The Gender Games
Why we are all being messed up by gender, and what we can do about it.'It's a boy!' or 'It's a girl!' are the first words almost all of us hear when we enter the world. Before our names, before we have likes and dislikes - before we, or anyone else, has any idea who we are. And two years ago, as Juno Dawson went to tell her mother she was (and actually, always had been) a woman, she started to realise just how wrong we've been getting it.Gender isn't just screwing over trans people, it's messing with everyone. From little girls who think they can't be doctors to teenagers who come to expect street harassment. From exclusionist feminists to 'alt-right' young men. From men who can't cry to the women who think they shouldn't. As her body gets in line with her mind, Juno tells not only her own story, but the story of everyone who is shaped by society's expectations of gender - and what we can do about it.Featuring insights from well-known gender, feminist and trans activists including Rebecca Root, Laura Bates, Gemma Cairney, Anthony Anaxagorou, Hannah Witton, Alaska Thunderfuck and many more, The Gender Games is a frank, witty and powerful manifesto for a world where what's in your head is more important than what's between your legs.

The Gender Games Details

TitleThe Gender Games
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 1st, 2017
PublisherTwo Roads
ISBN1473648580
ISBN-139781473648586
Number of pages368 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Glbt, Gender

The Gender Games Review

  • Simon
    May 25, 2017
    Part memoir and part social study and commentary Juno Dawson's The Gender Games is a fantastic, engaging and thought inducing look at gender, sex, sexuality and all the things in between that cause so much kerfuffle. I found it brilliantly direct, it made me understand something's I'd been puzzled about and left me feeling empowered as a person. I want it to do that for anyone who reads it. And you should read it, whatever you gender, sex or sexuality.
    more
  • Michael mister.is.me
    June 15, 2017
    An interesting Read.This book delivers a very good part-chatty memoir and part-introduction to gender and trans issues within society. Throughout the book it really made me think and want to go and read further into academic gender studies and look into some of social and political issues contemporary society raised within Dawson's book.
    more
  • Rachel Jones
    June 2, 2017
    Full review can be found at http://racheyragdoll.blogspot.co.uk/2...When it was announced that Juno would be releasing a non fiction book focusing on gender, I knew I had to read it! I've probably mentioned this a hundred times before, but I adore Juno's YA fiction books. Although I was initially interested in the topic of this new book that seemed a lot more adulty than any of her other books, I am not a big reader of non fiction. My recent non fiction reads have been by famous youtubers steppi Full review can be found at http://racheyragdoll.blogspot.co.uk/2...When it was announced that Juno would be releasing a non fiction book focusing on gender, I knew I had to read it! I've probably mentioned this a hundred times before, but I adore Juno's YA fiction books. Although I was initially interested in the topic of this new book that seemed a lot more adulty than any of her other books, I am not a big reader of non fiction. My recent non fiction reads have been by famous youtubers stepping out into the literary world, most often aimed at a young teenage audience, so I instantly knew I was stepping out of my comfort zone by reading this one. Although I have lived quite a sheltered life, thanks to the Internet, I have seen enough shit on Tumblr and in fan fiction that this book didn't send me screaming and crying in the opposite direction. Even though we are used to seeing young, innocent protagonists in Juno's books, this one is definitely only suitable for older teenagers and adults.I feel as if this books target audience is women (both trans and cis) in the 18-30 age category, and as I fall somewhere in the middle of this, I found myself relating to many of the issues that came up. Although your average “meninist” will insist that gender inequality doesn't exist, rape culture, the wage gap, being cat called in the street, amongst many other things proves that it does. I, along with many other women, have experienced drawbacks of being the “weaker sex” first hand, and I found some of the issues that were brought up extremely relatable. Although Juno had some very valid opinions, and I agreed with her opinions on the majority of the issues she brought up, there was one thing that was briefly mentioned that I felt was going a little too far. Although, like Juno, I am not a parent and therefore my opinions on parenting are no more or less valid than hers, I disagreed with her view that expecting parents shouldn't tell people the sex of their baby. Although I think “gender reveal” parties are ridiculous, I understand that expecting parents would be excited to share the babies sex, as it is the only information they have about their unborn child. I think this is a personal preference for each parent, and just because a parent decides to share what the babies sex is, it doesn't make them a bad person that's conforming to gender roles and forcing a gender on the baby. As Juno explained, sex and gender are two different things. Babies have no idea what gender is, and it's not going to matter to the baby if their parents dress them in pink, blue or yellow. It clearly is important to teach people that sex and gender don't always co-exist, and to not tell children they have to play with gender specific toys, but I feel as if it's unfair to take the excitement of revealing their babies sex away from a parent if it's what they want to do.Despite tending to avoid non fiction, I really enjoyed reading this book. It was a real eye opener into Juno's life as a transgender woman, and all the shit that transgender people have to go through so that they can live their lives in a body that they feel comfortable in, and how we still have a long way to go to stop transphobia. I really admire Juno for sharing such a personal story with us in an attempt to educate us, and ultimately teach us that women, no matter if we're black, white, cis, transgender, straight, heterosexual etc, should come together and support each other.
