Faithless
Oslo detectives Gunnarstranda and Frølich are back … and this time, it’s personal… When the body of a woman turns up in a dumpster, scalded and wrapped in plastic, Inspector Frank Frølich is shocked to discover that he knows her … and their recent meetings may hold the clue to her murder. As he begins to learn more about the tragic events surrounding her death, Frølich’s colleague Gunnarstranda deals with a disturbingly similar cold case involving the murder of a young girl in northern Norway. An unsettling number of coincidences emerge, and Frølich is forced to look into his own past to find the answers - and to catch the killer before he strikes again. Dark, brooding and utterly chilling, Faithless is a breath-taking and atmospheric page-turner that marks the return of an internationally renowned and award-winning series, from one of the fathers of Nordic Noir. ‘This is a chilling novel about betrayal, written in a hard-boiled style that highlights the careless misogyny of Dahl’s characters’ The Crime Roundup in The Sunday Times 'Dahl has an international reputation for skilfully plotted police procedurals that are drenched in the minutiae of detection. This is a fine example of his talent, featuring two of his most famous detectives, Gunnarstranda and Frolich, who disagree with each other far more often than they agree … If you have never sampled Dahl, now is the time to try’ Daily Mail ‘If you want your worst fears about what goes on inside a cop's mind confirmed, meet K.O. Dahl's Oslo sleuths, Gunnarstranda and Frølich … impossible to put down’ Guardian ‘Fans of procedurals … will snap this one up’ Kirkus ‘Skilfully orchestrated tension’ Barry Forshaw, Independent ‘A formidable talent’ Booklist ‘Little as it seems … an exciting read’ Publishers Weekly ‘Kjell Ola Dahl’s novels are superb. If you haven’t read one yet, you need to - right now’ William Ryan 'If you’re looking for a dramatic, fast-paced and character focused crime read, FAITHLESS is a good option for you, particularly if you have read others in the Oslo Detectives series!’ The Crime Review

Faithless Details

TitleFaithless
Author
ReleaseSep 1st, 2017
PublisherOrenda Books
ISBN-139781910633274
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Thriller, Scandinavian Lite..., Nordic Noir, Fiction, Mystery Thriller, European Literature, Scandinavian Literature, Adult Fiction

Faithless Review

  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    I'm starting to sound like a broken record while singing the praises of Orenda's books and telling you to go buy them, but I can't help it; they're just so good! While Faithless is technically book #7 in the Oslo detectives series, you can easily pick this up as a standalone, as all the characters and places bring you up to speed. We all know that I love a good police procedural, but I think the reason this one was so tight was that Nordic Noir element; the setting seems to read as a character a I'm starting to sound like a broken record while singing the praises of Orenda's books and telling you to go buy them, but I can't help it; they're just so good! While Faithless is technically book #7 in the Oslo detectives series, you can easily pick this up as a standalone, as all the characters and places bring you up to speed. We all know that I love a good police procedural, but I think the reason this one was so tight was that Nordic Noir element; the setting seems to read as a character all it's own and the slow building, steady suspense is masterfully done. This particular novel is heavy on the slow burn and I would not suggest picking this up when in the mood for a fast paced, action packed book; however, if you're looking for heavy characterization and a dark atmosphere, you won't go wrong diving into this one.If I really think about it, the reason Faithless worked so well for me was because of it's classic feel. The story is very traditional in the sense that it solves a case the old fashioned way, with detectives working slowly through the investigation and footing their own leg work in lieu of relying heavily on technology and miraculous lab work. In a sense, these elements brought a realness to the story that other flashier tales just can't nail down; I can truly see why the author is considered one of the fathers of Nordic Noir. Without giving away any plot details, I was really hooked by the way the story ended; the finale truly had me clamoring for the next book in a need it now sense. I'm keeping this review brief as the story itself is brief (my copy came to around 250 pages), and I'm hoping not to blabber on and give too much away or spoil the book for another reader. Highly recommended for those looking to expand their tastes in the genre and add another winning series to their collection.* Many thanks to Karen at Orenda Books for providing my gorgeous copy; the cover is stunning and multi-dimensional in person. It's always a pleasure to be a part of the blog tours!
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Detective Frank Frølich is in a bit of a spot. A few days ago he arrested a woman after finding cocaine in her purse. That night he attended a birthday party for old school chum Karl Anders where he met Karl’s new fiancée, Veronika Undset….yup, the woman he arrested. Well, that was awkward.Unfortunately, the next time they meet is after her horribly beaten body is pulled from a dumpster. Frank is uneasy about having personal ties to a murder investigation & requests to be left off the case. Detective Frank Frølich is in a bit of a spot. A few days ago he arrested a woman after finding cocaine in her purse. That night he attended a birthday party for old school chum Karl Anders where he met Karl’s new fiancée, Veronika Undset….yup, the woman he arrested. Well, that was awkward.Unfortunately, the next time they meet is after her horribly beaten body is pulled from a dumpster. Frank is uneasy about having personal ties to a murder investigation & requests to be left off the case. Even though they hadn’t spoken for years before the party, he knows Karl will be front & centre as a suspect. Besides, he has another case that needs attention. Rosalind M’Taya is a beautiful, young exchange student who came to study in Oslo for the summer & promptly disappeared. When Frank finds all her belongings still in her room, he knows she didn’t leave willingly. Inspector Gunnarstranda needs all hands on deck & denies Frank’s request. Another body has been found & the victim had ties to Veronika. And so they begin the process of picking apart her life, gathering an odd assortment of suspects as they dig. This is a fast paced procedural that definitely qualifies as Nordic Noir. As Frank & Gunnarstranda follow separate lines of investigation, they both encounter people who are shifty, scary and/or crazy. Early on there are hints something happened between Frank & Karl when they were teenagers that led to them drifting apart. As the story progresses, Frank has to come to terms with the event & his role in how it all played out. Along with the cast of suspects, we also meet other members of the police & forensic units. Personal details & glimpses of their private lives help flesh out the characters. But it’s Frank we get to know best as he works the murder case & continues his hunt for Rosalind. He’s a smart cop & complex man who is forced to confront past mistakes & fears. He may not like what he finds & although both cases are solved the results take their toll, personally & professionally.Many Scandinavian thrillers are very different stylistically from their typical American cousins. There’s no spoon feeding here. Not everything is spelled out & some questions go unanswered. And just as you reach the end….well, turns out the author kept a few zingers in reserve. It’s my first time reading this author & although I found 5 books listed as part of the Oslo Detectives series, I was unable to determine where this one fit in. As usual, Don Bartlett has done a stellar translation & I look forward to catching up with Frank & Gunnarstranda in the next one.
