The Worm and the Bird
A beautifully illustrated picture book from the bestselling author of The Fox and the Star. Deep below the earth, Worm dreams of having more space. There's not much room down there. Above, Bird waits, through sun and rain and wind. As the day goes on, will they both find what they are looking for? This is a book about searching and hoping, and how the smallest moment can be beautiful.

The Worm and the Bird Details

TitleThe Worm and the Bird
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 31st, 2017
PublisherParticular Books
ISBN-139781846149221
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Fiction, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels

The Worm and the Bird Review

  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    soooo, apparently i’ve become a downer. which is not a shocking realization; more a confirmation of how my ever-declining circumstances have affected my mood and outlook and productivity and now, even my ability to interpret books. because if the intended message of this book is “about searching and hoping, and how the smallest moment can be beautiful,” then i have never been less in synch with my own takeaway lesson. the book itself is beautiful - no surprise there, from its gilded cover to its soooo, apparently i’ve become a downer. which is not a shocking realization; more a confirmation of how my ever-declining circumstances have affected my mood and outlook and productivity and now, even my ability to interpret books. because if the intended message of this book is “about searching and hoping, and how the smallest moment can be beautiful,” then i have never been less in synch with my own takeaway lesson. the book itself is beautiful - no surprise there, from its gilded cover to its endpapers front(close-up)and backto its illustrations, color scheme and autumnal tone. all physically beautiful. but if all interpretations are valid (and they are), and dependent upon what the reader brings to the task, well, i must be the bleakest of bettys. i don’t want to ruin the story for you (even though, like The Fox and the Star, its charms are weighted in favor of the images), so suffice it to say, the first half of this story is presented from the perspective of the worm, and the second half from the perspective of the bird. i could not help but relate to the worm from the first sentence in the book, There's not much room where I live, an invertebrate-version of urban living and the teeming commute:the hectic pace and grueling determination just to get by:i have no problem relating to that worm, just like i relate to the ant in that grasshopper/ant fable, for all the good it’s done me. this little worm does what needs doing and sacrifices rest and pleasure and guts it out until he starts dreaming about maybe being a little more than he is, having a little more space, experience, opportunity - to break free from the crowded, busy soil and see if the grass is greener on the other side of the terrain. AND SO he risks it all and exerts himself, pushing his way to the top, anticipating an improvement over the cramped and stressful life he’s endured; a reward for all his diligence, and when he finally pokes his little worm head above the ground, he sees a bird has been waiting there all along for him. and spoiler alert, bickford-smith is a traditionalist when it comes to bird/worm relationships, so it doesn’t exactly go like this:and yes, before the POV switches to that of the bird, the worm does get to do something he never thought he would, but lemme tell you - it is a REAL fleeting joy. so, if you want to see this as a triumph and a (seriously - really brief) reward for hoping and taking a chance, you’re a better man than me. all i see is that putting yourself out there ends in tragedy and failure, so even if your life is horrible and unrewarding, that is just tough titties for you, because some people were just meant to eat dirt all day and thinking you deserve more than your lot is a good way to become food for someone else’s babies. or maybe i’m just projecting my struggle to find meaningful work upon this tale and maybe i’ve been the worm long enough and if i hang in there just a little longer, maybe someday soon i can become the bird.and then everyone will want to hire me!a beautiful book to look at. what you take away from it is your own little rorschach test.***********************************************if this is even half as pretty as The Fox and the Star, i will be thrilled.and i hope the early worm gets that bird...***********************************************okay, i have now read it and it is just as pretty as fox/star, but man ... that story, tho. maybe i'm just a glass-half-empty girl, but i think that message is dark. review to come...
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    There's not too much I want to say about this book as being a picture book the story is quite condensed. I can say it's a stunning object that I think adults and children alike will love. There is also some mild peril and slight dread I wasn't expecting. Hahaha. It's also perfectly autumnal.
