Everything I Know About Love
A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the wayWhen it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It's a book about bad dates, good friends and - above all else - about recognising that you and you alone are enough.Glittering, with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton's powerful début weaves together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes, and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age - while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.

Everything I Know About Love Details

TitleEverything I Know About Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir

Everything I Know About Love Review

  • Pip
    January 1, 1970
    Ladies and gentlemen, I have met my new personal hero. I started reading this book and immediately felt like I was cushioned perfectly in cotton wool and marshmallows, covered in fluffy blankets with cherubs singing to me and playing with my hair.In other words - this is genuinely one of the most lovely and funny and heartwarming memoirs I've read in my rather short life so far. I LOVE it more than I could possibly say. I laughed out loud (even on the tube which I find daunting) and cried on and Ladies and gentlemen, I have met my new personal hero. I started reading this book and immediately felt like I was cushioned perfectly in cotton wool and marshmallows, covered in fluffy blankets with cherubs singing to me and playing with my hair.In other words - this is genuinely one of the most lovely and funny and heartwarming memoirs I've read in my rather short life so far. I LOVE it more than I could possibly say. I laughed out loud (even on the tube which I find daunting) and cried on and off throughout as so many of Dolly's words rang true to me.Dating stories are my kryptonite and insights about loss and love I am always, always more than happy to gobble up. I love reading about peoples' experiences with love - romantic love, friendly love, young love, lost love. I WANT IT ALL. I LOVE IT MORE THAN SPRITEWhether you're single/dating/relationshipping/married, I highly recommend this. IT'S DIVINE. New all time favourite!
    more
  • Michelle Curie
    January 1, 1970
    Hey world, it's the girl who has spent the last two days glued to the pages of this book. It's not like I didn't know who Dolly Alderton was before, I didn't even know she was somebody you could know. When I received an advanced reader's copy of this from NetGalley, a quick google search put me right.Turns out she's a journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist who also has her own podcast The High Low and now also memoir. In Everything I Know About Love she shares the trials and triumph Hey world, it's the girl who has spent the last two days glued to the pages of this book. It's not like I didn't know who Dolly Alderton was before, I didn't even know she was somebody you could know. When I received an advanced reader's copy of this from NetGalley, a quick google search put me right.Turns out she's a journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist who also has her own podcast The High Low and now also memoir. In Everything I Know About Love she shares the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up with all the falling in love, getting drunk, going on bad dates and getting dumped. Does this ​sound familiar? You might say yes, because it sounds like everyone else's life or you might say because it also sounds like everyone else's memoirs. I've read books like this one before, but not many have managed to grip me from beginning to end like this one has. So what is it that makes Dolly Alderton's stories different?First of all, she can write. Her vignettes are humorous without being obtrusively funny, they're heartbreaking without being manipulatively whiney. At the same time she reflects and observes in a witty and intricate ways and never comes across as preachy - something that I consider my personal memoir pet peeve. But then it's also what she's writing that made this an entertaining read. Part of me was amused about how it brought back my own memories - I had forgotten how MSN used to be the place were the cool kids used to hang out after coming home from school. Though a few years older than me, her student years sounds a lot like the lives' of people I know personally - from being obsessed with male attention to relying on drugs to extend an average night out. What all those (sometimes relatable, sometimes crazy) anecdotes have in common is that they're full of love. Dolly has felt a lot of it, sometimes platonic, sometimes obsessive, not always healthy. What this has taught me though, is that there will never be a point where you'll know everything about love. And how joyful that is.
