The Killing Light (The Sacred Throne, #3)
The thrilling conclusion to Myke Cole's Sacred Throne trilogyHeloise and her allies are marching on the Imperial Capital. The villagers, the Kipti, and the Red Lords are only united in their loyalty to Heloise. They face both internal religious strife and devils pouring through the rent in the veil between worlds, but must overcome everything to topple an empire.

The Killing Light (The Sacred Throne, #3) Details

TitleThe Killing Light (The Sacred Throne, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 12th, 2019
PublisherTor.com
ISBN-139780765395993
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, LGBT, Audiobook

The Killing Light (The Sacred Throne, #3) Review

  • Petrik
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by the publisherTor.comin exchange for an honest review.A compelling read that offers a satisfying conclusion to The Sacred Throne trilogy.I wont be talking about the plot at all; theres nothing about the story that I can say without spoiling something from the previous two books. As for what worked for me, there were many. I found the start of this book to be significantly better than the beginning of The Queen of Crows. This doesnt mean that The Queen of Crows began horribly, but ARC provided by the publisher—Tor.com—in exchange for an honest review.A compelling read that offers a satisfying conclusion to The Sacred Throne trilogy.I won’t be talking about the plot at all; there’s nothing about the story that I can say without spoiling something from the previous two books. As for what worked for me, there were many. I found the start of this book to be significantly better than the beginning of The Queen of Crows. This doesn’t mean that The Queen of Crows began horribly, but in my opinion, that book requires readers to binge-read the first two books or at least read them not too far in-between; the story continued immediately with no refresher on who’s who and it took me a long time to care about Heloise again. However, The Killing Light is not inflicted by the same situation; it started by efficiently refreshing reader’s memories on the characters and most importantly, allowing me to reacquaint myself with Heloise Factor because Cole elaborated on her characterizations first. I loved this novella, it made me remember why I loved Heloise and her characterizations in the first book. Heloise’s main personality is kind and hot-tempered, seeing her struggles with the massive burden of responsibility that’s required of her was compelling. In this last book, the story focuses its themes on lies, faith, difficulty in unity, and the difficulty of connecting differences in cultures and beliefs. Freedom, family, war, sexuality, and love remains Heloise’s main concerns in the upcoming final battle; I enjoyed reading this book and I simply had a really hard time putting it down. “War, she was finding, was nothing so much as a series of choices between bad and worse.” One thing that I found to be very consistent throughout this trilogy was Cole’s brilliant characterizations. Not gonna lie, I actually enjoyed reading the dialogues, internal struggles, and interactions of this series more than the battle and action scenes themselves. I feel like Cole truly knows how to make sure that Heloise’s feelings—whether you like her or not—felt evocative for the readers. The philosophical moments of the book were also a nice addition of resonating topics to our current society that simultaneously helps flesh out the characters further. Come to think about it, it’s super rare for me to highlight many passages in a novella, but I really did for this trilogy. The pacing was incredibly well-paced and the actions were bloody vivid and intense. I can definitely see how Cole’s experience in writing military fantasy before played a role in bringing terrific results in the action scenes. “Men do what they want when they are in charge, and they tell themselves it’s right.” Not much else to say really. This is the end of this wonderful grimdark novellas trilogy and I want readers to experience this with little info. Cole mentioned in the acknowledgment that he was worried about writing a series in a genre that’s not in his comfort zone; I’ll say that there’s nothing to worry about and he needs to write more grimdark series, preferably a full novel this time. This is an awesome trilogy that mains a right balance between actions and characterizations thoroughly. Overall, I had a really fantastic time reading through it. Believe me, that’s saying a lot because generally, novellas don’t work for me; I prefer reading novels more than novellas or short stories. There were still some questions unanswered world-building wise, but The Killing Light tells a satisfying conclusion to Heloise’s journey with impact. Well done, Myke Cole! Series Review: The Armored Saint: 5/5 stars The Queen of Crows: 3/5 stars The Killing Light: 4/5 stars The Sacred Throne: 12/15 stars Official release date: November 12th, 2019You can pre-order the book from: Book Depository (Free shipping)The quotes in this review were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.You can find this and the rest of my reviews at Novel Notions
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  • Holly (Holly Hearts Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Oof. I held off reading this because I wasnt ready for the series to end and this was one hellride after another. Heloise my bb <3 Oof. I held off reading this because I wasn’t ready for the series to end and this was one hellride after another. Heloise my bb <3
