Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans
Another pop history pageturner from the New York Times bestselling authors of George Washington's Secret Six and Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates.When the British fought the young United States during the War of 1812, they knew that taking the mouth of the Mississippi River was the key to crippling their former colony. Capturing the city of New Orleans and stopping trade up the river sounded like a simple task--New Orleans was far away from Washington, out of sight and out of mind for the politicians.What the British didn't count on was the power of General Andrew Jackson. A formidable military leader with a grudge against the British and a heart for the common man, he rallied the divided inhabitants of New Orleans, bringing together Frenchmen, Native Americans, freed slaves, pirates, and Kentucky woodsmen.In their now trademark fashion, Kilmeade and Yaeger will trace the development of Jackson's character and bring the reader to the scenes of one of the most pivotal--and surprising--battles in American history.

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans Details

TitleAndrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans
Author
ReleaseOct 24th, 2017
PublisherSentinel
ISBN-139780735213234
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, North American Hi..., American History, Biography, Politics, Presidents

Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans Review

  • L.A. Starks
    January 1, 1970
    Although history gives theoretical (and civic) context when one is young, it can be far more interesting and perhaps should be reserved for those no longer in school, or at least those of us with some longer context of living, aka "lived experience."While I appreciate that rough-hewn, backwoods Andrew Jackson is considered to have a mixed legacy, this book is well worth reading for its explanation of the Battle of New Orleans, the key turning point in the lesser-known, but vital, conflict in Ame Although history gives theoretical (and civic) context when one is young, it can be far more interesting and perhaps should be reserved for those no longer in school, or at least those of us with some longer context of living, aka "lived experience."While I appreciate that rough-hewn, backwoods Andrew Jackson is considered to have a mixed legacy, this book is well worth reading for its explanation of the Battle of New Orleans, the key turning point in the lesser-known, but vital, conflict in American history--the War of 1812. (Or as the Canadians call it, the War of Southern Aggression, since leaders less astute than Jackson started off by trying to invade Canada.) Kilmeade and Yaeger have done a superb job of explaining, with maps and descriptions of strategy, just how Andrew Jackson, suffering from dysentery and the effects of a bullet lodged near his lung, led his multi-ethnic troops from Tennessee woodsmen to Creoles to freedmen to pirates in beating back the British just a few miles from New Orleans. The British had been victorious over Napoleon and so were considered the best fighting force in the world. They aimed their might at Louisiana's vital nexus. Jackson and his Americans saved for the just-formed United States not just a important gateway (think of New York City today), but the entire Louisiana Purchase-- half the nation's new land area--in key battles during a few short days in the winter of 1814-1815.Highly accessible, Kilmeade-Yaeger's book differs from most history tomes because it's so usefully focused.
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  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    I bought this book at an airport to read on a plane. This is very much an airport book. It's entertaining, and it was fun to learn more about the battle of New Orleans, but Jackson is a complicated character, and this portrayal crosses the line from "sympathetic" into "fawning," and "borderline inaccurate, historical revisionism." I know those are harsh words, but this book glosses over A LOT. I should have been more suspicious when Brad f-ing Thor was one of the jacket authors praising this. An I bought this book at an airport to read on a plane. This is very much an airport book. It's entertaining, and it was fun to learn more about the battle of New Orleans, but Jackson is a complicated character, and this portrayal crosses the line from "sympathetic" into "fawning," and "borderline inaccurate, historical revisionism." I know those are harsh words, but this book glosses over A LOT. I should have been more suspicious when Brad f-ing Thor was one of the jacket authors praising this. Anyway, if you want to read a good book about this general period that touches on Jackson, read the Henry Clay biography.
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  • Celia
    January 1, 1970
    Another excellent narrative non-fiction. I not only read but listened to the voice of Brian Kilmeade, the author. He is a radio talk show host on Fox. His reading expertise shows.I know that many people do not value or like Andrew Jackson. I understand why because his stance on Indian rights was abominable. However, I do begrudgingly admire him for his courage, his courtly manner and his love for his wife, Rachel.The Volunteers from TN were greatly outnumbered in the Battle of New Orleans. But J Another excellent narrative non-fiction. I not only read but listened to the voice of Brian Kilmeade, the author. He is a radio talk show host on Fox. His reading expertise shows.I know that many people do not value or like Andrew Jackson. I understand why because his stance on Indian rights was abominable. However, I do begrudgingly admire him for his courage, his courtly manner and his love for his wife, Rachel.The Volunteers from TN were greatly outnumbered in the Battle of New Orleans. But Jackson out-generaled his British opponent. With no formal battle strategy training, he was still able to win.This is the second book I have read about Jackson, the other being American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, by Jon Meacham.Jackson was a very interesting man and reading both these books furthered my knowledge of him4 stars.