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  • Paul O'Neill
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless blog tourFans of Nordic Noir will love this. This is book seven in the Oslo Detective series. Since the series was written in Dahl’s native Norwegian, the whole series hasn’t been translated into English as yet. Thankfully, this book also works as a standalone so there is no need to read the rest of the series before this one. The story is centred around Oslo detectives Gunnarstranda and Frolich. To me, the plot was rather unique and put one of the main characters in a very interesting Faithless blog tourFans of Nordic Noir will love this. This is book seven in the Oslo Detective series. Since the series was written in Dahl’s native Norwegian, the whole series hasn’t been translated into English as yet. Thankfully, this book also works as a standalone so there is no need to read the rest of the series before this one. The story is centred around Oslo detectives Gunnarstranda and Frolich. To me, the plot was rather unique and put one of the main characters in a very interesting situation to the point where it tested Frolich’s morals. I also thought the relationship between the two, and the rest of the team was humorous and similar things are what I imagine actually takes place in real life. I’m still not sure if it’s a good thing or a bad thing, but the police didn’t appear to be all that effective. If you’re looking for a team of supercops, look elsewhere. I think it’s a good commentary on the expectations of police forces everywhere who have too many cases on at once and lots of other stuff to balance. WritingDahl’s writing is crisp and allows the story to move forward at pace. In the main, Don Bartlett does a good job of translating the book into English. There are a few strange sentences here or there but it’s hard to tell if these were translation mistakes or style choices that Dahl made. I felt this worked in the book’s favour as it creates a unique reading experience. There is an overuse of popular sayings within however. Notable issuesFor me, there is a huge thing missing from this book and that’s Norway. Writers like Jo Nesbo, Val McDermid, Michael Connelly and Ian Rankin are able to transport you to a different place (albeit McDermid and Rankin usually transport me to places one or two miles away from where I live) and capture the essence of that place through the description of the surroundings or interactions with local people. They are able to make location a character in its own right. Dahl doesn’t achieve much of this here. You get the names of places which are, obviously, in Norwegian but the atmosphere of the setting didn’t come through the pages for me. Also, there wasn’t much in the way of description in terms of what the characters looked like. A fairly minor point as it’s something I usually prefer, I hate when authors describe the looks of their characters in minute detail but I think we need something to go on. I’ve no idea why the book is called Faithless either. Final thoughtIf you like Nesbo or any Nordic / Crime Noir stories, then this series should float your boat. As I mentioned, the full series isn’t translated yet but that shouldn’t stop you from diving right in. I thought the ending was fantastic. It has made me want to check out the next book. A very enjoyable and unique read. Blog tourThis is my first ever blog tour and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I look forward to seeing what other bloggers on the tour thought of this. Be sure to check out @OrendaBooks and follow @annecater and the #faithless tag to see more throughout the month of April.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent read here. I'm due on the blog tour soon so will be reviewing then.
  • Bookread2day
    January 1, 1970
    The godfather of Nordic is back. It's so easy to read Faithless as a stand alone novel. I found the story easy to follow. What I liked about this story is that it had characters from all different religions and nationalities. Oslo detectives Gunnarstranda and Frolich are back, and this time it's personal. Lets get this straight Frolich arrested Veronika Underset as she was leaving Zahid's house at the crack of dawn. When Policeman Frolich looks in her bag he had found some cocaine. Veronika clai The godfather of Nordic is back. It's so easy to read Faithless as a stand alone novel. I found the story easy to follow. What I liked about this story is that it had characters from all different religions and nationalities. Oslo detectives Gunnarstranda and Frolich are back, and this time it's personal. Lets get this straight Frolich arrested Veronika Underset as she was leaving Zahid's house at the crack of dawn. When Policeman Frolich looks in her bag he had found some cocaine. Veronika claimed that she didn't know how the cocaine came to be in her bag. When Frolich is invited to Karl Anders fortieth birthday party, who did Frolich see there? And who is his friend about to marry? unexpected twist of your worse nightmares are about to unfold. A murder, but who is murdered, why and by who? An African girl is missing. Can Frolich with cop's mind solve the jigsaw of a murder and a girl missing? Or will detective Gunnarstranda solve the murder mystery?Fans of police procedurals this is a must read.
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  • Nerdish Mum
    January 1, 1970
    You can immediately tell why Kjell Ola Dahl is one of the forerunners in the Nordic Noir genre, the writing is beautiful and the storytelling is incredibly well thought out that it's just a pleasure to read. Faithless is straight to the point and is very traditional in it's investigation style of the crime, it shows that it takes time to discover and research and solve crimes and that not all murders are solved by a sudden aha moment with some new technology. It's very refreshing to see this as You can immediately tell why Kjell Ola Dahl is one of the forerunners in the Nordic Noir genre, the writing is beautiful and the storytelling is incredibly well thought out that it's just a pleasure to read. Faithless is straight to the point and is very traditional in it's investigation style of the crime, it shows that it takes time to discover and research and solve crimes and that not all murders are solved by a sudden aha moment with some new technology. It's very refreshing to see this as a throw back to how crime novels used to be and I thoroughly enjoyed the slower pace and methodical nature of the book. I also really enjoyed Inspector Frank Frølich, his dedication and experience shine through and feel really authentic. I feel like he is believable as not just a character but as a real person and can imagine him working away in a police station solving crimes. The location stands out as its described perfectly and it feels like an extra supporting character who helps the story along, It's both beautiful and haunting and makes me want to visit right now. Faithless is the seventh book in the series and having not read the other six, I was still able to jump right in and treat this as a stand alone. As I said in my intro though, it now means I have six other books I need to go find and read because of how much I enjoyed Faithless. Faithless is chilling and compulsive reading and a great gateway to reading Nordic noir. Easily read in one sitting as the atmosphere consumes you and the story's twists and turns take you on a thrilling ride to the ending which is absolutely stunning. Overall an excellent novel and one I will be recommending from here on out.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comWithin the past few months I’ve become such a huge fan of a new to me genre, Nordic Noir. There’s something about this genre that really sucks me in, so when I heard that Orenda was publishing another translation, I knew I HAD to read this book. Karen Sullivan has such a fantastic eye for talent and she’s never sent me a book that I haven’t enjoyed and I’m pleased to say Faithless is another winner in my book. Kjell Ola Dahl has been referred All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comWithin the past few months I’ve become such a huge fan of a new to me genre, Nordic Noir. There’s something about this genre that really sucks me in, so when I heard that Orenda was publishing another translation, I knew I HAD to read this book. Karen Sullivan has such a fantastic eye for talent and she’s never sent me a book that I haven’t enjoyed and I’m pleased to say Faithless is another winner in my book. Kjell Ola Dahl has been referred to as the father of this genre and after reading his work, I can certainly see why. There are two things that really capture my attention that a good Nordic Noir novel has; a stunningly atmospheric setting and a slow burning pace that has an underlying sense of discomfort and tension. This book has both of these elements in wonderfully appropriate amounts, but it also had some additions that added so much substance to the book. This is a classic police procedural where the cops are chasing down suspects the old fashioned way, they hit the streets. Though I jumped into this series with this book, it easily read fine as a standalone. I was able to work out the characters and their group dynamic fairly easily and I never felt like I was missing out on anything important. Frank was a bit of an enigma, there’s a mysterious edge about him, he’s isolated, dark and brooding, but extremely well crafted. I don’t want to say much about the plot, but it’s very cleverly done and there were many twists and red herrings. The writing is sharp, crisp and precise and though it’s a slow burner, in the end things really heat up. Everything culminates in a shocking conclusion that left me reeling in the best possible way.