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  • Hamad
    January 1, 1970
    Is it just me or does the girl on the cover look like Gal Gadot?!!******************Hmmm, my reading life has been slow this week but I finished this and I liked it more than book 2. I will explain more in my review!Actual Rating: 3.5 stars
  • FanFiAddict
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: ★★★★★SynopsisThe thrilling conclusion to Myke Coles Sacred Throne trilogyHeloise and her allies are marching on the Imperial Capital. The villagers, the Kipti, and the Red Lords are united only in their loyalty to Heloise, though dissenting voices are many and they are loud.The unstable alliance faces internal conflicts and external strife, yet theyre united in their common goal. But when the first of the devils start pouring through a rent in the veil between worlds, Heloise must strike Rating: ★★★★★SynopsisThe thrilling conclusion to Myke Cole’s Sacred Throne trilogyHeloise and her allies are marching on the Imperial Capital. The villagers, the Kipti, and the Red Lords are united only in their loyalty to Heloise, though dissenting voices are many and they are loud.The unstable alliance faces internal conflicts and external strife, yet they’re united in their common goal. But when the first of the devils start pouring through a rent in the veil between worlds, Heloise must strike a bargain with an unlikely ally, or doom her people to death and her world to ruin.ReviewThanks to the publisher and author for an advanced reading copy of The Killing Light (The Sacred Throne #3) in exchange for an honest review. Receiving this ARC did not influence my thoughts or opinions on the work.The Killing Light, unlike Season 8 of Game of Thrones, was a highly satisfying and thrilling conclusion to the arc of Heloise the Palatine. You’ll cry, you’ll cry some more, and then you’ll want a giant bad-ass war engine to clobber people with. This trilogy has been very difficult to put down or place behind other books that have been vying for attention. From the beautiful covers (which, my goodness, Chris McGrath KILLED this one) to the words on the pages, Cole has a fantasy series to be immensely proud of.I’m pretty sure, without going back and looking at my reviews for the previous 2 books, I have stated that Heloise is one of the finest and most engaging female protagonists the fantasy world has seen. To be an adult and have the ability to become enamored with a young character such as herself; to be there with her through all of the trials and tribulations, deaths of loved ones, victories and defeats, and the coming-of-age process over the course of 3 books that are basically comprised of several months. It is staggering.On top of that, Cole has created this world that I feel still has untapped potential. I know you can say that about a ton of books, but there are so many places left to be explored and stones left unturned that it wouldn’t surprise me if the author brought us back sometime in the future. I also have many questions that predate this entire trilogy that, even though I would love to know more about, I am satisfied with the unknown. Can you tell that I really enjoyed it?Guys, I don’t know what else I can say that will make you pick up this series. Warhammer-esque power armor, huge bloody battles, devils, magic, LOVE. It is all there. Just buy The Armored Saint and see for yourself. You won’t regret it.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys! This book is the final one of The Sacred Throne trilogy. While I try to post no spoilers, if ye havent read the previous two then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . .I really did enjoy getting the conclusion to the story of Heloise. I thought the series be satisfying on the whole and book three was a quick and engaging read. The highlight of this series for me were the character interactions and struggles. I actually liked Heloises viewpoints and Ahoy there me mateys! This book is the final one of The Sacred Throne trilogy. While I try to post no spoilers, if ye haven’t read the previous two then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . .I really did enjoy getting the conclusion to the story of Heloise. I thought the series be satisfying on the whole and book three was a quick and engaging read. The highlight of this series for me were the character interactions and struggles. I actually liked Heloise’s viewpoints and changing inter-personal relationships more than the magic and action scenes. The other interesting takeaway was that the middle book of the trilogy was me favourite. I am hard pressed to think of another trilogy where that be the case.The minor issue with book three be that some of the fighting sequences beggared belief. The odds were so overwhelming at times that I mentally rolled me eyes at Heloise’s successes. And yet her realistic suffering both mentally and physically kept me engrossed. The plot also had some very unexpected turns that I loved. I wasn’t a huge fan of how the demons were defeated but I am a huge Heloise fan for sure. Even if I don’t envy her future.I am so glad that I didn’t give up on the trilogy after book one because this was a great series. All three novellas pack a punch and I highly recommend them. Arrr!
