Suitors and Sabotage, Cindy Anstey’s third book because of all t Actual Rating 2.5 StarsAS SEEN ON: A THOUSAND WORDS A MILLION BOOKS I received an ARC from Macmillan Intl in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own. Over the last few months, I’ve been reading more romance books than ever before. I absolutely love awkward encounters, chemistry filled moments and the eventual realisation that the two protagonists have been in love all along.I had HIGH hopes for Suitors and Sabotage, Cindy Anstey’s third book because of all the lovely reviews I’d seen trusted bloggers giving it, the GORGEOUS cover, and the premise in general.Instead, what I found, was a rather silly book with absolutely no character growth that I forced myself to finish over the course of an ENTIRE week and, worst of all, a romance I didn’t even feel. All in all, it was not a book I enjoyed.MY THOUGHTS:1. My initial problem, and one of the more jarring, was that I felt ABSOLUTELY 0% CHEMISTRY between our two forbidden lovers, Imogene and Ben. It was this Insta-love thing BUT dragged out over 250 pages, with the last 50 being your standard martyr nonsense. I SO BADLY WANTED TO FEEL THE ROMANCE between a headstrong artistic girl and an architect’s apprentice but I got nothing.2. Honestly, NONE of the characters in the book were well rounded. We heard nothing of their fears, anecdotes from their childhood or parental interaction and forgiveness or anything at all that made them seem more real. Instead, the only description// personality we got from them through the whole book, was EXACTLY what was in the back. I basically could have read the synopsis, instead of the whole book, because THERE WAS NOTHING BUT PINING AND WHINING ON THE INSIDE.3. So many of the plot points intended to harm Ben were so ridiculous, I skimmed through the pages everytime one happened. I especially did not understand the last two because WHAT EVEN? Bees? Muddy Water? Falling Roofs?4. Another thing I didn’t like was Emily and Imogene’s friendship. Not only was it THOROUGHLY UNEXPLORED and just there as an additional plot “problem” but also IMOGENE WAS SUCH AN UNSUPPORTIVE FRIEND (and jealous and petty) AND I HATED IT.5. Honestly, I wish this book had more SUBSTANCE, CHEMISTRY and PLOT and less ridiculous accidents and unsupportive friends and brothers. I don’t know if I’ll pick up another Cindy Anstey book in the future, but I can say for sure that I wasn’t a fan of this one. 2.5 stars.
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  • Erin Arkin
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come.
  • Jamie Winter
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reader copy through Edelweiss. I might revisit this title when a finished copy is available, primarily because i have a feeling the faults I have with it are due to it being an early rendering. While I found it a pleasant read there were multiple aspects that just didn’t sit well with me. That being said, it was a cute, fun, regency read that might just need some more work.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Lovers of Victorian novels will relish this YA novel of English manners. Imogen Chively is of age to marry and her father is determined that it will be a good match. It has been decided that Ernest Steeple is just such a candidate and so Imogen’s father is in high spirits when the young man and his younger brother Ben visit the family estate. Imogen is very shy and wants to find someone she actually loves as a husband and is unsure of the man who’s been chosen. Getting to know Ernest is critical Lovers of Victorian novels will relish this YA novel of English manners. Imogen Chively is of age to marry and her father is determined that it will be a good match. It has been decided that Ernest Steeple is just such a candidate and so Imogen’s father is in high spirits when the young man and his younger brother Ben visit the family estate. Imogen is very shy and wants to find someone she actually loves as a husband and is unsure of the man who’s been chosen. Getting to know Ernest is critical to her decision. But somehow his brother Ben always seems to catch her attention. And there’s something mysterious going on when Ben keeps getting into precarious positions. Ben’s love of architectural detail and Imogen’s artistic talent further establish a connection between the two. Complicating the scene is Imogen’s best friend who has set her sights on the charming, affable younger brother. But will Ben survive all the latest mishaps and ever get to study architecture? As in Jane Austen novels, the mannerisms of the time play a part. Decorum is expected and the dialog is formal and almost stilted by today’s standards. Ben is the most unencumbered by societal primness and thus the most lovable. That’s not to discount Ernest who’s steady and sweet. Though Imogen’s upcoming engagement hangs over her, the mysterious threats on Ben’s life consume much of her thoughts. Anstey mixes just the right amount of suspense and Victorian attraction to make this charmer a winner.4.5*
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  • Michaela (Mickey Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review -- Thank you Raincoast Books!!I had never seen or heard about this book before, until I was perusing through the the publishers catalogue, and came across this beautiful cover, and I was immediately interested. I absolutely love cute contemporary books, especially ones that take place in the 1800s. I immediately wanted to read it, and I'm glad I did!This book is about a young woman in the 1817s who is courting a young man... I received this ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review -- Thank you Raincoast Books!!I had never seen or heard about this book before, until I was perusing through the the publishers catalogue, and came across this beautiful cover, and I was immediately interested. I absolutely love cute contemporary books, especially ones that take place in the 1800s. I immediately wanted to read it, and I'm glad I did!This book is about a young woman in the 1817s who is courting a young man...but somehow begins to fall in love with