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  • Renae
    January 1, 1970
    This book should not be considered 'non-fiction; rather it should be placed with the personal essay collection and titled "AndRew JackSON is the BESTEST president ever". I have no idea how a non-fiction historical book gets written and published without one single reference to a primary source but somehow this nonsense did. The quality (lack thereof) of historical fact checking and reference wouldn't even pass a high school history class. At best this was a cute story from a personal opinion sta This book should not be considered 'non-fiction; rather it should be placed with the personal essay collection and titled "AndRew JackSON is the BESTEST president ever". I have no idea how a non-fiction historical book gets written and published without one single reference to a primary source but somehow this nonsense did. The quality (lack thereof) of historical fact checking and reference wouldn't even pass a high school history class. At best this was a cute story from a personal opinion stand point. At worst, and it was mostly at its worst, it glossed over a lot of facts while substituted personal opinion. The endorsements by Brad Thor and Brad Meltzer should have been a giant red flag.
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  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    We were lucky to win the War of 1812. We had lost control of the war in the north, losing battles in Canada. Then British troops set the White House on fire. If the British conquered New Orleans, they would control the mouth of the Mississippi River, cutting America off from its dream of western expansion, let alone forever changing Mardi Gras as we know it. In steps Andrew Jackson in the well-known refrain: “In 1814 we took a little trip, . . .” It’s not David McCullough, but read it for the im We were lucky to win the War of 1812. We had lost control of the war in the north, losing battles in Canada. Then British troops set the White House on fire. If the British conquered New Orleans, they would control the mouth of the Mississippi River, cutting America off from its dream of western expansion, let alone forever changing Mardi Gras as we know it. In steps Andrew Jackson in the well-known refrain: “In 1814 we took a little trip, . . .” It’s not David McCullough, but read it for the important American history which most of us never learned.
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  • Wes Knapp
    January 1, 1970
    I love American history and this book opened my eyes to aspects of the War of 1812 that I had only briefly studied. This is a must read for those interested in the history of New Orleans. I was surprised to read of Sam Houston and Davy Crockett 's involvement in Old Hickory's army.From Jean Lafitte to the Ursuline nuns to the multicultural mix of New Orlean's own citizens - all have a part in this story. Don't miss it!
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  • Scott Hitchcock
    January 1, 1970
    3.5*'sEntertaining account of the events. It's funny how much you forget from your school days about important historical events such as these.
  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    This is a breezy book which follows the life of Andrew Jackson. From his earliest orphan and schooling experiences, it follows the years of his 20's quite quickly. As being from Nashville, TN Jackson is always looked upon as the backwoods "outsider" in the systems which saw Eastern coast city men heading each and every aspect of the government and the military. So much so that the "west" as it was then in identity, was not a central onus for purpose. It follows all the linear in time progression This is a breezy book which follows the life of Andrew Jackson. From his earliest orphan and schooling experiences, it follows the years of his 20's quite quickly. As being from Nashville, TN Jackson is always looked upon as the backwoods "outsider" in the systems which saw Eastern coast city men heading each and every aspect of the government and the military. So much so that the "west" as it was then in identity, was not a central onus for purpose. It follows all the linear in time progression events following the Louisiana Purchase which had Andrew Jackson at core positions. And especially those of battle occurring after the first 1812 recruitment episodes. More than one. He was instrumental in raising a force to combat Indian/British allied forces in the "west". There are several battles highlighted in detail before the New Orleans success in 1814. It's written with jumps, IMHO. But the graphics, photos and other detailed accounts of those later years (and especially the physical injuries)- are excellent. But this does not give immense motivation copy or theory. To me that is a excellent quality. But I find others want interpretation of minutia far more to their particular slant of onus upon much later history or "eyes" of politico. This does give you a credible feel for the man, and how he was far more fair minded than given any credit for being. Detail upon mercy for prisoners and survivors, or to the surrendering chief and many other personal fellow soldier outcomes are detailed. But this is NOT done in the manner of psychological erudite analysis to give you any great insight to how he thought about himself or his own core cognition, IMHO. He hated the British for personal reasons and he had immense tragedy in his first 30 years. But you do understand why he he wanted a completely independent nation to be the MOST directed AWAY from Great Britain's influence. Even unto trade or any criteria that cut into the USA sovereign self dictates of choices. And how that Gulf Coast and Mississippi water way entry was so important to insure that it happened and what intense planning he contrived to fight there to win.Tough. Old Hickory indeed! It was no sure thing by any means. It changed the entire direction of the continental government as a "whole" growing identity and for practical applications. Both!