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  • Holly (The Grimdragon)
    January 1, 1970
    "The need to give him what he wanted, to climb out of the machine and into his arms, was so great that it nearly overwhelmed the terror that gripped her at the thought of leaving the machine, the anxiety that if she embraced her father, she would be Heloise again, not the armored saint she needed to be."The final book in Myke Cole's emotionally wrought The Sacred Throne trilogy, The Killing Light, is absolutely gorgeous. The series as a whole is one of my all-time favorites!The progression on "The need to give him what he wanted, to climb out of the machine and into his arms, was so great that it nearly overwhelmed the terror that gripped her at the thought of leaving the machine, the anxiety that if she embraced her father, she would be Heloise again, not the armored saint she needed to be."The final book in Myke Cole's emotionally wrought The Sacred Throne trilogy, The Killing Light, is absolutely gorgeous. The series as a whole is one of my all-time favorites!The progression on the covers (the first two from Tommy Arnold and this one by Chris McGrath) tell a story in itself.. from Heloise wearing oversized armor in book one as a young woman, to the armor fitting her more as an adult warrior in the final book. Her eyes say everything - she has been through hell and back! All three are stunning, but it's this last cover that just completely smashes it for me! McGrath encapsulated the very essence of Heloise Factor in one brilliant piece."She had been so brave for so long that now, looking at the devils, she had no courage left to her."Now, for my usual spiel about how this is book three in a trilogy and if you have yet to read the previous two books, then you should probably get on that. Because this series is fucking outstanding and you are missing out! WHAT EXACTLY ARE YOU WAITING FOR?!::ahem::But also, you will want to skip the rest of this review just in case.The Killing Light rages on with the story of Heloise and her loyal army marching to the Imperial Capital, about to face their greatest challenge yet. They are in pursuit of taking it over, but at what cost?The opposition is escalating, allies are quickly diminishing and injuries are mounting. Except, these evil forces haven't met a warrior like Heloise Factor before! The knife-handed, devil-slayer and all-around badass that she is. I couldn't love her more! She is fierce, complex and brave. Brave not only because she is powerful, but because she is resilient. She endures. She faces her fears and when she feels like she can't go on anymore.. she does. She truly is the hero we need.Breathless action scenes, heart felt character work and nearly perfect pacing. This series completely wrecked me! It's a masterclass in translating onto the page ALL THE FEELINGS! I was left moony eyed and a little weepy. Okay.. a lot weepy! Heloise will forever be a favorite for me, simply because I'll never forget her. She is a character that I'll hold dear to my heart. Always.Heloise Factor is someone who just wanted the right to be themselves, without shame. Instead, she was forced to fight a war that was seemingly beyond winning. A battle to bring freedom to her people from the zealots who control their land and impose their beliefs upon them.For all of the horror within this series, Myke Cole writes beautifully and turns a phrase as well as anyone. That juxtaposition is what makes me go weak in the knees when I'm reading a dark fantasy series. Brutal, grim, bleak.. yet there's an inkling of hope.The relationship between Heloise and Xilyka is something I need more of! Oof. A raw, genuine, electric coupling that continues to grow into this achingly real connection. With Xilyka's never-ending support, Heloise is able to discover who she is outside of the war machine. She finds something other than fighting to value. Xilyka teaches her that she is so much more than what her outer package reflects. It's who she is inside that matters. Life is about loving who you love, without fear or remorse.This series is for those of us that like our fantasy diverse and intelligent and stabby and gut-punchy! The writing is brilliant and the worldbuilding staggeringly vivid!I've tried to do this book, this series justice, but nothing I say can properly capture the soul-crushing beauty that it contains. You just have to read it for yourself!The Wheel continues to turn..(Endless thanks to Tor.com Publishing for sending me a copy to flail over!)**The quotes above were taken from an ARC & are subject to change upon publication**
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  • Flying Monkey
    January 1, 1970
