Everything I Know About Love
A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the wayWhen it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It's a book about bad dates, good friends and - above all else - about recognising that you and you alone are enough.Glittering, with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton's powerful début weaves together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes, and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age - while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.

Everything I Know About Love Details

TitleEverything I Know About Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 1st, 2018
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir

Everything I Know About Love Review

  • Pip
    January 1, 1970
    Ladies and gentlemen, I have met my new personal hero. I started reading this book and immediately felt like I was cushioned perfectly in cotton wool and marshmallows, covered in fluffy blankets with cherubs singing to me and playing with my hair.In other words - this is genuinely one of the most lovely and funny and heartwarming memoirs I've read in my rather short life so far. I LOVE it more than I could possibly say. I laughed out loud (even on the tube which I find daunting) and cried on and Ladies and gentlemen, I have met my new personal hero. I started reading this book and immediately felt like I was cushioned perfectly in cotton wool and marshmallows, covered in fluffy blankets with cherubs singing to me and playing with my hair.In other words - this is genuinely one of the most lovely and funny and heartwarming memoirs I've read in my rather short life so far. I LOVE it more than I could possibly say. I laughed out loud (even on the tube which I find daunting) and cried on and off throughout as so many of Dolly's words rang true to me.Dating stories are my kryptonite and insights about loss and love I am always, always more than happy to gobble up. I love reading about peoples' experiences with love - romantic love, friendly love, young love, lost love. I WANT IT ALL. I LOVE IT MORE THAN SPRITEWhether you're single/dating/relationshipping/married, I highly recommend this. IT'S DIVINE. New all time favourite!
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  • Nadia
    January 1, 1970
    Loooooved it! 😍😍😍I'm a bit embarassed to admit that I hardly knew who Dolly Adlerton was before reading this book, but after finishing Everything I Know About Love, I'm now a massive fan!Dolly took me on a journey through love, friendship, heartache and anxiety that was relatable, honest and funny. Filled with disastrous dates, wild nights out but also moving stories about friendship, this book will make you both laugh and cry.I heard this book being described as Sex and the City for millennials Loooooved it! 😍😍😍I'm a bit embarassed to admit that I hardly knew who Dolly Adlerton was before reading this book, but after finishing Everything I Know About Love, I'm now a massive fan!Dolly took me on a journey through love, friendship, heartache and anxiety that was relatable, honest and funny. Filled with disastrous dates, wild nights out but also moving stories about friendship, this book will make you both laugh and cry.I heard this book being described as Sex and the City for millennials and it absolutely is!! Right, I'm off to buy copies of the book for all my girlfriends!
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Bloody hell, pals. This book is sweet and silly, smart and serious. I would highly recommend. I don't read an awful lot of auto-biographical stuff but I knew of Dolly already, through her PanDolly and High-Low podcasts with Pandora Sykes and her amusing dating column in the Sunday Times. And when it popped up on NetGalley, I wanted it. I wanted it real bad. So, yes: this is a NetGalley freebie but thoughts are my own, of course: what is the point otherwise?So. Everything I Know About Love. That Bloody hell, pals. This book is sweet and silly, smart and serious. I would highly recommend. I don't read an awful lot of auto-biographical stuff but I knew of Dolly already, through her PanDolly and High-Low podcasts with Pandora Sykes and her amusing dating column in the Sunday Times. And when it popped up on NetGalley, I wanted it. I wanted it real bad. So, yes: this is a NetGalley freebie but thoughts are my own, of course: what is the point otherwise?So. Everything I Know About Love. That title isn't really a misnomer, not exactly, but it does set you up to think that it's about capital L Love - you know, Carrie Bradshaw's ridiculous, all-consuming, can't-live-without-it Love. But Dolly herself would be the first person to tell you that she has very little experience of that Love, actually. (Pun intended.) Would she like more? Yes. But has she been without love? That's a definite no there, my friend. This book is full of love, in its wild and various guises, but it shines most brightly in Dolly's over-whelming and supportive (but not always healthy) love for her friends, a tight knit group of woman who live with, live for, fight with and fight for each other. I won't lie; I was very jealous. Dolly, her best friend Farley and their extended group of wonderful women have something very special - and Dolly never, ever forgets that. I was eager for this book, you know. I was hungry. And