Godshaper Vol. 1
Ennay is a man without a god. Bud is a god without a human. Together, they might just survive.In 1958, the laws of physics stopped working: ignition, electricity, and combustion. But an alternative was provided, and people found themselves each accompanied by their own personal god, the new fuel and currency of the world. Varying in shape, size, and influence, these companion deities changed everything. Ennay, however, was born without a god and he’s not alone. Men and women like him are Godshapers, godless but with the ability to mold and shape the gods of others. Paired with Bud, a friendly god without a human, he goes on the road looking for food, shelter, and a paying gig. Despite their efforts to keep a low profile, Ennay and Bud stumble upon a mystery that will have lasting ramifications for god and man alike. Written by visionary author Simon Spurrier (The Spire, X-Men Legacy) and illustrated by breakout talent Jonas Goonface, Godshaper introduces a vast world teeming with bold ideas exploring ownership, freedom, and the pettiness of possession—both physical and spiritual.

Godshaper Vol. 1 Details

TitleGodshaper Vol. 1
Author
ReleaseNov 28th, 2017
PublisherBOOM! Studios
ISBN-139781608869398
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Fantasy, Graphic Novels, Magic

Godshaper Vol. 1 Review

  • Mark Schlatter
    January 1, 1970
    I'd rank the first three to four issues of this series as one of the most inventive reads I've had in years and one of the most surprising comics I've picked up in a while. Spurrier is building an America where in 1958 everything electric and mechanical stops working, but everyone gets a personal god to help with their lives. (These gods, thanks to the immensely good artwork by Jonas Goonface, resemble monochromatic Pokemon or stuffed animals.) As a result, the society depicted in 2017 still has I'd rank the first three to four issues of this series as one of the most inventive reads I've had in years and one of the most surprising comics I've picked up in a while. Spurrier is building an America where in 1958 everything electric and mechanical stops working, but everyone gets a personal god to help with their lives. (These gods, thanks to the immensely good artwork by Jonas Goonface, resemble monochromatic Pokemon or stuffed animals.) As a result, the society depicted in 2017 still has a strong 50's feel, all the way down to language and dress. There are a few individuals without gods (called nogodys or Shapers) who can manipulate the gods of others (think upgrades or reskins). And, of course, our protagonist Ennay is a Shaper who feels both the pain of being an outsider and the joy of being unconventional. He travels with a little rogue god, Bud, who strangely enough is not connected to a human.All that would be enough world-building to keep me interested, but Spurrier adds in a ton of music (Ennay is a "cantik" performer, which means music made without gods, only human effort) and a lot of gender fluidity. The result is a world that feels stuffed with detail and texture (and I haven't even mentioned what churches look like, the parties you have when you get your god, and the bead economy that everything runs on). It's an amazing tour de force of building a literary environment.However, the plot near the ends left me flat. There's a lot that happens in the last issue that has relatively little buildup, and some stuff is just left hanging. I'm concerned that the whole thing ended sooner than Spurrier wanted (possibly due to the publisher), and that there's no more coming. Still, if you are interested in a unique world delivered beautifully, I would take a look.
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