    2 Stars!Hmm. I was hoping to enjoy The Killing Light more than I did. The series started strong with The Armored Saint, but I felt the 2nd book dropped off considerably, and this final installment disappointed me even more. I had trouble buying into the plot in the 2nd and 3rd books. Even more concerning was the lack of depth of the characters. I felt the ancillary characters needed more development in the series. Heloise, who is the main point of view for the entire series, even started to 2 Stars!Hmm. I was hoping to enjoy The Killing Light more than I did. The series started strong with The Armored Saint, but I felt the 2nd book dropped off considerably, and this final installment disappointed me even more. I had trouble buying into the plot in the 2nd and 3rd books. Even more concerning was the lack of depth of the characters. I felt the ancillary characters needed more development in the series. Heloise, who is the main point of view for the entire series, even started to disappoint. Series Review: The Armored Saint: 5/5 starsThe Queen of Crows: 3/5 starsThe Killing Light: 2/5 stars
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    In the previous book we learned of the shocking hypocrisy of the Order. The Order persecutes the people of the Empire with the excuse of wiping out wizards before they can summon devils, but it turns out that the Order uses wizards themselves. We start this with Heloise barely holding together an alliance of villagers, travelers and the Red Lords as they head towards the capitol of the Empire. The situation looks bad when the Order appears to have rallied a large army ahead of them, only for In the previous book we learned of the shocking hypocrisy of the Order. The Order persecutes the people of the Empire with the excuse of wiping out wizards before they can summon devils, but it turns out that the Order uses wizards themselves. We start this with Heloise barely holding together an alliance of villagers, travelers and the Red Lords as they head towards the capitol of the Empire. The situation looks bad when the Order appears to have rallied a large army ahead of them, only for things to go from bad to catastrophic when the Order's use of wizards catches up to them in the worst way.This is a fantastic series that doesn't shy from showing the real cost of war to the people who fight it, but equally being clear that some fights aren't possible to walk away from. It also does a brilliant job at highlighting the trauma that even the strongest fighters suffer. Heloise can't leave her tinker armor: she finds it psychologically impossible. (I have questions relating to toilet mechanics, but I'll ignore those). It also shows to great effect the uniting power of a common enemy.I do have a minor issue with how it finishes (this one cries out for an epilogue), in that it feels like that this is only a satisfactory ending because the story cuts when it does.
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  • Justine
    January 1, 1970
    A very solid finish to a series that I thought was quite excellent overall. I liked all the different fantasy elements that Cole brought together, which made for such an interesting mix. I don't have much interest in reading the military fiction that Cole usually writes, but I would certainly pick up another fantasy if he chooses to write one, or even SF?
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  • Lata
    January 1, 1970
    This story was gut-wrenching, as Heloise and everyone shes picked up make their way together to the Emperor, with all the many divisions and hatreds exacerbated by exhaustion and hunger. Heloise is too angry, tired, grieving, put upon by everyones demands, and psychologically battered to exit the machine (begging the question of what about needing to eliminate?....)The story action is fierce, with the stakes getting believably bigger with each new setback. And there are several. The different This story was gut-wrenching, as Heloise and everyone she’s picked up make their way together to the Emperor, with all the many divisions and hatreds exacerbated by exhaustion and hunger. Heloise is too angry, tired, grieving, put upon by everyone’s demands, and psychologically battered to exit the machine (begging the question of what about needing to eliminate?....)The story action is fierce, with the stakes getting believably bigger with each new setback. And there are several. The different faiths and beliefs of each band within Heloise’s army was a source of much friction, showing how fragile and mistrusting the whole arrangement was, and had me tensely wondering what would blow this whole thing apart. Like the devils, who were even more terrifying when they reappeared.And meanwhile, there’s a lovely, sweet romance growing between Heloise and Xilyka, the only relationship Heloise has that is fully supportive and equal.I was satisfied by the wrap-up of this wonderful series, and felt this was a fantastic end to a terrific trilogy.
