Disappeared
Four months ago: Sara Zapata’s best friend disappeared, kidnapped by the web of criminals who terrorize Juàrez.Four weeks ago: Her brother, Emiliano, fell in love with Perla Rubi, a girl whose family is as rich as her name.Four hours ago: Sara received a death threat…and her first clue her friend’s location.Four minutes ago: Emiliano was offered a way into Perla Rubi’s world—if he betrays his own.In the next four days, Sara and Emiliano will each face impossible choices, between life and justice, friends and family, truth and love. But when the criminals come after Sara, only one path remains for both the siblings: the way across the desert to the United States.

Disappeared Details

TitleDisappeared
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherArthur A. Levine Books
ISBN-139780545944472
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Mystery, Contemporary, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

Disappeared Review

  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    “Getting dirty means doing what we have to do for our families and for those around us, given the realities of where we live, in this mess of a life that is good and bad.” This is not a bad book, but it is my least favourite Stork book to date and I think that's at least partially because I feel like I've read this story a couple of times before and I liked those books better - I'm thinking of Saint Death and Signs Preceding the End of the World. The book's main theme is a timely issue, especia “Getting dirty means doing what we have to do for our families and for those around us, given the realities of where we live, in this mess of a life that is good and bad.” This is not a bad book, but it is my least favourite Stork book to date and I think that's at least partially because I feel like I've read this story a couple of times before and I liked those books better - I'm thinking of Saint Death and Signs Preceding the End of the World. The book's main theme is a timely issue, especially for American readers who've spent recent years listening to negative portrayals of Mexican immigrants in mainstream politics. Both aforementioned books, and this one, offer insight into what it is really like for undocumented immigrants fleeing across the border, afraid for their lives and the lives of their families. These books dispel the harmful - and, frankly, abhorrent - myth that these immigrants are violent, lazy and looking to mooch off society.I have never understood this deep animosity towards other human beings and Stork, Sedgwick and Herrera offer these Mexican teens what they have frequently been denied by the media and politicians in the U.S. - their humanity. In Disappeared, Stork begins in Juarez with Sara, an aspiring journalist who hopes to shed light on the case of the young women who go missing in the city, never to be seen again. When an email arrives threatening Sara and her family, she finds herself pulled into a dangerous world where she must decide between doing the right thing and ensuring her own safety.Sara's brother, Emiliano, is the book's other perspective. After their father left, he has to provide for his family and he feels the burden of their poverty every day. Then an opportunity arises for him to make money - more money than he could have ever imagined - but to do so would mean compromising his integrity. Is it worth becoming someone he doesn't recognize in order to make more money?Eventually, events lead to Sara and Emiliano needing to escape Mexico and enter the United States - a long, perilous journey with dangers behind them, suspicion and hostility ahead, and the possibility of dehydration in the meantime.I liked the book, but I thought Saint Death, Signs Preceding the End of the World and Stork's other novels were stronger. It also used a really big pet peeve of mine - sensing. By this I mean the plot being moved in a certain direction and clues being uncovered by the characters “sensing” or “just knowing” things. I think it’s lazy storytelling for a weird feeling to guide the plot in the direction the author wants it to go. For example, at one point, Sara googles churches and instinctively knows when she sees the one shown in the photograph she is investigating because she gets a feeling. And when she opens a drawer and decides she needs to look inside a cigar box because “It feels almost like a voice asking her to look inside.”I thought the last chapter seemed a little weak, too. Books like this are one of those rare cases where an open ending works well - leaving the reader open to hoping the world gets better but not tying it up with a neat bow because this very real issue is anything but neat - but here the ending felt like something of a cop-out and an anticlimactic close to an emotional, high-stakes novel.Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • jv poore
    January 1, 1970
    Existence in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico requires a combination of courage, vigilance and restraint. The typical work-day commute equals exposure to potential harassment and harm. Truly dangerous, totally unavoidable. Students don’t have the luxury of focusing on academics or sports. Families need financial support.Emiliano attends his high school classes and participates on his soccer team, but he focuses on family and ‘his’ Jiparis. Intelligent, innovative and driven, Emiliano creates a small busine Existence in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico requires a combination of courage, vigilance and restraint. The typical work-day commute equals exposure to potential harassment and harm. Truly dangerous, totally unavoidable. Students don’t have the luxury of focusing on academics or sports. Families need financial support.Emiliano attends his high school classes and participates on his soccer team, but he focuses on family and ‘his’ Jiparis. Intelligent, innovative and driven, Emiliano creates a small business of collecting hand-made folk art from his pseudo-Mexican-Boy Scouts, which he sells to small shops. The Jiparis’ families receive the bulk of proceeds, of course, but Emiliano’s cut helps at home and his business has been noticed.A journalist with El Sol, Emiliano’s sister writes a weekly column about the city’s missing girls. Sara had shared her own story of loss, writing of the day her best friend was kidnapped. Friends and family members of other missing girls responded to her article, and Sara was assigned a weekly column. After reporting progress, Sara was stunned when she was ordered to drop the investigation and the article.Emiliano becomes acquainted with several of the city’s successful businessmen and his views seem to shift. Hard work is nothing without the willingness to get “a little dirty”. A person can only truly move up, in this world, when illegal activity is going down. Clearly, everyone is doing it; but it takes Emiliano time to realize how closely it is all connected.Mr. Stork deftly displays the complexities of life in Mexico, even as he highlights the hope, strength, determination and compassion in the people that call it home. Disappeared is a fictional story about Mexico’s missing girls, but the fact is, hundreds of Mexican women do disappear in this border city every year.This review was written for Buried Under Books by jv poore.
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  • Sarah Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, it's real good, yo. Read this.
  • Cherie
    January 1, 1970
    A young journalist is struggling to find her missing best friend (and the other missing women of Juarez) when she begins to get warnings to stop…she doesn't want to give up the hunt for her best friend but things quickly become very, very dark. At the same time, her younger brother finds his world turning very dark in promises that things will become lighter...a fast-paced read.
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  • Cheryl Klein
    January 1, 1970
    Francisco's brilliant writing meets THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO as Sara Zapata searches for her best friend, who was kidnapped by the Juarez mafia. It all unfolds over four days, and it's amazing.
  • Linda Owen
    January 1, 1970
    Supposedly the first sentence should indicate what to expect from a book."On the morning of November 14, the day she was kidnapped, Linda Fuentes opened the door to my house and walked into the kitchen, where my family was having breakfast;" so starts this amazing story. Sara Zapata is a journalist who has been writing about girls disappearing in Juarez since this happened. She receives a threat, to her and to her family, and in her subsequent investigation finds that Linda is still alive. Meanw Supposedly the first sentence should indicate what to expect from a book."On the morning of November 14, the day she was kidnapped, Linda Fuentes opened the door to my house and walked into the kitchen, where my family was having breakfast;" so starts this amazing story. Sara Zapata is a journalist who has been writing about girls disappearing in Juarez since this happened. She receives a threat, to her and to her family, and in her subsequent investigation finds that Linda is still alive. Meanwhile, her brother Emiliano is pursuing a better life and a girlfriend quite above him on the socio-economic scale, and gets caught up in a drug-smuggling scheme. All of this comes to a head and the family flees just ahead of murderers who shoot up their house. There's a lot more going on, but the major theme is personal choice between doing the right thing or going down a different path. Another thread is the importance of family, and just what constitutes a family. This is the best book I have read so far this year. And it won't even be published until September! I read a review copy.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Sara and her brother Emiliano live in Juarez, Mexico, and both are getting into trouble. Sara is a writer at the local newspaper, and she just won't let the public forget the local disappearing women--she writes a weekly column about the women. It hits close to home for her--her best friend Linda was one who was taken, and Sara hopes that she's still alive and not being too badly abused/trafficked. When Sara is threatened to NEVER write about her friend Linda or else her family will be hurt, she Sara and her brother Emiliano live in Juarez, Mexico, and both are getting into trouble. Sara is a writer at the local newspaper, and she just won't let the public forget the local disappearing women--she writes a weekly column about the women. It hits close to home for her--her best friend Linda was one who was taken, and Sara hopes that she's still alive and not being too badly abused/trafficked. When Sara is threatened to NEVER write about her friend Linda or else her family will be hurt, she is torn between what is right and what will save her family. Emiliano is in love with a beautiful rich girl, and he knows that all his little money-making schemes won't ever get him to her level. So when a local big shot offers an illegal deal that would get him rich quicker, he struggles about the decision. Both siblings end up in a lot of danger, and it turns into quite the action/adventure novel at the end. Love that Sara's point-of-view is included, even though she isn't a teenager anymore, and that the setting is Mexico. There were a few parts in the ARC that I hope get fixed--for example, Emiliano doesn't know that his older sister is afraid of heights and needs the bottom bunk. That just seems weird. I also wondered about the 20-pound laptop Sara owned--doesn't that seem awfully heavy? They haven't weighed that much since the 1980's, and no one really even owned a laptop back then.