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  • Kai
    January 1, 1970
    I'm borrowing Hannah's words when I say that this was a bit underwhelming a just "meh".Oh and I also sneakily read this in a bookshop.Find more of my books on Instagram
  • Rikke
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful book filled with pictures as meaningful as its words. Or perhaps, pictures weighs more than words in this particular case.The Worm and the Bird is a delight for the eye and the mind. It's about a worm, lived in cramped spaces beneath the earth, always working, never resting, always crawling on towards something else. Something different and something more.And it's a book about a bird, sitting excruciatingly still and waiting for a worm to stick its head up through the ground.But, mos A beautiful book filled with pictures as meaningful as its words. Or perhaps, pictures weighs more than words in this particular case.The Worm and the Bird is a delight for the eye and the mind. It's about a worm, lived in cramped spaces beneath the earth, always working, never resting, always crawling on towards something else. Something different and something more.And it's a book about a bird, sitting excruciatingly still and waiting for a worm to stick its head up through the ground.But, most of all: this is a story of life, of hoping and of the brief beauty that can occur in the nature's brutality.
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  • Karen Mace
    January 1, 1970
    A poignant little picture book that is just as beautiful inside as it is outside! A real stunner and one that both children and adults will enjoy on many levels!
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely beautiful cover, and gorgeous illustrations. A somewhat dark tale about the importance of devoting time to the things that really matter.
  • Vivek Tejuja
    January 1, 1970
    Is it even a book read, if it is a picture book? I say, why not? A book is a book is a book. Different genres are still counted as books, isn’t it? Picture books read are still counted as read books according to me and that’s quite alright.Now that that is out of the way, let’s talk about, “The Worm and the Bird”. This book is about a worm and a bird (as you might have rightly guessed, duh!) and the different things they want and how they almost get it or they do for that matter. Under the earth Is it even a book read, if it is a picture book? I say, why not? A book is a book is a book. Different genres are still counted as books, isn’t it? Picture books read are still counted as read books according to me and that’s quite alright.Now that that is out of the way, let’s talk about, “The Worm and the Bird”. This book is about a worm and a bird (as you might have rightly guessed, duh!) and the different things they want and how they almost get it or they do for that matter. Under the earth, the worm needs more space. Above the earth, the bird searches for something else. And that’s what the book is. Of course, what makes it so endearing are the illustrations and what one doesn’t expect (which I will not reveal) as well.Coralie Bickford-Smith’s earlier book, “The Fox and the Star” was a delight and so is this one. “The Worm and the Bird” is also about the shortness of life, but it also rings true of how life should be lived. Being a picture book, it cannot get preachy at all, which it isn’t.“The Worm and the Bird” is the kind of book which has to be read and appreciated by people of all ages. It is a lesson, but beyond that it is also to be read because of the stunning illustrations, the ink artwork and to get back to understand how stories are told.
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  • Rogene Carter
    January 1, 1970
    Unceasingly inspirational and beautiful.
  • Noura
    January 1, 1970
    So soft. So familiar. So special.I am glad this exists.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This was kind of depressing, which is probably why I liked it more than The Fox and The Star. It's a bit about mindfulness and the desire for solitude. It felt more like poetry than a picture book.
  • Rubal
    January 1, 1970
    increased the rating from 3 to 3.5 stars because of https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
  • JourneyThroughStoryland
    January 1, 1970
    3* stars for the aesthetic pleasing art but the text wasn't for me. Nothing special in that.