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  • Matthew Haddick
    January 1, 1970
    I got this book for Christmas 2017 and read it in three days.I wasn't sure exactly what to expect from it. I'd heard Kilmeade promote it and seen it advertised on the web, but I'd never read a Kilmeade book before. I didn't know if it would be a history book or in some way a self-promotion for Kilmeade, a morning news show anchor.Well, I was surprised. It was stunningly good. It is definitely a history book, but it has a story-telling aspect to it that's difficult to find in most books of this g I got this book for Christmas 2017 and read it in three days.I wasn't sure exactly what to expect from it. I'd heard Kilmeade promote it and seen it advertised on the web, but I'd never read a Kilmeade book before. I didn't know if it would be a history book or in some way a self-promotion for Kilmeade, a morning news show anchor.Well, I was surprised. It was stunningly good. It is definitely a history book, but it has a story-telling aspect to it that's difficult to find in most books of this genre. "Riveting" is a good way to put it - it has the details and sources of a historical narrative, but it also contains a "can't-put-it-down" nature that's very rare in history.The Battle of New Orleans is one of the most important in American history. It guaranteed the fast and unimpeded expansion of the United States into the West. Had this battle been won by the British, our nation would look very different - not only on a map, but also in our culture.As such, it is surprising even to me how little I knew of this battle going into the book. I'd consider myself a card-carrying American history nerd, but of this battle I must admit I knew virtually nothing. All I knew was Andrew Jackson defeated a superior British force at New Orleans, after the peace treaty had already been signed.There was so much more to the story. Jackson's force wasn't just outnumbered - it was cobbled together from all nationalities and backgrounds, forming a melting pot of an army. They were inexperienced and ill-equipped to deal with the British force that included several thousand more experience and better equipped regulars.Not to mention Jackson had very little experience as a general, and was going up against Edward Pakenham, a veteran of the Peninsular War, and Admiral Alexander Cochrane, who had landed the force that had sacked and burned Washington, D.C.Yet somehow Jackson pulled it off.Now, Kilmeade's portrait is unnecessarily positive of Jackson. He never said a bad thing about Jackson's character in the entire book. That's not a necessarily bad thing, but he did leave out some of Jackson's negative traits while listing the positive ones.But that does little to dim the excellency of Kilmeade's work. It's definitely worth a read. It's short - only about 230 pages, and without particularly small print or tight spacing. You could read this in a week.I'm excited to see more from Kilmeade. I will definitely read more of his work.
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  • John Nevola
    January 1, 1970
    Andrew Jackson and the Miracle at New OrleansWhen most Americans think about the battle of New Orleans, they envision a day long battle in which the hapless British threw themselves against a wall of well-entrenched Americans and suffered an ignominious defeat. There was a battle on January 8, 1815 that conforms to this perception but it was the culmination of a series of skirmishes that led up to that fateful (for the British) day.In fact, the struggle to keep New Orleans from British hands too Andrew Jackson and the Miracle at New OrleansWhen most Americans think about the battle of New Orleans, they envision a day long battle in which the hapless British threw themselves against a wall of well-entrenched Americans and suffered an ignominious defeat. There was a battle on January 8, 1815 that conforms to this perception but it was the culmination of a series of skirmishes that led up to that fateful (for the British) day.In fact, the struggle to keep New Orleans from British hands took the better part of two weeks. This does not include smaller battles for Pensacola and Mobile Bay that preceded the siege of the Crescent City.At the center of all this activity was General Andrew Jackson who commanded a mixed bag of American regulars, militiamen, volunteers and pirates. It was his job to keep New Orleans (and the Mississippi River) in American hands lest the British seize control of the western United States; a prospect that would prevent the western expansion of the young nation.How Jackson pulled this remarkable feat off against the best infantry in the world (they had just defeated Napoleon) is the crux of the Miracle of New Orleans. Written in a simple and engaging style, the book portrays the facts of the battle and withholds judgement of the participants. It makes a compelling case that the outcome of this battle was as important to the United States as the victory at Yorktown.Highly recommended to anyone interested in the history of the United States and the War of 1812.John E. Nevola - Author of The Last JumpUS Army VeteranMilitary Writer's Society of America
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  • Fred Forbes
    January 1, 1970