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  • Kate~Bibliophile Book Club
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is the first book I’ve read by Kjell Ola Dahl, and while not the first in this particular series, it can still most definitely be read as a standalone. The author has enough backstory between the pages that the reader won’t feel like they’ve missed any big events in the characters respective pasts.Scandinavian crime fiction is quite honestly my favourite locational crime genre. The colder the climate and the harsher the environment, the more my interest is piqued so needless to say I w Faithless is the first book I’ve read by Kjell Ola Dahl, and while not the first in this particular series, it can still most definitely be read as a standalone. The author has enough backstory between the pages that the reader won’t feel like they’ve missed any big events in the characters respective pasts.Scandinavian crime fiction is quite honestly my favourite locational crime genre. The colder the climate and the harsher the environment, the more my interest is piqued so needless to say I was thrilled to be taking part in the blog tour for Faithless.If you’re looking for a fast-paced read, you won’t get that here. What you will find with Faithless is a slow-burning and subtle story, with hidden depths and some excellent characterisation. I loved the way that Kjell Old Dahl unravelled the threads of the story, making the reader work alongside him as he wove it back together to create a thoroughly unexpected ending.Faithless is a suspenseful story, with superb characters and an utterly engaging plot. I really enjoyed reading it, and I look forward to reading more from Kjell Ola Dahl in the future.Highly recommended!
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  • Crime by the Book
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars for this classic Nordic Noir read! While this wasn't quite my style, I really enjoyed this book's slightly quirky characters and slow-burning mystery. The plot was a bit disjointed in my opinion, but I did enjoy a lot about it! Read my full review here: http://crimebythebook.com/blog/2017/4...
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  • Joanne Robertson
    January 1, 1970
    I was attracted to this book by the fabulous cover initially but having not read any other books in the series I was unsure if I would be able to follow who was who and what was what! But fear not, this book can absolutely be read as a standalone and if you’re not a big fan of Nordic Noir then this might actually be the book to ease you in gently to a love affair with this increasingly popular genre.When the body of a woman is found, Frolich is stunned to discover that it’s a woman he’s recently I was attracted to this book by the fabulous cover initially but having not read any other books in the series I was unsure if I would be able to follow who was who and what was what! But fear not, this book can absolutely be read as a standalone and if you’re not a big fan of Nordic Noir then this might actually be the book to ease you in gently to a love affair with this increasingly popular genre.When the body of a woman is found, Frolich is stunned to discover that it’s a woman he’s recently come into contact with in connection with another case. He had been involved in her arrest and subsequently release from custody and then to discover a much more personal connection which throws up a few more questions than it actually answers! So it comes as a huge shock to find her naked body which has been dumped after having boiling water poured all over it and  been wrapped in plastic (back to that fabulous cover!) Back from his holiday, Gunnarstranda investigates a similar cold case which bears a striking resemblance and could provide a much needed link. But Froliche is also in charge of investigating the disappearance of a student from the international summer school at The University of Oslo. So there’s a very busy workload here and both cases seem to ignite personal feelings within these two men making this a full on criminal enquiry.I do adore the more relaxed style of police procedural that seems to be the theme here in many Norwegian crime thrillers. There’s a different feel to how they deal with cases, in fact it reminded me here of how police drama series were done back in the 1980s, when things weren’t quite as politically correct! The tone in which they speak to each other is very relaxed, if not a bit too relaxed at times! But this meant I really connected with all the detective team involved throughout, especially Frolich. His love for the end result shines through aided by good old fashioned  police work and a methodical build up to the truth. I also found Lena fascinating and would have enjoyed having a bit more background to her story as I was interested in what made her tick, especially when it came to her relationship choices.The twists and turns of this story were brilliantly plotted and I rather enjoyed the journey of discovery far more than I had expected to. The translator has kept it crisp and current with a seamless transition from the original work. In fact, it’s the same translator (Don Bartlett) who has translated Gunnar Staalesen recently and he is the author who actually started my fascination with Nordic crime fiction so I wasn’t surprised that I found myself settling into the narrative as though it had always been in English. And now I’ve discovered the Oslo Detectives I’m looking forward to following them on their future cases!Thanks to Orenda books for my review copy of Faithless which I have chosen to read and review.
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  • Tracy (The Pages In-Between)
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first Norwegian Fiction read, EVER. And I am so pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed it. This is book 7 of a series, and I had not issue picking it up and reading it, without reading the prior 6 books. I was initially drawn to it because of the stunning cover. And than I read the synopsis and was sold.I felt this book was written at a superb pace. No information overload, just a nice steady story that holds your interest the entire time you read it. Some police procedural's tend t This was my first Norwegian Fiction read, EVER. And I am so pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed it. This is book 7 of a series, and I had not issue picking it up and reading it, without reading the prior 6 books. I was initially drawn to it because of the stunning cover. And than I read the synopsis and was sold.I felt this book was written at a superb pace. No information overload, just a nice steady story that holds your interest the entire time you read it. Some police procedural's tend to be so over dramatic, and almost generic feeling. FAITHLESS did not have this problem. The more I read, the more I found myself connecting with Frank and Lena, I want to know their back stories. I want to know what makes them who they are, and who they were. Now that I know these books exist, I fully intend on reading the rest of the series, albeit a bit backwards, I'm drawn in and I am craving more.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    I have lately found myself quite interested in reading books by Nordic authors. Since I'm Swedish is this perhaps not that strange, but I have previously not read that much Nordic crime books. I have just preferred American och British authors. Faithless intrigued me with its stunning cover and interesting blurb so I couldn't resist agreeing to do this blog tour. And, I'm glad I joined in because Faithless is really good.This book starts off with a simple arrest of a woman who leaves a house of I have lately found myself quite interested in reading books by Nordic authors. Since I'm Swedish is this perhaps not that strange, but I have previously not read that much Nordic crime books. I have just preferred American och British authors. Faithless intrigued me with its stunning cover and interesting blurb so I couldn't resist agreeing to do this blog tour. And, I'm glad I joined in because Faithless is really good.This book starts off with a simple arrest of a woman who leaves a house of a suspect that Frølich is staking out. She has drugs on her, but she denies that it's hers. What Inspector Frank Frølich didn't know at the time was that the woman is the fiance of a man that was once his best friend. He only finds this a little later one at the birthday party for the friend. Then, she ends up dead. What happened? Who killed her? Frølich and his colleague Gunnarstranda has to unravel this mystery. And, then Gunnarstranda finds a body while investigating the case. Has the killer struck again?Faithless is one of those books that hooks you from the start, the writing pulls you in and the story keeps your interest up all the way until the end. There are interesting side stories in the book as well, like the disappearance of a foreign student that Frølich is quite obsessed to find. And, then there is the murder of a girl that happened years ago, could that murder have connections to this case?All and all is this book terrific. The book different stories, different cases that all interested me, and I found myself quite liking both Frølich and Gunnarstranda. The ending left me wanting the next book, a bit of a cliffhanger situation that made me wonder what will happen next...I want to thank Orenda books for providing me with a free copy for an honest review!