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  • Jon Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Perfectly done.
  • LJ Waguespack
    January 1, 1970
    As Myke Cole concludes this stunning, trilogy, he succeeds in his initial challenge to write in this Fantasy genre, I for one, am glad he rose to the challenge, and can definitively say he exceeded my expectations. This trilogy is dark at times, but continuously circles back to belief in oneself, incredible challenges met, and self doubt conquered through extraordinary circumstances. I enjoyed this trilogy, never doubted Cole's abilities to meet the challenges he put on himself and as he emerges As Myke Cole concludes this stunning, trilogy, he succeeds in his initial challenge to write in this Fantasy genre, I for one, am glad he rose to the challenge, and can definitively say he exceeded my expectations. This trilogy is dark at times, but continuously circles back to belief in oneself, incredible challenges met, and self doubt conquered through extraordinary circumstances. I enjoyed this trilogy, never doubted Cole's abilities to meet the challenges he put on himself and as he emerges victorious in his writing, I sincerely hope he continues in this genre. The characters are heartfelt, the battles, losses and gains are heartwrenching, while reaffirming. Thank you Myke Cole, I look forward to reading more of your work, I am a fan.
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  • Melissa Jacobson
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous. Stunning. Haunting. Perfect. I think this may be my new favorite ending to a series? I am in love with Helios and I want to hug her forever. Make Cole is an incredible author and I am very excited to dive into his back log and to pick up any and all books he publishes in the future.
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  • Soo
    January 1, 1970
    Notes:Weakest book of 3. Many of the ideas & story elements were engaging & had potential for making the story complete but those elements were not pursued. A tidy ending with little attempt at real closure to the world.
  • Derrick Ranostaj
    January 1, 1970
    5 Stars hands down. Great pace and action to this series. Sorry to see this series end but it goes to prove Myke Cole and an excellent story teller, historian, and Paladin in 5th Edition. Highly recommend if you enjoy fantasy set in space. The plot really reminds me of Joan of Arc set to a campaign of War Hammer 40K
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  • Ginny
    January 1, 1970
    While not my favorite of the series, a very strong, very satisfying ending to Heloise's tale. Everything converges into one last battle, and things will never be the same. I still do not like Heloise, but she has had a lot of growth over the three books, and we can definitely see the growth in Killing Light. This is the first of the three that I read and did not listen to (thanks to NetGalley and the Publisher) and while I missed the narrator, I still heard her voice as I read Heloise :) so that While not my favorite of the series, a very strong, very satisfying ending to Heloise's tale. Everything converges into one last battle, and things will never be the same. I still do not like Heloise, but she has had a lot of growth over the three books, and we can definitely see the growth in Killing Light. This is the first of the three that I read and did not listen to (thanks to NetGalley and the Publisher) and while I missed the narrator, I still heard her voice as I read Heloise :) so that was nice. Anyway, highly highly recommend!
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  • Kendra
    January 1, 1970
    What an amazing and emotional ending to this trilogy. Powerful yet human, the story had me fully invested in Heloise. Myke did a terrific job writing - allowing her to question herself, to be emotional balanced with being able to fight when needed, yet get hurt. Really enjoyed this storyline.
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  • Stefanie
    January 1, 1970
    Short but oh so powerful.
  • Lois Young
    January 1, 1970
    A brilliant, a poignant, and a realistic end to this military fantasy series!!!Review of the entire trilogy will be available in the future!
  • Jeff Harris
    January 1, 1970
    Great conclusion to the story of Heloise Factor. Literally could not put this book down.
  • Mick
    January 1, 1970
    A heart-wrenching conclusion to this fantastic trilogy. Worth your time.