    more
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Bloody hell, pals. This book is sweet and silly, smart and serious. I would highly recommend. I don't read an awful lot of auto-biographical stuff but I knew of Dolly already, through her PanDolly and High-Low podcasts with Pandora Sykes and her amusing dating column in the Sunday Times. And when it popped up on NetGalley, I wanted it. I wanted it real bad. So, yes: this is a NetGalley freebie but thoughts are my own, of course: what is the point otherwise?So. Everything I Know About Love. That Bloody hell, pals. This book is sweet and silly, smart and serious. I would highly recommend. I don't read an awful lot of auto-biographical stuff but I knew of Dolly already, through her PanDolly and High-Low podcasts with Pandora Sykes and her amusing dating column in the Sunday Times. And when it popped up on NetGalley, I wanted it. I wanted it real bad. So, yes: this is a NetGalley freebie but thoughts are my own, of course: what is the point otherwise?So. Everything I Know About Love. That title isn't really a misnomer, not exactly, but it does set you up to think that it's about capital L Love - you know, Carrie Bradshaw's ridiculous, all-consuming, can't-live-without-it Love. But Dolly herself would be the first person to tell you that she has very little experience of that Love, actually. (Pun intended.) Would she like more? Yes. But has she been without love? That's a definite no there, my friend. This book is full of love, in its wild and various guises, but it shines most brightly in Dolly's over-whelming and supportive (but not always healthy) love for her friends, a tight knit group of woman who live with, live for, fight with and fight for each other. I won't lie; I was very jealous. Dolly, her best friend Farley and their extended group of wonderful women have something very special - and Dolly never, ever forgets that. I was eager for this book, you know. I was hungry. And I gulped it all up in three big bites, staying up later than I really should to finish it off. I think the fun here for me was, admittedly, partly because because Dolly and I are both English and close in age. There were many similarities for us, although she is definitely a lot posher. I don't mind saying that I'm a bit older than her, so I did miss some of those cultural things, especially the pure sheer devotion to local MSN - I used it, too, but I talked to people in America who were a little ahead of us here. But there's always interest for me in people who started to come of age as the internet did. (That's probably self-absorbed, but there it is.) And you know how they always say that New York is the fifth character in Sex and the City? Well, if London isn't a main role here, it was definitely a scene-stealing extra, popping up frequently and joyfully. Having lived in London for almost fifteen years now, I feel like the city was beautifully painted, mostly via a vividly ramshackle Camden Town. The reoccurring lists in this book were a real highlight for me. Dolly writes a literal list of what she knows about love at different ages and, my god, if they weren't exactly the lists I would have written at the same times. If they haven't aged and mellowed just like I have. If they haven't sharpened and become less likely to take your bullshit just like I have. They were perfect, truly. And one last thing I wanted to mention: Dolly writes a beautiful meditation on the difference between intensity and intimacy that left me reeling. A crazy, all-consuming relationship she has almost entirely over text which ends in a flurry of drama felt almost rude, the way it was pointing a big finger straight at me. I saw myself there and it made me put my Kindle down, as I was laying in bed next to the love of my life, and think about just that. I have been there, Dolly, I have lived that existence, confusing intimacy and intensity, trying to stretch the fizz of excitement into something more sustainable. But champagne goes flat and what you're left with after the bubbles have gone isn't entirely palatable. I loved it at the time and I'm so glad it's over. Thank you for writing about it so wonderfully, Dolly. Thanks for the wild ride.
    more
  • Rahel
    January 1, 1970
    This book has taught me a shocking amount about empathy.Most people who read this I‘m sure will find themselves in every other page and will marvel at how familiar Dolly‘s stories and feelings feel.For me, I kept thinking every couple of pages how much unlike Dolly I am as a person, and how different my problems and mishaps and self-doubts are to hers.And yet with every new page, I found myself feeling more and more close to her, I started genuinely loving her, which seems like such a weird thin This book has taught me a shocking amount about empathy.Most people who read this I‘m sure will find themselves in every other page and will marvel at how familiar Dolly‘s stories and feelings feel.For me, I kept thinking every couple of pages how much unlike Dolly I am as a person, and how different my problems and mishaps and self-doubts are to hers.And yet with every new page, I found myself feeling more and more close to her, I started genuinely loving her, which seems like such a weird thing to say about a real person who I haven‘t even googled and looked at!?In the end, the conclusion she reaches is the thing we fundamentally agree on: my best friends are the most wonderful, awe-inspiring people on this planet and the love they bring is the greatest thing of my life.