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  • Abbie
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is my first venture into Dahl’s books and I guess I did have some concern as to whether I would be able to get into the story as I had not met Oslo detectives Frølich and Gunnarstranda before. Much to my relief the story works well as a standalone and you can instantly pick up with the characters and not feel as though you are missing out on any back story. One of the reasons, I feel, for this is the concentration on the crime and police procedures rather than the personal lives of the Faithless is my first venture into Dahl’s books and I guess I did have some concern as to whether I would be able to get into the story as I had not met Oslo detectives Frølich and Gunnarstranda before. Much to my relief the story works well as a standalone and you can instantly pick up with the characters and not feel as though you are missing out on any back story. One of the reasons, I feel, for this is the concentration on the crime and police procedures rather than the personal lives of the detectives. From reading the above it may come across that I didn’t get a feel for the characters but this is not the case. We do get an insight into the private life of Gunnarstranda and Frølich and a sense of the relationship between them, however, it is in addition to the main story at hand and not in your face. The death of a woman Frølich knows and the involvement of an old friend certainly makes the case in Faithless personal to him, yet it is done in such a way that it never detracts from the main crux of the story. Memories from Frølich’s past re-surface and his feelings about being involved in a case in which he knows the victim adds a great layer to the story with it becoming very much a welcome addition rather than a distraction. I really enjoyed the police procedural aspect of Faithless which is written with an authenticity that highlights the instincts that come after years in the profession and does not overly rely on modern technologies in order to discover who committed the murder. In addition, Dahl expresses the feelings and thoughts that the detectives have towards their colleagues and the work they do in a candid, realistic way which gives the characters and the book a whole added layer. Faithless is a refreshing change from the emotionally challenged detectives we often see in crime fiction.Dahl is a skilled writer and in Faithless he has written a story that threads and winds its way around leaving you guessing and counter-guessing, never knowing where you will end up. The tension starts subtly and quietly descends into a darkness that leaves you stunned and totally taken aback. The translation by Don Bartlett is fantastically done and I never felt that something was lacking or lost in translation as I have in other translated novels. To be fair, however, this has never been an issue with books published by Orenda and they have restored my faith in translated fiction. Faithless is a subtly disconcerting read with an ending that takes you totally by surprise. I liked it for its genuineness, its realism and the fact it concentrates on the nitty-gritty detective work. If you like police procedurals that take you into the heart of the work detectives carry out you will enjoy Faithless.Thanks to Karen Sullivan and Anne Cater for my copy in exchange for my review and for inviting me to take part in the blog tour. This is my honest and unbiased review.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Now whenever Orenda Books announce a new book I am always keen to settle down and read it. And when it’s translated fiction then I am doubly excited as Karen Sullivan has an amazing eye for talent and I have yet to read a book she has chosen to champion that I haven’t loved. Faithless, I am very glad to say, was no exception.There is always a little trepidation when starting a book which is not the first in a series as you can’t be sure that you haven’t missed out on something vitally important Now whenever Orenda Books announce a new book I am always keen to settle down and read it. And when it’s translated fiction then I am doubly excited as Karen Sullivan has an amazing eye for talent and I have yet to read a book she has chosen to champion that I haven’t loved. Faithless, I am very glad to say, was no exception.There is always a little trepidation when starting a book which is not the first in a series as you can’t be sure that you haven’t missed out on something vitally important in the past books which will inform the book you are reading. I would say though that Faithless can be read as a standalone as I got enough of each of the characters to understand their relationship and dynamic and how they all fit into the story. That said, I don’t want to read it as a standalone so have purchased the other books in the series currently in translation. I’m only gutted that there are only four (now five) out of the eleven translated right now but I’m hoping Karen has plans to remedy that.Anyway. I digress. What about Faithless? Well the book opens up with one of the protagonists, Frank Frølich engaged in a stakeout on a man suspected of being behind a strong of high value robberies in the area. When Frølich detains a woman who is seen leaving the suspect’s house, little can he know that his past is about to come back to haunt him. When the woman is later found dead in a way reminiscent of a past murder, and an old friend is implicated, he is forced to confront a past he would rather remained forgotten.The book is slower in pace than your typical British or American thriller but for me that is what is so appealing about Scandi or Nordic Noir. The way in which the authors are able to build the tension without having to rely upon high speed chases or gratuitous or graphic shocks and thrills. Dahl has created tension a plenty in this book, and there are a couple of really edge of the seat moments where both Frølich and his colleague Lena Stigersan find themselves in great peril with their lives on the line. He has also managed to create an absolute twister of a plot in which I genuinely did not manage to guess who the killer was before the facts were thrust in my face at the end. There are so many suspects, so many people with motive and opportunity and at one stage it almost seems a foregone conclusion as to who the perpetrator was. And yet no. Dahl completely blindsided me. Love it.The characterisations in the novel are brilliant. Although these are already established characters, I was easily able to pick up with them and I was completely invested in their fates. They are unique; there is a real feeling of authenticity about each and every one. Frølich, lonely and looking for companionship and yet in this book plagued by a past which looks set to ruin him. I really began to like his character and his relentless pursuit of the truth, no matter the personal cost. Lena, also trying to find that elusive someone and taking sanctuary in a completely inappropriate relationship. She also risks everything to solve the case, and she was a truly intriguing character. And even Gunnarstranda was a character I grew to like. He is more measured in approach, perhaps due to his seniority, but his battles with accepting his partner’s faith in things outside of the physical plain did provide some moments of light in an otherwise dark story.The violence in this book is not hidden but it is not necessarily graphic in detail either. The setting is vivid and beautifully described and this is also a feature of Nordic noir which has me hooked. The way in which Dahl has captured the essence of the country within the pages, the ethics, the landscape, the lifestyle, seems effortless. I have no doubt this is aided by a seamless translation by Don Bartlett. My hats off to both and also to Orenda for bringing us another stunning work of fiction.I am totally hooked on the #OsloDetectives right now. 5 stars.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is one of a series of books that features Frølich, Gunnarstranda, Lena and their superior officer Rindal. I haven’t read any of the previous novels and whilst there was backstory missing with regards to their personal lives it didn’t impact on my enjoyment of this novel.When a young woman is found dead after being charged with possession of cocaine Frølich feels he is in a dilemma. He was the officer who charged her and at a party the same night he discovered that she was in a relation Faithless is one of a series of books that features Frølich, Gunnarstranda, Lena and their superior officer Rindal. I haven’t read any of the previous novels and whilst there was backstory missing with regards to their personal lives it didn’t impact on my enjoyment of this novel.When a young woman is found dead after being charged with possession of cocaine Frølich feels he is in a dilemma. He was the officer who charged her and at a party the same night he discovered that she was in a relationship with an old school friend. He pleads conflict of interest but is ignored. This isn’t the only case being investigated. A young African woman has disappeared whilst on placement at the university. They have suspects but their hands are tied without any evidence.A few years ago, I had read no Norwegian fiction. Now I wonder why there hasn’t been more translated into English. The ones I have read lately all seem to be part of a hugely successful series that has been published for several years and it is all very enjoyable.Apart from Rindal, all the detectives feature strongly and despite not knowing anything about them I got to know them all quite well. The investigations are quite intense, the detectives are all intent on getting a result. I felt their every mood, their self-doubt, and their relationships with each other (Rindel seemed to be somebody to ridicule) and their feelings regarding the various suspects.Lena’s investigations were the most worrying and she was the character who I liked the most. She had faults but she was in no denial about what they were. The ending was intriguing. I know the book was originally published a few years before translation and I’m eager to find out how it continues. I hope I don’t have long to wait.With thanks to Karen Sullivan for the copy received and the chance to take part in the blog tour
