Lumberjanes (Lumberjanes, #1)
Welcome to Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types. The five scouts of Roanoke cabin—Jo, April, Molly, Mal, and Ripley—love their summers at camp. They get to hang out with their best friends, earn Lumberjane scout badges, annoy their no-nonsense counselor Jen . . . and go on supernatural adventures. That last one? A pretty normal occurrence at Miss Qiunzella’s, where the woods contain endless mysteries. Today is no exception. When challenge-loving April leads the girls on a hike up the TALLEST mountain they’ve ever seen, things don’t go quite as planned. For one, they didn’t expect to trespass into the lands of the ancient Cloud People, and did anyone happen to read those ominous signs some unknown person posted at the bottom of the mountain? Also, unicorns. This hilarious, rollicking adventure series brings the beloved Lumberjanes characters into a novel format with brand-new adventures.  

Lumberjanes (Lumberjanes, #1) Details

TitleLumberjanes (Lumberjanes, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherAmulet Books
ISBN-139781419727252
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Fantasy, Humor

Lumberjanes (Lumberjanes, #1) Review

  • Hannah Greendale
    January 1, 1970
    At Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thisle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types, five girls from Roanoke cabin – April, Molly, Mal, Ripley, and Jo – are hard at work earning scout badges. When they help a unicorn find its way home, they discover an enormous mountain that’s never been charted on any maps. Keen to earn the Extraordinary Explorers medal, April concocts a plan to climb the mysterious mountain with her friends, but the journey is more perilous than expected, and getting home may At Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thisle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types, five girls from Roanoke cabin – April, Molly, Mal, Ripley, and Jo – are hard at work earning scout badges. When they help a unicorn find its way home, they discover an enormous mountain that’s never been charted on any maps. Keen to earn the Extraordinary Explorers medal, April concocts a plan to climb the mysterious mountain with her friends, but the journey is more perilous than expected, and getting home may not be possible. Lumberjanes is a popular series of graphic novels. Now, for the first time, the adventures of April and her friends are available as a full-length middle-grade novel. Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power! demonstrates progressive thinking and boasts a diversity of characters: Jo has two dads; Molly and Mal appear to have feelings for one another that exceed friendship; Barney – a recent addition to the camp – is a they rather than a he or she; the girls eat vegan chili while another sips soy milk; and rather than cursing, the girls say the names of famous women: “What the Ella Fitzgerald?!” she gasped. “I think my teeth are melting.” Though the girls face many dangers, they rarely suffer harm. In fact, all physical action in the book reads like a cartoon. It is very hard to go from traveling at superfast breakneck speed to a dead halt. Which is why Mal crashed into Molly crashed into Jo crashed into April. “OOF!” “OOOF!” “OOOOF!” “WHAAAH!” By the last WHAAAH, they had all stopped. If by “stopped” we mean “crashed into each other.” “Our mass-sprinting technique needs immediate and drastic improvement,” April groaned, crawling out from the bottom of the pile of Lumberjanes. Despite being a fun read because of its comedic unicorn encounters and its emphasis on “learning, curiosity, and caring,” the lighthearted narrative and goofy story is occasionally shattered by April’s hyper-active personality (perhaps she has ADHD?). “Okay okay okay.” April was so excited it was hard to talk or stand still or both of those things at the same time, so she jogged in place in the workshop, in front of jo, for a bit, saying, “Okay.” “Okay. Okay. Okay so . . . okay.” April closed her eyes; she could see the mountain in her mind’s eye now, as clear as anything. She pictured herself gripping the side of the rocky face, the wind in her hair. [. . .] “Okay,” she said again. It was hard to think with all these voices jumping up and down in her head. An ode to feminism, Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power! will surely delight fans of the graphic novels but may not appeal to older audiences experiencing Lumberjanes for the first time. - Note: Some parents may want to know that a line of the Lumberjanes Pledge is crossed out in the book (in two places) and replaced with a hand-written note that reads: Then there’s a line about God, or whatever.
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  • Maddie (Heart Full Of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    So lovely to read one of my fave graphic novel series in regular novel form! The new adventure felt very authentic to the Lumberjanes style, and their personalities consistent to the April, Jo, Mal, Molly and Ripley I already love. The little illustrations were such a sweet touch, and I especially loved the introduction of non-binary character, Barney. They were great, and I hope they turn up in the next book more!
