Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School (Two Dogs in a Trench Coat, #1)
Little dog Waldo and big dog Sassy are the best at what they do. They keep out squirrels and imminent intruders. They make sure there are no stray meatballs or muffin crumbs in the kitchen. And most of all, they protect their boy, Stewart. But something is wrong. Every day Stewart trudges off to an awful place called school. The dogs know it's awful because Stewart's parents ask him what he does at school, and he says, "Nothing." And he smells like a weird mixture of boredom and anxiety. They have to save him! Plus maybe there's an evil overlord! Or a squirrel!Waldo and Sassy hatch a plan to save Stewart by disguising themselves as a human. They can be a new student! Have they figured out any other aspect of their plan? Nope. They'll just figure it out as they go along. That's sure to work. But they find out that being a human student isn't quite what they imagined. There's gym (frisbee!), music (singing!), an alleged bully, and a teacher who is deeply suspicious of this new student. And best of all, they get lunch.This book kicks off the "Two Dogs in a Trench Coat" series. Be sure to read to learn if Waldo and Sassy can save Stewart from the evil overlord, if they can use their sad puppy eyes to get more than one lunch, and if they can get all the humans to think they're good dogs without actually revealing the fact that they are, you know, dogs.

Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School (Two Dogs in a Trench Coat, #1) Details

TitleTwo Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School (Two Dogs in a Trench Coat, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 29th, 2018
PublisherScholastic
Rating
GenreHumor, Childrens, Middle Grade, Animals, Chapter Books, Fantasy, Fiction, Funny, Academic, School

Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School (Two Dogs in a Trench Coat, #1) Review

  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusWaldo and Sassy are hard working dogs who scour the floor for meatballs and keep their humans' house safe from squirrels every day, even when the humans give them the Breakfast of Distraction and escape every day. They worry about their boy, Stewart, who seems very sad to go to school, so they work out a plan to get into the building and check out Stewart's evil overlords. Luckily, Waldo can speak human, so when he shows up at school wearing a trench coat and blaming all E ARC from Edelweiss PlusWaldo and Sassy are hard working dogs who scour the floor for meatballs and keep their humans' house safe from squirrels every day, even when the humans give them the Breakfast of Distraction and escape every day. They worry about their boy, Stewart, who seems very sad to go to school, so they work out a plan to get into the building and check out Stewart's evil overlords. Luckily, Waldo can speak human, so when he shows up at school wearing a trench coat and blaming all of his quirks on the fact that he is from Liver, Ohio, the teachers and students all believe that he is the new student, Salty. The biggest problem that Stewart is facing is that he hasn't done any work on his big project, and has even lost the Information Sheet about it, which spells certain doom. Once Waldo and Sassy get accustomed to the school routine (piles of meat for lunch!), they try to help Stewart with his project. They decide that squirrels are a great topic, and manage to put together a project that saves the day. There is a sequel in the works!Strengths: Even though this book would be easy enough for strong first grade readers to enjoy, it has a ton of funny jokes that will amuse adults as well. I love finding books like Stick Dog that incorporate both elements-- it's like whole wheat, organic toaster pastries sweetened with stevia. I read huge passages to my daughters, who agreed that Waldo and Sassy's voice sounds exactly like our dog Sylvie's, and we have taken to saying "tiny carrots wrapped in bacon" at every available opportunity. The parents' descriptions of being at work and playing with office supplies were hysterical as well. Plus... squirrels!Weaknesses: I strongly suspect that this will be a paper-over-boards binding, which will mean getting a copy from Perma-Bound because this is too good a book to let fall apart within a year!What I really think: Willing to spend a little more money and time on acquiring good bindings on quality notebook novels like Stick Dog, Big Nate and this book. Slightly annoyed at the publishers, but still glad of the books!