    My 5th great uncle was a murderer. Also Thomas Jefferson's nephew. He and his brother killed a slave named George for dropping a plate. Rather than face trial, the two decided to commit suicide in the family plot in Western Kentucky. While one of them, Lilburne Lewis used a stick to demonstrate how to kill oneself should the flintlock malfunction after they attempted to shoot each other the gun accidentally discharged killing him. The "survivor", Isham Lewis was arrested but managed to escape th My 5th great uncle was a murderer. Also Thomas Jefferson's nephew. He and his brother killed a slave named George for dropping a plate. Rather than face trial, the two decided to commit suicide in the family plot in Western Kentucky. While one of them, Lilburne Lewis used a stick to demonstrate how to kill oneself should the flintlock malfunction after they attempted to shoot each other the gun accidentally discharged killing him. The "survivor", Isham Lewis was arrested but managed to escape the Salem KY jail. The initial version I read indicated that he took off for New Orleans was swept up in the defense of the city and died in the Battle of New Orleans under an assumed name. Silly me, I tried to find him in the record of the deaths but quickly realized that it would be difficult if I did not know his assumed name. The U.S. dead numbered about 300 versus 10 times that many for the British.At any rate, that background is what sparked my interest in what actually happened so I picked up a copy of this book due to the good reviews and found it to be engaging. An excellent and concise and well written work that I can certainly recommend to anyone with a interest in American history. One thing I did not realize was the "melting pot" nature of the American defenders. Blacks, Indians, Whites, Creoles and Pirates joined forces to prevent Britain from taking over the city. The Brits were certainly surprised at the result since earlier in the war the taking of Washington DC and the burning of the White House were a cake walk.Interesting behind the scenes look at the diplomatic process going on in Ghent while the battle took place, the problem of slow communications and the reason the Brits insisted on specific language be included in the treaty. Nah, no spoiler, enjoy the book.By the way, just uncovered new info that Isham Lewis fought in the battle and was buried on the battlefield, supposedly under his own name. Interesting that he does not appear in the material compiled by the National Park Service and the University of New Orleans. The whole story is outlined in the court records of Ohio regarding the successful lawsuit of his widow for his back pay and pension. Looks like I'll have to dig a bit deeper!
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  • Joe Ricca
    January 1, 1970
    A jaunty telling of the War of 1812, and the exceptional battlefield tactics of Andrew Jackson. Though after reading you will be asking yourself if it wasn't for the over confident and greedy British Generals, would the United States look different today. Possibly, and the Native Americans (I hope that's what they are going by today) may have fared better as well. Greed, it's still whats for dinner. Just don't choke on your just deserts.
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  • Richard Fournet
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐5/5This book should be required reading for all students!Especially Louisiana students!All of the residents of New Orleans, this is a book that should be in your library!You can thank me later 😇 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️5/5This book should be required reading for all students!Especially Louisiana students!All of the residents of New Orleans, this is a book that should be in your library!You can thank me later 😇
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  • RITA BOTTILLO
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful readThis should be read to our schoolchildren when studying the war of 1812 . This is well written telling of our history that takes the reader the battle as it unfolds. It is instructing, and entertaining. It captures the spirit of the establishment of our republic. A mustread
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  • Jack Hansen
    January 1, 1970
    A brief background about Andrew Jackson's beginnings and his perseverance in most difficult situations preludes the Battle of New Orleans. This city is crucial for control of the territory west of the Mississippi River and the wealth such a port provides via trade from Northern and Midwestern regions in North America. If the British capture the city, America could easily collapse as a new country. The British destruction of Washington D.C. scatters the United States government into survival mode A brief background about Andrew Jackson's beginnings and his perseverance in most difficult situations preludes the Battle of New Orleans. This city is crucial for control of the territory west of the Mississippi River and the wealth such a port provides via trade from Northern and Midwestern regions in North America. If the British capture the city, America could easily collapse as a new country. The British destruction of Washington D.C. scatters the United States government into survival mode. Recent military victories at Fort Henry and Pensacola bolster US spirits but the battles are without reinforcements from a centralized government and a Secretary of War, James Monroe, who recently adds that hat to his Secretary of State collection, an onus he accepts from President Madison due to the casualties of war. The author narrates this well-written account with excitement and energy. Brian Kilmeade provides readers with his passion for the subject. He acquaints his audience with the characteristics that set Andrew Jackson apart from most of his contemporaries. The Battle of New Orleans showcases Jackson's talent as a tactician, leader, and inspiration to those who follow and fight with him. The man makes enemies as easily as he makes decisions and he is a decisive individual who assesses men, animals, terrain, and his enemy better than most. Kilmeade describes the genius behind events, how outnumbered and over-matched people come together to repulse the mighty British Navy and sophisticated, seasoned soldiers in the climax. This historical turning point in America's story exists because of a sense of duty and drive of one man, General Andrew Jackson.