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a lot of fun to read! I definitely didn't like it as much as the graphic novels, but it was still a very fun, adventurous story full of the characters we all know and love. I'd definitely recommend this to other fans of the Lumberjanes series, but not to people who aren't familiar with the series yet. Full review to come soon.
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    I breezed through these 150 pages where our heroines, once again, find themselves inadvertently in unimaginable trouble.
  • Brenda Ayala
    January 1, 1970
    I am not the demographic for this, and that was painfully obvious to me when reading. What makes it worse is that I've heard glowing reviews for this so my expectations were high--and I knowingly kept them high because I thought the book would deliver. These girls came across as idiotic and unrealistically hyperactive. If someone had told me this would read like a feminist Spongebob then maybe I would've accepted the story better. But as it was, I expected a good story with well-developed charac I am not the demographic for this, and that was painfully obvious to me when reading. What makes it worse is that I've heard glowing reviews for this so my expectations were high--and I knowingly kept them high because I thought the book would deliver. These girls came across as idiotic and unrealistically hyperactive. If someone had told me this would read like a feminist Spongebob then maybe I would've accepted the story better. But as it was, I expected a good story with well-developed characters. A story about unicorns and clouds just shouldn't be annoying! And that's what it boils down to. The characters and their dialogue annoyed the crap out of me. As a friend on Goodreads said, I'm sure this would do very well as an inane (but uplifting because feminism) animated show.
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  • Jessica Rodrigues
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to love this because so many people are into Lumberjanes these days, but overall, it was very "meh" for me. Maybe I overhyped it in my mind. My main critique is that this doesn't read like the first in a series -- the reader is dropped into the middle of the setting with several characters as if we should already know who they are. The characters never developed for me, and I doubt the attention span of your average 10 year old is much better.I mean, it's not bad -- if it seems l I really wanted to love this because so many people are into Lumberjanes these days, but overall, it was very "meh" for me. Maybe I overhyped it in my mind. My main critique is that this doesn't read like the first in a series -- the reader is dropped into the middle of the setting with several characters as if we should already know who they are. The characters never developed for me, and I doubt the attention span of your average 10 year old is much better.I mean, it's not bad -- if it seems like your bag, go for it -- but it's just didn't do it for me.received via Netgalley
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    This was super cute, very diverse, and a good storyline. As someone who reads the comics I have this two thumbs up. 👍🏽👍🏽
  • Sarah E.
    January 1, 1970
    I was gifted an ebook via Netgalley.This was my introduction to the Lumberjanes universe. Immediately following finishing this book, I read the first volume of the Lumberjanes comic by Noelle Stevenson. 3 stars may seem like I was meh about it, but honestly, I felt as though there was too much going on for it to be the best in a written novel format. Once I read the first volume of the comic, I knew that the book definitely would have been better in that comic form. The characters themselves are I was gifted an ebook via Netgalley.This was my introduction to the Lumberjanes universe. Immediately following finishing this book, I read the first volume of the Lumberjanes comic by Noelle Stevenson. 3 stars may seem like I was meh about it, but honestly, I felt as though there was too much going on for it to be the best in a written novel format. Once I read the first volume of the comic, I knew that the book definitely would have been better in that comic form. The characters themselves are very colorful and words don't do them justice. I loved so much about this and hope to continue on with the comics and learn more about the characters. It sounds like there is a lot of diversity that isn't really stated black and white style. The Lumberjanes remind me of a mixture of Adventure Time and The Mighty B, which means my kids would definitely enjoy the comics too!
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  • Jill Jemmett
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve read a couple of the Lumberjanes graphic novels before. They’re so cute! So I had to get the middle grade novel when I heard it was coming out. In this new story, the scouts find unicorns, not too surprising to fans of the series. What is surprising is that unicorns smell really, really bad (who knew!). They also find a mysterious foggy mountain. Let the adventures begin!Since I haven’t read all of the graphic novels, I liked the way that there was a lot of background given on the character I’ve read a couple of the Lumberjanes graphic novels before. They’re so cute! So I had to get the middle grade novel when I heard it was coming out. In this new story, the scouts find unicorns, not too surprising to fans of the series. What is surprising is that unicorns smell really, really bad (who knew!). They also find a mysterious foggy mountain. Let the adventures begin!Since I haven’t read all of the graphic novels, I liked the way that there was a lot of background given on the characters and the creatures they have met in the woods before, such as Bearwoman. There are also great illustrations too, which are also helpful since I tend to get the characters mixed up sometimes. Mariko Tamaki was a great choice to write this book. She’s so talented and she captured the Lumberjanes atmosphere and tone wonderfully in this story. I hope she continues to write the series. This is the perfect middle grade novel for fans of the series and new readers!FRIENDSHIP TO THE MAX! I received a copy of this book on NetGalley in exchange for a review.
