Dawn and the Impossible Three
Dawn Schafer is the newest member of The Baby-sitters Club. While she's still adjusting to life in Stoneybrook after moving from sunny California, she's eager to accept her first big job. But taking care of the three Barrett kids would be too much for any baby-sitter. The house is always a mess, the kids are out of control, and Mrs. Barrett never does any of the things she promises. On top of all that, Dawn wants to fit in with the other members of the BSC, but she can't figure out how to get along with Kristy. Was joining The Baby-sitters Club a mistake?

Dawn and the Impossible Three Details

TitleDawn and the Impossible Three
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherGraphix
ISBN-139781338067118
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Childrens, Middle Grade, Comics, Fiction

Dawn and the Impossible Three Review

  • Shira
    January 1, 1970
    kids won't notice that this isn't by telgemeier and will still love it. as a bsc lover and purist, though, I was a little confused by this book. for some reason they decided to combine Dawn and the Impossible Three with Hello, Mallory. both of those books have enough action and enough that is compelling that they merit their own books. the big problem with including aspects of hello, mallory in this book is that they completely ignore the jessi parts of that story. I know that taking jessi out kids won't notice that this isn't by telgemeier and will still love it. as a bsc lover and purist, though, I was a little confused by this book. for some reason they decided to combine Dawn and the Impossible Three with Hello, Mallory. both of those books have enough action and enough that is compelling that they merit their own books. the big problem with including aspects of hello, mallory in this book is that they completely ignore the jessi parts of that story. I know that taking jessi out makes the hello, mallory story short enough to fit into this book, but it just feels like taking out a character of color in this vastly predominantly white book.edit, after meeting and chatting with gale galligan about this book...since raina telgemeier hinted at mal joining the bsc in the previous book, scholastic thought that plotline should be incorporated into this book. scholastic and galligan are working on the best way to introduce jessi in a way that is thoughtful and sensitive (and not just give her the crappy first plotline she got in the original bsc series, where basically all her neighbors were super racist to her family, because it was the 80s and writers thought that all black character storylines had to be about that). I trust they'll do a good job!
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  • Kris - My Novelesque Life
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 4 STARS(Review Not on Blog) As a kid I LOVED the Baby-Sitters Club and would often spend hours scouring the library for the next title. Honestly, I probably read the series longer than I should have (reading level-wise), but it always felt like visiting friends. While I have never wanted to be a babysitter, I loved the club idea. As a bossy creative kid this was right up my alley. The friendships in this book was something I had always wanted. This was a series I grew up with and was my RATING: 4 STARS(Review Not on Blog) As a kid I LOVED the Baby-Sitters Club and would often spend hours scouring the library for the next title. Honestly, I probably read the series longer than I should have (reading level-wise), but it always felt like visiting friends. While I have never wanted to be a babysitter, I loved the club idea. As a bossy creative kid this was right up my alley. The friendships in this book was something I had always wanted. This was a series I grew up with and was my favourite for a long time. Confession time, I may have had a bit of a crush on Logan. I was working at the library and saw that this graphic novel come in while I checked material in. I was excited to see that Baby-Sitters Club was being introduced to another generation. I thumbed through the book and saw this was the same story with a few updates. While usually I am not a fan of updating original stories (as it gives us the time and place when something was first written), I was okay with this series being updated. Moving this novelized book into a graphic novel made it easier to accept new changes. I would definitely recommend this one to those who once enjoyed reading BSC in the past. This is also great read for young girls between 9-12. Another great instalment in the series - this time we get more about Dawn and how she comes to terms with three out of control kids.
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Yay! The graphic novel adaptations of the Baby-Sitters Club series continue with a new comic artist, Gale Galligan. She has a very similar style as Telgemeier's (and worked as a production assistant on Telgemeier's DRAMA) and kids will love her adaptations, too. Put this on your radar because kids will want it! (Coming in Sept.)
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  • Kayla (BOOKadoodles)
    January 1, 1970
    [4.5 stars] Really enjoyed the variety of panel work throughout this installment, as well as the use of inner monologue segments--I also appreciated how the story dipped into heavier topics. Hope Scholastic keeps producing these adaptations forever tbh.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so sad that I’ve finished this series for now - until the July release. I have been enjoying this series so much. The girls are responsible and deal with some serious issues. I will admit I don’t like Gale’s art quite as much as Raina’s, but this was still really cute and I can’t wait to read the next one.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Another winner in the Baby-Sitters Graphic evolution, however, they switched artists for this one. This book was translated into graphics by Gale Galligan, and while I liked the newer artwork, my son said he preferred Raina Telgemeier because her art is "more cartoony." To each their own, right?Again, this book touches on some pretty serious stuff. A negligent mother going through a rough divorce. A baby-sitting charge goes missing, and the usual, Kristy is feeling left out because when her mom Another winner in the Baby-Sitters Graphic evolution, however, they switched artists for this one. This book was translated into graphics by Gale Galligan, and while I liked the newer artwork, my son said he preferred Raina Telgemeier because her art is "more cartoony." To each their own, right?Again, this book touches on some pretty serious stuff. A negligent mother going through a rough divorce. A baby-sitting charge goes missing, and the usual, Kristy is feeling left out because when her mom marries Watson, she's going to have to move to the "rich neighborhood." Meanwhile, Dawn and Mary Anne are becoming closer friends as their parents' relationship blossoms. It's never a slow day in Stonybrook, CT. To be continued...