  • Lucas Rosen
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book as an ARC and it was fantastic. Its dark and brutal, and nothing was held back. Heloises arc is full of the same heavy hitting reality checks interspersed with her relentless pursuit of the justice shes sought for three books. Its a perfect wrap for a gritty, no-holds-barred series thats a smash hit for Cole. I read this book as an ARC and it was fantastic. It’s dark and brutal, and nothing was held back. Heloise’s arc is full of the same heavy hitting reality checks interspersed with her relentless pursuit of the justice she’s sought for three books. It’s a perfect wrap for a gritty, no-holds-barred series that’s a smash hit for Cole.
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  • Clare Rhoden
    January 1, 1970
    Great adventure and a wonderful cast of characters. Fuller review when commitments elsewhere completed.Enough to say that I ma now a rusted-on fan of Heloise and Xilyka.
  • Malum
    January 1, 1970
    A series that started strong but never really deeply explored its themes or gave a satisfying pay off for all of its set ups. The main character's sexuality is never explored beyond literally falling instantly in love with any attractive girl she meets. The themes of dangerous unyielding dogma isn't explored beyond "those church guys sure are jerks!". The main character starts as a scared child, develops into a warrior who threatens everyone who doesn't listen to her with death in book 2, and A series that started strong but never really deeply explored its themes or gave a satisfying pay off for all of its set ups. The main character's sexuality is never explored beyond literally falling instantly in love with any attractive girl she meets. The themes of dangerous unyielding dogma isn't explored beyond "those church guys sure are jerks!". The main character starts as a scared child, develops into a warrior who threatens everyone who doesn't listen to her with death in book 2, and then reverts back to being a scared child in book 3 for no real reason.Also, instead of getting better with her armor as the story goes on, she is as skilled with it as she needs to be for what the story needs at any given time. In one passage of this volume she is so nimble with it that she can quickly block people from running past her. In other passages she is constantly falling over in it like a clumsy oaf. The main villain never gets much more development besides him just being an asshole. His story does get a tiny bit more fleshed out in this last volume, but I found it extremely unsatisfying and shallow. The demons never get fleshed out more than just being slobbering goons. The ending didn't leave me saying "Wow, what a journey I took in this trilogy!" I just felt "Ok, well that's over I guess...". I didn't feel like I had been on a journey, but just watched a bunch of random things happen. On a related note, I didn't feel connected to any of these characters. They either didn't grow and develop at all (pretty much everyone) or grew in uncharacteristic and/or confusing ways (the main villain). Finally, what is Cole trying to say in this story? (view spoiler)[The best character, a gay wizard who teaches the main character to be who she is, gets killed in book one because the evil church was kind of right about magic all along? Then, the main character decides to keep the evil church going at the end? Is he saying that religion is bad but individuality is worse? I'm so confused by his message here (hide spoiler)].
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  • Marc Jentzsch
    January 1, 1970
    The journey of Heloise comes to a dramatic close here, and she doesn't get there without more trauma and more loss. Heloise's odyssey has been filled with violence and pain and horror, and she hasn't always weathered it well. But that's the thing with coming-of-age stories, particularly ones set in brutal fantasy worlds chock full of magic, monsters, and machines. Done well, the protagonist is not always right, doesn't win easily, and makes frequent mistakes. But through it all they learn and The journey of Heloise comes to a dramatic close here, and she doesn't get there without more trauma and more loss. Heloise's odyssey has been filled with violence and pain and horror, and she hasn't always weathered it well. But that's the thing with coming-of-age stories, particularly ones set in brutal fantasy worlds chock full of magic, monsters, and machines. Done well, the protagonist is not always right, doesn't win easily, and makes frequent mistakes. But through it all they learn and grow.Heloise is no exception to this, though she pays a higher price than the majority of young women (or young men, for that matter) that have come before her in the halls of fantasy fiction. Cole seems almost to delight in maiming her and denying her the compassion of companionship and family.Loudly critical of dogmatic systems - religion in particular, though cultures of other stripes take hits, too - the story still lends those systems a grounding in the reality of the world that helps with understanding. It continually edges into caricature, but inevitably backs off