Next Year in Havana
After the death of her beloved grandmother, a Cuban-American woman travels to Havana, where she discovers the roots of her identity--and unearths a family secret hidden since the revolution...Havana, 1958. The daughter of a sugar baron, nineteen-year-old Elisa Perez is part of Cuba's high society, where she is largely sheltered from the country's growing political unrest--until she embarks on a clandestine affair with a passionate revolutionary...Miami, 2017. Freelance writer Marisol Ferrera grew up hearing romantic stories of Cuba from her late grandmother Elisa, who was forced to flee with her family during the revolution. Elisa's last wish was for Marisol to scatter her ashes in the country of her birth. Arriving in Havana, Marisol comes face-to-face with the contrast of Cuba's tropical, timeless beauty and its perilous political climate. When more family history comes to light and Marisol finds herself attracted to a man with secrets of his own, she'll need the lessons of her grandmother's past to help her understand the true meaning of courage.

Next Year in Havana Details

TitleNext Year in Havana
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 6th, 2018
PublisherPenguin/Berkley
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Romance, Fiction, Contemporary Romance

Next Year in Havana Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 There are so many fantastic elements to this novel. The book opens with the Perez family fleeing Cuba after the revolution. This is the first thread of the story. The second is Elise Perez's granddaughter Marisol, traveling to Cuba, sixty years later to scatter her ashes in the country she had loved. The history of Cuba, Batista, Che and Castro are told in bold, detailed fashion using the Perez family to add a human element and interest to the story. This story would be my favorite part of t 3.5 There are so many fantastic elements to this novel. The book opens with the Perez family fleeing Cuba after the revolution. This is the first thread of the story. The second is Elise Perez's granddaughter Marisol, traveling to Cuba, sixty years later to scatter her ashes in the country she had loved. The history of Cuba, Batista, Che and Castro are told in bold, detailed fashion using the Perez family to add a human element and interest to the story. This story would be my favorite part of the book, a look back at what happened to the Perez family, and a revolution that promised much be delivered little. Said to have ended Batista's cruelty, in effect, in one quote by the author, it just replaced one dictator with another.Marisol would find love in Havana but also many other things she didn't know she was looking for. Again the descriptions of Havana we're done well, but that in one week two people would fall in love, was a bit unbelievable. I enjoyed the characters, the different looks at the people who fled Cuba, and those who stayed. There are a few surprises along the way, in this very readable book. Things may be more open in Cuba but as the book shows the danger for some is far from over. Very well written, the history, thankfully for me but maybe all readers will not feel the same, overshadowed the love story. The ending poignant, heartfelt but a little to pat. All in all z good read about a country of which I am still learning.ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    Every once in a while I start a book and from page one I am completely enamored with the every aspect of the book - the plot, the characters, the setting, and the relationships. Next Year in Havana is this type of book; as I read, I was constantly ruminating about how fabulous the book was. I love that feeling, and to me, it is the sign of an exceptionally good book. Next Year in Havana is told in a dual timeline format, alternating between the late 1950’s and present day. Both story lines are e Every once in a while I start a book and from page one I am completely enamored with the every aspect of the book - the plot, the characters, the setting, and the relationships. Next Year in Havana is this type of book; as I read, I was constantly ruminating about how fabulous the book was. I love that feeling, and to me, it is the sign of an exceptionally good book. Next Year in Havana is told in a dual timeline format, alternating between the late 1950’s and present day. Both story lines are equally compelling, and Chanel Cleeton artfully incorporates both the beauty and history of Cuba into her tale about courage in the face of family and loss. Cleeton’s family fled Cuba in 1967, and the personal connection and love she feels for the country are reflected in her tale. Cuba is a fascinating place to me, and stories set there always appeal to me. Next Year in Havana stands out because the author effectively integrates a significant amount of Cuban history while crafting a beautiful tale of family, love, and enduring relationships. I had never really understood the schism between those who left Cuba after Fidel Castro came into power versus those that remained. Without taking sides, Cleeton engenders sympathy for both groups and the difficult choices that those individuals had to make when choosing which path to take.I was curious about the title of the book when I began reading and thankfully she explains it: “As exiles, … hope is embedded in the very essence of our soul. ‘Next Year in Havana. It’s the toast we never stop saying, because the dream of it never comes true.’ ” What a beautiful tribute to Cuba that decades later those exiled still hope year after year that they can one day return, and how incredibly sad that it has still not come to pass.Sadly, I think it is easy for Americans to forget how lucky we are to live in a country where freedom is taken for granted. Reading about present day Cuba is scary: internet and cell phone coverage is scarce, the government controls what information is disseminated, food shortages are common, and retribution for speaking out can be punishable by death. The reminder is helpful in our current political environment; freedom and equality are worth protecting, and it is important to speak out against those attempting to infringe on those rights.Next Year in Havana is spectacular. I loved the entire book and was thrilled with the small surprise at the end. I had an inkling that the surprise might be coming and was glad when it worked out that way. I struggled a bit with the resolution of the present day story line but am not sure that there was any other way for it to end; it certainly did not impact my view of the book. The cover of Next Year in Havana deserves to be mentioned also; it is simply stunning and fits the book beautifully. Thanks to Berkley Publishing and BookBrowse for the chance to read this ARC. All opinions are my own.
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    To be reviewed!
  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    FULL REVEW WILL BE ON FEBRUARY 14 ALONG WITH A GIVEAWAY FOR THS BOOK."Ms. Chantell has a mesmerizing effect on you as you read about the adventures and lives of the Perez girls and of living in Cuba then and now.Her descriptions of the scenery, the kitchens, the food, and simply everything is detailed, beautiful, and exquisite.Let’s not forget that absolutely gorgeous cover, and remember that no book can be complete without a little bit of love and romance.The book was a lesson in the history of FULL REVEW WILL BE ON FEBRUARY 14 ALONG WITH A GIVEAWAY FOR THS BOOK."Ms. Chantell has a mesmerizing effect on you as you read about the adventures and lives of the Perez girls and of living in Cuba then and now.Her descriptions of the scenery, the kitchens, the food, and simply everything is detailed, beautiful, and exquisite.Let’s not forget that absolutely gorgeous cover, and remember that no book can be complete without a little bit of love and romance.The book was a lesson in the history of Cuba and its people. If you have an interest in the history of Cuba, NEXT YEAR IN HAVANA will be a book you won't want to miss. The secret that Marisol finds out about her grandmother is sweet but heartbreaking. ENJOY if you read NEXT YEAR IN HAVANA. 4/5This book was given to me free of charge and without compensation by the publisher and NetGalley in return for an honest review."
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  • Renee Rosen
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!
  • Christie«SHBBblogger»
    January 1, 1970
  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I’m having trouble putting words to my thoughts right now, and the tears streaming down my face don’t help, but that was fantastic. Not at all what I was expecting when I started, yet everything I wanted to read. And then some. If I had to describe this in one word it would be “Unputdownable”. Elisa and Marisol’s timelines weave together a seamless glimpse into the past—a history we don’t get in our American textbooks—with present day in a heart-achingly romantic, and emotionally engulfing story I’m having trouble putting words to my thoughts right now, and the tears streaming down my face don’t help, but that was fantastic. Not at all what I was expecting when I started, yet everything I wanted to read. And then some. If I had to describe this in one word it would be “Unputdownable”. Elisa and Marisol’s timelines weave together a seamless glimpse into the past—a history we don’t get in our American textbooks—with present day in a heart-achingly romantic, and emotionally engulfing story of love, loss, family, and what it really means to be free. This reads like a love letter to Cuba, it’s beautiful scenery, it’s people, and it’s complicated history. Read it.
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  • Chanel Cleeton
    January 1, 1970
  • Amy Bruno
    January 1, 1970
    Absolute page-turner! Full review to follow...
  • Lia Riley
    January 1, 1970
    My heart! This book was everything I wanted-historical fiction at its finest. A gorgeous story of upheaval, family, loss and love. Expanded review to come.
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