I gulped it all up in three big bites, staying up later than I really should to finish it off. I think the fun here for me was, admittedly, partly because because Dolly and I are both English and close in age. There were many similarities for us, although she is definitely a lot posher. I don't mind saying that I'm a bit older than her, so I did miss some of those cultural things, especially the pure sheer devotion to local MSN - I used it, too, but I talked to people in America who were a little ahead of us here. But there's always interest for me in people who started to come of age as the internet did. (That's probably self-absorbed, but there it is.) And you know how they always say that New York is the fifth character in Sex and the City? Well, if London isn't a main role here, it was definitely a scene-stealing extra, popping up frequently and joyfully. Having lived in London for almost fifteen years now, I feel like the city was beautifully painted, mostly via a vividly ramshackle Camden Town. The reoccurring lists in this book were a real highlight for me. Dolly writes a literal list of what she knows about love at different ages and, my god, if they weren't exactly the lists I would have written at the same times. If they haven't aged and mellowed just like I have. If they haven't sharpened and become less likely to take your bullshit just like I have. They were perfect, truly. And one last thing I wanted to mention: Dolly writes a beautiful meditation on the difference between intensity and intimacy that left me reeling. A crazy, all-consuming relationship she has almost entirely over text which ends in a flurry of drama felt almost rude, the way it was pointing a big finger straight at me. I saw myself there and it made me put my Kindle down, as I was laying in bed next to the love of my life, and think about just that. I have been there, Dolly, I have lived that existence, confusing intimacy and intensity, trying to stretch the fizz of excitement into something more sustainable. But champagne goes flat and what you're left with after the bubbles have gone isn't entirely palatable. I loved it at the time and I'm so glad it's over. Thank you for writing about it so wonderfully, Dolly. Thanks for the wild ride.
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  • Michelle Curie
    January 1, 1970
    Hey world, it's the girl who has spent the last two days glued to the pages of this book. It's not like I didn't know who Dolly Alderton was before, I didn't even know she was somebody you could know. When I received an advanced reader's copy of this from NetGalley, a quick google search put me right.Turns out she's a journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist who also has her own podcast The High Low and now also memoir. In Everything I Know About Love she shares the trials and triumph Hey world, it's the girl who has spent the last two days glued to the pages of this book. It's not like I didn't know who Dolly Alderton was before, I didn't even know she was somebody you could know. When I received an advanced reader's copy of this from NetGalley, a quick google search put me right.Turns out she's a journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist who also has her own podcast The High Low and now also memoir. In Everything I Know About Love she shares the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up with all the falling in love, getting drunk, going on bad dates and getting dumped. Does this ​sound familiar? You might say yes, because it sounds like everyone else's life or you might say because it also sounds like everyone else's memoirs. I've read books like this one before, but not many have managed to grip me from beginning to end like this one has. So what is it that makes Dolly Alderton's stories different?First of all, she can write. Her vignettes are humorous without being obtrusively funny, they're heartbreaking without being manipulatively whiney. At the same time she reflects and observes in a witty and intricate ways and never comes across as preachy - something that I consider my personal memoir pet peeve. But then it's also what she's writing that made this an entertaining read. Part of me was amused about how it brought back my own memories - I had forgotten how MSN used to be the place were the cool kids used to hang out after coming home from school. Though a few years older than me, her student years sounds a lot like the lives' of people I know personally - from being obsessed with male attention to relying on drugs to extend an average night out. What all those (sometimes relatable, sometimes crazy) anecdotes have in common is that they're full of love. Dolly has felt a lot of it, sometimes platonic, sometimes obsessive, not always healthy. What this has taught me though, is that there will never be a point where you'll know everything about love. And how joyful that is.
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  • Lex
    January 1, 1970
    I saw this book everywhere. It sat on my shelf for months because I wasn't quite sure what it was, and then I skimmed the first few pages and ended up reading the whole thing within 24 hours. It's funny and sad, and hopeful and realistic. It has a bit of Louise Rennison about it in the best way. Sobbed big chunky tears and laughed out loud many times. V good!!!!
