Lost For Words
You can trust a book to keep your secret . . .Loveday Cardew prefers books to people. If you look closely, you might glimpse the first lines of the novels she loves most tattooed on her skin. But there are things she'll never show you.Fifteen years ago Loveday lost all she knew and loved in one unspeakable night. Now, she finds refuge in the unique little York bookshop where she works.Everything is about to change for Loveday. Someone knows about her past. Someone is trying to send her a message. And she can't hide any longer.Lost for Words is a compelling, irresistible and heart-rending novel, with the emotional intensity of The Shock of the Fall and all the charm of The Little Paris Bookshop and 84 Charing Cross Road.

Lost For Words Details

TitleLost For Words
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 20th, 2017
PublisherBonnier Zaffre
Rating
GenreFiction, Writing, Books About Books, Contemporary, Romance

Lost For Words Review

  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    Booklover, bookworm, booknerd, bibliophile--whatever you prefer to be called--this is a book for you! “Who wouldn’t rescue a book?” Touching read about a bookseller with a dark past who finds solace in books. When she finds a lost book, she doesn’t expect to connect with its owner in a way that forces her to come to terms with her difficult childhood. This is an enjoyable, poignant story that pulled at my heartstrings. Loveday likes books more than people. Books mean so much to her that her ta Booklover, bookworm, booknerd, bibliophile--whatever you prefer to be called--this is a book for you! “Who wouldn’t rescue a book?” Touching read about a bookseller with a dark past who finds solace in books. When she finds a lost book, she doesn’t expect to connect with its owner in a way that forces her to come to terms with her difficult childhood. This is an enjoyable, poignant story that pulled at my heartstrings. Loveday likes books more than people. Books mean so much to her that her tattoos are of her favorite first lines. She is 25 years old and has worked in the same secondhand bookshop since she was 15. The bookstore and books are her comfort zone; the reader doesn’t know exactly why Loveday hides amongst books and the little bookstore. Her life is quiet and she relishes in her routine. As much as she tries to stay away from people, there’s something about her that seems to attract them to her, especially the crazies. It is not until Nathan, who is a poet and magician, comes into her bookstore to claim a lost book that she slowly starts to let down her guard. I absolutely loved reading this--the main focus is on Loveday's traumatic childhood, which is slowly revealed. Since this is primarily a character study, there isn't much action but Loveday's character held my attention. The mystery of her childhood kept me intrigued, although the more I learned the less I wanted to know as what is revealed is pretty awful.Loveday is a likable and witty character, and I could identify with her relationship with books. And of course, I loved the role of books and the bookshops! I really liked how Butland used books to help bring Loveday's emotions to the surface. It has some very dark moments but there's a lot of whimsy, wit, and love woven in to lighten the tone. I highly recommend! I received a copy of this book from NetGalley and St. Martin's Press in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kristin (KC) - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    *3.85 stars* <-- (Don't judge, book-nerd struggles are REAL)A delicate rendering of heartache and forgiveness, and the healing power of a bookshop! Give me a cozy bookshop setting, a quirky cast of sarcastic bibliophiles, and a shake of mystery to pepper my pages and I’ll be a happy reader every time. LOST FOR WORDS was a lovely read, even if it wasn't a particularly lively one. This author has a unique writing style that shines as though it’s been freshly polished—sophisticated, sharp, and w *3.85 stars* <-- (Don't judge, book-nerd struggles are REAL)A delicate rendering of heartache and forgiveness, and the healing power of a bookshop! Give me a cozy bookshop setting, a quirky cast of sarcastic bibliophiles, and a shake of mystery to pepper my pages and I’ll be a happy reader every time. LOST FOR WORDS was a lovely read, even if it wasn't a particularly lively one. This author has a unique writing style that shines as though it’s been freshly polished—sophisticated, sharp, and witty without trying too hard. Loveday, (cute name, right?) is quite a lovable, one-of-a kind protagonist. For reasons warranted she’s generally sad, but she has a quiet spunk that’ll make you smirk when you’re least expecting to. Her defensive tone is almost perpetual and certainly predictable, and peeks through her internal chatter as though she suspects even the reader of judging her. She’s fragile in a way that makes you want to hold her together, but straightforward and honest in a way that’ll make you wish you had a pinch of her gumption. She tells her broken story directly to the reader, as though she considers you her confidant. She's stronger than she feels, and her gradual character growth is both impressive and believable.Loveday works at a bookshop—the owner, a kind older man who looks after Loveday, keeps her grounded and cared for. There’s a touching love story entwined that becomes a driving point, but doesn't absorb all the focus. Heartache, forgiveness, and inner-strength remain at the core. This plot moves slowly and sort of coasts in a soothing motion that felt akin to the gentle swaying of a boat—rocking over ripples with few waves in sight. There were moments I wanted more of a pulse and grew slightly tired, but the beautiful writing and heartwarming connections kept me afloat. I appreciated and looked forward to the element of poetry, which was also a gentle but lovely addition. The fractured relationship between Loveday and her parents, along with its residual effects, was executed wonderfully and dominated the pages. I’d recommend this one after an action-packed read for a peaceful change of pace and a delightful stroll through the life of the lovely Loveday—a bonafide, quirky book-lover with issues to conquer and love to embrace. And also—for the skillful and eloquent prose upon which my reading eyes feasted! Book Stats: ▪  Genre/Category: Contemporary Fiction/Romance/Book lovers!▪  Characters: Quirky, fun, well-rounded bibliophiles. ▪  Plot: A young woman who works in a bookshop struggles to overcome her past while allowing love into her present.▪ Writing: Eloquent, smooth, polished, poetic.▪ POV: 1st Person Perspective: Loveday ▪  Cliffhanger: None. Standalone::::Sister Read with the lovely Norma, who's discussion made this all the more enjoyable! 💜::::
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  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Stephanie Butland writes a delightfully charming, moving and beautiful piece of contemporary fiction set in a second hand bookshop in York. It features the wonderfully prickly, hard to get to know and sarcastic Loveday Cardew, with her nose ring and tattoos of lines from treasured books. Books mean so much more to her than humans, and the bookshop is her refuge from the world. Only the endearing and eccentric bookshop owner, Archie, has managed to pierce her heavily fortified armour, with a frie Stephanie Butland writes a delightfully charming, moving and beautiful piece of contemporary fiction set in a second hand bookshop in York. It features the wonderfully prickly, hard to get to know and sarcastic Loveday Cardew, with her nose ring and tattoos of lines from treasured books. Books mean so much more to her than humans, and the bookshop is her refuge from the world. Only the endearing and eccentric bookshop owner, Archie, has managed to pierce her heavily fortified armour, with a friendship that has developed through the years, and even he has no idea of the secrets she keeps close to her chest. Archie adores Loveday, feeling that she is worth the time and effort it takes to get to know her. Fifteen years ago, Loveday experienced a huge heartbreaking trauma that led to her being taken into foster care. One day, she happens to come across a book of poetry outside on the pavement, picks it up and puts up a found notice in the shop. This fateful act presages the entrance of the magically entrancing poet, Nathan Avebury, who sees beyond the difficult and unprepossessing exterior of Loveday's character. Strange parcels begin to arrive which have meaning for Loveday. This is a dark story of heartbreaking secrets and love. Will Loveday be able to let love enter her life after her experience with Rob? This is a novel that goes back and forth in time narrated by Loveday. This is a brilliant read with great quirky characters, the memorable Loveday and the perfect setting of a bookstore where it is understood just how special books are. Just wonderful and highly recommended! Many thanks to Bonnier Zaffre for an ARC.