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  • Dee-Cee It's all about the books
    January 1, 1970
    As part of the Oslo detective series, Faithless is the 7th book which was originally written in Norwegian and the only one to be translated so far. I was a little bit apprehensive about reading this book as I usually like to start a series at the beginning but Faithless can easily be read as a standalone I found.The book starts off with Frank Frølich carrying out a surveillance operation, which should be quite simple but things take a turn when a body is found and it turns out to be the girlfrie As part of the Oslo detective series, Faithless is the 7th book which was originally written in Norwegian and the only one to be translated so far. I was a little bit apprehensive about reading this book as I usually like to start a series at the beginning but Faithless can easily be read as a standalone I found.The book starts off with Frank Frølich carrying out a surveillance operation, which should be quite simple but things take a turn when a body is found and it turns out to be the girlfriend of an old pal Frølich has just reconnected with after 20 years. Not only that on a different case a young student disappears with out a trace and the hunt is on to find out what happened and where she is.The characters are all well developed and I particularly liked Frølich, his determination and possibly loneliness drew me to him. Also Lena, she seemed like a really interesting character, quite feisty and I’d like to have found out a little bit more about her, hopefully we’ll get to read more in this series soon that can shed more light into her character.This isn’t a fast paced book but it grabs your attention and keeps you reading, the story has many twists and turns and I really wasn’t sure where the author was taking us and how it would end but it all tied up brilliantly and actually left me so disappointed I’d finished the book. This being the first book I’ve read in the Nordic Noir genre it’s really given me the taste for it, I thoroughly enjoyed Faithless and I’ll definitely be looking out for more books in the same genre.
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  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    Booktrail the locations of the novel here - FaithlessI do love a good slice of Nordic Noir and this was a nice meaty feast from start to finish. A good elk pie – a nice crust with a good hearty filling which the more you chewed the more flavour it revealed.Why am I describing it like a pie? Well it looks set to be Nordic style investigation from the start but as you read, what lies beneath becomes all the more meaty and exciting.Enough about pies though – this was a unique police procedural and Booktrail the locations of the novel here - FaithlessI do love a good slice of Nordic Noir and this was a nice meaty feast from start to finish. A good elk pie – a nice crust with a good hearty filling which the more you chewed the more flavour it revealed.Why am I describing it like a pie? Well it looks set to be Nordic style investigation from the start but as you read, what lies beneath becomes all the more meaty and exciting.Enough about pies though – this was a unique police procedural and thriller which was slow paced but had enough tension and mystery to keep things moving nicely. I liked getting to know Frølich. Well he’s a grumpy old thing isn’t he? Doesn’t want to go to a 40th birthday party from someone he’s lost touch with but well when he gets there, he finds out a lot more than he bargained for!An African student in Norway has gone missing and the search is on – the visit to shady characters in the backs of cars on Oslo streets, the cold cases….well everything stacks up and the case starts to weave the various strands together very nicely indeed.I am definitely on the case with the next Frølich and Gunnarstranda- there’s a lot to like and a lot to get your teeth in to. A bit like a meaty feast of a pie when you think about it. Satisfying. But leaves you looking forward to the next serving. Really enjoyed getting my teeth in to this one.
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  • booksofallkinds
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first foray into the genre of Nordic Noir and I wasn't exactly sure what to expect, but I certainly didn't expect such an atmospheric, hauntingly tense journey of murder, lies, and dark, disturbing characters. Frølich is trying to unravel the murder of a young woman, who just happened to be engaged to a childhood friend of his, Karl Anders, whom he hadn't seen in twenty years. With strange friendships and plenty of secrets, it seems the more Frølich digs into the victim's life, the mo This is my first foray into the genre of Nordic Noir and I wasn't exactly sure what to expect, but I certainly didn't expect such an atmospheric, hauntingly tense journey of murder, lies, and dark, disturbing characters. Frølich is trying to unravel the murder of a young woman, who just happened to be engaged to a childhood friend of his, Karl Anders, whom he hadn't seen in twenty years. With strange friendships and plenty of secrets, it seems the more Frølich digs into the victim's life, the more confusing the case becomes. At the same time, a young student literally disappears into thin air, and a fellow Detective is looking into a connection with a cold case in Northern Norway. But as the clues start to stack together Frølich must confront the demons of his past if he is going to be able to unlock this chilling crime. FAITHLESS by Kjell ola dahl caught my attention immediately and kept me gripped from beginning to end. With plenty of suspense, confusion, dead ends, and seemingly unrelated circumstances, I questioned how exactly the author was going to be able to pull it all together and give a satisfactory ending - but oh my God, it did so much more! Completely taking me by surprise I definitely did not guess who was behind it all and I love that (there is nothing worse than when you figure it all out 1/3 of the way through!). The story flows effortlessly, weaving each section cleverly together with its expertly detailed settings and in-depth characters until it is seamless. FAITHLESS gave me chills aplenty and I read this book in 3 hours - yes it is that good. FAITHLESS by Kjell ola dahl is part of a series but can be read independently. This book starts a new addiction to the Nordic Noir genre for me and I cannot wait to get buying. *I voluntarily reviewed this book from the Publisher
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the different characters making up the police team. It took me a while to figure out their professional relationship – who was the boss of who, and so on - and I guess I missed knowing more of their back story that must have been played out in earlier books in the series. Frolich is an interesting character who comes across as rather solitary, lonely even with no current relationship. In that respect, he reminded me of Colin Dexter’s Inspector Morse. In this case, Frolich feels conflicte I liked the different characters making up the police team. It took me a while to figure out their professional relationship – who was the boss of who, and so on - and I guess I missed knowing more of their back story that must have been played out in earlier books in the series. Frolich is an interesting character who comes across as rather solitary, lonely even with no current relationship. In that respect, he reminded me of Colin Dexter’s Inspector Morse. In this case, Frolich feels conflicted and compromised by an old friend’s connection with the victim, particularly since it reawakens troubling memories from his childhood.I liked the way that various attitudes to modern day policing were covered. There is Gunnerstanda, suspicious of the “new ways” – data analysis, sifting through CCTV footage, etc – instead clinging to a belief in the value of face-to-face conversations to get to the truth. He also has a strong “sixth sense” when danger lurks. Lena is more into action, whatever it takes to nail a suspect, with sometimes a seemingly casual regard for her own safety. And there is the boss, Rindal, focused on the need to use resources effectively.The author deftly manages a number of different plot strands - a missing Nigerian woman, a spate of burglaries and the discovery of a dead body that has chilling echoes of an earlier murder. Dahl constantly plays with the reader’s expectations of how these different strands might come together and introduces a number of plausible suspects to keep one guessing right up to the end. I was certainly led up a few garden paths to some red herrings!I really enjoyed reading Faithless and I will certainly look out for other titles by the author.I received an advance reader copy courtesy of publishers, Orenda Books, in return for an honest review.To read this and other reviews of great books, visit my blog: https://whatcathyreadnext.wordpress.com/
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  • Ken Fredette
    January 1, 1970
    Kjell's story seems to hit several thoughts that are probably on all officers conscience minds when they come up against an old friend in a case wondering what to do. What should they do about each of their people when they have triggered several different scenarios where they have caught the villains and kept their mouths shut. Giving us two different ending to people who we liked in the story. It's worth reading.