into nuance and a sort of grudging understanding. It never quite falls into the depths of tripe and angst, though I can't help but feel a longer page count would have betrayed it and for that alone, the brevity of the book is a real strength. Its primary weakness is the myopia of the setting. Things feel small and dark and by the second book, very well defined. This, the final chapter, does little to broaden the world or infuse it with the wonder that would make me pine for more. As such, this book serves as a fantastic end-cap and resolution, even wallowing in pain as it does.Cole makes no bones about why he wrote this series, and at times it can feel a little like it has a few checkboxes it tries really hard to hit, but I think that Cole did a wonderful job making a new world and filling it with meaning.This series has been a great ride.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. I loved this series. It would be selfish of me to say that I want more of this series, but the ending was so complete that there really isnt a reason for more. The Killing Light was an electrifying and solid conclusion to the story of Heloise, and like the other two novels I had one hell of a time trying to put this one down. It is most certainly a page turner, one that grips you from the start and doesnt let you off the ride until you hit that satisfying ending. Each I loved this book. I loved this series. It would be selfish of me to say that I want more of this series, but the ending was so complete that there really isn’t a reason for more. The Killing Light was an electrifying and solid conclusion to the story of Heloise, and like the other two novels I had one hell of a time trying to put this one down. It is most certainly a page turner, one that grips you from the start and doesn’t let you off the ride until you hit that satisfying ending. Each installment of this series was more heart wrenching and gut punching than the last; it chewed you up, spat you out, and then you went crawling back for more. Again, the action scenes in this novel were well written and easy to follow without feeling lost. It’s believable, raw, bloody, and emotional. Everything moves at a breakneck pace but the descriptions are enough for readers to actually be able to visualize what is happening, as if you’re a part of the action. Each of the characters are unique in their own way, and there wasn’t a single one that I found to be boring or lacking. I wanted to know everything about each of them, more! Each of them seemed to highlight and represent each facet of human emotion without being cliché. All of Cole’s world building was reflected through his characters, and as I have said in previous reviews of this series, what a world to be in. The trauma and loss is palpable, unlike some novels I have read in the past, I actually felt for Heloise. Her coming of age story is one of violence and suffering, yet she comes to terms with all of this to become an incredibly engaging character. She finds her voice. I enjoyed it so much. If you can get your hands on it, read it.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    With The Killing Light Myke Cole brings The Sacred Throne trilogy to a dramatic and satisfying conclusion.From the start, this series has been brutal and heartbreaking in its presentation of the world--not to shock or revel in the violence, but because the world can be a harsh and violent place. In slim volumes (for the fantasy genre), Cole builds an entire world out of a very contained story. Seen through the eyes of a single character, Cole's craft of world building and story telling is truly With The Killing Light Myke Cole brings The Sacred Throne trilogy to a dramatic and satisfying conclusion.From the start, this series has been brutal and heartbreaking in its presentation of the world--not to shock or revel in the violence, but because the world can be a harsh and violent place. In slim volumes (for the fantasy genre), Cole builds an entire world out of a very contained story. Seen through the eyes of a single character, Cole's craft of world building and story telling is truly an accomplishment.And his central hero of Heloise, a girl just trying to do the best she can for the people she cares about, is engaging in her complexity and simple humanity. Young girl and revered hero, daughter and leader, lover, commander, child, and savior--the tensions in Heloise's character add depth and drama to her unfolding story. She is not a heroic figure cut from some story--and she is. In her vulnerability, she is more human and more true for her weaknesses and doubts. She is the sort of hero we need, because most heroes are truly people who feel they do not belong--but who press on regardless in order to achieve "just one more impossible thing."Cole's handling of the story rests comfortably within fantasy and military fiction. But in the same moment, he does not follow what is comfortable or familiar. With diverse voices, shocking twists, and lingering themes that defy easy answers--this trilogy succeeds on many levels. It is bold, finely crafted, exciting from start to finish--and lands with bittersweet weight across every beautiful, tragic moment.