    more
  • Simon Pegg
    January 1, 1970
    A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the way
  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting concept, I haven't read many memiors but do have a few on my TBR shelf. Once I started this book I wasn't sure what to expect and for a bit I was wanting more description rather than just been told something, but after about 30% the book got more detailed and interesting. I really liked Dolly and her friends were fabulous they all were supportive of her and there for her, which is what you need in a friend. I finishied this book wishing there was more books. I hope Dolly This was an interesting concept, I haven't read many memiors but do have a few on my TBR shelf. Once I started this book I wasn't sure what to expect and for a bit I was wanting more description rather than just been told something, but after about 30% the book got more detailed and interesting. I really liked Dolly and her friends were fabulous they all were supportive of her and there for her, which is what you need in a friend. I finishied this book wishing there was more books. I hope Dolly does write another book. Thanks goes to net galley and the publishers for providing me a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I listen to Dolly’s podcast ‘The High Low’, which I love, so I knew I’d love this book. Being exactly the same age as her, I could relate to so many of her cultural references (especially those about the emergence of the internet into our daily lives and the use of MSN messenger which became pretty obsessive for my peers and I!) and although this was something which really sold the book for me, I imagine they’ll resonate with people a few years younger and older than I, but will be lost on most I listen to Dolly’s podcast ‘The High Low’, which I love, so I knew I’d love this book. Being exactly the same age as her, I could relate to so many of her cultural references (especially those about the emergence of the internet into our daily lives and the use of MSN messenger which became pretty obsessive for my peers and I!) and although this was something which really sold the book for me, I imagine they’ll resonate with people a few years younger and older than I, but will be lost on most others. I enjoyed reading about Dolly’s foray into dating and her short lived relationships (there are too many of parallels with my own life, I’m loathe to admit!), but was a little disappointed with the numerous references to drugs. That being said, this is her story and she’s telling it exactly as it is. Dolly has a fantastic writing style, sharing just enough detail to make you feel you’re living the experience with her, but not overdoing it so that the anecdotes are tedious. On the whole this was a thoroughly enjoyable read and one I’d highly recommend.
    more
  • Soraya B
    January 1, 1970
    The best damn book I've read this year and I genuinely don't knowwwwww what to do with myself now how can I start something else SEND HELP DOLLY THE QUEEN I LOVE ONE (1) WOMAN
  • Lucy Brown
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 - This book made me so appreciative of the friends that I have and the memories that we've made. Witty, fun and wise.
  • Chocolaa
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book much more that I thought I would… Dolly's voice is so nice to read, it actually can be read as a fiction book easily. There is a Bridget Jones atmosphere all along, but with a much better ending!
  • Ferb
    January 1, 1970
    A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the way
  • Georgia
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to Everything I Know About Love on audiobook, mostly during my commute. This was good and bad - good because I hate to not finish books and there's no way I would've finished this if I had to dedicate 100% of my attention to it, as opposed to listening whilst travelling, cleaning etc. However, the bad was that I perhaps would've interpreted it differently in book form. In audio form, I found Dolly frustrating, whiney and self-indulgent where I might have taken the written format more I listened to Everything I Know About Love on audiobook, mostly during my commute. This was good and bad - good because I hate to not finish books and there's no way I would've finished this if I had to dedicate 100% of my attention to it, as opposed to listening whilst travelling, cleaning etc. However, the bad was that I perhaps would've interpreted it differently in book form. In audio form, I found Dolly frustrating, whiney and self-indulgent where I might have taken the written format more light heartedly. I don't want to be too harsh about this memoir because it's ultimately someone's life and that feels wrong. However my low rating was largely due to the awful, selfish attitude Dolly takes to her friendships. I understand the odd pang of envy when friends are getting married and you're far behind, but Dolly seemed to genuinely wish for her friends lives to go wrong just so their attention could be focused on her. Yet when something does go wrong, she swoops in and describes all the things she said and did because she's such a great friend - it came across as incredibly self-indulgent.There was the odd part of this book which made me think and reflect, but mostly I wanted it to end as I was so irritated by it. I didn't find it funny and, at one point, inadvertently groaned and willed it to stop out loud when it went on.. and on.. and on about some unfunny text messages about bins. If you do want to give this book a try, I'd recommend paper form as opposed to audiobook which I imagine makes it more light hearted.