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  • Renee (itsbooktalk)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find all my reviews at www.itsbooktalk.comFaithless is the fifth book in the Oslo detectives series and yes, I've once again jumped into a series mid-way. If I didn't know it was a series though I'm not sure I would've realized it because it very much reads as a standalone. I'm sure there are character threads woven throughout but I can't say I noticed that I was missing anything.The story begins with a stakeout and right away we meet Frank Frolich who's staking out the house of a suspec You can find all my reviews at www.itsbooktalk.comFaithless is the fifth book in the Oslo detectives series and yes, I've once again jumped into a series mid-way. If I didn't know it was a series though I'm not sure I would've realized it because it very much reads as a standalone. I'm sure there are character threads woven throughout but I can't say I noticed that I was missing anything.The story begins with a stakeout and right away we meet Frank Frolich who's staking out the house of a suspected robber. When a lady (Veronika Undset) leaves the house and he's sent to follow and subsequently question her, several plot pieces are set in motion. It's not long before Frank realizes his past seems to have firmly planted itself in his present, making him somewhat uncomfortable and on guard. Then a murder is committed leaving Frank stunned and searching for answers.Frank's comrade and fellow Oslo detective, Gunnarstranda, is investigating the disappearance of a University student so we are privy to 2 separate investigations which may or may not have connections. I found Gunnarstranda to be an interesting character as he sought to solve his case using old-fashioned detective work. His disdain for all the modern technology like CCTV's was apparent and amusing. Then there's Lena, a female colleague, who I have to say I never quite decided if I liked or not and then later in the story when she goes rogue and puts herself in a very precarious situation, I really thought that perhaps she wasn't the sharpest tool in the shed.Faithless is classic Nordic Noir in that the pace is slow, the clues are layed out gradually, and the detectives work fairly methodically. The sentence structure was often short and choppy which did take some getting used to on my part. One thing I really appreciated, however, was the linear timeline. The story progresses in a straightforward manner...no flashbacks! Something that was missing for me in this book though was a sense of place. I never felt like I could picture the surroundings and the atmospheric details I've come to enjoy in other Nordic Noir novels weren't there for me in this one. I did find the characterization to be strong and while the resolution of one of the mysteries seemed to be pretty lackluster, the other one was a surprise. I always love to be fooled and the author managed to pull one over on me in terms of the murder.
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  • David Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I'm grateful to Karen at Orenda Books for a copy of this book and to Anne for inviting me onto the tour.I hadn't previously met the team of Oslo detectives of which Gunnarstranda and Frølich are a part, and there is clearly a fair amount of backstory to them - not least in the way that Gunnarstranda drops out of his holiday to get back in on the case even where, it seems, he isn't really needed. And what about Lena Stigersand and her strange, not to say brutal, relationship with Ståle Sender? An I'm grateful to Karen at Orenda Books for a copy of this book and to Anne for inviting me onto the tour.I hadn't previously met the team of Oslo detectives of which Gunnarstranda and Frølich are a part, and there is clearly a fair amount of backstory to them - not least in the way that Gunnarstranda drops out of his holiday to get back in on the case even where, it seems, he isn't really needed. And what about Lena Stigersand and her strange, not to say brutal, relationship with Ståle Sender? And the bad blood (seemingly) between Frølich and his boss, Rindar?I don't know how far these complex relationships develop from previous books, but in any case, Faithless is still an excellent place to pick up the threads and get to know the lives and loves of the detectives. They come across as real people, and that reality only adds resonance to the crimes they're confronted with here.Kjell Ola DahlThe first of these is the very nasty murder of a young woman - found dumped in a skip, her skin scalded by boiling water, her clothes missing. Rape is assumed: but there's a link back to Frølich, and to an old friend of his, which suggests the death may be connected to an ongoing investigation. The affair wakes something in Frølich's mind and he begins to experience what seems to be PTSD. can he get to the truth without having to go back to some very dark places in his past?There are also similarities between this crime and a cold case - but that took place 1500km away, and many years ago. As the deaths begin to rack up, Frølich is also investigating the disappearance of Rosalind M'Taya, a young African visitor to Oslo. Nobody else seems to take it very seriously - while it's not spelled out there seems to be a whiff of racism here - but Frølich can't resist picking away at this loose end, even with another major investigation on.This is a fascinating ensemble cast: it's enthralling simply watching how they react and bump off one another, trying to tease out in one's mind not only who committed the crime(s) but how the team's cohesion - or lack of it - will affect the investigations. It's actually much more fun than the classic brooding loner detective, who we know will wrap everything up on the last page (and go away to brood). Yes, there are characters here who strike out on their own - and get into real danger - but one the whole there is more of the air of a family - a dysfunctional family beset by rivalries and resentments, but still a family.Bartlett's translation serves the story well, preserving enough of an air of foreignness (which is important - I always think it's a shame if a translation becomes so seamless that you may as well be reading about Milton Keynes or Glasgow) yet making the story readable and clear. And behind that, Dahl's story is taut, at times tragic and always, always absorbing.So, who is faithless, how, and why? Saying too much would spoil the story, but I think most of the characters are, in different ways - not all of them in bad ways, admittedly, but there is a lot of darkness here, in a book that's set in the long Northern summer days.I'm now eagerly looking forward to hearing more about the Oslo Detectives.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    Dark, intriguing, and pacy, this book is the perfect example of what makes Nordic Noir so popular.Frølich is called to investigate the death of a woman he has recently arrested and then met again at an old friend’s party, while also looking into the disappearance of a university student. Gunnarstranda is investigating a similar cold case. Is there a connection? What is the personal angle where Frølich is concerned? And the plot thickens…A police procedural with an edge and a deftly woven plot, t Dark, intriguing, and pacy, this book is the perfect example of what makes Nordic Noir so popular.Frølich is called to investigate the death of a woman he has recently arrested and then met again at an old friend’s party, while also looking into the disappearance of a university student. Gunnarstranda is investigating a similar cold case. Is there a connection? What is the personal angle where Frølich is concerned? And the plot thickens…A police procedural with an edge and a deftly woven plot, this is great crime fiction. But it was the stuccato prose and short-but-page-turning chapters that enveloped the novel and added to the eeriness of the reading experience. It drew me in as I bounced along with the rhythm of the writing – greatly crafted by both the author and the translator. Now excuse me while I go and find the previous installments of this series…*Thank you to Orenda Books for my free review copy.