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  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    This book was dumb. It had many plot issues. One dog could speak human, the other dog was surprised by this but then suddenly, inexplicably is able to do the same with zero reasoning why. The “problem” in the story (waiting too long to work on a big project for school) is solved by doing it last minute and still getting an A++. Not the best lesson for a book to teach... the idea that two dogs in a trench coat could fool 9 year olds, the teacher, principal and secretary for days is far fetched as This book was dumb. It had many plot issues. One dog could speak human, the other dog was surprised by this but then suddenly, inexplicably is able to do the same with zero reasoning why. The “problem” in the story (waiting too long to work on a big project for school) is solved by doing it last minute and still getting an A++. Not the best lesson for a book to teach... the idea that two dogs in a trench coat could fool 9 year olds, the teacher, principal and secretary for days is far fetched as well. Overall not impressed.
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  • Karina
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a fun and funny book! Sure to please new readers. Love all of the food references!
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure how I feel about this book. Maybe my expectations were too high going in? The premise sounds hilarious, but it just didn't work for me. Also it got annoying that every time a food was mentioned it was in bold. Somehow seeing the word "meat" in bold ten times on a page lacks appeal. I know the story is from the dogs' perspective, but it seemed unnecessary, and if you're going to do that why not bold everything that would excite a dog, like squirrel? (and there were a ton of squirrels I'm not sure how I feel about this book. Maybe my expectations were too high going in? The premise sounds hilarious, but it just didn't work for me. Also it got annoying that every time a food was mentioned it was in bold. Somehow seeing the word "meat" in bold ten times on a page lacks appeal. I know the story is from the dogs' perspective, but it seemed unnecessary, and if you're going to do that why not bold everything that would excite a dog, like squirrel? (and there were a ton of squirrels) However, I would totally recommend this book to anyone looking for an easier chapter book who enjoys dogs doing silly things.
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  • Margo Tanenbaum
    January 1, 1970
    Great new series for ages 8-12 who are fans of books like Captain Underpants or Bad Kitty.
  • Dylan
    January 1, 1970
    If you judge this book by its cover or its title, you won't be disappointed. Surprisingly, the book manages to be funny and remain funny throughout its entirety - truly an impressive feat in a children's book.I think this will be a popular title among younger readers.
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  • Jen Van Fleet
    January 1, 1970
    Kyndel’s review: This book is super funny with two dogs who sneak into school to help Stewart. My favorite part was when Stewart gave his chaotic presentation!
  • Niki (Daydream Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just pure fun! So hilarious! We need more silly chapter books in the world!
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious for kids and adults
  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Very cute, very fun partial-graphic novel about two clever dogs who miss their boy so decide to disguise themselves and join him at school. Some of the absurdist commentary may go over the heads of younger readers, but parents will enjoy the jokes.
  • Dannie Moore
    January 1, 1970
    Julie Falatko is at it again with this amazing and hilarious chapter book! From the perspective of dogs, Falatko has captured the thought process of a dog (as humans perceive it, anyway) beautifully. Even the writing style feels as though a dog wrote the book. It's truly a canine masterpiece that had me giggling from cover to cover. Meatball!
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Funny and ridiculous transitional book (chapter book/middle grade). Colin Jack's illustrations were perfect. Some of the dialogue and how it was indicated was a bit confusing, though.
  • Deborah
    January 1, 1970
    Is it hilarious? Of course. It's by Julie Falatko!
  • Anica
    January 1, 1970
    So fun. I giggled my way through this, then shared it with my 10-year-old niece, who declared, "It's really funny. I definitely want to read a sequel. The dogs are hilarious." Two paws up!