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  • Tatiana Dengo
    January 1, 1970
    Never thought I would find myself saying this, but in all honesty: this book chewed me up and spit me back out again. The Killing Light is the combination of all of the greatest strengths of the two books that came before it. It reinforced the topic of the first book: the harsh growing pains of realizing the world you have been taught about has been a deception all along. It included battles more heart-pounding than anything that happened in the second book. And best of all, the demons. Theres Never thought I would find myself saying this, but in all honesty: this book chewed me up and spit me back out again. The Killing Light is the combination of all of the greatest strengths of the two books that came before it. It reinforced the topic of the first book: the harsh growing pains of realizing the world you have been taught about has been a deception all along. It included battles more heart-pounding than anything that happened in the second book. And best of all, the demons. There’s TONS of them in this book, enough to make up for the lack of them in book two (and some of them didn’t even come from hell). Once you reach the middle of this book, you won’t be able to put it down. The Killing Light reaches a poetic climax that will shock you, and might make you laugh in shock, at the incredulity of it all. After that climax, I am very pleased with how great this series ended up being when you look back to it as a whole. Myke Cole is one of those writers whom I feel has a great understanding of the human condition, and this especially shines through when you see how he voices Heloise’s anxieties and insecurities. While I’ve read on Twitter that he unfortunately doesn’t plan to return to this world, I truly hope he’ll return to the medieval fantasy genre eventually. Highly recommended to fans of: medieval epic fantasy, and readers looking for a satisfying lgbtqia romance.
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  • Guillermo
    January 1, 1970
    I have to say I originally fell in love with this trilogy, with what it tried to do, with its style and pacing, with every last one of its character and its story. The first book was an utter joy to read. So was the second, up until the disappointing Deus Ex Machina at the end of it. This one wrecked any last hope I had with half a book still to go. Its not that the ending was bad, or that the characters themselves turned tedious. I enjoyed reading about most of them, thought they were all I have to say I originally fell in love with this trilogy, with what it tried to do, with its style and pacing, with every last one of its character and its story. The first book was an utter joy to read. So was the second, up until the disappointing Deus Ex Machina at the end of it. This one wrecked any last hope I had with half a book still to go. Its not that the ending was bad, or that the characters themselves turned tedious. I enjoyed reading about most of them, thought they were all intriguing and well-written. And I actually enjoyed the ending itself as well, if an ending can ever be considered apart from all the plot elements that drive the story into it. What I truly hated was the choice of making the devils into the main antagonists of the story, instead of the Order, when the other two books spent themselves basically setting the Order as the enemy. It was both lazy and disappointing. In one fell swoop the author killed what I consider was the driving heart of the series, and replaced with a standard and generic 'save the world' that felt utterly flat, all the more because the devils were utterly boring as enemies.I would have much preferred a final confrontation between Tone and Heloise, and think it would have been more fitting with the story of the two previous entries.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    Myke Cole provides a perfect ending to this series. Seeing Heloise's saga end is heartbreaking for me as a reader because Mr. Cole has written a damn near perfect trilogy here and I wanted it to be so much longer. I want more time with the all of these characters and I am not going to get it but at the same time I realize that all good things must come to an end and this end is as beautiful as it is brutal. The Sacred Throne trilogy is one of the best trilogies I've ever consumed and consume it Myke Cole provides a perfect ending to this series. Seeing Heloise's saga end is heartbreaking for me as a reader because Mr. Cole has written a damn near perfect trilogy here and I wanted it to be so much longer. I want more time with the all of these characters and I am not going to get it but at the same time I realize that all good things must come to an end and this end is as beautiful as it is brutal. The Sacred Throne trilogy is one of the best trilogies I've ever consumed and consume it I did. I devoured these books not because they were easy to read but because I fell in love with the characters. Each installment better than the last and each more heart wrenching.Mykes terse style of writing lends to reading this whole series at a breakneck pace. It's impossible not to share the urgency of Heloise and the rest of the characters as the reader is dragged through the entire gamut of human emotion. There is no respite from the story here, no stopping to smell the roses, the pacing is absolutely brutal and rightfully so. Myke spares no words here yet is not Spartan in his worldbuilding. I am truly amazed at how much the world comes alive in these three books, however it is the characters that drive this amazing tale and if you haven't fallen in love with them by the end of the story then I posit that you have no soul.
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