    more
  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Another book that I was disappointed by. This I have decided is because I'm obviously not the right age and by that, I mean that I'm too old and cannot relate with - the casual drug taking, the one-night stands or the desperation to have to be at a party. And what was with the random lists and recipes that were peppered through the book? Was there a point to this? Personally, I felt that this kind of memoir has been done a million times before and much better. I have given this book 1 star on Go Another book that I was disappointed by. This I have decided is because I'm obviously not the right age and by that, I mean that I'm too old and cannot relate with - the casual drug taking, the one-night stands or the desperation to have to be at a party. And what was with the random lists and recipes that were peppered through the book? Was there a point to this? Personally, I felt that this kind of memoir has been done a million times before and much better. I have given this book 1 star on Goodreads. Many thanks to Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Natalie Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I felt a real connection to this book - aspects of my childhood and teenage years were so similar to Alderton’s. She describes the rollercoaster ride of university that really would be impossible without the insanely close female friendships that you forge. And I felt in awe of her writing the entire way through. I think I’ve read this at the perfect time.
    more
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I rarely read books at the right time in my life and this was simply brilliant. I’ll be recommending this to everyone I know for the next decade and can’t really put into words how much I enjoyed it.
  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    thoroughly enjoyed every word
  • Diem
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant!I have spent the last 24 hours nose deep in this book. I was trying to inhale all of Dolly Alderton's words as fast as I could. But I didn't want it to end either. Every single sentence was a joy to read, Alderton is funny and she can write. However, there are a few lines which niggled me because I read them as fat-phobic. I don't think it was intentional, because we've all internalised a load of crap about what is attractive, and what isn't. Alderton also details her relationship with Brilliant!I have spent the last 24 hours nose deep in this book. I was trying to inhale all of Dolly Alderton's words as fast as I could. But I didn't want it to end either. Every single sentence was a joy to read, Alderton is funny and she can write. However, there are a few lines which niggled me because I read them as fat-phobic. I don't think it was intentional, because we've all internalised a load of crap about what is attractive, and what isn't. Alderton also details her relationship with her body, and weight in a chapter that made me clutch the book a bit tighter, desperately hoping for the best. We shouldn't make anyone an 'every woman', because it erases nuances but also what an absolute burden for her. But as I devoured and took a mental note of everything, what surprised me the most was that I, a 20 year old Vietnamese-Australian in Melbourne, saw so much of myself in a 28 year old white woman from London. Reading Everything I Know About Love was like receiving advice from a non-patronising, older and worldly girlfriend. It is is a rollicking, good read and a definite favourite of the year.
    more
  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars- I didn't know anything about Dolly Alderton going into this book, in fact i'd never even heard of her until I heard people raving about this memoir. I am so glad that I decided to pick this up despite that as I just adored it! Memoirs are very hit and miss reads for me, but this one grabbed my attention and I read through it so quickly switching between the audio and physical versions. Everything I know about Love is essentially a book all about growing up, falling in love, finding yo 4.5 stars- I didn't know anything about Dolly Alderton going into this book, in fact i'd never even heard of her until I heard people raving about this memoir. I am so glad that I decided to pick this up despite that as I just adored it! Memoirs are very hit and miss reads for me, but this one grabbed my attention and I read through it so quickly switching between the audio and physical versions. Everything I know about Love is essentially a book all about growing up, falling in love, finding yourself and all the trouble that comes in between. It was funny, heart breaking but most of all, it was relatable. I love how it brought back memories for me. For example, the MSN section which reminded me so much of being in my early teens rushing home to chat with my friends which made me laugh out loud as I reminisced. Then there were also sections, such as that about food and weight loss, where I felt myself connecting so immensely to what Dolly was talking about in a way that made my heart hurt to remember. It was just so real. I don't even know how to describe exactly what it was I loved about this, but I honestly feel like I just read this at the perfect time in my life.
    more
  • Cait Flanders
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't love this book, at first. Even 200 pages in, I still didn't love it. But the reason I didn't love it had less to do with the book (the writing is very engaging, which is why I kept reading) and more to do with the fact that I saw way too much of myself in it. Dolly's description of her drinking/dating life in her twenties is eerily similar to mine. I kept wanting to shout, "stop hanging out with these loser men!" but then realized I never used to give myself that same advice. I wanted b I didn't love this book, at first. Even 200 pages in, I still didn't love it. But the reason I didn't love it had less to do with the book (the writing is very engaging, which is why I kept reading) and more to do with the fact that I saw way too much of myself in it. Dolly's description of her drinking/dating life in her twenties is eerily similar to mine. I kept wanting to shout, "stop hanging out with these loser men!" but then realized I never used to give myself that same advice. I wanted better for her... and then she did better for herself. The end was the telling of a true love story, but not the one you'll assume it might be about.