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 rounded downI'm on the fence with this one - it was light and very readable (even while discussing some heavier topics) and I enjoyed the early 00s nostalgia trip for a bit (yes, we all remember MSN messenger), but overall this felt bloated, self-indulgent and could have been 100 pages shorter. I wasn't a fan of the inclusion of the "recipes" (one was for scrambled egg?!) or fictional satirical emails either.I’ve enjoyed Dolly’s writing in The Sunday Times magazine in the past, but this coll 2.5 rounded downI'm on the fence with this one - it was light and very readable (even while discussing some heavier topics) and I enjoyed the early 00s nostalgia trip for a bit (yes, we all remember MSN messenger), but overall this felt bloated, self-indulgent and could have been 100 pages shorter. I wasn't a fan of the inclusion of the "recipes" (one was for scrambled egg?!) or fictional satirical emails either.I’ve enjoyed Dolly’s writing in The Sunday Times magazine in the past, but this collection of “hilarious” anecdotes of her making poor choices in men and doing drugs/getting drunk while seemingly not learning much left me feeling frustrated. And the conclusion that female friendships are the important thing overall? I didn’t buy it - all of the stories shared throughout the rest of the book didn’t support this conclusion. Only Dolly’s friend Farly comes out of this book looking good!Reading about other people being hungover and self absorbed throughout their 20s (while not doing much else) doesn't make for a fun read, at least for me, anyway. I don't know why so many people in their early 30s are writing memoirs these days - collections of anecdotes that were hilarious (for you) at the time aren’t bringing anything new or insightful to the table for the rest of us.
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  • Joanna
    January 1, 1970
    WELL. I was expecting to like this and thought it would the perfect light summer read. What I actually got was the diary of a someone who came across as the epitome of privilege and entitlement. I don't want to be too mean spirited, but the majority of the book was the author simply 'regaling' us with her totes hilarious exploits, which were not amusing or original - and therein lay the problem. Having a Rod Stewart themed party? Uh, great? Throughout the book, all I kept thinking was YOU'RE UNI WELL. I was expecting to like this and thought it would the perfect light summer read. What I actually got was the diary of a someone who came across as the epitome of privilege and entitlement. I don't want to be too mean spirited, but the majority of the book was the author simply 'regaling' us with her totes hilarious exploits, which were not amusing or original - and therein lay the problem. Having a Rod Stewart themed party? Uh, great? Throughout the book, all I kept thinking was YOU'RE UNIQUE: JUST LIKE EVERYONE ELSE. I got a strong sense of that youthful idea that assumes everything you're doing is radical and groundbreaking and that no-one has ever done it before. Newsflash: people have been doing it all for years. And, reading about someone doing the can-can in a pub and kicking over a tray of glasses just makes me think what a fucking nightmare it must be to be around this person (pity the staff who had to literally pick up the pieces here). I also really felt for her friend, Farly, who just seemed lovely. I thought a lot of Dolly's incredibly childish behaviour towards her was bordering on abusive: passive-aggressive, petty and spiteful and not what anyone should have to contend with from someone who considers themselves to be a friend. On the few occasions when she actually did right by her pal, she then told us in great detail exactly *how* generous/thoughtful/considerate she had been. It felt kind of like when you're not supposed to tell people about charity as it kind of destroys the sentiment behind it. Also: her whole shtick was based around being this total party girl, which you got the sense she knew was covering up other problems in her life, but the ratio of party girl exploits and her being totes random to any actually self-awareness in this area was heavily skewed towards the former, which just served to reinforce unhelpful ideas around this trope. Disappointing.
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  • Georgia
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to Everything I Know About Love on audiobook, mostly during my commute. This was good and bad - good because I hate to not finish books and there's no way I would've finished this if I had to dedicate 100% of my attention to it, as opposed to listening whilst travelling, cleaning etc. However, the bad was that I perhaps would've interpreted it differently in book form. In audio form, I found Dolly frustrating, whiney and self-indulgent where I might have taken the written format more I listened to Everything I Know About Love on audiobook, mostly during my commute. This was good and bad - good because I hate to not finish books and there's no way I would've finished this if I had to dedicate 100% of my attention to it, as opposed to listening whilst travelling, cleaning etc. However, the bad was that I perhaps would've interpreted it differently in book form. In audio form, I found Dolly frustrating, whiney and self-indulgent where I might have taken the written format more light heartedly. I don't want to be too harsh about this memoir because it's ultimately someone's life and that feels wrong. However my low rating was largely due to the awful, selfish attitude Dolly takes to her friendships. I understand the odd pang of envy when friends are getting married and you're far behind, but Dolly seemed to genuinely wish for her friends lives to go wrong just so their attention could be focused on her. Yet when something does go wrong, she swoops in and describes all the things she said and did because she's such a great friend - it came across as incredibly self-indulgent.There was the odd part of this book which made me think and reflect, but mostly I wanted it to end as I was so irritated by it. I didn't find it funny and, at one point, inadvertently groaned and willed it to stop out loud when it went on.. and on.. and on about some unfunny text messages about bins. If you do want to give this book a try, I'd recommend paper form as opposed to audiobook which I imagine makes it more light hearted.