  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    Waldo and Sassy are dogs. They are very good at protecting their house from the squirrel invasion, napping, and eating treats. They also love their humans. And when they notice that Stewart, their boy, keeps coming home from this place called school smelling bored and anxious, they decide it must be an awful place. With a trench coat, some balancing skills, and Waldo's ability to speak human, the dogs cook up a plan to go to this school place and rescue Stewart.I've seen a lot of rave reviews of Waldo and Sassy are dogs. They are very good at protecting their house from the squirrel invasion, napping, and eating treats. They also love their humans. And when they notice that Stewart, their boy, keeps coming home from this place called school smelling bored and anxious, they decide it must be an awful place. With a trench coat, some balancing skills, and Waldo's ability to speak human, the dogs cook up a plan to go to this school place and rescue Stewart.I've seen a lot of rave reviews of this book saying this is a great humorous read for kids. Waldo and Sassy's adventures at school were not quite what I thought they would be. They are goofy and silly (there's also plenty of smart and witty humor), but also help put a positive spin on school, help Stewart realize he needs to be more responsible so he's less stressed, and even the bully seems different with the dogs around. In short, these two canine rescuers have a lot of fun in their rescue, readers have fun watching them, and they manage to save the day while not only keeping Stewart in school but making it a more positive experience for him. So kids will have fun reading it, and adults will like the message (and may get aspects of the humor that completely fly over the heads of middle grade readers). It would be a great read aloud for an upper elementary class. The large font size, simple sentences (thanks to the dogs' halting English), attractive illustrations, and humorous plot also make this a great pick for reluctant readers. Highly recommended for readers who enjoy humorous reads, dog lovers, kids who have a poor attitude about school, and reluctant readers.No content issues.
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  • Stephanie Croaning
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for young readers who are ready to read longer chapter books but still rely on illustrations to help them decode or tackle longer text. The story is silly and fun and could appeal to Captain Underpants fans.Chapter book, fictionby Julie Falatko; illustrated by Colin JackScholastic Press, 20184 out of 5 stars Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School is the first book in what will be a series featuring Sassy and Waldo. The two dogs are a lovable pair who unwittingly make the wor This is a great book for young readers who are ready to read longer chapter books but still rely on illustrations to help them decode or tackle longer text. The story is silly and fun and could appeal to Captain Underpants fans.Chapter book, fictionby Julie Falatko; illustrated by Colin JackScholastic Press, 20184 out of 5 stars Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School is the first book in what will be a series featuring Sassy and Waldo. The two dogs are a lovable pair who unwittingly make the world a better place, which is the roles dogs are meant to play in the world.Sassy and Waldo usually spend their days protecting their house from evil squirrels, but when they notice their boy, Stewart, goes to a place called "school" every day and doesn't seem to have any fun, they set out to rescue him. There is plenty of humor as the dogs convince administrators, teachers, and other students that they are a new kid who just moved in from Liver, Ohio. Schools seems like a great place to Sassy and Waldo, who love PE, figure out how to get extra MEAT in the cafeteria, and even befriend the school bully. It is funny how all the things that Stewart dislikes, the dogs find to be wonderful.The Two Dogs stories are funny and will appeal to young readers who enjoy goofy stories. The numerous illustrations -- almost one on every page -- help support those kids who need more support in reading longer text and building reading stamina. Teachers and parents who are looking to move kids away from Captain Underpants or graphic novels might like this series.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this ARC from the publisher's booth at North Texas Teen Book Festival. I had no idea what to expect -- but it was actually pretty cute! It's a VERY good depiction of "dog logic," though things did get a bit repetitive at times. Overall, it was pretty funny, and I think kids will enjoy it more than I did.I'm a little bit obsessed with the idea of Squirreltown. That was probably my favorite part of the book. (Dog lore! I love that the dogs have their own belief system.)I mostly read Ad I picked up this ARC from the publisher's booth at North Texas Teen Book Festival. I had no idea what to expect -- but it was actually pretty cute! It's a VERY good depiction of "dog logic," though things did get a bit repetitive at times. Overall, it was pretty funny, and I think kids will enjoy it more than I did.I'm a little bit obsessed with the idea of Squirreltown. That was probably my favorite part of the book. (Dog lore! I love that the dogs have their own belief system.)I mostly read Adult and YA books, but one trend that bothers me in kids'/MG lit is how adults are often ignorant/useless/etc. The adults in this book are both of those things and more, which annoyed me a little bit, but most of them play such small roles that it didn't really matter. The only adult we saw a lot of, Ms. Twohey, was entirely too trusting of this weird new student in a trench coat, but was less annoying than the parents, school admin, and other random adults who popped up in the book.I also didn't love how almost every food item was in bold -- maybe the inconsistency will be fixed in the final edition, but a) it wasn't bolded every time, and I couldn't find the logic of when it was/wasn't, and b) it got kind of distracting after awhile. At first it was cute, since I could hear the dogs' voices putting extra emphasis on meatball and stray cheese but it got old about 10 pages in.To end on a positive note... I love how seriously the dogs took their "job" of protecting the house from squirrels. Have you seen even one squirrel in your house lately?! No? That's because your dog is A GOOD DOG!