  • April Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    Gawd, these illustrations though
  • Katrina Southern
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't technically receive any books for Christmas, but I DID get money and used it to buy myself, among others, this gorgeous hardcover. I actually got 'The Fox & The Star' a couple of years ago from my sister and I really think I'm going to end up collecting Bickford-Smith's beautiful works! I'm a big fan of gorgeous art AND fairy tales, and her books combine both, becoming the perfect, short, Christmas read!I have to say, that I didn't like this one quite as much as 'The Fox & The S I didn't technically receive any books for Christmas, but I DID get money and used it to buy myself, among others, this gorgeous hardcover. I actually got 'The Fox & The Star' a couple of years ago from my sister and I really think I'm going to end up collecting Bickford-Smith's beautiful works! I'm a big fan of gorgeous art AND fairy tales, and her books combine both, becoming the perfect, short, Christmas read!I have to say, that I didn't like this one quite as much as 'The Fox & The Star' because I didn't fully understand it's message and fund it a little...depressing? It was supposed to be an 'appreciate things you have' kind of thing I THINK, but for me it almost said 'if you have a bad lot in life, put up with it and don't try to change it because it will probably all go horribly wrong'... That being said, I LOVED the art in this so much, that I found myself reading through it multiple times to take it all in. The attention to detail is exquisite and the way that the words are rendered on the page is clever too. These are great stories for children, though this one was a little sad and had no real 'ending' as such. I think stories are better when they have a clear message, which this did not, but it was, nevertheless, a beautiful addition to my bookshelves!
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  • Ceri
    January 1, 1970
    Not a sequel in story, but perhaps a sequel in tone, the Worm and the Bird is the second stunning children's book by Coralie Bickford-Smith. If you were charmed by the first book, this second one will be better. If anything it surpases the first book not only in art but in the storytelling too. Poignant and layered and a little bittersweet (at least if you are an adult), it's added to by the use of metallic ink both on the cover and inside.It is beautiful.
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  • Holly Rea
    January 1, 1970
    A really stunning book. The illustrations, and the overall appearance of this book is beautiful. I do think The Fox and the Star is better, in appearance and definitely in story. I didn't feel the message of this book as much as the previous one. And let's face it, a fox is usually going to be more attractive than a worm. But I still think it's a book worth having on your bookshelves.
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  • Christen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very short picture book. The word “picture” is an understatement as each page contains beautiful works of art. This simple storyline reminds the reader to appreciate the present and the treasures of your own life. I have never felt so related to an earthworm as I have when reading this book. Take 5 minutes out of your day to appreciate this gorgeous book.
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  • Andreia
    January 1, 1970
    Read at the Foyles bookshop in Southbank. The book is so beautiful and so fast and easy to read (hello picture books, my old friends) you won't be able to put it down before you finish it. The illustrations are amazing and I really wish I were a child who was learning how to read because this would definitely be my new favourite book. It's about a worm and a bird who are deeply wanting for something and a kind of metaphor about how every one of us is searching for whatever makes us whole at the Read at the Foyles bookshop in Southbank. The book is so beautiful and so fast and easy to read (hello picture books, my old friends) you won't be able to put it down before you finish it. The illustrations are amazing and I really wish I were a child who was learning how to read because this would definitely be my new favourite book. It's about a worm and a bird who are deeply wanting for something and a kind of metaphor about how every one of us is searching for whatever makes us whole at the same time as everyone else, resulting in a lack of space and opportunities but also on untamed dreams. Of course children won't get that part but that's the beauty of reading children's book as an adult. You are never too old and you are always wiser.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Not so sneakily read this all in Waterstones. Don't think the illustration is really that striking to want to buy a copy for myself, and I feel as if the Fox and the Star was more well crafted in the colour decision making and also played around with how the fox looked more than how the Worm and the Bird looked. Also I have a feeling Coralie Bickford-Smith maybe reused the print of the Bird for a few pages, just for a different colour and it felt a little lazy to me and didn't really deliver any Not so sneakily read this all in Waterstones. Don't think the illustration is really that striking to want to buy a copy for myself, and I feel as if the Fox and the Star was more well crafted in the colour decision making and also played around with how the fox looked more than how the Worm and the Bird looked. Also I have a feeling Coralie Bickford-Smith maybe reused the print of the Bird for a few pages, just for a different colour and it felt a little lazy to me and didn't really deliver anything original. I am a big fan of the bronze on the hardback though.The message of this picture book of things continuing in different forms was okay, I guess. I'm not quite sure of what a child would think of this picture book, but for me, it was a bit meh.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    Nice book, well made and the pictures look amazing. The story though is no where near as good as the Fox and the Star, in fact it felt very babyish at times. Also missing are those bright orange colours, a worm just isn't bright enough to stand out. Highlight of the book those was the bird, watching and waiting for the worm, every other page featured the bird, in all weathers looking quite comical at times. That was my opinion, my daughter loved this book. If you haven't read the fox and the sta Nice book, well made and the pictures look amazing. The story though is no where near as good as the Fox and the Star, in fact it felt very babyish at times. Also missing are those bright orange colours, a worm just isn't bright enough to stand out. Highlight of the book those was the bird, watching and waiting for the worm, every other page featured the bird, in all weathers looking quite comical at times. That was my opinion, my daughter loved this book. If you haven't read the fox and the star then give that one a go.