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  • Rahel
    January 1, 1970
    This book has taught me a shocking amount about empathy.Most people who read this I‘m sure will find themselves in every other page and will marvel at how familiar Dolly‘s stories and feelings feel.For me, I kept thinking every couple of pages how much unlike Dolly I am as a person, and how different my problems and mishaps and self-doubts are to hers.And yet with every new page, I found myself feeling more and more close to her, I started genuinely loving her, which seems like such a weird thin This book has taught me a shocking amount about empathy.Most people who read this I‘m sure will find themselves in every other page and will marvel at how familiar Dolly‘s stories and feelings feel.For me, I kept thinking every couple of pages how much unlike Dolly I am as a person, and how different my problems and mishaps and self-doubts are to hers.And yet with every new page, I found myself feeling more and more close to her, I started genuinely loving her, which seems like such a weird thing to say about a real person who I haven‘t even googled and looked at!?In the end, the conclusion she reaches is the thing we fundamentally agree on: my best friends are the most wonderful, awe-inspiring people on this planet and the love they bring is the greatest thing of my life.
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  • Carla
    January 1, 1970
    Com 20% de audiobook pensei em desistir, mas depois melhorou ligeiramente e acabei por levar a audição até ao fim, só para concluir que não é livro para mim. Os assuntos são tratados de uma forma muito "teenager" e eu já não me encontro nesse patamar...
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed it at the start for nostalgia reasons (yes, I remember the modern sound! I remember chatting on MSN!). But after a while, I found it quite repetitive, both of itself (here's another drunk story that I'm officially telling in a disapproving tone but really I'm quite impressed with how mad and fun I am) and just of loads of other writing (let's make fun of excessive hen dos/weddings etc like a million other people, let's talk about being true to yourself and liking yourself first before I enjoyed it at the start for nostalgia reasons (yes, I remember the modern sound! I remember chatting on MSN!). But after a while, I found it quite repetitive, both of itself (here's another drunk story that I'm officially telling in a disapproving tone but really I'm quite impressed with how mad and fun I am) and just of loads of other writing (let's make fun of excessive hen dos/weddings etc like a million other people, let's talk about being true to yourself and liking yourself first before a relationship etc etc). I quite liked the writing about female friendship at the end, and that started to make me try and rethink my impressions, as I think a focus on the love of female friendships is important and interesting. But I think my problem is that this isn't what it actually was - rather it was a focus on her, and she happened to have female friends as her most lasting connection, which felt very different (and it was all a bit 'look at me, I'm such a great friend') . I guess my main problem was that I found her very narcissistic and unlikeable. The tone and writing reminded me a lot of Caitlin Moran who I also find irritating and someone who states the obvious but thinks she's being really incisive.
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  • Booksaremybestfriends
    January 1, 1970
    Hallo ihr Lieben ☺Habt ihr eure große Liebe schon gefunden oder sucht ihr noch? 🙈Dolly Alderton erzählt in ihrem Buch „Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe“ von peinlichen Dates, verkorksten Beziehungen, komischen Partys und ihrer Suche nach dem Mr. Right 👱🏻♂❤Mit einer gehörigen Portion Humor, Selbstironie und treffender Ehrlichkeit erzählt sie von verschiedenen Phasen ihrer Jugend und ihres Erwachsenenlebens und beschreibt Situationen, in denen sich wohl jede und jeder schon einmal befunden hat. Hallo ihr Lieben ☺️Habt ihr eure große Liebe schon gefunden oder sucht ihr noch? 🙈Dolly Alderton erzählt in ihrem Buch „Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe“ von peinlichen Dates, verkorksten Beziehungen, komischen Partys und ihrer Suche nach dem Mr. Right 👱🏻‍♂️❤️Mit einer gehörigen Portion Humor, Selbstironie und treffender Ehrlichkeit erzählt sie von verschiedenen Phasen ihrer Jugend und ihres Erwachsenenlebens und beschreibt Situationen, in denen sich wohl jede und jeder schon einmal befunden hat. Dolly durchlebt nicht nur die romantische Liebe, sondern auch Freundschaft und die Liebe innerhalb der Familie. Verbundenheit, Vertrauen und Verlust stellt sie offen und ehrlich dar. Ich musste gemeinsam mit Dolly lachen, aber auch Tränen verdrücken, denn ich glaube fast jeder kann sich irgendwo mit ihr identifizieren. Erwachsen werden, zu sich selbst finden, sich selbst lieben und manchmal auch hassen gehört zu jedem Leben dazu. „Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe“ ist eine Mischung aus Autobiographie, Coming Up Age Roman und Ratgeber - humorvoll, herzlich und einfach ein Buch für jedermann 😊
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I listen to Dolly’s podcast ‘The High Low’, which I love, so I knew I’d love this book. Being exactly the same age as her, I could relate to so many of her cultural references (especially those about the emergence of the internet into our daily lives and the use of MSN messenger which became pretty obsessive for my peers and I!) and although this was something which really sold the book for me, I imagine they’ll resonate with people a few years younger and older than I, but will be lost on most I listen to Dolly’s podcast ‘The High Low’, which I love, so I knew I’d love this book. Being exactly the same age as her, I could relate to so many of her cultural references (especially those about the emergence of the internet into our daily lives and the use of MSN messenger which became pretty obsessive for my peers and I!) and although this was something which really sold the book for me, I imagine they’ll resonate with people a few years younger and older than I, but will be lost on most others. I enjoyed reading about Dolly’s foray into dating and her short lived relationships (there are too many of parallels with my own life, I’m loathe to admit!), but was a little disappointed with the numerous references to drugs. That being said, this is her story and she’s telling it exactly as it is. Dolly has a fantastic writing style, sharing just enough detail to make you feel you’re living the experience with her, but not overdoing it so that the anecdotes are tedious. On the whole this was a thoroughly enjoyable read and one I’d highly recommend.