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  • Melanie Dulaney
    January 1, 1970
    This nominee for the 2019-2020 Texas Bluebonnet Award had me laughing out loud and will likely have many of my 4th and 5th graders moving into “guffaw” territory. Sassy and Waldo take their dog-jobs very seriously, but that is the only thing that gets that adverb! These two are determined to keep the house squirrel free and to get to the bottom of Stewart’s problem with that dreaded place called School. Author Julie Falatko has them dressing up in an old trench coat and waltzing into Bea Arthur This nominee for the 2019-2020 Texas Bluebonnet Award had me laughing out loud and will likely have many of my 4th and 5th graders moving into “guffaw” territory. Sassy and Waldo take their dog-jobs very seriously, but that is the only thing that gets that adverb! These two are determined to keep the house squirrel free and to get to the bottom of Stewart’s problem with that dreaded place called School. Author Julie Falatko has them dressing up in an old trench coat and waltzing into Bea Arthur Elementary as a new, albeit furry, student who just happens to have recently gained the art of speech and just happens to land in their young human’s class. Along with crazy squirrels, big projects, productive trips to the cafeteria and an interesting connection with Bax the Bully, Falatko liberally sprinkles figurative language and great vocabulary amid rich context. Readers will easily discern the meanings of words like vigilant, feisty and nonchalant while teachers will have ample material for reinforcing the use of sensory language, similes and onomatopoeia (imminent intruders and flourishing fluff, being only two examples of the later). I will be reading from the end of page 12 through page 16 as a promo for this excellent launch into a new series that already has a book 2 available and number 3 right on the horizon, but I may have to practice it several times to avoid snorting with laughter as I try to engage my students. Highly recommended with no warnings on content for read aloud or independently in grades 2-5, especially if those students are fans of Vernon’s Hamster Princess and Dragon Breath books or Cronin’s Chicken Squad series.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Sassy and Waldo love their human companion, Stewart. But like many dogs, they wonder why he has to leave them every day for a place called school that he seems to hate so much. They decide to try to keep him home, and when that doesn't work, they put on a trench coat, and work together to infiltrate the place. As it turns out, school isn't half as bad as they had imagined, and the two dogs have a blast attending the classes and playing ball. They even point out that Bax, a boy that Stewart is co Sassy and Waldo love their human companion, Stewart. But like many dogs, they wonder why he has to leave them every day for a place called school that he seems to hate so much. They decide to try to keep him home, and when that doesn't work, they put on a trench coat, and work together to infiltrate the place. As it turns out, school isn't half as bad as they had imagined, and the two dogs have a blast attending the classes and playing ball. They even point out that Bax, a boy that Stewart is convinced hates him and is a bully, might be more than he thinks. Everything comes to a head on the day Stewart's big presentation on squirrels is due, and he and his classmates get much more than they asked for when a squirrel enters the classroom. I haven't decided what to think about the teacher, Ms. Twohey, who seems to have several great ideas for engaging her students but also thinks very highly of herself and her abilities as a teacher. There are questions that remained for him at the book's conclusion such as how a dog could gain the ability to speak, but I'm sure most young readers won't care and just be entertained by the idea of family pets going to school. I mean, who among us hasn't imagined this happening? The black and white illustrations add to the book's humor and entertainment value.