his younger brother, and the problems that ensue because of it. It's a sweet, beautiful contemporary book with a bit of a mysterious twist to it!I'm going to start off by saying that I adored the writing style of this book. It was heartfelt and sweet, and it was beautifully written. I found a few small things about this book that bothered me a little bit, but overall I enjoyed it and I'm happy I read it.I find that sometimes the romance between two characters can be forced in some ways, but this is definitely not the case here! I loved how Imogene and Ben were falling in love slowly, even though they try everything in their power not to. They fall for each other without any warning, and I enjoyed how it didn't feel forced in any way. It felt like they had no control over it, and it was just the way that it was supposed to be. And the ending!! Oh, the ending crushed me in the best way possible.I also enjoyed how this book was a cute romance story, instead of a steamy one. It was cute and sweet and funny and awkward, which is exactly how young love is supposed to be. I loved how the characters were embarrassed by the little things they did awkwardly, as well as how they were flirting and the build up to the ending. The love story felt real and not forced, and the characters seemed to be the ones controlling the story.With that said, I found the book to be a bit slow at the beginning, and that there was quite a gap between the actual beginning of the book and the beginning of the story itself. The beginning was a bit difficult to get into, as the action didn't really start until about 50-60 pages in. However, once I hit that point, I flew through the book and read the rest in one sitting.The book also has a bit of a mysterious aspect to it, as there are "accidents" that keep happening and keep either getting Ben into trouble, or almost killing him. I really enjoyed how the characters reacted to these "accidents" and how the girls were doing everything in their power to try and get to the bottom of them. The only problem I had was that I think that the way the person who was causing these accidents was found out was a bit unrealistic - with them just outright saying that it was them. With the mystery that was being built up through the entire book about these "accidents", I would have enjoyed it better and found it more realistic if one of the main characters had found out who it was and confronted them, or found evidence to prove it, instead of the person doing it out and out saying that it was them.I did thoroughly enjoy the book with that being said, and I found the characters to be well developed, the conversations to be awkward and sweet, and I loved every single character (even the bad person), and the writing was a perfect fit for the story that was being told. Be sure to check this book out when it comes out in April!Overall - ★★★☆☆.5
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  • Maureen Lubitz
    January 1, 1970
    Full review coming to You Have Your Hands Full closer to release day. The tone of this book is relatively light, and because it has been marketed to a YA audience, the content is much tamer than the typical historical romance. In keeping with the Austen-inspired motif, there is nothing more than kissing between the characters. This doesn’t mean that there is any less tension; Anstey is quite handy with the angst as characters try to figure out what they want, and how they can achieve their goals Full review coming to You Have Your Hands Full closer to release day. The tone of this book is relatively light, and because it has been marketed to a YA audience, the content is much tamer than the typical historical romance. In keeping with the Austen-inspired motif, there is nothing more than kissing between the characters. This doesn’t mean that there is any less tension; Anstey is quite handy with the angst as characters try to figure out what they want, and how they can achieve their goals without hurting other people. I would absolutely recommend Suitors and Sabotage. This book transcends its genre, and I think it will appeal to historical romance fans of all ages. The mystery is quite compelling; I found myself surprised by the reveal of the villain. Anstey does a good job with characterization and she has created an immersive Regency world. As I’ve mentioned, the previous books are not connected, so you don’t have to read any of Anstey’s other books before reading this one. Anstey is one of my favorite authors, and I am already looking forward to her next book. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advance copy of this book.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    (I received an ARC of this book on NetGalley from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.)This book was fine, just fine. I probably wouldn't have read it if I'd realized I'd already read a book by this author. It delivers on its promise that there are, in fact, both suitors and sabotage.Other than that, this book is nothing special. Imogene is being courted by Older Brother, but it's really Younger Brother who has her heart. But Best Friend also likes Younger Brother, and Older B (I received an ARC of this book on NetGalley from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.)This book was fine, just fine. I probably wouldn't have read it if I'd realized I'd already read a book by this author. It delivers on its promise that there are, in fact, both suitors and sabotage.Other than that, this book is nothing special. Imogene is being courted by Older Brother, but it's really Younger Brother who has her heart. But Best Friend also likes Younger Brother, and Older Brother is a nice guy, and she doesn't want to hurt his feelings... so there's a lot at stake. I said to my wife "Wow! Cindy Anstey has really painted herself into a corner" and I was super excited to see how things would resolve without one or more parties never speaking to each other again... well, Anstey just walks right over the wet paint in the fourth quarter and doesn't even seem to look at her shoes. So... yeah. It’s a fine little book to read on a plane or train, but nothing special.