    more
  • George Lester
    June 7, 2017
    I listened to the audiobook (also read by Juno Dawson) and now I urge you all to read it! It's delightful, thought provoking and touching. The audiobook is also particularly masterful as Juno is such a wonderful storyteller. It made me laugh (in public) it made me mouth YES GAWD (also in public) to its messages and the fine points it makes on gender. Seriously, read it, listen to it, devour it! A brilliant book and (I hate when people say this, but sometimes it's true!) an important one at that.
    more
  • Jeanette
    June 19, 2017
    A very interesting read and certainly gave me lots to think about. I am not going to write what this book is about as not only do i not wish to spoil for others, but the title should give one a good idea.So pleased to have had the opportunity to read this book, which i won in a recent Goodreads First Reads giveaway.
    more
  • Ross Duffy
    June 17, 2017
    This was so factual and interesting and just let me discover who Juno Dawson really is. Also it let me find out more about the genders, sexualities and the LGBTQ+ community in general.Honestly. An amazing read which I recommend to everyone!
  • Charlotte
    June 8, 2017
    Juno Dawson – primarily known for her Young Adult books – came out in 2015 and was met with tremendous support from her readers, the book community and her publisher (who have since gone to lengths to reprint her books under her new name). Following this announcement – though I feel that isn’t the right word to use – Juno went on to talk publicly about her transition in a monthly Glamour Column. I asked her in the past if she was likely to write a book either featuring a trans character or about Juno Dawson – primarily known for her Young Adult books – came out in 2015 and was met with tremendous support from her readers, the book community and her publisher (who have since gone to lengths to reprint her books under her new name). Following this announcement – though I feel that isn’t the right word to use – Juno went on to talk publicly about her transition in a monthly Glamour Column. I asked her in the past if she was likely to write a book either featuring a trans character or about her own experience of transitioning. She said yes. I will admit I expected The Gender Games to be all about her experience of transitioning; and doing so in the public eye. Which it is in part, though it focuses on the bigger problem of gender throughout. Gender is personified, built up to be the creature in the dark ruining everyone’s fun. She talks about growing into a gay man and who she believes that was the label that fit until society developed and “transgender” became more commonly known. She acknowledges the privilege she still had as a gay man when it came to her publishing career once she compared it to her female counterparts and how they are many spaces for young LGBT people online with this likes of Hannah Hart and Tyler Oakley racking up millions of views and subscribers along with the ever-growing success of Ru Paul’s Drag Race yet none of them are recognised in the so-called “mainstream media.” She goes into details of how men can benefit from feminism if it wasn’t seen as such a dirty word and things such as “you throw like a girl” aren’t helping anyone. She brings in contributors such as Sex & Relationships Youtuber Hannah Witton and drag queen Alaska to illustrate how universal some experiences are. For me, I learnt a lot about the importance of not taking things at face value. I follow Juno avidly on all her social media and have experienced a sort of pride watching her publically grow since her announced her transition but it seemed to lean towards the positive. In The Gender Games the reader really gets to see what goes on behind those glamour columns and Instagram stories. The reader gets to see the hardships, the abuse, the state of our NHS when it comes to dealing with gender, and just how isolating it can be. She talks about how the LGBT community itself is not perfect and highlights the important stigma around bisexuals – something I have sadly experienced myself and how a change needs to happen within for those on the outside to take anyone seriously.Another important factor is that Juno acknowledges she is not perfect. She is aware of her privilege and quick to declare that he knows not everyone had the same resources available to them. She mentions that she messes up too and it’s important to apologise and work on being better.Which is something that I’m sure all of us can do.