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  • Melisa
    January 1, 1970
    Do you ever open up a book and connect with it right away? That’s what happened to me with this one. The writing, the characters, the dialogue - it all hooked me from the get go and didn’t let go. The beautiful cover is a little misleading - I thought this was going to be a light-hearted read based around a bookshop but it ended up being so much more. This is a very deep, detailed look at a woman who has gone through an unimaginable amount of pain in her life and how it affects all of her decisi Do you ever open up a book and connect with it right away? That’s what happened to me with this one. The writing, the characters, the dialogue - it all hooked me from the get go and didn’t let go. The beautiful cover is a little misleading - I thought this was going to be a light-hearted read based around a bookshop but it ended up being so much more. This is a very deep, detailed look at a woman who has gone through an unimaginable amount of pain in her life and how it affects all of her decisions and personality going forward. This is a book for book people. The main character, Loveday (what a cool name!), has worked in a bookshop since she was fifteen years old, enjoys books more than people, and even has her favorite quotes tattooed on her body. I absolutely loved the character of Archie (and not just because my son’s name is Archer!) he was such a charming, lovely character who always had Loveday’s best interests at heart. This is a slow moving, highly developed story that will tug at your heart strings and give you a whole new cast of characters to love. Recommend to all bibliophiles!Thank you to St. Martin’s press for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Norma * Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    Well what is better than reading a book that speaks to you like a book and has so many references of books that is so easily relatable to? THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP!THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP by STEPHANIE BUTLAND is a wonderfully charming, light, moving, and endearing tale that is set in the greatest place ever, a bookshop. Any books that have any indication that it is going to be about a bookstore or books, I’m in, no questions asked. They are by far one of my favourite settings! Also, I hav Well what is better than reading a book that speaks to you like a book and has so many references of books that is so easily relatable to? THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP!THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP by STEPHANIE BUTLAND is a wonderfully charming, light, moving, and endearing tale that is set in the greatest place ever, a bookshop. Any books that have any indication that it is going to be about a bookstore or books, I’m in, no questions asked. They are by far one of my favourite settings! Also, I have to mention that beautiful cover! STEPHANIE BUTLAND delivers an absolutely lovely, appealing, and well-written read here that was more character-driven than plot-driven with wonderful, relatable and likeable characters. Our quirky and snarky main character is Loveday (adorable name right?) and she is known to love her books more than people. My husband has accused me of that many a times! LOLThis isn’t a fast-paced read by no means, it’s slow-moving and might have lost me a few times but as we follow along Loveday’s journey and learning the mystery behind her traumatic past, I found myself totally intrigued and couldn’t help but fall in love and identify with Loveday’s character. This book made me smile and was an absolute comfort for me to read! I truly enjoyed the escape into Loveday’s life and found this to be an entertaining, quick and easy read. Would recommend!*~* This was a Sister Read that I read along with my dear friend, Kris. Thank you so much, Kris for reading and discussing this one with me. You made it that much more fun! Thank you so much to NetGalley, St. Martin’s Press, and Stephanie Butland for the opportunity to read an advanced copy of this book in exchange for a review.Review written and posted on our themed book blog Two Sisters Lost In A Coulee Reading.https://twosisterslostinacoulee.comCoulee: a term applied rather loosely to different landforms, all of which refer to a kind of valley.
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    4 bibliophile stars to The Lost for Words Bookshop! 📚 📚 📚 📚 My friend, Melisa, spotted this book even before it was listed on Netgalley. When I heard about it, I knew I had to read it, too. Loveday Cardew is an introvert known to prefer books to people. Any of us could relate to her bibliophile ways. She is fortunate to work in a bookshop of all places, and within those walls, she holds some significant secrets about her own dark past. This story is all about Loveday. What is she hiding, and how 4 bibliophile stars to The Lost for Words Bookshop! 📚 📚 📚 📚 My friend, Melisa, spotted this book even before it was listed on Netgalley. When I heard about it, I knew I had to read it, too. Loveday Cardew is an introvert known to prefer books to people. Any of us could relate to her bibliophile ways. She is fortunate to work in a bookshop of all places, and within those walls, she holds some significant secrets about her own dark past. This story is all about Loveday. What is she hiding, and how do books help her cope? Loveday is quirky, with a sharp wit and a heart of gold. This is an emotional read as Loveday opens up, grows up, and explores her beginnings. Ultimately, The Lost for Words Bookshop is a serendipitous ode to the books we all know and love and how they can help us escape real-life, heal ourselves, and in turn give us bountiful hope. There’s nothing better than that, right? Thank you to Stephanie Butland, Thomas Dunne Books, and Netgalley for the complimentary copy. The Lost for Words Bookshop will be published on June 19, 2018. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    I was instantly intrigued by this story by the cover and the title. The Lost for Words Bookshop... what more can you ask for?! This novel features our main character Loveday Cardew. Loveday has worked for Lost for Words bookstore for over 10 years. She is quite the character with her nose ring and fascinating tattoos depicted throughout her body that represent quotes from her favorite books. It almost made me want to get one... :) Loveday isn't the best fan of people and loves her books way more I was instantly intrigued by this story by the cover and the title. The Lost for Words Bookshop... what more can you ask for?! This novel features our main character Loveday Cardew. Loveday has worked for Lost for Words bookstore for over 10 years. She is quite the character with her nose ring and fascinating tattoos depicted throughout her body that represent quotes from her favorite books. It almost made me want to get one... :) Loveday isn't the best fan of people and loves her books way more then socializing. As the story starts to progress, you realize that Loveday has suffered a great loss has a young girl. She hides her secrets very well and doesn't want to open herself up to anyone. One day Loveday starts receiving books at her bookshop that suggest someone knows about her past. Loveday's life is about to change..... What I really enjoyed about this novel was the characterization. I loved Archie!! It's full of warmth and love!! The story really comes to life exploring how one can overcome their fears and loss. "A bookshop is not magic but it can slowly heal your heart." I felt the story was a bit slow in the beginning for me and it dragged in some areas but overall it was a light, uplifting, and fluffy read :).3.5 stars rounded up for me! Thank you so much to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for the advanced arc!Publication date: 6/19/18Published to GR: 5/16/18