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  • Alyssa Marie
    January 1, 1970
    So I went into this book a little apprehensive. I hadn’t enjoyed the last lumberjane volume that much that I read and was worried I was tired of this series. BUT THIS BOOK BROUGHT IT ALL BACK TOGETHER AGAIN. It was SOO GOOD. It was honestly better than any regular comic volume I’ve read in this series. It made you love the characters even more which is so lovely. It’s just so much fun, the whole time. It’s honestly hard for me to get excited and wrapped up in action sometimes, but this really ha So I went into this book a little apprehensive. I hadn’t enjoyed the last lumberjane volume that much that I read and was worried I was tired of this series. BUT THIS BOOK BROUGHT IT ALL BACK TOGETHER AGAIN. It was SOO GOOD. It was honestly better than any regular comic volume I’ve read in this series. It made you love the characters even more which is so lovely. It’s just so much fun, the whole time. It’s honestly hard for me to get excited and wrapped up in action sometimes, but this really had me drawn in.Basically this book is a novel story of the lumberjanes!It has all the fun, great things about the lumberjanes and then some. It was more fleshed out, which it obviously should be cause it’s not a graphic novel. The storyline was cute and fun and I LOVED EVERY SECOND. I really had thought about giving up on this series, but I’m definitely continuing! THAT CLIFFHANGER?! Ugh I need more stat. If you’ve read lumberjanes and enjoyed it, I can’t recommend this enough!
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  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a massive fan of the Lumberjanes comic (reading this actually inspired me to go back and catch up on the new editions, and I'm obsessed all over again!) and this is the perfect book version. It's always hard to transfer mediums, but this does a great job of capturing the unique humour and loveable style of the comics. I love all of these characters so much, and would happily read about their adventures for their entire lives!
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  • Yaiza
    January 1, 1970
    Súper divertido y con los mismos mensajes maravillosos sobre la amistad que el cómic (FRIENDSHIP TO THE MAX!). La caracterización de los personajes era perfecta, aunque está bastante centrado en April y un poquito en Mal y su relación con Molly, y dejan a Jo y Ripley algo olvidadas. Además la narrativa, que me preocupaba un poco por leer una novela infantil después de los cómics, me hizo morirme de risa y encaja genial con el estilo de Leñadoras.
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  • Laura Noakes
    January 1, 1970
    This book captures the spirit of the Lumberjanes comics so perfectly. I absolutely loved the plot of this middle grade novel, really enjoyed seeing more of the character's backstory and the drawings throughout were awesome. Basically, if you're already a fan of the Lumberjanes comics, you'll love this, and if you like girl power, friendship, kindness and unicorn-laden adventures, you need to read this book ASAP!
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  • Madison Bishop
    January 1, 1970
    As a big fan of the comics, I found this book really delightful. Like in the original series, they really throw you right into the story, which some kids might love and others might find confusing. I loved the additional illustrations--the design of this book is absolutely wonderful. I really hope this engages new readers!
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Hooray! The Lumberjanes have a whole novel to adventure around in! Everyone's favorite, supernatural-mischief-prone campers are at it again. April, Mal, Molly, Jo and Ripley run into a real, live unicorn (because of course they do) and discover an enormous mountain that, for reasons unknown, does not appear on any map. Every the over-achiever, April becomes determined to climb the mountain, so the whole gang sets off to climb a really weird mountain (after greeting the herd of unicorns who live Hooray! The Lumberjanes have a whole novel to adventure around in! Everyone's favorite, supernatural-mischief-prone campers are at it again. April, Mal, Molly, Jo and Ripley run into a real, live unicorn (because of course they do) and discover an enormous mountain that, for reasons unknown, does not appear on any map. Every the over-achiever, April becomes determined to climb the mountain, so the whole gang sets off to climb a really weird mountain (after greeting the herd of unicorns who live at the mountain's base, naturally). For once, the adventure is intentional, but that doesn't make it any less unexpected. So, it's always fun to visit Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types and this outing is no exception. I was a little worried about whether I'd enjoy a non-comic version of my favorite kid's comic series. Tamaki captures the essence of each character very well and the zany plot featuring unicorns (who apparently smell really, really bad, btw), improbable mountains, and a fun array of new characters, is classic Lumberjanes material. Fans won't be disappointed, but even newbies will be charmed by this fun and funny adventure.