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  • storymamas
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished this silly and funny book. Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School is sure to have your kids laughing along the way. Stewart’s dogs decide to investigate the place he goes each day because he comes home and never talks about it, aka school! Sassy and Waldo dress up in a trench coat and enroll in the Bea Arthur Memorial Elementary. Fooling everyone but Stewart, the dogs, now a student named Salty joins the class and learns a lot about the human world. I adore Julie’s humor, she had m Just finished this silly and funny book. Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School is sure to have your kids laughing along the way. Stewart’s dogs decide to investigate the place he goes each day because he comes home and never talks about it, aka school! Sassy and Waldo dress up in a trench coat and enroll in the Bea Arthur Memorial Elementary. Fooling everyone but Stewart, the dogs, now a student named Salty joins the class and learns a lot about the human world. I adore Julie’s humor, she had me laughing during her Snappsy books and this one carries the same subtle humor, one that if you are not paying attention you might miss it, but when you catch it, it is so clever! .I think so many kids will enjoy this book. Kids who love pets, especially who had a dog and has thought about taking it to school. Also, I think students can relate to Stewart, a character who isn’t thrilled with the idea of school and needs that extra push to be motivated into learning. I am excited to recommend this one to my 3rd graders and also to get my hands on the next trench coat adventure, out now!
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  • Stephanie Bange
    January 1, 1970
    In this slapstick animal fantasy, family dogs Waldo and Sassy decide to make school more excitng/fun/lively for their young mater Stewart by following him and enrolling in school. When Stewart is giving his big "informational presentation" about squirrels to the class, chaos ensues when alive squirrel comes into the classroom.Filled with puns, hunger pangs for all things meaty, and a few toilet scenes, Waldo (with Sassy supporting him) stumbles about, bluffing his way through the school day as n In this slapstick animal fantasy, family dogs Waldo and Sassy decide to make school more excitng/fun/lively for their young mater Stewart by following him and enrolling in school. When Stewart is giving his big "informational presentation" about squirrels to the class, chaos ensues when alive squirrel comes into the classroom.Filled with puns, hunger pangs for all things meaty, and a few toilet scenes, Waldo (with Sassy supporting him) stumbles about, bluffing his way through the school day as new kid "Salty, from Liver, OH", dealing with Max the Bully, and encouraging Stewart to have fun. High use of conversation and action makes the book read quickly. With black & white with gray wash illustrations by Colin Jack, just the right amount of naivete from the dogs, cluelessness by Stewart and complete gullibility fro the teacher (who thinks she is being investigated by a rival school), this new beginning chapter book series will keep emergent readers howling in delight. Optional purchase for grades 3-5.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that I think would appeal to anywhere from a strong reader in early grades up to 5th or 6th because it's funny and involves dogs and silliness. I think there's strong appeal across grade levels, for sure.The book's plot is pretty much 100% summed up in the title--two dogs in a trench coat do, in fact, go to school. They can speak human and no one recognizes them as dogs. So obviously there's some suspension of disbelief required, but I don't think kids will care and I This is one of those books that I think would appeal to anywhere from a strong reader in early grades up to 5th or 6th because it's funny and involves dogs and silliness. I think there's strong appeal across grade levels, for sure.The book's plot is pretty much 100% summed up in the title--two dogs in a trench coat do, in fact, go to school. They can speak human and no one recognizes them as dogs. So obviously there's some suspension of disbelief required, but I don't think kids will care and I think most kids will find it hilarious. The dogs get easily distracted by food and squirrels and end up loving school with its mystery meat lunches, singing in choir, running during PE, and fun projects in class. They are able to help their human, Stuart, with a project he's been putting off. This is the major plot point of the book, and is the weakest part, but it's enough fun that I didn't really care. I think I can sell this to lots of kids, and the fact that it's a series makes it even better!