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this story about a quirky young lady named Loveday Cardew, with nose ring and first sentences of novels tattooed on her body, who has worked in a bookshop in York since she was fifteen years old. Loveday had spent years in a foster home after a tragedy happened in her family life, and she just has a crazy love for books which makes her job ideal.Because of what happened in her family, I don’t think she believes in love for herself, and she just really doesn’t like people anyway... exce I enjoyed this story about a quirky young lady named Loveday Cardew, with nose ring and first sentences of novels tattooed on her body, who has worked in a bookshop in York since she was fifteen years old. Loveday had spent years in a foster home after a tragedy happened in her family life, and she just has a crazy love for books which makes her job ideal.Because of what happened in her family, I don’t think she believes in love for herself, and she just really doesn’t like people anyway... except for the older man Archie who owns the bookshop and has taken her under his wing. Archie is a great character in this book, and is a help to her in realizing her potential.A love interest comes around in the form of a magic man who loves poetry. Maybe things will actually be okay for Loveday!There are a couple other stories going on within this story that kept me reading.A light and easy read!Thank you to NetGalley and St Martin’s Press for the ARC
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  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    4 Bibliophile Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟This was a lovely quirky book filled with books and charm... this was a very uplifting read that put a smile on my face... and even though the characters in this book did not have the most ideal of lives at all times... they all had a love for books and eventually found love for themselves and others...Loveday is a lovely quirky character... who truly underestimates herself and those around her.... my heart broke for her so many times, she really had a rough childhood an 4 Bibliophile Stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟This was a lovely quirky book filled with books and charm... this was a very uplifting read that put a smile on my face... and even though the characters in this book did not have the most ideal of lives at all times... they all had a love for books and eventually found love for themselves and others...Loveday is a lovely quirky character... who truly underestimates herself and those around her.... my heart broke for her so many times, she really had a rough childhood and the result of that was tremendous distrust.... she was so fortunate to have two wonderful men enter her life... Archie her boss... and Nathan her love interest.... both these gentlemen were truly genuine good guys.... and I loved the development of her relationships with both of them...This book will appeal to all book lovers! From the setting in the delightful second hand book shop... to the book quotes tattooed on Loveday... to all the many book references.... I also have to say I appreciate the fact that not every book reference in this book was made to a classic... not every book enthusiast loves the classics... including myself!Absolutely recommend for a pleasant summer read to anyone who is a fan of quirky characters, books, or a good story...*** Many thanks to St. Martin’s Press for my copy of this book ***
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  • Mackey St
    January 1, 1970
    All the stars for The Lost for Words Bookshop and Loveday Cardew!   “God, I don't love much but I love words.” ― Stephanie Butland, Lost For Words There are times when certain characters in a book are so vivid, so real that you want those characters to be in your life forever - in the real world and not just books. Loveday Cardew is one of those brilliant characters. Loveday is flawed, she is hurt, she is sarcastic and definitely a loner, but her soul reaches out through the pages and grabs you All the stars for The Lost for Words Bookshop and Loveday Cardew!   “God, I don't love much but I love words.” ― Stephanie Butland, Lost For Words There are times when certain characters in a book are so vivid, so real that you want those characters to be in your life forever - in the real world and not just books. Loveday Cardew is one of those brilliant characters. Loveday is flawed, she is hurt, she is sarcastic and definitely a loner, but her soul reaches out through the pages and grabs your heart fiercely and does not let go! Not since Eleanor Oliphant have I felt so strongly about a fictional character. And yes, I know there are comparisons between Eleanor and Loveday, but they are very different and so are the two books. Loveday has experienced more heartache in her short life than most experience in a lifetime. She finds solace and refuge in an old bookstore and through the owner, Archie, who becomes like a father to her, not that she needs one, you understand. Loveday needs nothing and no one except BOOKS. Despite her introversion, she has attracted two very dissimilar men and their stories are enfolded with Loveday's as well. She has secrets, dark secrets, that she has kept hidden since she was a child. Now, with the arrival of a box of books on their bookstore steps, those secrets are threatening to be revealed. As we learn of Loveday's past, as the secrets are revealed, we realize that either they will kill her - literally - or through their revelation she will grow. The story is told from within Loveday's amazingly quirky, sardonic mind in three parts - the far past, the past and the present. The back and forth of these timetables can get, at times, confusing but not so much to detract from the overall telling of the story. There are marvelous references to books throughout that obviously will delight any true bibliophile. In fact, the entire book - its prose, the references, the chapter headings and the bookshop itself - are like manna for a book lover's soul. The Lost for Words Bookshop is a narrative, not a suspense or thriller. Its story unfolds slowly but eloquently. If you don't read any other book this summer, I would suggest this one as your must read. Loveday will stay with you long after the last page is turned. My thanks to #Netgalley, St. Martin's Press and Stephanie Butland for the opportunity to read this incredible book.
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    This book was everything I hoped it would be: a book about books and life in a bookshop, a quirky main character, a handsome young man and a gentle love story. Well written with great characters and a wealth of human feelings and emotion.Sassy, prickly Loveday Cardew is a damaged soul. Her nose-ring and tattoos of first lines from her favourite books are part of the shell she's built around herself. Something traumatic happened in her childhood and she ended up in foster care. At 15 she met Arch This book was everything I hoped it would be: a book about books and life in a bookshop, a quirky main character, a handsome young man and a gentle love story. Well written with great characters and a wealth of human feelings and emotion.Sassy, prickly Loveday Cardew is a damaged soul. Her nose-ring and tattoos of first lines from her favourite books are part of the shell she's built around herself. Something traumatic happened in her childhood and she ended up in foster care. At 15 she met Archie, the owner of The Lost for Words bookshop who offered her a part time job and 10 years later she is still there, very much an integral part of the bookshop, watched over by Archie, a gregarious and friendly man who has become Loveday's friend and family. Loveday loves books more than people, "Books don't care if you've got a degree or what you watch on TV. Books don't judge if you've got tattoos, if your friends are few." She hates crowds and social situations and would rather be home in her small bedsit reading or writing poetry. One day all that changes when she finds a lost book of poetry at the bus stop and posts a found notice on the bookshop board. A young man called Nathan, a poet and part time magician walks in to claim it and sees beneath Loveday's antisocial front to the frightened and fragile girl hiding there.This is a very charming and engaging book. It was lovely to watch Loveday's journey towards facing her past and learning to live and love again. Archie and Nathan are wonderful characters and the bookshop is just what every bookshop should be.With thanks to Netgalley and the publisher St Martin's Press for a digital copy to read.