    more
  • Jessica Kennedy
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book so deeply and whole-heartedly. The moment I realised it wasn't really about the kind of love I'd initially thought it was, I fell hard for it. I will now spend the rest of my evening crying alone as I think about what beautiful people my friends are. As you were.P.S. This book was recommended to me by more people than any I can remember. They were all right.
    more
  • Elaine Mullane
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up Dolly Alderton's debut, Everything I Know About Love, for a light read in between some heavier novels (I'm still thinking about you, Jude St. Francis). I breezed through this enjoyable collection of stories which covers roughly the last decade of Alterton's life.Our author tells us about her childhood in the London subarbs and recounts the trials and tribulations of her teenage life during MSN's reign, before taking us on to university where she was introduced to some of her closest I picked up Dolly Alderton's debut, Everything I Know About Love, for a light read in between some heavier novels (I'm still thinking about you, Jude St. Francis). I breezed through this enjoyable collection of stories which covers roughly the last decade of Alterton's life.Our author tells us about her childhood in the London subarbs and recounts the trials and tribulations of her teenage life during MSN's reign, before taking us on to university where she was introduced to some of her closest lifelong friends, many of whom are brought to life here.At first I thought I couldn't relate to Alderton's tales: they seemed to be all on the very wild side of what you would call enjoying your 20s. There are drugs, one night stands, heavy partying, a lot of alcohol consumption and the worrying situations it can get you in to. Alderton seemed, in her youth, to suffer from a lack of guidance and at times I wondered where the story was going. But there's something else here; something warmer and insightful. There were times when I didn't like the author, finding her behaviour selfish and immature, but her ability to look inward and reflect on her behaviour drew me back in. Just when I thought I was going to dislike this book because of an unlikable narrator, Alderton's self-awareness saved her.What might surprise you about this book, is that it's not actually really about men. There are, of course, stories about first dates, blind dates, disastrous dates and great dates but, really, this is a book about female friendship. A tribute to it, if you will. It is about making friends, growing up with friends, living with them, sticking by them, and dealing with changes in the terms of reference of friendships. There are some very touching stories here, particularly in relation to Alderton's friendship with her very best friend, Farly. There are hilarious commentaries on hen nights, wedding invitations and baby showers, all poking fun at how people and friendships change as people begin to 'settle down', leaving the eternal singletons to feel inadequate and financially stretched from the constant gifting process attached to your female friend beginning a new stage in her life with a man. There are breakups, disappointments and even death, and everything is handled with a brave and unapologetic honesty that Alderton really should be commended for.As a millennial myself (just about), I could relate to the needless drama you experience (and create!) in your 20s. I know what it is to experience loss, to grapple with change, to say goodbye to particular times in your life, to comforts and to people. I've struggled to make friendships work and to admit to myself when they are over; when to hold on and when to let go. I know what it is like to feel like you are not good enough; to feel like you have to people-please your way through friendships and life in the hope of feeling accepted and validated. Alderton captures this dilemma so adequately and offers this advice: look inside yourself; find a home within yourself. Stop looking outside yourself, to other people for your worth. We (you) are enough. This debut has both humour and heart. It is about the highs and the lows, the order and the mess, the light and the dark. It is both tender and rugged, simple and complicated. It will resonate with women of all ages but will really hit home for millenials living in London. A charming collection of anecdotes and observations about navigating your way through life and friendship, with all its twists, turns and bumps. 3.5 stars.