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  • Shawna Busby
    January 1, 1970
    Waldo and Sassy are two faithful dogs to Stewart. They worry about him going to school as he doesn't seem to enjoy it and want to rescue him. This is a funny quick read although the plot seem ridiculous and unbelievable. I think young readers will enjoy this book. The problem I found while reading this story was the issue Stewart was having with his Big School Project and how he waited until the last minute to complete it and still received an A++. This is not a good message to send to our child Waldo and Sassy are two faithful dogs to Stewart. They worry about him going to school as he doesn't seem to enjoy it and want to rescue him. This is a funny quick read although the plot seem ridiculous and unbelievable. I think young readers will enjoy this book. The problem I found while reading this story was the issue Stewart was having with his Big School Project and how he waited until the last minute to complete it and still received an A++. This is not a good message to send to our children. That and the fact that two dogs in a trenchcoat was able to get passed the children, teachers and principal of the school is mind boggling.Needless to say, within the story there was a child Stewart thought was a bully and come to find out that was his last name and he ended up being a really good friend to Stewart. Stewart also began to appreciate school more as Waldo and Sassy showed him how much fun it could be. Also loved the food references and how Waldo and Sassy were such good dogs by keeping the squirrels out of their house and yard.
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  • Melissa Mcavoy
    January 1, 1970
    “If you follow rules you get a cookie, it’s a good system.”Sassy and Waldo are the best at their jobs: not only has a squirrel never gotten into the house, Waldo has never missed discovering a stray meatball and Sassy has never failed to nap in the square patch of sun in the hall. But now the two faithful hounds have an even bigger job, saving their boy Stewart from the scary place called school. But when supplemental hand licking, backpack hiding and preventative shoe lace untying are not enoug “If you follow rules you get a cookie, it’s a good system.”Sassy and Waldo are the best at their jobs: not only has a squirrel never gotten into the house, Waldo has never missed discovering a stray meatball and Sassy has never failed to nap in the square patch of sun in the hall. But now the two faithful hounds have an even bigger job, saving their boy Stewart from the scary place called school. But when supplemental hand licking, backpack hiding and preventative shoe lace untying are not enough to keep Stewart at home Sassy and Waldo come up with a bold plan.What a great and hilarious chapter book. With illustrations on every page this is perfect for kids just foraying into books with longer chapters. It is also terrific as a read aloud, especially for families trying to accommodate siblings.
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  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    Wacky adventures of Sassy and Waldo, two dogs who spend their days keeping their home safe from squirrels, but then decide to help their owner Stewart. Stewart thinks school is boring and our furry friends want to come and help him out. Dressing up in an overcoat they manage to fool the secretary, teacher, principal, and other students into thinking they are a new kid from Liver, Ohio. If you read this with the eyes of a child you will see lots of humor and fun-if you try to read it with the log Wacky adventures of Sassy and Waldo, two dogs who spend their days keeping their home safe from squirrels, but then decide to help their owner Stewart. Stewart thinks school is boring and our furry friends want to come and help him out. Dressing up in an overcoat they manage to fool the secretary, teacher, principal, and other students into thinking they are a new kid from Liver, Ohio. If you read this with the eyes of a child you will see lots of humor and fun-if you try to read it with the logic of an adult you'll miss all that. A willing suspension of disbelief is required to fully enjoy this tale of two tails. The illustrations and varied fonts will help young readers follow the threads of thinking and dialogue for these crazy pups. For 8-12 year olds who like stories of pets and school hijinks.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    A big thank you to Scholastic and Edelweiss for a digital ARC of this book.Sassy and Waldo are concerned about their boy Stewart. He does not seem to enjoy this place called school very much and have very little to say about it each day when he gets home. They decide to break up their squirrel maintenance routine and get into the school to rescue Stewart. After considering various options, they discover a trench coat in the dad's closet and use it for a disguise. I was charmed by the cover and w A big thank you to Scholastic and Edelweiss for a digital ARC of this book.Sassy and Waldo are concerned about their boy Stewart. He does not seem to enjoy this place called school very much and have very little to say about it each day when he gets home. They decide to break up their squirrel maintenance routine and get into the school to rescue Stewart. After considering various options, they discover a trench coat in the dad's closet and use it for a disguise. I was charmed by the cover and wanted to see more of the artwork in the book. Unfortunately the artwork is not yet final, so this review is really based mainly on the story. There were some funny bits, but not enough for me to want to read more in the series.