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  • Sarah Joint
    January 1, 1970
    The best possible way I can describe this book to you is that it's a book for book lovers. We get a lot of book references and a protagonist that both works in a book shop and has meaningful lines from stories she's enjoyed tattooed on her body. If I didn't already have several tattoos, I might steal that idea! It is a very charming story, but darker than the book cover and even the blurb makes it look. It's still a really enjoyable read, but more emotional than I was expecting. It's a book that The best possible way I can describe this book to you is that it's a book for book lovers. We get a lot of book references and a protagonist that both works in a book shop and has meaningful lines from stories she's enjoyed tattooed on her body. If I didn't already have several tattoos, I might steal that idea! It is a very charming story, but darker than the book cover and even the blurb makes it look. It's still a really enjoyable read, but more emotional than I was expecting. It's a book that I read slowly to savor more instead of devouring. I won't go too deeply into the story, because I think the blurb provided is purposefully vague. It's a story to immerse yourself into and can be very surprising at times. Four and a half stars from me for its beautiful charm, wonderful details, and intriguing story. Loveday Cardew is most comfortable lost among the stacks of the wonderful book shop she has been lucky enough to work at for years. She's closest to the owner, a charming older man with endless stories almost too fantastic to be true. She certainly prefers books to people. Books are a comfort. A place to escape to. People simply cannot be trusted, a fact that has been proven to her again and again. This is the reason she clutches her books close to her chest and keeps almost every single person in her life at arm's length. She's been through a lot, and keeps a lot of secrets from everyone... but someone out there is ready to shine a bright light on her past.I received a copy of this book from Net Galley and St. Martin's Press, thank you! My review is honest and unbiased.
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  • Fictionophile
    January 1, 1970
    What bibliophile can resist a novel about a charming used bookshop, with even more charming and quirky protagonists? I can't.  To further my interest, I've read some great reviews of this novel by some of favorite fellow bookbloggers. And... did I mention it is set in York, England?  What a package!This delightful novel features a memorable protagonist, Loveday Cardew. She has worked for "Lost for Words" for the past ten years, is twenty-five years old, has a nose ring, and several tattoos which What bibliophile can resist a novel about a charming used bookshop, with even more charming and quirky protagonists? I can't.  To further my interest, I've read some great reviews of this novel by some of favorite fellow bookbloggers. And... did I mention it is set in York, England?  What a package!This delightful novel features a memorable protagonist, Loveday Cardew. She has worked for "Lost for Words" for the past ten years, is twenty-five years old, has a nose ring, and several tattoos which depict lines from her favorite novels. She'll be the first to admit that she likes books much better than she likes people.  An introvert, she avoids confrontation at all costs. I confess that in the first chapter or so I wasn't Loveday's biggest fan, though over the course of the novel I came to love her like a daughter.  The author cleverly put forth her bristly and sarcastic character so as to show how Loveday put up walls against the people she meets."I word hard, but I know that I'm also hard work."Loveday's poem explaining why she loves books:"I like books cause they don't care if your knickers match your bra. If you've washed your hair. I like books cause they don't invade your space. They sit on your shelf and don't get in your face. I like books cause they don't mind what your heart contains, who you've left behind. I like books cause they don't give a shit when you get to the end - what you think of it. Books don't care if you've got a degree or what you watch on TV. Books don't judge if you've got tattoos, if your friends are few. I like books cause they don't care."Loveday's one true friend is the owner of "Lost for Words". More like family than he is a boss, Archie is a portly, gregarious gentleman. Generous in size and generous in nature. Archie wears a lot of tweed, smokes a pipe, and has a luxuriant moustache. He adores Loveday like a father and calls her his little 'stray waif'."Archie says I keep all my interesting bits well hidden and getting to know me is an exercise in faith rewarded."One day Loveday finds a poetry book on the pavement. As any true bibliophile would, she rescues the book from the elements and takes it back to the bookshop. She posts a sign in the window "Found" with the books details.  This small, seemingly inconsequential event will profoundly impact the lives of three people.Nathan Avebury, a poet and magician, notices her sign in the window and comes in to claim his book. Nathan seems to see beyond Loveday's off-putting demeanor to the person she is underneath."When you're a child you don't always know the right questions, and you don't know that you don't have forever to ask them."Though part of this novel are flashbacks to Loveday's childhood days in Whitby, her past is a well guarded secret that is not divulged until near the end of the book. We know that she suffered a great trauma in her childhood and that when she was ten years old she was put into the foster system."Small memories come from the kind of tiny reminders that you simply can't predict, and so can't protect yourself from, and they catch you, paper cuts across the heart."All of the characters in this novel are so genuine and so very 'human'.  Villains and angels are both represented - showing that no one is completely one or the other.  This is a book that will steal the heart of ardent bibliophiles and those who carry emotional baggage from their youth. "Lost for Words" is laced with moments that will alternately make you laugh and make you weep. If you were expecting a 'cutesy' chick lit book, you will soon discover that "Lost for Words" has hidden depths with some very serious themes. In a nutshell - I loved it!My sincere gratitude to Bonnier Zaffre Books via NetGalley for providing me with a digital copy of this novel. I was only too happy to write this review.