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  • Grayson
    January 1, 1970
    What would you do if your best friend has been kidnapped and have been sent threats from unknown users?What would you do if the love of your life's dad is a business man that works with some very bad people?This is what happens in Disappeared by Franscisco X. Stork.This is one of the most intriguing books I have ever read.This book tells the story of a brother and sister that have problems in their lives and have to make life threatening choices to get to their goal.I recommend this book to high What would you do if your best friend has been kidnapped and have been sent threats from unknown users?What would you do if the love of your life's dad is a business man that works with some very bad people?This is what happens in Disappeared by Franscisco X. Stork.This is one of the most intriguing books I have ever read.This book tells the story of a brother and sister that have problems in their lives and have to make life threatening choices to get to their goal.I recommend this book to high schoolers.I also like this book because it appeals to both genders.This book was very interesting and action paced as well.This is more then just a regular old novel.This really tells the story of life in Juarez, a Mexican city.It may seem slow at first, but it gets more intense as the story continues.For example, the brother in the story named Emiliano is in love with the girl of his dreams, yet after having a talk with her dad, Emiliano discovers a dark secret about their family.If you ever want to read a intruiging book, read this extraordinary book by Francisco X. Stork.
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  • Ginny
    January 1, 1970
    DISAPPEARED by Francisco X. StorkSlight spoiler alert at endI was given an Advanced Reader Copy through a program with Follett Books. It took just a short while to become curious about this book, but then it sucked me in. I was intrigued with learning about a culture not too far south of here where people were poor and happy, or poor and unhappy, some worked hard and had strong ethics, some didn’t. We learned how interwoven the drug trade is with any kind of personal financial success, how seri DISAPPEARED by Francisco X. StorkSlight spoiler alert at endI was given an Advanced Reader Copy through a program with Follett Books. It took just a short while to become curious about this book, but then it sucked me in. I was intrigued with learning about a culture not too far south of here where people were poor and happy, or poor and unhappy, some worked hard and had strong ethics, some didn’t. We learned how interwoven the drug trade is with any kind of personal financial success, how serious is the corruption of government, while at the same time there are many who are trying to right it from within. It’s hard for our characters to be sure of whom they can trust. It sounds a lot like life anywhere, but here, it is all extreme, extreme.I liked this story because though the main characters are being either seduced or threatened by the evil, they choose good in the end. Thank you, Follett!