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  • Chantal (Every Word A Doorway)
    January 1, 1970
    I pretty much love everything Dolly writes and this was a fun, self-aware, poignant memoir. Nothing revolutionary but recommend if you're in your 20s and need something to help you through or just want a laugh.
  • Simon Pegg
    January 1, 1970
    A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the way
  • Evie Braithwaite
    January 1, 1970
    I just love this woman.Although I adored Dolly already from listening to her podcasts, I wasn’t sure whether I’d be able to connect with her. I’m just embarking on the journey into my twenties, I never went to boarding school and my love life isn’t exactly anything to write home about. However, this was such a heart-warming memoir so full of hope which had me both laughing out loud and tearing up.Everything I Know About Love isn’t restricted to talk of romantic relationships. Rather, Dolly has n I just love this woman.Although I adored Dolly already from listening to her podcasts, I wasn’t sure whether I’d be able to connect with her. I’m just embarking on the journey into my twenties, I never went to boarding school and my love life isn’t exactly anything to write home about. However, this was such a heart-warming memoir so full of hope which had me both laughing out loud and tearing up.Everything I Know About Love isn’t restricted to talk of romantic relationships. Rather, Dolly has navigated an ocean of relationships in her life; partners, friends and, most importantly, the relationship with herself. This is all intertwined with hilarious anecdotes of dreadful dates and drunken antics, but also with moments of profound melancholy. Her chapters satirising the pretentious nature of the likes of hen dos and baby showers were hilarious. Her sarcastic narration of these pages via the audio book only made them even more amusing. Moreover, she hits the nail on the head when discussing feelings of loss and insecurity. Although I’m only starting my adventure into my twenties, I certainly resonate with her expression of having no idea where to start.This is a beautiful love-letter to female friendship and the importance of self-love.
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  • Jessie
    January 1, 1970
    There were parts in there that I really enjoyed and appreciated. I felt like, at times, I really connected with Dolly. The writing style was nice and made for an easy read. However, as the book progressed, I felt - at times - quite annoyed with her character. I find it quite brave to open up about your life in the way she did. It was believable and real and although I didn’t always agree with her, it was interesting to read about someone’s life who went through similar struggles and sometimes de There were parts in there that I really enjoyed and appreciated. I felt like, at times, I really connected with Dolly. The writing style was nice and made for an easy read. However, as the book progressed, I felt - at times - quite annoyed with her character. I find it quite brave to open up about your life in the way she did. It was believable and real and although I didn’t always agree with her, it was interesting to read about someone’s life who went through similar struggles and sometimes dealt with them very differently. If your in your 20’s and your into your popular non-fiction, this is probably a good one for you!
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting concept, I haven't read many memiors but do have a few on my TBR shelf. Once I started this book I wasn't sure what to expect and for a bit I was wanting more description rather than just been told something, but after about 30% the book got more detailed and interesting. I really liked Dolly and her friends were fabulous they all were supportive of her and there for her, which is what you need in a friend. I finishied this book wishing there was more books. I hope Dolly This was an interesting concept, I haven't read many memiors but do have a few on my TBR shelf. Once I started this book I wasn't sure what to expect and for a bit I was wanting more description rather than just been told something, but after about 30% the book got more detailed and interesting. I really liked Dolly and her friends were fabulous they all were supportive of her and there for her, which is what you need in a friend. I finishied this book wishing there was more books. I hope Dolly does write another book. Thanks goes to net galley and the publishers for providing me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lucy Brown
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 - This book made me so appreciative of the friends that I have and the memories that we've made. Witty, fun and wise.5 - Even better the second time round.