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    Loveday Cardew works in a bookshop owned by Archie.Working in a bookshop is perfect for Loveday because she is a shy almost introverted person through no fault of her own.THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP is a lovely read and will make you jealous of Loveday’s job, but not of the heartaches she keeps hidden.Besides the books and the bookshop, the characters in THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP are the best, especially Archie....loved him. He is a bit on the unorganized and fly-by-night type of person, but Loveday Cardew works in a bookshop owned by Archie.Working in a bookshop is perfect for Loveday because she is a shy almost introverted person through no fault of her own.THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP is a lovely read and will make you jealous of Loveday’s job, but not of the heartaches she keeps hidden.Besides the books and the bookshop, the characters in THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP are the best, especially Archie....loved him. He is a bit on the unorganized and fly-by-night type of person, but he loves his job, loves Loveday, and loves how Loveday helps him keep the shop going.Loveday is lovable, sweet, and a bit on the odd side.Nathan is someone I would like to know and someone very sweet to Loveday.Rob was annoying and unlikeable.The secondary characters worked well with the main characters and added mystery and tension.As THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP goes back and forth in time, a few mysteries and secrets about Loveday’s childhood are revealed.Her family history definitely explained her closed-mouthed-about-her-feelings, lost-for-words personality.If you like books, bookshops, wonderful characters, a bit of mystery, and secrets kept, THE LOST FOR WORDS BOOKSHOP is for you.I’m sure most readers fall into most of those categories, so you won’t want to miss reading this charming, alluring read.The cover itself draws you in.There are some heartaches in it, but for the most part it is a lovely, bookish read. ENJOY when you read this book. 5/5This book was given to me free of charge and without compensation by the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Bkwmlee
    January 1, 1970
    What an enjoyable read! When I first read the summary and found out this story is about a bibliophile and takes place in a bookshop, I was immediately interested in reading it. I love “books about books” and with this one taking place in a bookshop, I anticipated that there would likely be plenty of references to various literary works. For me, as a book lover, part of the fun in reading these types of books is being able to recognize the literary references sprinkled throughout the story – of c What an enjoyable read! When I first read the summary and found out this story is about a bibliophile and takes place in a bookshop, I was immediately interested in reading it. I love “books about books” and with this one taking place in a bookshop, I anticipated that there would likely be plenty of references to various literary works. For me, as a book lover, part of the fun in reading these types of books is being able to recognize the literary references sprinkled throughout the story – of course, this one had plenty of references to books, but what set this apart from other “books about books” for me was the unique way in which some of these references were incorporated into the story: the main character Loveday Cardew, who works at the Lost for Words Bookshop, has some of her favorite quotes from books she has read tattooed on various parts of her body. It was interesting to see which quotes Loveday chose and the significance those words had for her. Loveday is a wonderfully drawn character – flawed and broken after having endured unspeakable tragedy as a child, she was a loner who didn’t like interacting with people and instead, found comfort in the world she created for herself through books and a love of reading cultivated since childhood. She is quirky, sarcastic, unapologetic, and has a negative outlook on life due to what she endured many years ago, yet it was precisely these traits that made her such a realistic and endearing character. Having the entire narrative told from Loveday’s first person point of view worked really well with this book, as we got the chance to dive deep into her mindset and personality firsthand, which for me, also made it easier to connect with this character on an emotional level. The other character I adored in this book was Archie, the owner of the bookshop who was eccentric and charming and larger-than-life in many ways, yet genuinely cared for Loveday and as a mentor as well as father figure, always had her best interests at heart. I loved the special bond that Archie and Loveday shared – their interactions and the way they bantered back and forth with each other always managed to put a smile on my face (which of course should come as no surprise that I cried real tears over the ending). The other supporting characters in the story (Nathan, Melodie, Rob, etc.) were also well-drawn – this is definitely a cast of characters that I won’t soon forget.The character of Loveday reminded me of Eleanor in Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine while the bookshop setting, Archie, as well as the events that occur around the bookshop remind me of Gabrielle Zevin’s The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry . Both books were ones I read last year and absolutely adored! For me, this book was a worthwhile read that went deeper than I expected in terms of exploring important issues such as domestic violence, mental illness, love, resilience, social convention, childhood trauma, etc. yet managed to remain lighthearted and even uplifting. This is a well-written story, one that can be simultaneously heartwarming and heartbreaking (and will likely make you shed a few tears or two), but definitely highly recommended!Received ARC from Thomas Dunne Books / St. Martin’s Press via NetGalley.
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  • Margitte
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those contemporary reads that celebrates the unique voices in wordsmithery. FROM THE BLURB:The Lost for Words Bookshop is a compelling, irresistible, and heart-rending novel, perfect for fans of The Storied Life of AJ Fikry and The Little Paris Bookshop.The book starts out as a family drama, then slowly evolves into mystery and suspense and finally gears up for a thriller denouement with love added as the final flavor.Loveday Cardew pulls the strings of her own life and in the end This is one of those contemporary reads that celebrates the unique voices in wordsmithery. FROM THE BLURB:The Lost for Words Bookshop is a compelling, irresistible, and heart-rending novel, perfect for fans of The Storied Life of AJ Fikry and The Little Paris Bookshop.The book starts out as a family drama, then slowly evolves into mystery and suspense and finally gears up for a thriller denouement with love added as the final flavor.Loveday Cardew pulls the strings of her own life and in the end determines the outcome of everyone's lives around her, just because they love her. Her mainstay was her best friends, books, throughout the onslaught of all the curve balls hitting her so constantly, unexpectedly and unsolicited. What choices does a young girl have after all while she is unable to control her own destiny? Like a beautiful butterfly, and despite the odds, she follows the five stages of becoming the best and most beautiful being she can be: - As an egg she hatches within a home where tension and circumstances slowly changes the outcome of her destiny while she silently observes the drama and the outcome. - As a caterpillar she has to navigate through her social environment and try to survive all the odds against her. - As a pupa she discovers her own talents and abilities when she finally comes face to face with a life on her own. - And suddenly she is the gorgeous butterfly who enters the realm of love and reproduction. However, for that to happen, she needs to grow and trust, especially when things just start happening all at once...and messages to succeed appears in the books left at the door of the book store she came to call home. The walls of books which are her barriers against life's uncertain narrative, are not as assuring anymore when life knocks with a different tone on her door and the books start to talk back. It is a wonderful uplifting, yet sad story, with enough chick lit tidbits to make it a delightful read for a wide variety of bibliophiles. Atmospheric, fast-moving, tense. Fantastic.The ending was chick-lit meh to me personally. However, as a family drama, with a young woman as the protagonist it is a deeply inspiring story and palatable for most readers. The novel is a cut way above the rest. Unique and refreshing. Tastefully written, and eloquently executed. A truly great experience.RECOMMENDED
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  • *TUDOR^QUEEN*
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up to 4.This advance reader copy was provided by the publisher St. Martin's Press via NetGalley.I was drawn to this book for its location (England, of course) and its setting of a book shop. Two great passions of mine in one tome!The story's main character is a 25-year old woman named Loveday Cardew who has worked in a book shop in York since the age of fifteen. She has a love of reading since youth, a passion she shared with her Mom. When she was a child there were a lot of sp 3.5 stars rounded up to 4.This advance reader copy was provided by the publisher St. Martin's Press via NetGalley.I was drawn to this book for its location (England, of course) and its setting of a book shop. Two great passions of mine in one tome!The story's main character is a 25-year old woman named Loveday Cardew who has worked in a book shop in York since the age of fifteen. She has a love of reading since youth, a passion she shared with her Mom. When she was a child there were a lot of special times with her Mom. They would bake together (especially parkin, a gingerbread cake traditionally made with oatmeal and black treacle, which is often associated with Yorkshire or Leeds, England), go to the beach in Whitby (where they lived), and also visit book shops. Her dad worked on oil rigs and spent a lot of time away from home, so Loveday and her Mom were especially close. There are alternating time periods from when Loveday was nine and the present day, when Loveday is twenty-five. Loveday is very content in the pleasant and protective bubble of the book shop. She's had a couple of romantic relationships which crossed into sexual territory, but where the body progressed the communication/emotional aspect did not. For, Loveday holds tragic secrets of her childhood and there are sensitive firewalls distancing herself from others. She has a wonderful and loyal friendship with the shop owner Archie, a decent apartment and a job that she loves. However, when she was nine something happened to shatter her normal family life. As Loveday lives her new life in a new city she's guarded when it comes to personal questions of her childhood. Then one day Nathan comes into the shop. A somewhat elegantly dressed cravat-wearing magician, Nathan invites Loveday to a nearby club for "Poetry Night." Nathan participates each Wednesday with a new and meaningful offering. What cannot easily be said in normal conversation sometimes can be less painfully communicated through the poetic art form. Will Loveday find the emotional strength to step up to the open mike and bare her soul through poetry? Will she ever be able to really trust anybody? You'll have to read this for yourself for the mystery to unfurl. I will only share that I was moved to tears by one particularly poignant Poetry Night which prompted me to add the 4th star to my rating!