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  • Art
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very readable history book and a surprisingly wonderful quick read.There is nothing dry about this story of Andrew Jackson and his successful defense of New Orleans against vastly superior British forces in the War of 1812.Jackson is a populist president who earned his following while saving his country and its future by winning the battle at a time when the country had no experienced generals and was lacking leadership.At risk is the control of the Mississippi River, which would preve This is a very readable history book and a surprisingly wonderful quick read.There is nothing dry about this story of Andrew Jackson and his successful defense of New Orleans against vastly superior British forces in the War of 1812.Jackson is a populist president who earned his following while saving his country and its future by winning the battle at a time when the country had no experienced generals and was lacking leadership.At risk is the control of the Mississippi River, which would prevent the country from expanding westward, and the future of the emerging nation.Jackson is an amazing character. As a child, he was wounded by British soldiers and left without a family during the Revolutionary War. He falls in love with his beloved Rachel, settles in Tennessee and leads the likes of Sam Houston and Davy Crockett in a successful war with William Wetherford's Red Stick Creek Indians.So when Britain again attacks the US, leaving its Capital and the White House in ashes, Jackson and his Tennessee Volunteers are called on to defend the nation.I can't say enough about how good this book is, how readable the history and how amazing the story. I'm going to have to go back and read the authors' earlier effort.
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  • Hunter Satterfield
    January 1, 1970
    Quick, insightful read on the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812. Taught me a few things I didn't know about the War of 1812 and Old Hickory. The third book that Kilmeade has written in the "pop history" genre. All three books are very good, but the Jefferson/Tripoli pirates one was my favorite. I recommend all three for those seeking light history lessons.
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  • Chad Brady
    January 1, 1970
    Very good look at the battle that made a president. As much of a draw as the war of 1812 was, the battle for New Orleans was a decisive victory for the Americans, and it is the battle that saved post 1812 America from a resurgent presence of the British in the americas! USA! USA! USA!!
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Well researched, excellent notes and bibliography, Kilmeade also makes history writing a page turner. I really enjoyed his previous two books, George Washington's spy ring and Jefferson and the Barbary Pirates, and this book does not disappoint. Well worth the time, check it out.
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  • Aimee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is very well-researched and worth reading if you are interested in U.S. History. It relates the Battle of New Orleans mainly through archived letters from the time. The book does seem to portray Andrew Jackson in a very positive light and glosses over some of his less popular traits revealing the authors' biases. It was a defining, culturally significant time in U.S. History that set the stage for generations to come. The book does not go into deep detail about this time period but foc This book is very well-researched and worth reading if you are interested in U.S. History. It relates the Battle of New Orleans mainly through archived letters from the time. The book does seem to portray Andrew Jackson in a very positive light and glosses over some of his less popular traits revealing the authors' biases. It was a defining, culturally significant time in U.S. History that set the stage for generations to come. The book does not go into deep detail about this time period but focuses on this one battle and General Jackson's role in it. If read in conjunction with other more objective historical books, it is a good book to have as part of your personal library.
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  • Russ
    January 1, 1970
    Very readable. A nice balance between just hitting the wave tops and a Rick Atkinson-type, detailed look at the historical battle of New Orleans. At 237 pages, its short enough that you don't get bogged down on too much detail, but well-researched with just enough detail to give readers a real sense of what happened and why its important.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    History that reads like narrative is always more fun. I might have enjoyed my history classes if the text had been this interesting. The War of 1812 was much more critical than I ever realized and Andrew Jackson is my new hero. Loved it.
  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    What a remarkable leader and patriot. Excellent book. God bless Old Hickory!!
  • William Matthies
    January 1, 1970
    Prior to reading this book, my knowledge of the Battle of New Orleans came from a 1959 Johnny Horton song, "The Battle of New Orleans" (https://youtu.be/VL7XS_8qgXM). The song mentions "Colonel Jackson" in the second line but Horton might as well said it was Colonel Sanders since my 11-year-old mind had not encountered much history to that point. All I knew was I liked the drums and the fact that they replaced a melted down cannon with an alligator. But this book corrected that.The writing is go Prior to reading this book, my knowledge of the Battle of New Orleans came from a 1959 Johnny Horton song, "The Battle of New Orleans" (https://youtu.be/VL7XS_8qgXM). The song mentions "Colonel Jackson" in the second line but Horton might as well said it was Colonel Sanders since my 11-year-old mind had not encountered much history to that point. All I knew was I liked the drums and the fact that they replaced a melted down cannon with an alligator. But this book corrected that.The writing is good as is the balance between providing enough historical detail versus too much. If you'd like to know more about the key battle in what many regard as the second war of independence between the United States and Britain, this is for you.