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  • Sylwia (Wish Fulfillment)
    January 1, 1970
    It was great to see the characters and how their individual stories are progressing, along with how their friendships are growing and changing. And just like in the other books in the series, the girls have to tackle some heavy stuff. This volume highlighted the dangers of babysitting and I appreciated how it discussed the difference between babysitting and parenting. This series doesn't get enough hype!
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  • Alice Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Cute!
  • Maggie Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    If you were worried about the switch in artists for this series, I have to say that Gale Galligan makes an excellent replacement with art that is full of energy! I am still enjoying the subtle changes to the stories to make them fit in 2017. This particular volume about Dawn was an excellent story about fostering resilience and maturity in younger girls. Dawn found herself in a difficult situation with a new babysitting job, and she had to take on a lot of responsibilities that were unfair. Not If you were worried about the switch in artists for this series, I have to say that Gale Galligan makes an excellent replacement with art that is full of energy! I am still enjoying the subtle changes to the stories to make them fit in 2017. This particular volume about Dawn was an excellent story about fostering resilience and maturity in younger girls. Dawn found herself in a difficult situation with a new babysitting job, and she had to take on a lot of responsibilities that were unfair. Not only did she rise to the occasion, she was able to stand up for herself and say that these things were not okay to an adult! I appreciated that the book dealt with the idea that adults make mistakes and are not always right without requiring Dawn to take on adult responsibilities forever. A fun, short read that's great for tweens!
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  • Manasi
    January 1, 1970
    dawn baby sits for the barrettes and they are impossible to baby sit. mary anne gets to redecorate her own room and she hasn't changed her room since she was two years old. and mary anne now gets to do her hair how she likes it. and if mary anne's father gets married to dawn mother dawn and mary anne will become step sisters. and mallory pike is a new member of the baby sitters club!
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  • Stephanie Tournas
    January 1, 1970
    Those who adore the Babysitters Club graphic novels have something to cheer about: a fifth title in this ever popular series. Dawn, the newest member of the club, accepts a job babysitting at the Barrett's, where the kids are off the wall and the place is a mess. Dawn has to decide how to talk to Mrs. Barrett about the mayhem. She also has to contend with an increasingly grumpy Kristy, who is president of the club. Although the four previous books in the series were written and illustrated by Those who adore the Babysitters Club graphic novels have something to cheer about: a fifth title in this ever popular series. Dawn, the newest member of the club, accepts a job babysitting at the Barrett's, where the kids are off the wall and the place is a mess. Dawn has to decide how to talk to Mrs. Barrett about the mayhem. She also has to contend with an increasingly grumpy Kristy, who is president of the club. Although the four previous books in the series were written and illustrated by superstar Raina Telgemeier, Gale Galligan does a great job of portraying the drama and challenges of the girls in the club, and her wonderful illustrations seem very close to those in the previous four books.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    This was my favorite of the first group of books in the original series. It was lovely to revisit it in a new form, but I much preferred the images of them on the original covers to the graphic novel versions. Still, if it's this or not reading the series at all, certainly a young person should read this. The charm is retained and my love of Dawn remains.
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Professional Review written for WASHYARG:Dawn is one of the newest members of The Babysitter’s Club, and she’s still trying to prove her worth. For some reason, the club’s founder and president, Kristy, doesn’t seem to like her that much. To make matters worse, Dawn has started to babysit for the Barrett’s. The kids themselves are wild enough – but their mom is the real problem. In this fifth installment of the Baby-Sitter’s Club graphic novel series, cartoonist Gale Galligan gracefully takes Professional Review written for WASHYARG:Dawn is one of the newest members of The Babysitter’s Club, and she’s still trying to prove her worth. For some reason, the club’s founder and president, Kristy, doesn’t seem to like her that much. To make matters worse, Dawn has started to babysit for the Barrett’s. The kids themselves are wild enough – but their mom is the real problem. In this fifth installment of the Baby-Sitter’s Club graphic novel series, cartoonist Gale Galligan gracefully takes over for Raina Telgemeier. Her art style holds its own, but won’t distract or disappoint lovers of the original four books. The story itself has surprising depth. Dawn struggles with standing up for herself when the mother of her babysitting charges is neglectful to the point of danger (at one point, Dawn almost feeds one of the kids chocolate without knowing they are allergic). Her eventual ability to face this complicated conundrum is empowering and inspiring, and makes this comic appropriate for anyone from 3rd-7th grade. A must-purchase for libraries where the rest of the series is popular.