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  • Carlene Inspired
    January 1, 1970
    For this review and others visit Carlene Inspired.Wow, this book got to me in ways I never expected it to. The Lost for Words Bookshop by Stephanie Butland left me with my heart hurting, tears streaming down my face, and a desire for it to go on and on and never end. We follow Loveday in present-day 2016 and learn of her, at first wonderful and later difficult, past in flashback chapters. We see her in school plays, reading with her father, baking with her mother, and hiding with her secrets in For this review and others visit Carlene Inspired.Wow, this book got to me in ways I never expected it to. The Lost for Words Bookshop by Stephanie Butland left me with my heart hurting, tears streaming down my face, and a desire for it to go on and on and never end. We follow Loveday in present-day 2016 and learn of her, at first wonderful and later difficult, past in flashback chapters. We see her in school plays, reading with her father, baking with her mother, and hiding with her secrets in her bedroom. She's kept her past private, her family consisting of the people she chooses, specifically bookshop owner Archie. Lost for Words is her happy place, her escape with the books she connects to better than people, but the bookstore also brings to her people, like a lover, a poet, and someone with boxes that take her right back into the past."It's good to be reminded that the world is full of stories that are, potentially, at least as painful as yours."Loveday is an enigma, she functions with little help from others, shares very little personal information, but allows the first lines of novels to tell her story for her as tattoos on her skin. She's hiding from a past she doesn't want to admit she has, hiding from comfort of sharing herself with another, and yet so desperate to tie the books she reads to her past in some way. She's like a child in many ways, though more caution with her feelings and matters of the heart. I ached for her, even before I knew what her past was made up of. She was meek in many ways and yet so strong and stubborn in others. Her past making up much of who she is, though unaware of how impactful those around her presently also are in making her into someone new. Loveday is a reader and The Lost for Words Bookshop is a book for book lovers."I suppose it's the fact that these small memories come from the kind of tiny reminders that you simply can't predict, and so can't protect yourself from, and they catch you, paper cuts across the heart."Stephanie Butland's writing is lyrical, the story is fresh, and the poems that tie Loveday to another such a romantic way to reveal feelings. I loved every single secondary character in this novel, even those who are more foe than friend. Each sparks a match to Loveday, pushing her to reveal more of herself, to accept more of herself, and showing her to accept the open arms of others. Archie is the best man I've ever met in a book and he's not even what one would consider handsome. He's described as portly and jovial, the kind of man who tells a tale that you know must be embellished, only he's got the odd friends to show for it. His love of Loveday, his support of her, is so much like that of a father and I really ached for Loveday and how she didn't recognize him as such. He's so important in her growth in this novel and I easily could have read the story of them working together for ten years forever. They're quite the pair, I think I would've liked to know him. Of course, there's Nathan, a boy who charms her and disarms her, bringing forth a Loveday that I had come to think we would only see in her childhood flashbacks. He's the knight who helps her take down the walls she'd spent so long building and fortifying. Every character felt so real, with Stephanie Butland's descriptive storytelling bringing each to life along with the quant York setting. "'And be brave, Loveday. Ask the questions you want to ask. Seek out the people you want in your life. It might not be as hard as you think.'"The Lost for Words Bookshop is not what I would call chick lit, but rather Women's Literature and really a book anyone with difficult baggage can relate to. With heavy topics covered like mental health, trauma, and abuse, Stephanie Butland tells a romantic story with a purpose. As a bibliophile I connected with this book, with Loveday and her only-in-my-dreams tattoos, and the unique take Stephanie Butland had on burying the hatchet, finding oneself, and embracing life's quirks whether joyous or difficult. I had a fantastic giggle when Loveday, as a child, pointed at that being a reader makes saying words aloud so much more difficult, as we really haven't a clue how it really should sound. So true. I do suggest you prepare yourself with tissues, because for every laugh I had at the character's wittiness I also shed a tear for the heartache Loveday had come to accept. I know this is a book I will reread many times, in fact I can already picture the cold winter nights with cocoa in hand and Loveday to keep me company. ARC provided by St. Martin's Press and Netgalley.
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  • Dale Harcombe
    January 1, 1970
    A book set in a bookshop always has the potential to be good. But it needs more than just being about books. It need interesting characters. Enter Loveday Cardew. (Loveday is a Cornish name for those who were wondering.) Loveday much prefers books to people. Perhaps for good reason. She knows what to expect from books. People are much harder to figure out and sometimes those you trust let you down badly, she has found. Then into the York bookshop where she has worked since she was 15, comes a po A book set in a bookshop always has the potential to be good. But it needs more than just being about books. It need interesting characters. Enter Loveday Cardew. (Loveday is a Cornish name for those who were wondering.) Loveday much prefers books to people. Perhaps for good reason. She knows what to expect from books. People are much harder to figure out and sometimes those you trust let you down badly, she has found. Then into the York bookshop where she has worked since she was 15, comes a poet. Around the same time three deliveries of books arrive that resonate far too much with Loveday and bring to mind unsettling memories. Her past is not something she wants to dwell on and with good reason.I loved the quirky, prickly character of Loveday and the way she has first lines of books tattooed in various places on her skin. I loved all of the book references including some of the crazy requests people come in with to bookshops and especially the way Loveday’s back story unfolds throughout the book. Chapters are divided up into poetry, history and crime with a couple of different ones at the end. Archie who owns the bookshop and Nathan, both poet and magician, are interesting and likeable characters. Not everyone is. The writing is engaging. I liked, ’His eyes were the kind of blue you find on self-help book covers, to suggest clarity and calm.’ And this one when Loveday is looking at a particular book. ‘I suppose it’s the fact that these small memories come from the kind of tiny reminders that you simply can’t predict, and so can’t protect yourself from, and they catch you, paper cuts across the heart.’ The reader gets a clear picture of a happy early family life before everything changes and Loveday ends up in foster care. Since then she has worked on remaining largely invisible. I loved everything about this book and powered through it. My husband could tell how involved I was in the story by the sounds that erupted at times, laughter, anger, concern and tears. I simple had to keep reading till I reached the end. A must read book for anyone who loves books and characters that are a bit out of the ordinary, while not skimming over some of the good and the bad aspects of families, friendships and romantic relationships. An absolute five star read.