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  • Jpp
    January 1, 1970
    With an impressive narrative talent, and even bringing no new fact or ideas, Kilmeade wrote a solid story of this useless but historical battle where Jackson smashed a British Army still involved in Napoleonian wars. Even won after the end of the II Independence war, New Orleans battle had a strong symbolic value, bringing together French Luisiana militias, American volunteers, Haitian freemen, French pirats and US regular troops in a fight where they killed 2000 British veteran soldiers and suf With an impressive narrative talent, and even bringing no new fact or ideas, Kilmeade wrote a solid story of this useless but historical battle where Jackson smashed a British Army still involved in Napoleonian wars. Even won after the end of the II Independence war, New Orleans battle had a strong symbolic value, bringing together French Luisiana militias, American volunteers, Haitian freemen, French pirats and US regular troops in a fight where they killed 2000 British veteran soldiers and suffered less than 20 casualties.
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  • Wayne
    January 1, 1970
    It seems a bit of a stretch to term an historical account a "page turner", but "Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans" fits the bill. Granted, most of the book describes the battle & the events immediately leading up to it which, as with many compact historical events (e.g. "Blackhawk Down"), can make for exciting reading. However, the author does provide context surrounding this famous battle for the reader, mostly from the standpoint of Jackson's participation in the lead-up events It seems a bit of a stretch to term an historical account a "page turner", but "Andrew Jackson and the Miracle of New Orleans" fits the bill. Granted, most of the book describes the battle & the events immediately leading up to it which, as with many compact historical events (e.g. "Blackhawk Down"), can make for exciting reading. However, the author does provide context surrounding this famous battle for the reader, mostly from the standpoint of Jackson's participation in the lead-up events. Not being familiar with either the man nor the Battle of New Orleans, I found the book quite awe inspiring. Author Brian Kilmeade recounts many incidents that highlight Jackson's character: his bravery, diplomacy, honour, intelligence, love of his wife, humility in God's eyes, sternness, respect for his enemies, intransigence (to the detriment of both allies & enemies), & love for his country. One particularly poignant incident [SPOILER ALERT] involved the massacre of a village of about 300 whites, blacks, & Indians (including women & children) by a band of renegade Indians. Having received the governor's, as well as the President's, permission to launch a punitive expedition, Jackson's men descended upon the enemy encampment. All the enemy warriors were killed; some women & possibly children perished, but the remaining 84 prisoners were comprised entirely of women & children. One male infant was pried from his dead mother's embrace & brought to Jackson. Upon asking his prisoners why they refused to look after the orphaned child, the general was told that, because all its relations were dead, he too should also be killed. Jackson, citing the exigencies of Higher Authority, mixed brown sugar and water & fed the squalling little bundle of humanity until it revived. This child was eventually adopted by Mr. & Mrs. Jackson & raised as one of their own. Although modern historians appear somewhat loathe to impute acknowledgement of Deity to the historical characters of which they write, Mr. Kilmeade does not shy away from recording such. God, whether one believed in Him or not, was simply a fact of life in years past; people were unafraid to invoke His name, whether in passing conversation or in supplication. One moving example [SPOILER ALERT] occurred as New Orleans was being advanced on by an overwhelming British force, with only Jackson's quickly cobbled together crew of settlers, Cajuns, Indians, blacks (free & slave), pirates, townsfolk, & frontiersmen standing in their path. The Ursuline nuns sequestered themselves within the chapel & beseeched Providential succour. When the city was eventually delivered from danger on January 8, 1815, a solemn mass was held shortly thereafter. The Mother Superior had vowed, during the battle, to do so should the city be delivered. To this day, this vow is still honoured by these devout sisters. Although it's probably superfluous to mention, these nuns cared for the wounded & sick of both sides after the engagement.The author delved into mountains of research in order to ascertain exact numbers, dates, chronology, & other related data in order that an accurate a picture as possible be presented. Where data, such as number of troops involved in a certain event, is not specifically known, Mr. Kilmeade readily acknowledges such. Thankfully, this book contains an index (a number of historical works that I've recently read lack such a useful tool; "chapter notes" are a poor substitute). A number of well drawn maps really assisted in understanding events, & they were liberally located in sections of the book where events unfolded. Overall, the book itself is well organized, & it was a treat to read.