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  • Elisa
    January 1, 1970
    This novel is part of a series that I'd never read before. Like most Nordic crime thrillers, it's full of disturbing individuals and horrific crime scenes. Inspector Frank Frølich arrests a woman leaving the house of a well-known criminal. He then runs into her at a party, starting a complicated case in which he keeps getting more and more involved. He is also trying to find a young African student who went missing shortly after arriving in Oslo. As many other dogged detectives, he will pursue t This novel is part of a series that I'd never read before. Like most Nordic crime thrillers, it's full of disturbing individuals and horrific crime scenes. Inspector Frank Frølich arrests a woman leaving the house of a well-known criminal. He then runs into her at a party, starting a complicated case in which he keeps getting more and more involved. He is also trying to find a young African student who went missing shortly after arriving in Oslo. As many other dogged detectives, he will pursue the case even when it starts destroying him. Some parts, like when one of the detectives walks in the basement of a building with long, dark hallways and the feeling of being watched, made my skin crawl. There were two issues that distracted me from the plot: one is that the author seems to go out of his way to be politically correct to an excessive degree. The other was the translation, which was not organic and felt forced. I still mostly enjoyed the story.I chose to read this book and all opinions in this review are my own and completely unbiased. Thank you, NetGalley/Trafalgar Square Publishing!
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  • Clair
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is part of the Oslo Detectives series featuring Gunnarstranda and Frølich, as this series was originally written in Norwegian, not all of the series have made it (yet, hopefully!) into English however this works wonderfully as a standalone. There is enough recap to bring new readers up to date.What starts as a simple surveillance operation ends up far more complicated for Frank Frølich when a woman's body is found scaled and wrapped in plastic in a dumpster....who Frølich happens to be Faithless is part of the Oslo Detectives series featuring Gunnarstranda and Frølich, as this series was originally written in Norwegian, not all of the series have made it (yet, hopefully!) into English however this works wonderfully as a standalone. There is enough recap to bring new readers up to date.What starts as a simple surveillance operation ends up far more complicated for Frank Frølich when a woman's body is found scaled and wrapped in plastic in a dumpster....who Frølich happens to be vaguely acquainted to. This is an interesting take on a police procedural as, alongside the investigation itself, Frølich is also fighting with his conscience and moral code considering his clear conflict of interest.Alongside this murder enquiry, there is also an investigation into the disappearance of a young student with eerie similarities to a cold case.I'm not going to go into the story too much so as not to ruin the well-plotted unravelling of links and the past crashing into the present but suffice to say there is a lot more than meets the eye.As I am beginning to realise with Nordic Noir, the pace is of a slower nature but still builds tension beautifully. I really liked Dahl's writing style which is edgy, realistic and atmospheric. Faithless is brilliantly translated by Don Barlett, the narrative is seamless with little hint that this was first written in Norwegian.I really enjoyed Faithless and fans of translated fiction and crime will not be disappointed. I will be looking out for more from Dahl and his protagonists Frølich and Gunnarstranda.
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  • Marina Sofia
    January 1, 1970
    Good old-fashioned storytelling, a slower paced police procedural with personal psychology which reminded me of Karin Fossum.
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy Scandinavian Noir... but sometimes I wonder whether this vogue has given rise to the publication of less-gifted practitioners, or whether the translations receive all the attention they deserve.In this book, for instance, I could not figure out what the relationship was between the different cops. That is, who was whose boss? Who led the department? Titles were remarkably absent, and the interactions seemed quite loose- different from your classic police procedural, where one can figure I enjoy Scandinavian Noir... but sometimes I wonder whether this vogue has given rise to the publication of less-gifted practitioners, or whether the translations receive all the attention they deserve.In this book, for instance, I could not figure out what the relationship was between the different cops. That is, who was whose boss? Who led the department? Titles were remarkably absent, and the interactions seemed quite loose- different from your classic police procedural, where one can figure out who gives the orders and who follows them (or, with 21st century protagonists, disregards them). Granted, this is a book in a series, but I think that even in a series, every book should be self-explanatory, without too much reliance on earlier books. (Think of Sue Grafton's Alphabet series, where Kinsey Milhone explains her vital stats in every first chapter.). And it wasn't just the professional relationships between the cops; I even struggled with the personal relationships. For a US reader, it's not that self-evident that "Gunnarstrada" is a man's name and "Tove" is a girl's name, so it took me a moment to figure out that this was a detective and his girlfriend taking a vacation.Anyway : the Oslo police is investigating the murder of a woman who was known to associate with a suspected bad guy, and who had been arrested for the possession of cocaine but released. The investigating officer has a conflict, because she was the fiancee of a former school friend of his. in parallel, a young African woman, just arrived in Oslo for a summer term, goes missing. The main problem with the book, for me, is that it seemed contrived. People just act in ways that don't make sense to me. A woman who gets into trouble because cocaine was found in her handbag, and who knows that it was planted there by a certain person, doesn't say anything to the police but chooses to confront that person in private. A cop gets invited to a party by an old "friend" he hasn't seen in 20 years - for no good reason that I could discern, except as a plot device to bring the cop into social contact with a suspect he had arrested earlier that morning. A female cop single-handedly, and without backup, decides to offer herself up as decoy for a suspected killer, only to goof spectacularly the very second things get hairy - this is a contrived tension, due to a character acting stupid, not due to excellent plotting. Similarly, one of the characters jeopardizes his career by a wild attack on a civilian, and not a spur of the moment impulse, either, but a determined seeking out and thrashing. In summary : Henning Mankell has nothing to fear.
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    3 starsVeronika Undset is the murdered woman who was left in a dumpster burned and naked, wrapped in plastic. Inspector Frank Frolich and his team are investigating the case. Frank is a childhood friend of Veronika’s fiancé Karl Anders Fransgard who is also the main suspect in her death.Some of the other officers on the case are: Stale Sender the ”murderer of asylum-seekers” as he is called behind his back and Lena Stigersand are police officers who are carrying on an affair – a very odd one, Mu 3 starsVeronika Undset is the murdered woman who was left in a dumpster burned and naked, wrapped in plastic. Inspector Frank Frolich and his team are investigating the case. Frank is a childhood friend of Veronika’s fiancé Karl Anders Fransgard who is also the main suspect in her death.Some of the other officers on the case are: Stale Sender the ”murderer of asylum-seekers” as he is called behind his back and Lena Stigersand are police officers who are carrying on an affair – a very odd one, Mustafa Rindal is the boss of the team and the philosopher of the group and Gunnarstranda is another Inspector with the team. Another suspect is Kadir Zahid who is originally from Pakistan and is an all-around bad guy, thief and with his fingers in many enterprises. The team is also investigating the cold case of young woman named Rosalind M’Taya who is missing and presumed dead. When Gunnarstranda finds another dead body, the heat is turned up on the Veronika Undset case. The murdered man, Sivert Almeli was apparently following Veronika and taking photos of her. The cases get more and more complicated as more suspects in both cases are identified. The tension and the speed of the story ratchet up.This book is fairly well written and plotted. It does, however, have a tendency to wander at times. I read another one of Dahl’s books and felt that it was better. The suspense starts out in this book almost immediately and increases throughout the novel. I like the police officers and the team got along well. I like police procedurals where there isn’t a lot of tension and infighting between the team members. I want to thank NetGalley and Trafalgar Square Publishing for forwarding to me a copy of this book to read.