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  • Ingrid
    January 1, 1970
    Loveday has worked in the Lost for Words Bookshop for 10 years, one of those shops booklovers aren't able to resist. With every chapter a layer hiding the secret in her life is peeled away which makes it compelling reading. There is romance, but it fits well in the story. It could have been a YA book.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The “Books are our best lovers and our most provoking friends.” *Poetry* Books Behave by Loveday CardewI like books cause they don’t care if your knickers match your braIf you’ve washed your hair.I like books cause they don’t invade your spaceThey don’t get in your face.I like books cause they don’t mindWhat your heart containsWho you’ve left behind.I like a book cause it doesn’t give a shitWhen you get to the end what you think of it.Books don’t care if you’ve got a degreeWhat you watch on TV. The “Books are our best lovers and our most provoking friends.” *Poetry* Books Behave by Loveday CardewI like books cause they don’t care if your knickers match your braIf you’ve washed your hair.I like books cause they don’t invade your spaceThey don’t get in your face.I like books cause they don’t mindWhat your heart containsWho you’ve left behind.I like a book cause it doesn’t give a shitWhen you get to the end what you think of it.Books don’t care if you’ve got a degreeWhat you watch on TV.Books don’t judge if you’ve got tattoosIf your friends are few.I like books cause they don’t care. Loveday Cardew has worked at The Lost for Words Bookshop since she was 15. Now a young woman she bears her tattoos and nose piercing as a shield. Her sarcastic laced tongue serves as her sword. She doesn’t care to fit into anyone’s box. Her best friends are her beloved books and her family consists of the avuncular book shop owner, Archie. Although Loveday keeps a journal of her poetry she doesn’t trust anyone to share her thoughts.That is until one fateful day when she finds a book of poetry in the road. A bibliophile at heart she can’t abandon a friend. She rescues the book and posts an advertisement in the front window of The Lost for Words Bookshop which brings the handsome Nathaniel Avebury to her door. *History*But Loveday is not an easy egg to crack. She has built up this hard exterior over time and is cynical with good reason. Will she be able to let down her guard? Or will any chance at love and happiness evade her. *Crime*Certainly Loveday must come to terms with her past. Ultimately she must allow herself to forgive. “The first lines did not define the last pages in real life the way they did in books.”Special thanks to NetGalley, St. Martin's Press and Stephanie Butland for receiving an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Umut Rados
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 30%. I received this book from NetGalley, so thanks to them and the publisher. The blurb seemed cute and it was taking place in a book shop. Who doesn’t like stories in a book shop, right? Unfortunately, this book joined the trend of having a protagonist, who suffered from domestic violence and dealing with the effects of it in her current life. The blurb doesn’t mention this. It was along the lines of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine. I was not a fan of that book either. I personally DNF at 30%. I received this book from NetGalley, so thanks to them and the publisher. The blurb seemed cute and it was taking place in a book shop. Who doesn’t like stories in a book shop, right? Unfortunately, this book joined the trend of having a protagonist, who suffered from domestic violence and dealing with the effects of it in her current life. The blurb doesn’t mention this. It was along the lines of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine. I was not a fan of that book either. I personally don’t find it heart warming to read about someone’s difficulties dealing with the world, until someone comes to the rescue and changes everything. I also don’t find it realistic. So, sadly I DNF’ed this book around the 30% mark. If you like these type of stories and if you liked Eleanor Oliphant’s story, you might like it.
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  • Diane Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    Now this is my idea of a great summer read. A mystery in a bookshop, although it's so low key that I didn't even realize it was a mystery til about halfway through. A joy to read because of all the book references, and for anyone who has worked in a bookstore, there's all that inside knowledge you are privy to. Not too heavy, but not fluff. A snarky, sarcastic heroine who made me laugh, but had some substance to make the story believable. Some bad guys, some great guys, and some in between. A fu Now this is my idea of a great summer read. A mystery in a bookshop, although it's so low key that I didn't even realize it was a mystery til about halfway through. A joy to read because of all the book references, and for anyone who has worked in a bookstore, there's all that inside knowledge you are privy to. Not too heavy, but not fluff. A snarky, sarcastic heroine who made me laugh, but had some substance to make the story believable. Some bad guys, some great guys, and some in between. A fun read, but with tears at the end to even things out. Yes, a perfect summer read. But it would be just as good in any other season as well.
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  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    Loveday Cardew's best friends are books. She tattoos the first lines of her favorite books on her body like a collection of fond memories she wants to keep close forever. She hides a secret about her past and never lets people past her defenses. Books don't judge. Books don't pity. She works in a bookshop, surrounded by the peace and feeling of safety the books give her. But, someone has found out about her past. And Loveday Cardew's quiet little world is about to tumble into chaos. I loved this Loveday Cardew's best friends are books. She tattoos the first lines of her favorite books on her body like a collection of fond memories she wants to keep close forever. She hides a secret about her past and never lets people past her defenses. Books don't judge. Books don't pity. She works in a bookshop, surrounded by the peace and feeling of safety the books give her. But, someone has found out about her past. And Loveday Cardew's quiet little world is about to tumble into chaos. I loved this book! As the story progressed and I learned more and more about Loveday....her past, her thoughts, her secret....I found myself sympathizing more and more with her. Sometimes the past keeps a tight grip on a person that takes years to loosen. I know this experience personally from my disastrous relationships with my birth family. For Loveday, she hides from her hurts and emotions and only loves books...until she lets her defenses down just a bit. And the world comes crashing in. So realistic. I also love the idea of getting tattoos of first lines of favorite books, or those with personal meaning.I listened to the audio book version of this novel. Narrated by Imogen Church, the audio is just under 9 hours long. Church's voice is perfect for this book, and I loved the audio. Even with my hearing loss, I was easily able to hear and understand the entire book. This was a binge listen for me.....I couldn't stop once I got immersed in the story. This book is sad, hopeful, and beautiful. Despite how we remember our lives Before, there is always a life After. I absolutely loved this book and will be reading more by this author. I usually steer away from emotional fiction, but this story is beautiful. I have to admit that this book sat on my To-Read shelf for awhile before I worked up the courage to read it. I knew it would poke at the hurts still present from my own past...and I had to work up the courage to go there. I'm so glad I did.....totally rewarding experience. Full stars from me! **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from St. Martins Press via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**
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  • Robin Bonne