    more
  • Siobhan
    June 22, 2017
    The Gender Games is part-memoir, part-manifesto, covering many aspects of how gender messes up lives and society. It follows Dawson’s personal narrative around gender as a trans woman whilst also pointing out major issues with the ways in which gender is framed and how gender affects people, from being forced into looking one way or playing with that toy to being at risk of violence or lacking vital opportunities. The varied topics discussed include the north-south divide in England, issues with The Gender Games is part-memoir, part-manifesto, covering many aspects of how gender messes up lives and society. It follows Dawson’s personal narrative around gender as a trans woman whilst also pointing out major issues with the ways in which gender is framed and how gender affects people, from being forced into looking one way or playing with that toy to being at risk of violence or lacking vital opportunities. The varied topics discussed include the north-south divide in England, issues with PE in schools, friendships (and how they are gendered), the rise of the alt-right and other internet stances of non-acceptance, transitioning, gym culture, fairy tales, and growing up.She tells her own story in a witty, often self-deprecating way, and uses her experiences as a teacher and as a YA fiction writer as well as her own childhood to question how children are pushed into stereotypes or pushed away from what they really want to do or be. The book is full of pop culture references and relatable British jokes like her dad calling Little Chef ‘Little Thief’. It is an accessible, enjoyable read that encourages people to question gender and examine how it can be detrimental in society. It is also an important memoir that shows experiences that many people will know very little about and which can be a life line to those who do. She points out that hers is only one example, but that is the point: a personal reflection on gender from somebody who has thought a lot about it, which will inspire others to think further.
    more
  • Jen
    June 30, 2017
    In this no holds barred memoir Juno Dawson lays bare her life, thoughts, and hopes for the future as a trans woman. This is a personal story of Juno's experiences and is told with humor, passion, and a clear love for all people to understand one another and support our journeys as we stand up against the ever-present forces of Gender.This book is a fascinating look into the life of one trans woman, who is quick to point out she is not speaking for every trans person, and can only speak for her o In this no holds barred memoir Juno Dawson lays bare her life, thoughts, and hopes for the future as a trans woman. This is a personal story of Juno's experiences and is told with humor, passion, and a clear love for all people to understand one another and support our journeys as we stand up against the ever-present forces of Gender.This book is a fascinating look into the life of one trans woman, who is quick to point out she is not speaking for every trans person, and can only speak for her own experiences. It's worth reading to understand how our experiences differ from each other, and the ways in which they're similar. If you're not a trans man or woman then I would urge you to read this book, it is definitely for you! It will make you look again at what you thought you knew about gender and reassess the bullshit way it affects all our lives.
    more
  • Maggie Chats
    June 25, 2017
    Juno Dawson provides a different spin (for me at least) on the subject of gender. She discusses gender as a being used to categorize humans even before they are born--placing labels and expectations on humans that may not be what they are. Juno shares her story and a few stories of other people who were, due their anatomy, categorized as a gender and treated in a gender specific way. She provides a lot evidence that this traditional way of raising 'boys and girls' is harmful and confusing for al Juno Dawson provides a different spin (for me at least) on the subject of gender. She discusses gender as a being used to categorize humans even before they are born--placing labels and expectations on humans that may not be what they are. Juno shares her story and a few stories of other people who were, due their anatomy, categorized as a gender and treated in a gender specific way. She provides a lot evidence that this traditional way of raising 'boys and girls' is harmful and confusing for all people. I found Ms. Dawson's writing completely honest and thought provoking. To me, she is spot on when she talks about feminism, privilege of specific genders, races and sexual orientations and our current political climate (this book was publish this year 2017 so the issues she writes about are very current).Overall The Gender Gamesis so interesting and really makes you think, I learned a lot and as one reviewer said 'this book answers questions I didn't know I had'.
    more
  • allbooksnoheart
    June 22, 2017
    This book is absolutely fantastic and should be read by just about everyone. Reading often as an editorial made it easy to pick up and follow and Juno's experience totally struck a chord with me, and my own teenage years and the shift in cultural attitudes we have seen in recent years. I did have to put it down and breathe through some particular teenage flashbacks. But really I do think everyone should read it- it highlights so much about how we perceive gender and how society constructs and fo This book is absolutely fantastic and should be read by just about everyone. Reading often as an editorial made it easy to pick up and follow and Juno's experience totally struck a chord with me, and my own teenage years and the shift in cultural attitudes we have seen in recent years. I did have to put it down and breathe through some particular teenage flashbacks. But really I do think everyone should read it- it highlights so much about how we perceive gender and how society constructs and forms these boxes around us- to the extent we let them. The blue - pink aisle divide in the toy shop is a real and infuriating problem
    more
  • Ruth Brookes
    June 19, 2017
    Fascinating, forthright & thought provoking. Juno Dawson's memoir/diatribe on gender politics is painfully blunt, acutely observed and a rallying cry for all who long for equality. Highly recommended.
  • Cat
    June 18, 2017
    A must read for EVERYONE who wants a more accepting life for others.
  • Rae
    June 24, 2017
    I found this a tough read due to the blunt language and sexual descriptions, but Juno gave me a lot to think about re gender and culture. A worthwhile, but difficult, read. Picked this up in the U.K.
  • Elle
    June 19, 2017
    OH BOY OH GIRL OH WHATEVER THIS WAS AMAZING
Write a review