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  • Logan Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    The fifth graphic novel, and first of Gale Galligan's run as cartoonist, is a sort of combo adaptation of BSC #5, Dawn and the Impossible Three, and BSC #14, Hello, Mallory. To start with the good, I really love Gale's art.It's quite different from Raina's, but I feel like it also goes really well with the material. It's a little more shoujo and anime-y, and it's very pretty and sweet. (The shoujo style especially works for glamorous Mrs. Barrett.) It's also very expressive, with plenty of The fifth graphic novel, and first of Gale Galligan's run as cartoonist, is a sort of combo adaptation of BSC #5, Dawn and the Impossible Three, and BSC #14, Hello, Mallory. To start with the good, I really love Gale's art. It's quite different from Raina's, but I feel like it also goes really well with the material. It's a little more shoujo and anime-y, and it's very pretty and sweet. (The shoujo style especially works for glamorous Mrs. Barrett.) It's also very expressive, with plenty of dramatic close-ups. The way Gale draws babies, like Marnie Barrett, cracks me up: there's such an innocent goofball-ness. Onto the script. Here is where I have issues. In theory, I don't have a problem with the comics continuity diverging from canon, but in this case, combining the two books into one graphic novel does neither of them a service. The plots are not interwoven, exactly - it's mostly Mallory stuff in the beginning and mostly Dawn stuff at the end, and they don't really comment on each other. Both plotlines feel rushed, and the book lacks the usual gentle pace and room to breathe. Some of the most iconic scenes feel perfunctory, like the baby-sitters giving Mallory a baby-sitting test. Combining a Dawn book with a Mallory book also muddies the strong sense of a single narrator/point-of-view character that BSC books usually have (including the previous graphic novel adaptations). Dawn is clearly the POV character here, but that totally changes the entire context and meaning of most of the Mallory scenes. One of the coolest things about "Hello, Mallory" is how it gets you to see your most beloved characters as antagonists, and that doesn't happen here. Plus, Dawn isn't a particularly interesting or pivotal character in Mallory's storyline, so it just leaves you with a feeling of, "Why is Dawn telling this story?" My *final* and maybe biggest problem with the way the Mallory storyline is executed is that it manages to do so in a way that completely erases Jessi. She's not even introduced in this book. Is there another plan to introduce her? Because as of this writing, it's two books later (Boy-Crazy Stacey just came out), and still no sign of her. I'm withholding judgment until the end of Gale's run, but it feels super weird and kind of suspect to me that it seems like the graphic novel series has dropped the only black member of the club.Stray Observations* The baby-sitting test scene really gets short shrift. It's one of the fastest and smallest-drawn in the book. Meanwhile, in "Hello, Mallory," it takes up multiple chapters; the club prepares for the test all week, giving Mallory time to brood anxiously and giving the senior sitters time to overthink it, looking up unnecessarily complicated gotchas and trick questions, so that by the time they administer it, they're asking Mallory to answer things they didn't know themselves before writing the test. In the graphic novel, the entire test feels impromptu, completely changing the point of the scene! And the pomp of having a two-part test with a drawing section is also smoothed out, as Mallory is asked to describe, rather than draw, the digestive system (though, confusingly, a picture of it the drawing featured as a chapter closer.) The scene is not only rendered toothless, it's internally contradictory. * There are still remnants of the Kristy vs. Dawn rivalry plotline, where the two compete for Mary Anne's affections while helping her redecorate her room, even though the pivotal Kristy and Dawn bonding scene has already been snatched up by Raina Telgemeier and used in the Claudia and Mean Janine graphic novel. With that said, I think Gale works around this nicely, shifting the resolution of the plotline into an existing scene where Dawn, Mary Anne, and Kristy hang out in the barn after Dawn's family BBQ, and Kristy admits she is anxious about moving to Watson's house. It's a totally logical place to resolve the "friend triangle" (more so than the placement of Dawn and Kristy's bonding in chapter five, FIVE, of the original Dawn and the Impossible Three)* Braden Lamb's coloring is pretty as always, although I wish they'd made Mary Anne's new room navy blue and yellow as in the book. It was always kind of hard for me to picture but seemed like it could be really cool, surprisingly bold, and VERY different from her original pink room. Instead, in the comic, her new room is beige and aqua, which is much more tame.