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  • Grace
    January 1, 1970
    My friend Dani picked up this ARC at SDCC 2017 as a gift for me. I must say this book is a delight. Hard-core Lady Types are going to find so much to love about it. Even people who aren't familiar with the comics will love it. It's inclusive and funny and full of witty humor that kids and adults will love. I'm so excited to share this with everyone in October!
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Mariko and Brooke got the voice of Lumberjanes perfect. Full review to come.
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    love the comics and am so thrilled that this is now a middle grade novel!!! I did not see the final artwork, and an eagerly awaiting the release date!
  • Andy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a super cute and magical story following the Lumberjanes into middle grade mania. Spoiler alert: Unicorns stink. 😝
  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved this book! So much fun and full of stinky unicorns and crazy adventures like usual.
  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    The Lumberjanes encounter unicorns, mysterious mountains, and cloud people on their first prose adventure. I was so utterly disappointed by this. I love the graphic novels, and fully expected to love this, but I really didn't. It got better after part one when the plot finally started, maybe up to a 2.5 star level, but oh, I couldn't abide the writing style. It was super juvenile, more appropriate for 7-9 year olds than 10-12 year olds, and tried so hard to be cheerful and clever and quirky that The Lumberjanes encounter unicorns, mysterious mountains, and cloud people on their first prose adventure. I was so utterly disappointed by this. I love the graphic novels, and fully expected to love this, but I really didn't. It got better after part one when the plot finally started, maybe up to a 2.5 star level, but oh, I couldn't abide the writing style. It was super juvenile, more appropriate for 7-9 year olds than 10-12 year olds, and tried so hard to be cheerful and clever and quirky that it was just over the top bad. In some instances, I could see how it could be an interpretation of one of the graphic novel panels, but our interpretations certainly differed--the girls seemed ridiculous, rather than their adventures. Crazy things happen at this camp, and things definitely get silly, but this just didn't have the same feel for me. Boo.
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  • Kim Dyer
    January 1, 1970
    I was so excited to read this novel but unfortunately, I was left feeling a bit underwhelmed by it. Lumberjanes is one of my favourite comics for young readers, but this novel adaption left a lot to be desired. The writing was clunky, often taking the form of "Jo did this... April thought that..." and a little light on descriptions.Although it did spend a little time in the first chapter introducing the girls, I don't think the book is very newcomer friendly as it does make frequent references b I was so excited to read this novel but unfortunately, I was left feeling a bit underwhelmed by it. Lumberjanes is one of my favourite comics for young readers, but this novel adaption left a lot to be desired. The writing was clunky, often taking the form of "Jo did this... April thought that..." and a little light on descriptions.Although it did spend a little time in the first chapter introducing the girls, I don't think the book is very newcomer friendly as it does make frequent references back to the events of the comic. I also felt that somethings that worked well in the comic (such as the name-dropping of famous women) were a bit confusing on page.Yet the story does capture the feel of a Lumberjanes comic. While it was possibly targeted at slightly younger readers, it has the same wholesome focus on friendship, loyalty and adventure. The tone is always light and the humour is very endearing, especially April's puns and Ripley's joy of life. While the story seemed to lose its drive at the halfway point, the first part of the adventure - including flatulent unicorns and an attempt to scale a crystaline mountain - was enthralling and I devoured the book in two sittings to find out what happened next.The ending of the novel is okay. While we never do find out the secret of the mountain, the girls do finish their quest and April learns a valuable lesson about friendship. However, there is still much left open for a sequel. Jo's sudden discovery over the final pages is left quite vague, but it's clear exactly where this story will continue on to.In terms of character, the book is a bit varied. While the main cast are all distinct, I did feel that the group was a bit too large. The focus in the story fitted between them on every page, which was a little distracting as it meant that only a few sentences were ever spent with each character. I was also a little disappointed by the representation in the story.The Lumberjanes comic contains a very diverse cast, with the group of protagonists including a character of Latinx descent, a lesbian couple and a trans girl, yet all of this escapes mention in the story. Similarly Barney - a non-binary secondary character - gets a brief cameo (which includes a brief discussion about their preferred pro-nouns) but then disappears from the story. This, for me, was a big disappointment and one I hope is rectified in future novels.Anyhow, that's about all I have to say. It's a fun little story for fans but it didn't hook me like the comics did and there is certainly room for improvement in future volumes. Still, I did enjoy reading it and will certainly pick up the next book in this series.