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  • Michelle Mallette
    January 1, 1970
    See my full review at https://mmbookshelf.wordpress.com/201...What a lot of fun this first title in a new series is! Kids will delight in the shenanigans and mischief Waldo and Sassy create as they decide to save their human Stewart from school after noticing he comes home less than happy. When they discover a place with playtime, friends, food and cool stuff to learn, it's up to Sassy and Waldo to help Stewart discover he likes school after all. With tons of black and white cartoon-like illustr See my full review at https://mmbookshelf.wordpress.com/201...What a lot of fun this first title in a new series is! Kids will delight in the shenanigans and mischief Waldo and Sassy create as they decide to save their human Stewart from school after noticing he comes home less than happy. When they discover a place with playtime, friends, food and cool stuff to learn, it's up to Sassy and Waldo to help Stewart discover he likes school after all. With tons of black and white cartoon-like illustrations to help newly independent readers gain confidence, this new series will have lots of fans in no time. Adults may find the premise a bit silly but for kids with imaginations, it is just plain fun.
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  • Rebecca Caufman
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like this book. I wanted to laugh. But I didn't. It starts off well...two dogs worried about their human and why this thing called school is making him miserable so they dress up as a new student to investigate. But when none of the humans figure out that Salty is really two dogs things went down hill for me. The class has a big research project they need to do and the boy never asks his teacher for help and when he loses the sheet he doesn't ask for a new one. The night before the p I wanted to like this book. I wanted to laugh. But I didn't. It starts off well...two dogs worried about their human and why this thing called school is making him miserable so they dress up as a new student to investigate. But when none of the humans figure out that Salty is really two dogs things went down hill for me. The class has a big research project they need to do and the boy never asks his teacher for help and when he loses the sheet he doesn't ask for a new one. The night before the project is due he decides to do the project on squirrels and base it on the facts his DOGS tell him which he gets and A++ on! The humor just did not work for me.
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  • Lizz Axnick
    January 1, 1970
    This is a silly and preposterous book. I absolutely loved it. Young readers will enjoy the adventures of Waldo and Sassy, as they go to school to save their boy, Stewart, from the evil overload. They are not sure who this overload is, but he must be stopped because Stewart says that school is a horrible place. Waldo is the top half of the trench coat and persona, Salty from Liver, Ohio.This is one of the funniest kid books I have ever read. I adored the illustrations and the jokes about squirrel This is a silly and preposterous book. I absolutely loved it. Young readers will enjoy the adventures of Waldo and Sassy, as they go to school to save their boy, Stewart, from the evil overload. They are not sure who this overload is, but he must be stopped because Stewart says that school is a horrible place. Waldo is the top half of the trench coat and persona, Salty from Liver, Ohio.This is one of the funniest kid books I have ever read. I adored the illustrations and the jokes about squirrels. Audiences young and old who love their dogs will enjoy this book. I look forward to the next one.
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  • Kari Healy
    January 1, 1970
    Sassy and Waldo are two dogs on a mission - to save Stewart from this thing called school. Two Dogs in a Trench Coat - Go to School is a humorous story that elementary students will enjoy reading. Who knew dogs could have so much fun at school? Instead of the usual naps at home and keeping the house free of squirrels, Sassy and Waldo disguise themselves to blend in at school and learn just what Stewart is doing each day. The silly adventures that the dogs take part in each day will have students Sassy and Waldo are two dogs on a mission - to save Stewart from this thing called school. Two Dogs in a Trench Coat - Go to School is a humorous story that elementary students will enjoy reading. Who knew dogs could have so much fun at school? Instead of the usual naps at home and keeping the house free of squirrels, Sassy and Waldo disguise themselves to blend in at school and learn just what Stewart is doing each day. The silly adventures that the dogs take part in each day will have students excited for book 2. Book 19 of #30booksummer#kidlitexchange #ilovereading #fortheloveofreading #librarian #bookworm @kidlitexchange #keepthemreading
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