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  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsa book with a time of day in the titleSo heartwarming! Such nostalgia. Super cute illos! 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 5 stars✔️a book with a time of day in the titleSo heartwarming! Such nostalgia. Super cute illos!
  • ReaganNoelle
    January 1, 1970
    Mary Ann's mom and Dawn's dad are dating. And Mary Ann's dad is letting her redecorate her room to butter her up because he is dating Dawn's mom. Mal joins the babysitters club. My favorite character is Dawn because she babysits and can make even cleaning up a game to get the kids to do things that no kids really want to do. I liked that Dawn said "anytime" not thinking that it would reall mean "all the time." That's why she is my favorite character.
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  • Amelia
    January 1, 1970
    This book was great! I thought this book was not going to be that good because this book is from a new character Dawns perspective and I thought it wouldn't be that interesting/important as the other books in the series. But, it turns out this book was also a very important book in this series and I hope they make more! So, I rate this book 5 STARS!
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this, even with the change of illustrators. The drama didn't seem as intense in this one as it did in some of the others. Still a cute story.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    I love that the BSC is getting a fresh makeover in graphic novel form.
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    Wasn’t a fan of the way they combined Dawn and the Impossible Three with Hello Mallory, especially because they didn’t add in Jessi.
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    I love these new editions of the BSC so much. I was a little disappointed when I read that Raina Telgemeier would not be illustrating this volume but Gale Galligan is wonderful & I will definitely continue reading the series with her artwork.
  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed the new artist and while I’ve never read the original series, they do go through a wide variety of contemporary topics and issues.
  • Rachel Piper
    January 1, 1970
    Re-reading these as graphic novels feels less pathetic than it would otherwise.
  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    This was the best one yet. I can’t believe how serious the books were - all the complex things we were able to work through as child readers. So so good.
  • Katie Solt
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    This was an awesome book and I think it was the best one in the series. I rated it 5 out of 5 stars because it has more drama and more action than the rest of the books in the series. Like when Dawn lost on of her kids she was babysitting for and they had to call the police. I am looking forward to reading more books (if they make them) in this series.
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  • Katelyn Marie
    January 1, 1970
    This one was a thrilling book in the series and Dawn handled everything spectacularly.
  • Jessica E
    January 1, 1970
    Another winner in this series
  • Elsie Santiago
    January 1, 1970
    All babysitters club books are amazing. I recommend for you to read this series. I love reading this series because all the books are funny and there is so much drama. But this book in particular is one of my favorites. This book is one of my favorite book because it's where most of the drama happens. The 5 girls are friends one day and enemies another. Also because this book is really funny. For example, this day the girls are mad but Dawn and someone else are supposed to babysit but since the All babysitters club books are amazing. I recommend for you to read this series. I love reading this series because all the books are funny and there is so much drama. But this book in particular is one of my favorites. This book is one of my favorite book because it's where most of the drama happens. The 5 girls are friends one day and enemies another. Also because this book is really funny. For example, this day the girls are mad but Dawn and someone else are supposed to babysit but since the girls don't talk they communicate by telling a kid to tell the other girl. Also because Dawn does all the work and can't handle all 3 kids. I hope you take some time out of your day to read the babysitters club series if not you'll be a little confused but you should at least read this book. It's a great story.
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  • Maria Rowe
    January 1, 1970
    I was hesitant to read this because I really, really enjoyed Raina Telgemeier's first four editions. I thought Gale Galligan did a good job, although it took a little getting used to. I really love how Mrs. Barrett was done - exactly how I pictured her down to the shiny hair. I was really thrown off while reading this because I realized this is a combination of Dawn and the Impossible Three #5 and Hello, Mallory #14. I always tie Mallory and Jessi together because they're both in #14. So it was I was hesitant to read this because I really, really enjoyed Raina Telgemeier's first four editions. I thought Gale Galligan did a good job, although it took a little getting used to. I really love how Mrs. Barrett was done - exactly how I pictured her down to the shiny hair. I was really thrown off while reading this because I realized this is a combination of Dawn and the Impossible Three #5 and Hello, Mallory #14. I always tie Mallory and Jessi together because they're both in #14. So it was strange reading this without Jessi in it. Why weren't books #5 and #6 (where Kristy's mom marries Watson) combined? That would have made more chronological sense and also #5 was never the best (for so many reasons) but #6 was always a favorite. They would have worked better together if books were going to be combined. Ugh. So, I don't know. I have mixed feelings on this. The art is great, but I don't really like how they added parts of another book that happened later in the series. I'm going to go with 3 stars because I'm really frustrated with how this was edited. Great job on the art though - taking over for Raina Telgemeier could not have been an easy task!
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