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book uses alternating perspectives between reporter, Sara, and her younger brother, Emiliano. Sara's best friend was kidnapped several months ago and she uses her position at the paper to continue shining light on her friend and other girls like. After Sara and her family are threatened, Sara's bosses insist that she stop investigating and work on other things. Sara simply can't and her honor makes her the best person for the job.Emiliano has his own identity crises, when some bad dudes off This book uses alternating perspectives between reporter, Sara, and her younger brother, Emiliano. Sara's best friend was kidnapped several months ago and she uses her position at the paper to continue shining light on her friend and other girls like. After Sara and her family are threatened, Sara's bosses insist that she stop investigating and work on other things. Sara simply can't and her honor makes her the best person for the job.Emiliano has his own identity crises, when some bad dudes offer him the ability to make some money in a not so legal way. Emiliano must decide what is most important to him.This was set up to be a fast crime mystery, but it was a bit dry for me. I did know the characters and I understood their motivations and actions, but it was difficult to connect with the story. I never found myself fully caring to solve the mystery. I feel that this novel gave hope to situations that felt hopeless. It just didn't rock my world.
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  • Penny
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Goodreads for the ARC in a giveaway. Timely issues of today are covered. It's tells of the corruption in Mexico, poverty, drug trafficking.and sex slavery. It appears that the wealthy in Mexico are not honest people. Emiliano is the younger brother searching for a better life for his Mami and sister, Sara. Sara works as a reporter who is searching for her best friend, Linda, who was kidnapped. The story is told in alternating chapters by Sara and Emiliano. This method of story telling Thank you Goodreads for the ARC in a giveaway. Timely issues of today are covered. It's tells of the corruption in Mexico, poverty, drug trafficking.and sex slavery. It appears that the wealthy in Mexico are not honest people. Emiliano is the younger brother searching for a better life for his Mami and sister, Sara. Sara works as a reporter who is searching for her best friend, Linda, who was kidnapped. The story is told in alternating chapters by Sara and Emiliano. This method of story telling works well. I found the book powerful and unforgettable. Thank you Goodreads for the ARC.
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  • Ethan Garcia
    January 1, 1970
    Disappeared By Fransisco X. Stork is An Amazing suspenseful book. I would Recommend This Book To young adults and teenagers mostly because me personally i had to Read every Page twice. I went out of my comfort zone and read a Mystery Book. Sara Our main Character Lost one of her best friends due to the Cartel/Mafia, Kidnapped. Sara is a news reporter and will not rest until she finds Her friend. i give this book a 8 out of 10. I love this book and i hope You do to.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Set in Mexico close to the American border, this teen novel studies the issues of drug lords, sex traffiicking and immigration through the eyes of brother and sister Sara and Emiliano Zapata. The story is suspenseful and timely and will open the eyes of many teens to the lives of contemporary Mexican teens. Through his well written and edited plot, Stork captures the voice of the teens and involves the reader in the moral dilemmas that Sara and Emiliano face.
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  • Mrs. Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Told from alternating points of view of brother and sister Sara and Emiliano. I wasn't as invested as I read it as I was AFTER reading it as I considered Stork's quiet, thorough, no holds barred examination of the base struggles of right v wrong....the slippery slope of good v bad actions....Nicely depicts the damage and hope of individual choices and change.
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  • Denise Weintraut
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. This book had some interesting insights on just how easily someone can be lured into the drug trafficking trade and a bit on immigrant stories, but it just wasn't enough to overcome the weak and transparent writing. It's clean enough for a middle school audience, but it isn't a book that I recommend.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    A thriller that is similar in story to a recent read with The Border in which political issues in Mexico have led to decisions to escape or flee or at least fear for your life. A friend goes missing and is being threatened if she tries to uncover where she is while a brother is romantically interested in a girl from a higher class and has to choose the right path.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    The most off-putting thing about this is that it's written in present tense. I liked it overall, but I felt the last 30 pages were crammed with new information, and it wasn't clear whether it's set up for a sequel or not. I felt the alternating viewpoints were done well, though.
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  • Keith
    January 1, 1970
    I love every book Francisco X. Stork writes. I couldn't put this one down. Topical & timely. A great read!
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Strong ending; if the first few chapters disappoint, skip to Part 2. Part 2 is the story's strength.
  • Kait
    January 1, 1970
    Not sure if it was the third person present tense narrative or what, but this one just lacked a sense of urgency for me. Plus, lots of loose ends.Full review to come.
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Another Scholastic book recommended by Kelli!
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