  • Astrid
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 Sterne ⭐Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe fühlte sich an wie eine wilde Mischung aus dem Leben von Bridget Jones und Amy Whinehouse. Zumindest stelle ich mir genauso den Querschnitt daraus vor. Dabei sind dies die Memoiren von Dolly Alderton, gerade mal 28, Kolumnistin und Autorin für die britischen Medien. Was weiß also Dolly Alderton in ihren Zwanzigern über die Liebe? Nicht viel, wie sie selbst sagt. All ihre Schlüsse zieht sie aus den langen Freundschaften zu ihren Freundinnen, die se 3.5/5 Sterne ⭐️Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe fühlte sich an wie eine wilde Mischung aus dem Leben von Bridget Jones und Amy Whinehouse. Zumindest stelle ich mir genauso den Querschnitt daraus vor. Dabei sind dies die Memoiren von Dolly Alderton, gerade mal 28, Kolumnistin und Autorin für die britischen Medien. Was weiß also Dolly Alderton in ihren Zwanzigern über die Liebe? Nicht viel, wie sie selbst sagt. All ihre Schlüsse zieht sie aus den langen Freundschaften zu ihren Freundinnen, die seit ihrer Kindheit, Schul- oder Unizeit kennt. Mit denen hat sie mehr Streitereien gehabt, länger zusammen gelebt und mehr um sie gekämpft, als um jeden Mann. Und damit könnte „Alles, was ich weiß über die Liebe“ ein Liebesbrief an eben diese Frauen sein. Denn eigentlich ist es eine gut geschriebene, humorvolle Erzählung über wahre Freundschaften und dem langen, steinigen Weg zur Selbstliebe gesetzt in den 2000ern, so dass man sich selbst zurück versetzt fühlt in die Zeit der eigenen Jugend und der Zeit vor dem guten alten MSN-Messenger, der den Blick in die Welt bot.Doch leider verliert sich Alderton schon sehr schnell in ihren Erzählungen über Alkohol, Drogen, Partys und Sex. Vom ersten Alkohol mit gerade Mal zehn bis zu dem unzähligen One-Night-Stands erleben ihre komplette Jugend mit. Jedoch setzt sie erwachsen sein sehr schnell mit der Freiheit zu trinken, zu vögeln (sorry!) und zu tun, was sie will, gleich und das tut sie auch in einem unerträglichen Ausmaß, dass weit entfernt von einer „rebellischen Teenagerphase“ entfernt ist. Massenhaft Dates, zahllose Sexpartner, Drogendealer auf den Partys, eskalative Abstürze, sowie sinnfreie und teure Taxifahrten quer durch England. Selbst als Dolly nach einem Absturz nicht mehr glaubt, in London zu sein, realisiert sie nicht, wie schlimm es um sie steht. Die Einsicht kommt erst viel später, als sie während eines Urlaubs und eines misslungenen Tinderdates am Tiefpunkt ankommt und sich eine Therapeutin sucht, die leider nicht die Aufmerksamkeit im Buch bekommt, die sie haben sollte. Denn hier sind wir am Knackpunkt: Zwar hinterfragt sie ihr Männer- und Sexverhalten, lässt jedoch den Alkohol- und Drogenkonsum fast außen vor, obwohl es der große Mix des exzessiven Verhaltens ist, der das Problem an sich darstellt. Trotz allem ist es ein ehrlicher Einblick in Dolly Aldertons Leben, in ihre Erinnerungen und ihre Erfahrungen. Witzig geschrieben, wobei ich vermute, dass im englischen Original der ein oder andere Wortwitz mehr zu finden ist. Brutal ehrlich und ein sehr lesenswerter Seelenstriptease, dem an der ein oder anderen Stelle ein bisschen mehr Selbstreflexion gut getan hätte.