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  • Paul Roper
    January 1, 1970
    First this:You can find "Battle of New Orleans on Amazon Music... In 1814 we took a little tripAlong with Colonel Jackson down the mighty MississippiWe took a little bacon and we took a little beansAnd we caught the bloody British in the town of New OrleansWe fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while agoWe fired once more and they began to runnin'On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoWe looked down the river and we seed the British comeAnd First this:You can find "Battle of New Orleans on Amazon Music... In 1814 we took a little tripAlong with Colonel Jackson down the mighty MississippiWe took a little bacon and we took a little beansAnd we caught the bloody British in the town of New OrleansWe fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while agoWe fired once more and they began to runnin'On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoWe looked down the river and we seed the British comeAnd there must have been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drumThey stepped so high and they made their bugles ringWe stood behind our cotton bales and didn't say a thingWe fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while agoWe fired once more and they began to runnin'On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoOld Hickory said we could take 'em by surpriseIf we didn't fire our muskets till we looked 'em in the eyesWe held our fire till we seed their faces wellThen we opened up our squirrel guns and gave 'emWell, weFired our guns and the British kept a-comin'There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while agoWe fired once more and they began to runnin'On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoYeah they ran through the briers and they ran through the bramblesAnd they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't goThey ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'emOn down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoWe fired our cannon till the barrel melted downSo we grabbed an alligator and we fought another roundWe filled his head with cannonballs 'n' powdered his behindAnd when we touched the powder off, the gator lost his mindWe fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while agoWe fired once more and they began to runnin'On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoYeah they ran through the briers and they ran through the bramblesAnd they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't goThey ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'emOn down the Mississippi to the Gulf of MexicoHut, hut, three, fourSound off, three, fourHut, hut, three, fourSound off, three, fourHut, hut, three, fourWriter/s: JAMES MORRIS Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLCLyrics licensed and provided by LyricFindEasy to read, well constructed, looking forward to the next one... I had a hard time putting this down, riveting...
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This reads more like a thriller novel that will keep you up half the night than the history it actually is. Because it was so different from the nonfiction history books I usually read, I was initially unsure whether I would like it when I started reading, but once I got into it I couldn't stop reading. And because it is about the defense of New Orleans during the War of 1812, I already knew how it ended!One thing I've noticed about the War of 1812 in general is that most of the accounts seem to This reads more like a thriller novel that will keep you up half the night than the history it actually is. Because it was so different from the nonfiction history books I usually read, I was initially unsure whether I would like it when I started reading, but once I got into it I couldn't stop reading. And because it is about the defense of New Orleans during the War of 1812, I already knew how it ended!One thing I've noticed about the War of 1812 in general is that most of the accounts seem to be somewhat biased, although I suppose that comes with the territory - an inconclusive war in which no territory changed hands and the treaty ended it was basically an agreement to end hostilities and did not even address the casus belli (and British and American historians even disagree on whether the fact that the British rules about impressment were technically rescinded before the start of hostilities meant the whole war had no real basis). And "The Great Compromiser" Henry Clay, who helped negotiate the treaty didn't approve of it either. From what I could see this tended toward the American point of view, although the British point of view was not completely ignored. Most interestingly, the book pointed out that to Great Britain and most of the rest of Europe, the Louisiana Purchase was not seen as a legitimate acquisition of territory by the United States - to most of Europe, Napoleon had stolen the land from Spain and had no right to sell it.Another interesting tidbit: Thomas ap Catesby Jones, the US Navy commander who worked with Jackson to defend New Orleans, was the inspiration for Commodore J- in Moby Dick.