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is the first book I have read in the Oslo Detectives series, the first one translated into English I think, but judging by the quality of this book and that ending, I am desperate to get my hands on any future translated books in the series! This book had me gripped from page one. I’d just flicked it open to read the opening chapter before bed and before I knew it early morning sunlight was peeking through the curtains and I was down to my last twenty pages. I was so absorbed in the pl Faithless is the first book I have read in the Oslo Detectives series, the first one translated into English I think, but judging by the quality of this book and that ending, I am desperate to get my hands on any future translated books in the series! This book had me gripped from page one. I’d just flicked it open to read the opening chapter before bed and before I knew it early morning sunlight was peeking through the curtains and I was down to my last twenty pages. I was so absorbed in the plot and was unaware of just how quickly I had been reading it until then, but there hadn’t been a single moment where I considered putting the book down. Faithless is a dark and atmospheric novel and one that I found to be utterly enthralling. When the body of a woman is found dumped, scalded with hot water and wrapped in plastic, Oslo detective Frank Frølich is shocked to discover that the woman is not only someone he’d met recently but also someone he arrested recently as she was in possession of cocaine. On top of that, she also has connections to an old friend of Frølich and so he has a bit more invested in this particular case than he should have. I thought Frølich’s personal link to this case made it all the more interesting as we get to see the development of his character too as he battles with his conscience and the lines between professional and unprofessional conduct. He’s put in a difficult position but I liked the challenges he faces as it made me warm to his grumpy persona even more. Frølich is a complex character and I found the more we learn about him, the more intrigued by him I was. I have to say just how much I love how the cover represents the woman’s body wrapped in plastic. This is such a stunning and powerful graphic which showcases one of the main themes of this novel. One thing I loved about this book though was just how much was going on. There are many cases rolled into one book here and each of them are resolved at their own pace which allows the other unsolved cases to take over. Not only is there the identity of the murderer to discover but also a missing student case to uncover as well as much more in this relatively short but impactful novel. As the layers to the book peel away, what is left behind is one main case, the murder of Veronika Undset, and this particular case had me glued to the pages dying to get some answers. I was truly blind-sighted by the author as I guessed the outcome of the case early on and then by the time we discover what really happened my own guess was forgotten as I had about ten other ideas about what could have happened and they were, of course, all wrong, because I was right the first time! I loved picking at some of the clues and trying to work this one out for myself. I found that the somewhat calmer nature of the police in Faithless enabled me to get more involved in trying to figure it all out myself and this is one aspect I particularly enjoyed because it makes for a more inviting police procedural novel where, as the reader, I felt more a part of it than I would usually. Frølich and Gunnarstranda are the main detectives in Faithless and despite not knowing any of their history I didn’t feel like I’d missed out on too much by not having read the other, untranslated books in the series. To me even though Faithless is part of a series it read like a standalone in that nothing felt lacking. This was an easy book to slip right into and the dynamics between the workforce early on, and throughout, helped me to engage in the story and the characters soon became familiar to me which is not normally the case when you begin reading in the middle of a series. The pacing of Faithless was exactly how I liked it, not rushed but instead built up and teased out in a slower, steadier pace, burning with tension and haunting with its lingering prose. I found the tone to the writing at times could be quite chilling and suspenseful as the case in this book is quite a bleak one. I don’t think I’ve been this engrossed in a book like this for a long time. The author had me absolutely hooked from the moment we discover Veronika has been murdered and though I could not wait to discover what had happened to her, I was disappointed that the book had to come to an end because I was enjoying it too much. I’m a big fan of that ending though, and I will be recommending this book for a long time to come, right until I can hopefully get my hands on the next book in the series.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    Faithless is a newly translated book in the Oslo Detectives series featuring Frank Frølich and Inspector Gunnarstranda. Frølich has been invited to a school friend’s 40th birthday party. He has not seen his friend for some twenty years, but he goes anyway and discovers his old friend’s fiancée Veronika is the woman he just arrested for cocaine possession. The party is great fun, but when he is called out to his next murder case, the fiancée is the murder victim. Clearly he must tread carefully i Faithless is a newly translated book in the Oslo Detectives series featuring Frank Frølich and Inspector Gunnarstranda. Frølich has been invited to a school friend’s 40th birthday party. He has not seen his friend for some twenty years, but he goes anyway and discovers his old friend’s fiancée Veronika is the woman he just arrested for cocaine possession. The party is great fun, but when he is called out to his next murder case, the fiancée is the murder victim. Clearly he must tread carefully in this investigation.There are too many connections on this case. Veronika is suspected of working with their original investigative target, Kadir Zahid who they wish was the murdered, too bad he has their own investigators for an alibi. Then there is the possible gang of thieves who seem to be robbing Veronika’s clients. There is a stalker, her fiancé of course, and then to complicate everything, a possible serial killer connection is made with a similar murder of a victim who resembled Veronika.They manage to rule out the stalker when Gunnarstranda finds him dead. But they still have far too many suspects, including a psychologist who connects to all three victims. Team member Lena Stigersand risks far too much pursuing a private investigation and Frølich reaches too far when he finally figures out the last piece of the puzzle. These are detectives who care deeply and risk much while Gunnarstranda struggles to provide inspiration, mentorship, and restraint.I liked Faithless a lot. It’s fair, we learn what the detectives learn when they learn it and yet it’s complex enough we aren’t rolling our eyes, begging them to put two and two together. Their leaps of logic happen in time with or even before my own. That makes me happy. The characters are complex individuals, but they are not filled out with the kinds of quirks that become tedious when repeated in book after book.This is a Scandinavian mystery in the best sense, with professional cops who don’t fantasize about being Dirty Harry. Even when the detective color outside the lines, there is a respect for the lines and they suffer consequences and disapproval rather than glad-handed praise from people who think bullying is bravery and brutality is strength. Folks who like law-breaking, violent thugs for their police will be disappointed, even though there is some extrajudicial action.I admire K. O. Dahl and look forward to more in the series.Faithless will be released September 1st. I received an e-galley from the publisher through NetGalley.Other English translations of books by K. O. Dahl are The Fourth Man, The Man in the Window, The Last Fix, and Lethal Investments.Faithless at Orenda BooksKiel Ola Dahl author sitehttps://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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