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Welcome to Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet's Camp for Hardcore Lady Types. The five scouts of Roanoke cabin—Jo, April, Molly, Mal, and Ripley—love their summers at camp. They get to hang out with their best friends, earn Lumberjane scout badges, annoy their no-nonsense counselor Jen... and go on supernatural adventures. That last one? A pretty normal occurrence at Miss Qiunzella's, where the woods contain endless mysteries. Today is no exception. When challenge-loving April l Welcome to Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet's Camp for Hardcore Lady Types. The five scouts of Roanoke cabin—Jo, April, Molly, Mal, and Ripley—love their summers at camp. They get to hang out with their best friends, earn Lumberjane scout badges, annoy their no-nonsense counselor Jen... and go on supernatural adventures. That last one? A pretty normal occurrence at Miss Qiunzella's, where the woods contain endless mysteries. Today is no exception. When challenge-loving April leads the girls on a hike up the TALLEST mountain they've ever seen, things don't go quite as planned. For one, they didn't expect to trespass into the lands of the ancient Cloud People, and did anyone happen to read those ominous signs some unknown person posted at the bottom of the mountain? Also, unicorns.Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power! is an adventure of epic proportions, because when can you have more fun if not at camp with your best friends wandering through the woods, investigating mysteries, and finding supernatural creatures grazing in fields?This book is about everyone of cabin Roanoke. Jo, April, Molly, Mal, and Ripley. Even Jen and her near-constant worrying if the girls are really paying attention to what she wants them to do. But in little ways it's a bit more about April. It's April who often leads them on adventures, plotting and planning beforehand. It's April who doesn't stop, won't stop, and keeps moving. And it's April who leads them here, first looking for different types of plants and then up a mountain. It's all well and good to lead, to plot and plan, but sometimes you have to stop and think. You have to stop and ask your friends if they're all okay with climbing up a strange mountain.Having read some of the comics, I think this is a great companion for young readers. It's quick and fun and messy like their comic adventures with a little more character insight and background than you'll get from a character's conflicted expression. Here in book form, the girls' thoughts and feelings are more accessible. And I fell in love with new character Barney, the genderqueer/non-binary camper who's new to the Lumberjanes. The illustrations by Brooke A. Allen were great, a wonderful reminder of the comic art and a great break in the prose. I would certainly recommend this to middle grade readers of the Lumberjanes comics.(I received an e-galley of this title to review from Amulet Books through NetGalley.)
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  • Literacy Alliance
    January 1, 1970
    Based on the popular graphic novel series, Lumberjanes has decided to take these hardcore ladies into novel format for another round of friendship to the max. The Roanoke Cabin is working on their plant badges. Having stumbled across a magical field of unicorns and a mysterious mountain, the girls are determined to climb and explore this new territory since April has decided that like Rosie, the fearless camp director, she wants to earn the Extraordinary Explorer medal. Of course, if you know th Based on the popular graphic novel series, Lumberjanes has decided to take these hardcore ladies into novel format for another round of friendship to the max. The Roanoke Cabin is working on their plant badges. Having stumbled across a magical field of unicorns and a mysterious mountain, the girls are determined to climb and explore this new territory since April has decided that like Rosie, the fearless camp director, she wants to earn the Extraordinary Explorer medal. Of course, if you know these talented and intelligent ladies at all, you understand that they will find themselves trapped in one crazy and heartfelt adventure with cloud people, smelly unicorns, clingy vine, and disappearing mountains. With the dangers that come with being bold and their friendships and interests tested to the max, these ultra-femme scouts must figure out who they want to be while also escaping a cloudy future. The Lumberjanes series usually resides in YA shelving but this title is more for the middle grades, especially with the sporadic illustrations. Like the artwork, Tamaki successfully maintains the cute, quirky plot of the graphic novels, and I would have sworn Ellis and Stevenson wrote this book—the voice is on point. The feminist appeal with Rosie the Riveter and famous women shouted out in expressions is inspiring. These girls represent a mix of fortes and weaknesses without the stereotypes. Their friendship is supportive and realistic. As with the graphic novels, there is appropriate diversity representing the LGBTQA+ community, with a gender binary character and scouts with two fathers. Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power is a fun and spunky fantastical read for any feminist-minded tween.I would like to thank NetGalley and ABRAMS Kids/Amulet Books for providing me with a free ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review. Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power is set to publish October 10, 2017Lumberjanes: Unicorn Power (Lumberjanes #1) by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Brooke Allen (ABRAMS Kids, 2017)Review by Christine F.