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 A quick and pleasant read about a used bookstore, a woman with a secret past, and the men who love her. I had a little trouble relating to the main character, Loveday, as she seemed just as closed off to me, the reader, as she did to the other characters in the book.Even though I enjoyed this book, there were a few elements that were off to me. I wished for a more suspenseful build up around the ex boyfriend, Rob. I found myself puzzling over Loveday’s choices and reasoning behind her choice 3.5 A quick and pleasant read about a used bookstore, a woman with a secret past, and the men who love her. I had a little trouble relating to the main character, Loveday, as she seemed just as closed off to me, the reader, as she did to the other characters in the book.Even though I enjoyed this book, there were a few elements that were off to me. I wished for a more suspenseful build up around the ex boyfriend, Rob. I found myself puzzling over Loveday’s choices and reasoning behind her choices. She was a very confusing character, and sometimes her motives were unclear. I assume she had C-PTSD, but the symptoms were glossed over which disappointed me. There were a lot of missed chances at character development. I wanted to know them better. My favorite character was Archie, and he brightened every scene he was in. He brought more life to this book than any of the other characters in it, though Nathan’s Doc Martins were a close second best. The comment about Angela Carter irked me. In a book that is supposed to be for book lovers, it felt like a slap in the face to have one of my favorite authors insulted. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a free copy of this ebook in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    "A bookshop is not magic, but it can steal away your heart. A bookshop is not magic, but it can slowly heal your heart."This is a lovely character-driven novel set in the eponymous second-hand bookshop in York, England. Loveday Jenna Cardew has worked there since she was fifteen, when the owner Archie caught her trying to sneak out with a copy of her favorite book, Possession. For most of her childhood, Loveday had been in foster care after her father's death and her mother was taken away when s "A bookshop is not magic, but it can steal away your heart. A bookshop is not magic, but it can slowly heal your heart."This is a lovely character-driven novel set in the eponymous second-hand bookshop in York, England. Loveday Jenna Cardew has worked there since she was fifteen, when the owner Archie caught her trying to sneak out with a copy of her favorite book, Possession. For most of her childhood, Loveday had been in foster care after her father's death and her mother was taken away when she was ten. She prefers books to people and perhaps escaping into books has saved her life. Her body is tattooed with the first line of her favorite novels.Now at twenty-five, she meets the poet Nathan, who begins to pull her out of herself. Can she truly believe anything lasting can come from this? Or will he leave when he learns her truth?Told from the damaged Loveday's first-person point of view, the chapters alternate between her distant past, more recent past and the present. This novel was in solid five-star territory for me until the last 15 percent when I thought it fell into the mundane. Loveday, Archie, Nathan and others really came to life in these pages and I truly liked and cared for them. Even the villain was well-drawn. This utterly charming book came very close to being my favorite read for 2018. Good going, Ms Butland! I'll look forward to reading more of your books to come. I received an arc of this novel from the publisher via Netgalley for my honest review.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 5 Glorious Stars!I didn’t know much about this book before diving into it, and first third of it didn’t prepare me for how much I’d love it by the end. I’m giving this 5 stars, and am recommending it to all my friends. The author, Stephanie Butland, danced along the edge melodrama, but didn’t step over that line. This might be categorized as chick-lit, but it’s really a primer about life. I grew to love the main character, Loveday Cardew (her Welsh name is pronounces Love-dee). She was p Rating: 5 Glorious Stars!I didn’t know much about this book before diving into it, and first third of it didn’t prepare me for how much I’d love it by the end. I’m giving this 5 stars, and am recommending it to all my friends. The author, Stephanie Butland, danced along the edge melodrama, but didn’t step over that line. This might be categorized as chick-lit, but it’s really a primer about life. I grew to love the main character, Loveday Cardew (her Welsh name is pronounces Love-dee). She was prickly, intelligent, reclusive, and she fiercely loved the bookshop she worked in. She reminded me a little bit of the main character, Eleanor, in ‘Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine’ by Gail Honeyman. We start to learn Loveday’s backstory in the chapters that alternate between Loveday’s childhood, and the current day.There is a mystery from Loveday’s childhood that slowly unfolds, and as it does, you begin to see the forces that shaped the current narrow life she lives today. Her rock is Archie, the owner of the bookshop that she’s worked at for the last ten years, since she was fifteen. She lives in York between the bookshop, and her small bed-sit (studio) apartment. She’s had a few romantic encounters, before Nathan pops into the bookshop, but nothing that has made her feel like giving up her single existence. Nathan is looking for a book of poetry that he’d lost in the street. Loveday rescued the book because she couldn’t stand to see a book treated as garbage. She then posted a note about the found book in the bookshop window. Nathan comes in to claim the book. From that initial contact, and against her better judgement she is slowly pulled into Nathan’s orbit. She starts to attend Poetry Night at the local pub. Nathan (a published poet, and sometime magician) emcees the weekly open mic event.Loveday is drawn to Nathan but she’s built so many walls around herself that she can’t share all of her truth with him. Archie, the large mysterious bookstore owner encourages her to open up to Nathan, but she just struggles with those trust issues. Then books from her childhood start arriving with the boxes of used books dropped off for resale. Are they the actual books from her childhood? Who would have access to these books, and who would torment her this way by leaving the books for her to find? Without getting bogged down in too many plotlines or retelling of the story, just let me say that this books surprised me multiple times. It brought me up short a few times, and dang it, it made me actually cry once. It tries to answer important questions like, “How do you survive early trauma?’” “How do you learn to take a risk?” Will Loveday be able to break old patterns and craft a new life for herself? Take my recommendation, this book isn’t a risk. You want to get to know Loveday, and see how it all turns out. It’s a great read.Thank-you to NetGalley; Thomas Dunne Books; and the author, Stephanie Butland; for providing a free ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Hristina
    January 1, 1970
    Copy received through NetGalleyIt's a book that talks about the power of books, it's especially written for bookworms. I loved that, I loved how the story progressed, the writing is great, but most of all, I loved the characters, they make this book. This was a very interesting, comforting read, and it's definitely a book that I will re-read soon.
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  • Jo (An Unexpected Bookish Geek)
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a rather quick and mediocre read. I picked it as it made for something different, and when I realised the story itself was centered around a bookstore, well, who wouldn't be up for that? Although this book was okay, and wasn't terrible, I found a few things wrong with it.First off, I had difficulty relating to the main character, Loveday, in any way whatsoever. This I think, is because she comes across as reserved, and she is pretty much like that with every person she meets. I rea This book was a rather quick and mediocre read. I picked it as it made for something different, and when I realised the story itself was centered around a bookstore, well, who wouldn't be up for that? Although this book was okay, and wasn't terrible, I found a few things wrong with it.First off, I had difficulty relating to the main character, Loveday, in any way whatsoever. This I think, is because she comes across as reserved, and she is pretty much like that with every person she meets. I realise that is part of her character, but when you cannot relate to a character, it detaches you from the story. Loveday kind of had me at a loss in parts. Some of her choices were questionable and the reason behind those choices were not always clear for the reader. This made for some frustrating reading. I believe that the book lacked suspense with Loveday and her ex. I think there could have been so much more descriptions and explanations included in this book relating to this. Archie was the best character, and probably because he actually "had" some character. I enjoyed the descriptions of the bookshop and the mention of some famous classics that I happen to love. Unfortunately, the ending was rather abrupt and flat. I just think this book had the potential to be so much better.
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  • Liz Fenwick
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It has stayed with me...beautiful and heartfelt.
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