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  • Beth Bonini
    January 1, 1970
    My 24 year old daughter bought this book and then she passed it around to all of her flat mates. At the time they were all going through relationship angst and break-ups and I can well imagine how Dolly’s voice was a beacon of light shining through the darkness and confusion. I don’t know if all women my age (51) can remember what it is like to be in their 20s, but I certainly can - and in a weird way, I feel like I am back at that stage again (single again after 25 years of marriage). There isn My 24 year old daughter bought this book and then she passed it around to all of her flat mates. At the time they were all going through relationship angst and break-ups and I can well imagine how Dolly’s voice was a beacon of light shining through the darkness and confusion. I don’t know if all women my age (51) can remember what it is like to be in their 20s, but I certainly can - and in a weird way, I feel like I am back at that stage again (single again after 25 years of marriage). There isn’t the same urgency to find the one that my daughter and her friends seem to feel, but even just the idea of dating again is territory littered with emotional landmines. (On the subject of online dating, Dolly says: “Online dating is for the brave. It’s increasingly hard to meet people in real life and those who take matters into their own hands - who pay a monthly fee for the chance to edge closer to love, who fill out an embarrassing profile saying they’re looking for a special someone to hold hands with in the supermarket - are towering romantic heroes.”)Is a 30 year old journalist really qualified to give life/love advice? I would say yes. Dolly is the first to acknowledge that she has never had a properly long-term relationship with a man, but her long and loving relationship with her best friend Farly (and a large group of other girl friends) is testament to her ability to have sustained intimate relationships. Although ostensibly about the author’s relationships with men, in truth this book is about her relationship with her female friends - and finally, most importantly, herself. I know women twice Dolly’s age who would say that the most profound and intimate relationships of their lives have been with their friends (usually female), and I include myself in that group. One of the most interesting (and mature) chapters in the book details the therapeutic process, and I would say it was just as relevant for someone 50ish as someone who is only 20ish. As for the book itself, it is compulsively readable. It’s funny and poignant, honest and sometimes too raw (truly cringeworthy). As a mother, I couldn’t help but feel glad that Dolly got through her hard-partying years without lasting disaster. She has several ways of organising her maturation process, and one of them is a list (which alters quite a lot) detailing “Everything I Know About Love” at different stages of her growing-up years. There is definitely a ‘millennial’ vibe to certain aspects of the book - for instance, the satirical invitations to various life events - and her experiences are very much London-centric; but having said that, I think there is enough ‘universal’ material to appeal to a wide variety of readers.Note: I read this book as a sort of ‘preparation’ for seeing Dolly interview Nigella Lawson (mostly on the subject of food and cookery, but I do wish that they had also talked about relationships!). Dolly Alderton also writes a column for the Style section of The Sunday Times, and my daughter is a big fan of her podcast The High Low.
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  • Frances
    January 1, 1970
    Other than being blonde British women who were born in the late 80’s, Dolly and I have very little in common (I’m more of a Farley). However, I adored spending time inside her brain reading this book. This is ‘laugh out loud on the bus like a weirdo’ funny and I immediately started boring other people with bits that amused me. It’s not all sunshine and rainbows and you’re not going to agree with all of her choices but it’s just bloody delightful and I would definitely recommend.
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  • Diem
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant!I have spent the last 24 hours nose deep in this book. I was trying to inhale all of Dolly Alderton's words as fast as I could. But I didn't want it to end either. Every single sentence was a joy to read, Alderton is funny and she can write. However, there are a few lines which niggled me because I read them as fat-phobic. I don't think it was intentional, because we've all internalised a load of crap about what is attractive, and what isn't. Alderton also details her relationship with Brilliant!I have spent the last 24 hours nose deep in this book. I was trying to inhale all of Dolly Alderton's words as fast as I could. But I didn't want it to end either. Every single sentence was a joy to read, Alderton is funny and she can write. However, there are a few lines which niggled me because I read them as fat-phobic. I don't think it was intentional, because we've all internalised a load of crap about what is attractive, and what isn't. Alderton also details her relationship with her body, and weight in a chapter that made me clutch the book a bit tighter, desperately hoping for the best. We shouldn't make anyone an 'every woman', because it erases nuances but also what an absolute burden for her. But as I devoured and took a mental note of everything, what surprised me the most was that I, a 20 year old Vietnamese-Australian in Melbourne, saw so much of myself in a 28 year old white woman from London. Reading Everything I Know About Love was like receiving advice from a non-patronising, older and worldly girlfriend. It is is a rollicking, good read and a definite favourite of the year.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    I definitely took some time to warm to this book. For most of the first half, I was thinking, "If I wanted to hear about posh public schoolgirls getting coked out their tits and spending time with nasty men I'd hang about any one of the pubs in St Andrews on a weekday." Luckily, the book finds its feet after Dolly graduates university and gets out of the 'fun but horrifying anecdote' part of her life and into the bit where she has to contend with being a proper adult. I feel like if I were older I definitely took some time to warm to this book. For most of the first half, I was thinking, "If I wanted to hear about posh public schoolgirls getting coked out their tits and spending time with nasty men I'd hang about any one of the pubs in St Andrews on a weekday." Luckily, the book finds its feet after Dolly graduates university and gets out of the 'fun but horrifying anecdote' part of her life and into the bit where she has to contend with being a proper adult. I feel like if I were older I'd be saying 'I wish I had this book when I was in my early twenties' but I actually AM in my early twenties and it, fortunately, gets to be helpful to me now.