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a digital review copy from NetGalley*I love the Lumberjanes graphic novel series and when I saw that it was going to be a full-length novel I couldn't wait to read it. This book follows the Roanoke gang as they discover a herd of unicorns and climb a secret mountain. I have to admit that it was weird at first to read about these characters' adventures without the comic illustrations. However, after a few chapters I got used to it and was happy to read a new story about the Lumberjane *I received a digital review copy from NetGalley*I love the Lumberjanes graphic novel series and when I saw that it was going to be a full-length novel I couldn't wait to read it. This book follows the Roanoke gang as they discover a herd of unicorns and climb a secret mountain. I have to admit that it was weird at first to read about these characters' adventures without the comic illustrations. However, after a few chapters I got used to it and was happy to read a new story about the Lumberjane girls. Mariko Tamaki did a good job of writing the Lumberjanes' story in book form. I enjoyed getting a more in-depth look to the camp and the girls that can't always be conveyed through the comics. I also really liked that this book included some of Brooke Allan's illustrations; it wouldn't be right to have a Lumberjanes book without some sort of artwork throughout. This book was everything the graphic novels are: fun and lighthearted with an emphasis on girl power and friendships. The relationships between April, Jo, Ripley, Mal, and Molly is one of my favorite aspects of the Lumberjanes series so it was nice to see that it was handled so well in this novelization. My only complaint is that this book seemed to focus mostly on April, and while I love her character, I was hoping to learn more about the other girls and read from their perspectives more. However, with the way this book ended I'm hoping there will be more full-length books in this series that puts the other girls in the spotlight. Overall, this was such a fun quick read. I loved reading about the Lumberjanes and being able to see what's going on in their heads. And while this book does seem to be written on the younger side of middle grade, any Lumberjanes fan is sure to like it!
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  • Krista K.
    January 1, 1970
    Friendship to the Max!I received this arc from Netgalley for an honest review.If you're not already familar, Lumberjanes is a series of graphic novels that details the stories of five friends at an unusual camp for girls. The stories focus on positive, female friendships, smart campers, and fun adventures. This is the first in a series of novels inspired by the graphic novels for middle-grade readers.While working to earn their LIVING THE PLANT LIFE badge, the five scouts of Roanoke--April, Jo, Friendship to the Max!I received this arc from Netgalley for an honest review.If you're not already familar, Lumberjanes is a series of graphic novels that details the stories of five friends at an unusual camp for girls. The stories focus on positive, female friendships, smart campers, and fun adventures. This is the first in a series of novels inspired by the graphic novels for middle-grade readers.While working to earn their LIVING THE PLANT LIFE badge, the five scouts of Roanoke--April, Jo, Mal, Molly, and Ripley--stumble upon a unicorn! The unicorn leads them to a herd of unicorns, where April discovers the tallest mountain she's ever seen. Determined to earn her Extraordinary Explorers medal, she convinces her friends to hike the mountain with her, but they unexpectedly find themselves in the land of Cloud People. The girls must figure out their way to get back to camp or spend the rest of lives drinking tea and discussing weather with the Cloud People.Unicorn Power also introduces a new character, Barney, who identifies with "they/them" pronouns, who will hopefully have a more prominent role in later books.The story fully captures the spirit of Lumberjanes and is certain to find new readers whose messages of girl power, kindness, and friendship are sure to resonate.
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  • Bridgette
    January 1, 1970
    I received an egalley from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.It took me a bit to warm up to this, probably because I'm used to reading the monthlies of the comic. The comics are all ages and while they're fun and light while dealing with friendship, crushes, gender identity and the writing of the comics feel very different from the writing of the this novel. And for anyone who might be wondering, this is a novel. There are illustrations (some of mine looked unfinished, but that's not un I received an egalley from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.It took me a bit to warm up to this, probably because I'm used to reading the monthlies of the comic. The comics are all ages and while they're fun and light while dealing with friendship, crushes, gender identity and the writing of the comics feel very different from the writing of the this novel. And for anyone who might be wondering, this is a novel. There are illustrations (some of mine looked unfinished, but that's not unusual for galleys), but it is not a graphic novel. It is definitely written like a middle grade/kids fiction (as it should be since the comic's target audience is kids and middle schoolers). It's familiar, typical Lumberjanes adventures and mayhem. A simple trip to earn a badge turns into finding unicorns turns into climbing a mountain not on any map April can find turn into... well, turns in a fantastic Lumberjanes adventure I can't spoil. Readers don't have to be fans of the comics to start this. It will help if you are, but there's enough of an introduction to the girls and the camp that no prior knowledge is necessary. It's face-paced and sure to delight readers. Bonus points for major Molly & Mal feels. Overall, it's a delightful, fast-paced, quick read good for anyone wanting an adventure store.