    more
  • Claire Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect 5 star read from me - one of the best, honest, moving reads of 2018 so far. Cant stop shouting about this one from the rooftops
  • Sara Oxton
    January 1, 1970
    Everything I know about Love by Dolly Alderton a witty and honest five-star read. I thought this book was so funny, I’m a woman of a certain age so a lot of the cultural references were so funny to me, but I really do think even if you were a different age or genre you would get this book, you may not get all the references but the writing is so good you will be sucked in and some may go over your head but some will make you chuckle. Just be warned if you are a woman of a certain age, be mindful Everything I know about Love by Dolly Alderton a witty and honest five-star read. I thought this book was so funny, I’m a woman of a certain age so a lot of the cultural references were so funny to me, but I really do think even if you were a different age or genre you would get this book, you may not get all the references but the writing is so good you will be sucked in and some may go over your head but some will make you chuckle. Just be warned if you are a woman of a certain age, be mindful you may leak if you laugh to hard. (There’s a real possibility with this book)This is a book about relationships, but the variety of relationships keeps it interesting and fresh and so funny you won’t be able to put it down. I will definitely be looking out for Dolly in her other lives, I can’t wait to read more of her funny and honest heart-warming stories.
    more
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Book reviews on www.snazzybooks.com.Everything I Know About Love is one of those books that completely drew me in because, being almost the same age as Dolly, I remember these things affecting me as I grew up - from MSN to the growing popularity in online dating, and everything else that so affected us 'millennials' when growing up.I have to be honest, I wasn't really aware of Dolly Alderton before reading this, so I was coming at it as a rather ignorant reader, but turns out you in no way need Book reviews on www.snazzybooks.com.Everything I Know About Love is one of those books that completely drew me in because, being almost the same age as Dolly, I remember these things affecting me as I grew up - from MSN to the growing popularity in online dating, and everything else that so affected us 'millennials' when growing up.I have to be honest, I wasn't really aware of Dolly Alderton before reading this, so I was coming at it as a rather ignorant reader, but turns out you in no way need to know background info the enjoy this. Sure, people who know of her or have read her column/ listened to her podcast might enjoy it even more as they can find out more about her, but it's not at all essential to the enjoyment!The observations about life are interesting and fun to reads about, and Dolly has an engaging and very frank way of writing - she's honest about her life and mistakes, and you feel that you're getting to know her. It made a lovely break from the many crime novels I've been reading recently.Dolly's writing is incredibly easy to read, humorous without being too 'try hard' and it contains lots of feel good messages, again without trying too hard to be a 'feel good' or 'preachy' book. There are highs and lows, dark and happy moments, and lots of entertaining situations. I raced through this and would definitely recommend this.Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy of this novel on which I chose to write an honest and unbiased review.
    more
  • Victoria Highfield
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic memoir that will resonate with any young woman today. I found myself nodding along and laughing to Dolly's experiences as if she was sitting opposite me, glass of discounted prosecco in hand. As Dolly would say, it is the tipple of the bloody decade after all! From her love affair with dial up internet as a teenager to disastrous tinder dates as a single London gal, she takes you on a rollercoaster ride of womanhood that is completely relatable.I had expected the book to provide me w A fantastic memoir that will resonate with any young woman today. I found myself nodding along and laughing to Dolly's experiences as if she was sitting opposite me, glass of discounted prosecco in hand. As Dolly would say, it is the tipple of the bloody decade after all! From her love affair with dial up internet as a teenager to disastrous tinder dates as a single London gal, she takes you on a rollercoaster ride of womanhood that is completely relatable.I had expected the book to provide me with lots of laughs as I know how naturally witty Dolly is from her Podcast that she co-hosts with fellow journo Pandora Sykes, however what I wasn't prepared for was how deeply moving some parts of the book were. Dolly writes beautifully about the tragic loss of her best friend Farly's younger sister Florence to leukaemia and the love she has for both her friend and family seep through the pages like honey. The latter is the main crux of the book: Dolly may not have much experience of having a serious relationship with a partner however we can all learn something from her on how devoted she is to her friends. A touching read that talks about the importance of friendship and loving yourself.