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  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Another book that I was disappointed by. This I have decided is because I'm obviously not the right age and by that, I mean that I'm too old and cannot relate with - the casual drug taking, the one-night stands or the desperation to have to be at a party. And what was with the random lists and recipes that were peppered through the book? Was there a point to this? Personally, I felt that this kind of memoir has been done a million times before and much better. I have given this book 1 star on Go Another book that I was disappointed by. This I have decided is because I'm obviously not the right age and by that, I mean that I'm too old and cannot relate with - the casual drug taking, the one-night stands or the desperation to have to be at a party. And what was with the random lists and recipes that were peppered through the book? Was there a point to this? Personally, I felt that this kind of memoir has been done a million times before and much better. I have given this book 1 star on Goodreads. Many thanks to Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kate Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    Adored the easy going writing style of this book. Just flew through it. Wasn’t particularly gripped by every chapter but there were definitely a good few moments that spoke to me. Just fell in love with Dolly as a person and will def read any else she releases. Felt like I was having a chilled conversation with a friend.
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  • Soraya B
    January 1, 1970
    The best damn book I've read this year and I genuinely don't knowwwwww what to do with myself now how can I start something else SEND HELP DOLLY THE QUEEN I LOVE ONE (1) WOMAN
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Books come into our lives at the strangest of times. Some generally just pass me by in an afternoon, put back on the shelf to be forgotten until it’s time to make room for more. Some become automatic favourites and seem to breed in different editions until I have no room left.And some, like Everything I Know About Love, exist on my radar for the longest time but then get slipped quietly into my hands, the bright cheerful cover whispering, ‘Now it is time to read me.’I don’t think I’ve ever read Books come into our lives at the strangest of times. Some generally just pass me by in an afternoon, put back on the shelf to be forgotten until it’s time to make room for more. Some become automatic favourites and seem to breed in different editions until I have no room left.And some, like Everything I Know About Love, exist on my radar for the longest time but then get slipped quietly into my hands, the bright cheerful cover whispering, ‘Now it is time to read me.’I don’t think I’ve ever read anything as vicariously as I did this book. In a total of three hours, comatose on the empty floor of my living room in the one bedroom flat I still think I can afford on a publishing salary, picking at a block of gooey double cream brie, my life became inexplicably entwined with Dolly’s. Her friends became my friends, her sadness became my sadness, her triumphs, her trials and her epiphanies melded into my own. I cried at the loss of a sister I didn’t even know, I laughed at antics that I wasn’t involved in but could picture so clearly as if they were my own. Each chapter was like looking back at my own memories, remembering my own stories.Everything I Know About Love will be one of those I will constantly breathe. Being a single, about to turn thirty so am having a crisis adult myself (what did they call it in the book? Tottenham Court Road and Amazon Prime?), this couldn’t have come at a better time. It was a story I needed to hear. It was words I needed to soak in. As I curled up in bed, drifting off to sleep, it was like Dolly had shined a light into my life, reminding me of how far I’ve come and what lies ahead for me. Somehow, she’d torn me open and made me look at myself, at how similar but not we both are in love, life and friendships. And what that all in fact means. At what is important. Our stories are both so different, but within those three hours of reading time, it was like Dolly was speaking directly to me, and me alone.This is what makes a memoir like Everything I Know so beautiful. There are pieces of this book that every girl, no matter at what age they are, will be able to relate to. It is a book that women will be able to come back to. And I absolutely can’t wait to read whatever Dolly comes out with next.
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  • Chocolaa
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book much more that I thought I would… Dolly's voice is so nice to read, it actually can be read as a fiction book easily. There is a Bridget Jones atmosphere all along, but with a much better ending!
  • Candice
    January 1, 1970
    At first, I really didn't like Dolly. I don't know why, it might be the teen version of herself that I didn't relate to. However, the adult version, I can relate to perfectly.I was a really well written memoir on friendships, love and growing up.
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