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  • Carys
    January 1, 1970
    I've only read the first volume of the Lumberjanes graphic novels but I absolutely adored it so when I heard that this new MG series was coming out I knew that I had to pick it up. Overall, the story was just adorable. It was lovely to be able to revisit these characters and join them on their latest adventure. One thing that I particularly loved was how diverse it was; there's mention of Jo having 2 dads and the inclusion of Barney who is non-binary (and was one of my favourite characters!) The I've only read the first volume of the Lumberjanes graphic novels but I absolutely adored it so when I heard that this new MG series was coming out I knew that I had to pick it up. Overall, the story was just adorable. It was lovely to be able to revisit these characters and join them on their latest adventure. One thing that I particularly loved was how diverse it was; there's mention of Jo having 2 dads and the inclusion of Barney who is non-binary (and was one of my favourite characters!) The acceptance and understanding that the other characters had for Barney was really great and I think was very important, especially for a MG novel which will be being picked up by readers a lot younger than myself. The message of putting acceptance and friendship above everything else really shone through (FRIENDSHIP TO THE MAX!) The illustrations (although unfinished in my copy as it's an arc) also seem like they're going to be cute and add another layer of charm to the story. I'd definitely recommend this if you're a fan of the comics or if you just want to read a fun story which has adventure and friendship at the very heart of it. If there are more Lumberjanes books to come I'll definitely be picking them up!
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  • Lorna (Loz) Parsons
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an adorable book. As a disclaimer, I should probably mention that I have not read any of the comics beforehand and the comics are referenced here and there throughout the book so if you can or have read them, you have a little advantage there. There also isn't very much introduction of the characters so, if you haven't met them before like I hadn't, it took me until around halfway through before I really knew who was who and I might still struggle now). This follows the funny, goof This was such an adorable book. As a disclaimer, I should probably mention that I have not read any of the comics beforehand and the comics are referenced here and there throughout the book so if you can or have read them, you have a little advantage there. There also isn't very much introduction of the characters so, if you haven't met them before like I hadn't, it took me until around halfway through before I really knew who was who and I might still struggle now). This follows the funny, goofy and silly story of a group of girls who go on adventures. They are Lumberjane scouts and proud to be so! They find unicorns, a mountain that isn't really a mountain and mythical flowers. Logically, the story made no sense, it was just a bunch of jumble and I loved that about this. I really needed something light hearted and funny and this nailed what I needed. It was short and sweet. The characters were lovable. It was great. I think I'm going to have to try and find the comics because I imagine they're a lot like the book and it would be great to see how it reads in comic version. A full review will be published on my blog nearer to the publication date.
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  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Mariko Tamaki successfully translates my favorite current comic book into prose. This book seems meant for a slightly younger audience than the comic, but it has the same overall tone. Because of the much greater amount of text, Tamaki is able to reveal the characters' feelings and personalities more extensively than the comic usually does. The book brings out their individual personalities, whereas in the comic, they're sometimes hard to distinguish. April is the central character in this book, Mariko Tamaki successfully translates my favorite current comic book into prose. This book seems meant for a slightly younger audience than the comic, but it has the same overall tone. Because of the much greater amount of text, Tamaki is able to reveal the characters' feelings and personalities more extensively than the comic usually does. The book brings out their individual personalities, whereas in the comic, they're sometimes hard to distinguish. April is the central character in this book, so I hope other characters will get more of a spotlight in future volumes. A few things in this book will make more sense to readers who are familiar with the comic. "Then there's a line about God or whatever" is a quotation from the comic. Barney's brief appearance may seem like a token effort to insert some gender diversity, but Barney is a much more significant character in the comic. (And speaking of gender, Jo is a trans girl, though the book never mentions this.)
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