    more
  • Lois Shafier
    January 1, 1970
    After months of being told that I'd LOVE The High Low and Pandora/Dolly's 'young women in London' ideals, I thought I'd listen to the recommendations from my friends and give it a go. I listened to the podcast which I thoroughly enjoy and thought it'd be wise to pick up Everything I Know About Love.Reading about Dolly's despair on the coming out of pop star Will Young transported me back to my own person 13-year old heartbreak when I heard the same news on the radio. Instantly, I felt comforted After months of being told that I'd LOVE The High Low and Pandora/Dolly's 'young women in London' ideals, I thought I'd listen to the recommendations from my friends and give it a go. I listened to the podcast which I thoroughly enjoy and thought it'd be wise to pick up Everything I Know About Love.Reading about Dolly's despair on the coming out of pop star Will Young transported me back to my own person 13-year old heartbreak when I heard the same news on the radio. Instantly, I felt comforted by nostalgia and knew I was going to really enjoy reading. I found the autobiography incredibly addictive: relating to many of Dolly's accounts of drunken nights out, mishaps and ambiguity about the world around her. Her 'breakthrough' in the last few chapters seriously inspired me. To value myself, warts and all, and to appreciate everything I already know, own and have, whilst knowing that there is so much to still explore. Women under 30 - READ THIS BOOK.
    more
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    I tried to read this book three times and I’m not going to give it yet another chance. I stopped reading around page 180, but I just can’t finish it. I struggle empathising with someone who just messes her life up. I don’t mean to be judgemental or anything, I happen to like Dolly Alderton, or I like her insight on things, more exactly. I think this is because of where I come from, but I cannot read about drugs and heavy-drinking and think that’s alright. It’s not. In fiction, I’m okay with it b I tried to read this book three times and I’m not going to give it yet another chance. I stopped reading around page 180, but I just can’t finish it. I struggle empathising with someone who just messes her life up. I don’t mean to be judgemental or anything, I happen to like Dolly Alderton, or I like her insight on things, more exactly. I think this is because of where I come from, but I cannot read about drugs and heavy-drinking and think that’s alright. It’s not. In fiction, I’m okay with it because there is a lesson to be learnt in general. But I can’t read about somebody’s life and just accept the mess it is. This is obviously a very personal opinion.
    more
  • Emma Holbrook
    January 1, 1970
    This was a tough read, which is an absurd thing to say about a book I read in 2 days, and yet! Initially, it's hard to see the frivolous anecdotes of drunken debauchery as anything other than self-indulgence, until - just like getting to know anyone - you begin to understand why. You're soon rewarded with a witty, warm and refreshingly honest gem that is particularly on the money when it comes to grief, people-pleasing, the joy of female friendships and the endless pursuit of a sense of self. A This was a tough read, which is an absurd thing to say about a book I read in 2 days, and yet! Initially, it's hard to see the frivolous anecdotes of drunken debauchery as anything other than self-indulgence, until - just like getting to know anyone - you begin to understand why. You're soon rewarded with a witty, warm and refreshingly honest gem that is particularly on the money when it comes to grief, people-pleasing, the joy of female friendships and the endless pursuit of a sense of self. A book to stick around for.
    more
  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    Where do I even begin being able to convey all the humour, heartbreak and love that are encapsulated in this novel?! I was lucky enough during my work experience at Penguin to attend the press launch for ‘Everything I Know about Love’ and meet Dolly and her best friend Farly who features an awful lot in the book. I had actually never heard of Dolly before the start of my placement as I don’t really listen to podcasts or read magazines (which are the platforms she usually uses).The book itself is Where do I even begin being able to convey all the humour, heartbreak and love that are encapsulated in this novel?! I was lucky enough during my work experience at Penguin to attend the press launch for ‘Everything I Know about Love’ and meet Dolly and her best friend Farly who features an awful lot in the book. I had actually never heard of Dolly before the start of my placement as I don’t really listen to podcasts or read magazines (which are the platforms she usually uses).The book itself is one hell of a read. Dolly Alderton has such a way with words that she manages to make you laugh out loud (which I don’t usually do while reading) before turning the page and bursting into tears! Dolly’s writing itself is very endearing and heartfelt but also immensely sincere. Not only is her book humorous, it is filled with insightful commentaries on people around her, witty cultural references and genuine raw emotion whether it be about love or loss.
    more
  • Katey Lovell
    January 1, 1970
    I first became aware of Dolly Alderton's memoir through listening to The High Low podcast (highly recommended) and my interest was piqued when it became clear the 'love' referred to in the title encompassed friendships as well as romantic love, lust alongside familial relationships. A gorgeously honest book which had me hooked from the off, Everything I Know about Love explores what it is to be human. A must-read.
    more
Write a review