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  • Kristin MB
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful all-ages book. It seems like a kids book, but I could really relate to the worm as an adult. Not sure what that says about my life 🙃! I thought it was beautifully done packed with a surprising amount of emotion. Also, perhaps a nice way of looking at the life cycle, or least the end of life. I can see how this book could be interpreted negatively, but I didn't see it that way. I absolutely loved it. It is a book that can certainly be read quickly, but I for one enjoyed lingering on A delightful all-ages book. It seems like a kids book, but I could really relate to the worm as an adult. Not sure what that says about my life 🙃! I thought it was beautifully done packed with a surprising amount of emotion. Also, perhaps a nice way of looking at the life cycle, or least the end of life. I can see how this book could be interpreted negatively, but I didn't see it that way. I absolutely loved it. It is a book that can certainly be read quickly, but I for one enjoyed lingering on each page.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Such a beautiful cover! It really is a stunning cloth-bound hardback book and follows in the same thread as Bickford-Smith's previous book The Fox and the Star from 2015. It tells the story of a worm who waits and waits for the right time to visit the world above. Meanwhile, we see a bird also patiently waiting. It encourages us to appreciate the world around us as we never know when we might lose access to it. It also shows both the good and bad aspects of patience. I really empathised with Th Such a beautiful cover! It really is a stunning cloth-bound hardback book and follows in the same thread as Bickford-Smith's previous book The Fox and the Star from 2015. It tells the story of a worm who waits and waits for the right time to visit the world above. Meanwhile, we see a bird also patiently waiting. It encourages us to appreciate the world around us as we never know when we might lose access to it. It also shows both the good and bad aspects of patience. I really empathised with The Worm, as I also procrastinate! I'm not as patient as The Bird.It's a simple plot, but tension is built by slowly heading towards the moment The Worm and The Bird meet (as I'm sure you can guess the outcome!) and each page deserves a long, slow look at its beauty. I hope to see more books like this from Coralie Bickford-Smith as they are charming, quick reads that look gorgeous on the shelf and in your lap!
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing meditation on dualities!
  • Dipali
    January 1, 1970
    As usual, her illustrations are breathtaking.
  • Rekki
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful artwork, very pleasing to the eye. A sad yet hopeful little story.
  • Elizabeth Willis
    January 1, 1970
    Stunningly beautiful & oh-so-strange. Also a sad sad story about the brevity of life and appreciating the beauty of the world while you have a chance.
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    The design is just so beautiful, but I wish a writer would be hired to bring some cogency to this artist's stories.
  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    Utterly gorgeous and wonderfully poignant. Not all illustrated books are for kids and this is a sublime example.
  • ~☆clockwork
    January 1, 1970
    I've yet to read this to my children as it's a Christmas present, but I know they're going to love it,like the fox and the star this is illustrated beautifully I've never seen children's books like this and I'm so glad I bought them as they are truly special i recommend these expecially in hardback
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    A seemingly simple picture book about a worm and a bird with surprisingly sophisticated topics between the lines of text. What will you do to make your dreams come true? Are you missing out on things when you push them aside to meet your goals? What happens once you find your dream? A good read for discussion between all ages.
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