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  • Jessica Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Suitors and Sabotage is an immensely pleasurable Regency period romp following young Imogene Chively through the trials and tribulations of being wooed by a respectable and kind suitor while inadvertently falling in love with his brother and working to solve the mystery of who among their party may be intending to cause them great harm.Cindy Antsey’s stories are beautifully written, with fun and flowery language befitting a period novel. Her characters vividly bring to life the etiquette and wit Suitors and Sabotage is an immensely pleasurable Regency period romp following young Imogene Chively through the trials and tribulations of being wooed by a respectable and kind suitor while inadvertently falling in love with his brother and working to solve the mystery of who among their party may be intending to cause them great harm.Cindy Antsey’s stories are beautifully written, with fun and flowery language befitting a period novel. Her characters vividly bring to life the etiquette and wit of a way of life from a popularly romanticized period, setting scenes of both great fun and drama, exploring romantic conflict and flirtation at the height of propriety, including exciting moments involving heated looks that elicit more goosebumps than a typical love scene in modern romance novels. Her novels carry the appeal and enjoyment of both a period drama and a modern romance with a writing style which beautifully blends the language and ideals of the old and the new. I have greatly enjoyed all of Cindy Antsey’s novels as well as all Swoonworthy books I have been fortunate enough to read thus far and I eagerly await my next read by this publisher and by this author.I highly recommend all of Cindy Antsey’s books and if you too enjoy her novels, I recommend the These Viscous Masks series by Tarun Shanker and Kelly Zekas (also a Swoonworthy read) and The Beautiful One’s by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (published by Thomas Dunne Books), both of which add a heavy dose of fantasy and magic to this pleasurable period.
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  • DB in Richmond
    January 1, 1970
    Once again I am drawn into Cindy Anstey's Regency world in another stand-alone YA novel, Suitors and Sabotage. Strong character building with friendship, trust, mystery, and potential romance. Characters have problems such as extreme shyness, loss of parent, isolation, anger. But problems are part of life. Anstey shows how our relationships help us overcome our own issues. 4.5* out of 5*I received eArc from the publisher via NetGgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    I marked this 5 stars because it is a solid teen read, and for early middle graders on up, with a beautiful nod to Jane Austen. AS an adult reader it could have a teeny bit more depth, but I enjoyed it and the characters and thought it was very solid for young adult minus all the drama
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  • Vicky Skinner
    January 1, 1970
    Just like all of Cindy's books, Suitors and Sabotage is funny, exciting, and romantic. I know she's always compared to Austen but seriously it's like YA Austen and I just wish these books had existed when I was a teenager. Such a lovely book and I wait impatiently for the next one!
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  • Libby
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful teen romance a la Jane Austen. A mild, rather easily solved mystery with a good-intentioned villain. I liked that the two brothers who are rivals for Imogene's affections are both likeable. Total escapism - in the best possible sense. Review based on a Netgalley ARC.
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  • Addietot
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful, clean book. Nice light reading set in Regency times. I received an electronic copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Rach
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    Adorable! Loved the angst and am so happy she got the brother I was rooting for in the end. Well written Victorian romance - can't wait for the sequel
  • Ellen Fisher Sanderson
    January 1, 1970
    AdorableSix more hours of read a thon how shall I spend them?
  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a light, fluffy read. It kept me entertained, but unfortunately I was not invested in the characters or their relationship. Good if you are looking for something light and quick!
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 to 4 stars
  • Sami
    January 1, 1970
    Cindy Anstey continues her streak of oh-so-adorable Regency fiction with Suitors and Sabotage. Shy Imogene is anxious about meeting a prospective suitor her father has picked out for her...even more so after she falls for his brother, Ben. An aspiring architect, Ben is drawn to Imogene and enlists her to teach him drawing lessons, but still tries to keep his distance for his brother's sake. After a series of mysterious accidents, however, Imogene will have to find her voice if she wants to save Cindy Anstey continues her streak of oh-so-adorable Regency fiction with Suitors and Sabotage. Shy Imogene is anxious about meeting a prospective suitor her father has picked out for her...even more so after she falls for his brother, Ben. An aspiring architect, Ben is drawn to Imogene and enlists her to teach him drawing lessons, but still tries to keep his distance for his brother's sake. After a series of mysterious accidents, however, Imogene will have to find her voice if she wants to save Ben...and avoid an unhappy marriage. Love, Lies, and Spies is still my favorite, but I thoroughly enjoyed Suitors and Sabotage. Anstey has a nice touch with Regency details, and although shy, Imogene is just as strong as Juliana and Lydia. **read uncorrected on Edelweiss
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Love the characters she creates and this one has a fun element of intrigue. The FTC requires that I disclose that I received a free copy of the book from the publisher.
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