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  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third book I have encountered from the author (the third of which I am almost finished listening to on audiobook) [1], and they all share some general similarities.  For one, all of the works have been about the early history of the American Republic, and have dealt with courage and daring in ways that are clearly meant to be relevant to the contemporary period.  By and large, this is a good book and a book that is easy to appreciate as someone who is interested in the life and times This is the third book I have encountered from the author (the third of which I am almost finished listening to on audiobook) [1], and they all share some general similarities.  For one, all of the works have been about the early history of the American Republic, and have dealt with courage and daring in ways that are clearly meant to be relevant to the contemporary period.  By and large, this is a good book and a book that is easy to appreciate as someone who is interested in the life and times of Andrew Jackson [2].  The most irritating part of this book, though, is its maps.  Particularly speaking, there are maps in this book that claim through their boundaries that Texas had been a part of the Louisiana Purchase (which was not true), and had been given up by the Adams-Onis treaty of 1819 and then re-annexed in 1845, which helped prompt the Mexican-American War.  Now, these maps do not include a commentary, but they do buttress a misguided view of American diplomatic history that remains popular today for Southerners, suggesting a darker political side to this book that is not explored in the text itself.The contents of this book run about 250 pages and take up thirteen chapters after a brief prologue that gives some of the biography of Andrew Jackson.  The first few chapters of the book provide some context of the War of 1812 for readers who are not familiar with it, looking at the way that freedoms were at risk from high-handed British actions on the high seas (1), the lackluster American performance at the beginning of the War of 1812 with failed invasions of Canada (2), and the makings of Andrew Jackson as an effective general through his prosecution of the Creek Wars and as an effective political leader in Tennessee (3).  A discussion of Jackson's brutal and decisive victory against the Creeks (4) precedes a narrative of the British invasion plans of 1814 (5).  At this point the narrative moves to a discussion of Jackson's successful moves on Mobile and Pensacola (6) and the British choice to target New Orleans after failing in their previous attempts to roll up the American south (7).  Three chapters cover the loss of Lake Borgne by the overmatched American flotilla (8), the slow process of assembling both armies below New Orleans (9), and the first battle of New Orleans, an indecisive night attack by Jackson that blunted British initiative and cost many British lives (10).  The rest of the book looks at the more famous Second Battle of New Orleans and the American establishment of sound defensive lines (11), the decisive defensive victory by Jackson's army (12), and the withdrawal of British forces and the acknowledgment of peace (13), followed by an epilogue, acknowledgments, notes, suggestions for further reading, and topical index.There is a lot to appreciate and enjoy about this book.  The authors clearly have a firm grasp of writing compelling narratives, Andrew Jackson makes for great and colorful copy, and the arrogance of the British leadership in particular receives a gruesome and appropriate judgment.  This book may strike non-American readers as a bit more bumptious than some might be comfortable with, but the authors deserve a great deal of credit for their attention to diplomatic history and their placement of the Battle of New Orleans in a context that extends from the nervous and tentative beginnings of America's history as an independent republic to the more self-confident attitude that the United States had following the battle, where the defensive victory of a motley crew of mismatched American troops over the cream of Wellington's army inspired Americans with a great deal of martial pride and made Andrew Jackson an important figure not only in military history but also American politics.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...[2] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...
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  • Brent Ecenbarger
    January 1, 1970
    I'd read a biography on Andrew Jackson last year (Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times by H.W. Brands), but was given this one as a recommendation by another reader, who gave the glowing recommendation that it was interesting and could be finished in two nights. As a result, I already had a pretty good knowledge of most of what was in this book prior to reading it. Overall though this was still an interesting read because Andrew Jackson's early exploits are fascinating enough to visit twice.Althou I'd read a biography on Andrew Jackson last year (Andrew Jackson: His Life and Times by H.W. Brands), but was given this one as a recommendation by another reader, who gave the glowing recommendation that it was interesting and could be finished in two nights. As a result, I already had a pretty good knowledge of most of what was in this book prior to reading it. Overall though this was still an interesting read because Andrew Jackson's early exploits are fascinating enough to visit twice.Although the title of this book makes it sound as though it's entirely about the Battle of New Orleans, out of the 230ish pages I'd say just about half or less focuses on the actual battle (buildup, battle and immediate aftermath). The rest of the book gives some good background on Jackson's early years, the other key figures in New Orleans during the battle, and some political background to make the context of the war understandable. This is a very quick read though, and a book I'd recommend for somebody that just wants the exciting parts of Jackson's pre-presidential biography.More than any other president (at least through Lincoln... I'm still working my way up from him), Jackson came from nothing and had exciting moments throughout his life. From the early encounter with the British (and loss of his entire family), to duels with future powerful politicians and battles with Native Americans, Jackson lived the type of life that created a frontier folk hero. Having read several biographies of presidents after Jackson, I enjoyed the refresher on how important moments occurred with guys like Henry Clay and Thomas Hart Benton, who obviously both went on to have massive political careers of their own.The description of what occurred in the Battle of New Orleans was what you'd hope for in a book like this, providing drama that reminds me of the stuff I find in Bernard Cornwell's Napoleonic War books. The stories of dying Generals and ships unable to escape cannon fire provided both memorable moments and emotional resonance usually lacking in biographical material. More than any other moment, I'll remember the heartbreaking story of a man trying to warn the Americans about the arrival of the British and his loyal dog that followed him along the way. Because I prefer my biographies more complete and detailed than this, it definitely doesn't crack my favorites, but I think this is a book many fans of history could really enjoy.
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