Bless Her Heart
Laugh-out-loud funny and unabashedly uplifting, with just the right amount of Southern sass, Sally Kilpatrick's wonderful novel centers on one woman's journey from unhappy marriage to a surprising second chance . . . On the day Posey Love discovers that her born-again husband has been ministering to some of his flock a little too eagerly, she also learns that he's left her broke and homeless. Posey married Chad five years ago in hopes of finding the stability her hippie mother couldn't provide. Instead she got all the trappings of security--house, car, seemingly respectable husband--at the price of her freedom. Posey's mother, Lark, accepts her daughter's return home with grace, though her sister can't resist pointing out that being a sweet Southern wife hasn't worked out as planned. And so, with the Seven Deadly Sins as a guide, Posey decides to let loose for once. Envy is easy to check off the list--Posey only has to look at her best friend's adorable baby for that. One very drunken night at The Fountain bar takes care of gluttony. As for lust--her long-time friend, John, is suddenly becoming much more than a pal. One by one, Posey is bulldozing through her old beliefs about love, family--and what it really means to be good. And she's finding that breaking a few rules might be the perfect way to heal a heart . . . Praise for Sally Kilpatrick's Novels "Don't miss this quirky, fun love story. I couldn't put it down." --Haywood Smith, New York Times bestselling author on Better Get to Livin' "Kilpatrick mixes loss and devastation with hope and a little bit of Southern charm. She will leave the reader laughing through tears." --RT Book Reviews on The Happy Hour Choir "A pleasantly engaging take on Romeo and Juliet." --Library Journal on Bittersweet Creek

Bless Her Heart Details

TitleBless Her Heart
Author
ReleaseOct 31st, 2017
PublisherKensington Publishing Corporation
ISBN-139781496710734
Rating
GenreWomens Fiction, Chick Lit

Bless Her Heart Review

  • Sally Kilpatrick
    January 1, 1970
    In keeping with tradition, I mark this book as read on the day that I turn in my page proofs. I have read this book. And read it some more. Then I read it one more time--and that's after writing it. This is my tale of a preacher's wife who gives up church for Lent.
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  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    There were only three words in the English language that I hated with all of my being: bless, your, and heart—specifically in that order.Every Southerner knows what it means when someone blesses your heart, so it's no mystery why Posey Love hates hearing that phrase, especially after a lifetime of having her heart blessed by someone. But then, her life hasn't exactly turned out the way she'd planned, either. She thought she would be a teacher, married with a couple of kids. At 32, she was marrie There were only three words in the English language that I hated with all of my being: bless, your, and heart—specifically in that order.Every Southerner knows what it means when someone blesses your heart, so it's no mystery why Posey Love hates hearing that phrase, especially after a lifetime of having her heart blessed by someone. But then, her life hasn't exactly turned out the way she'd planned, either. She thought she would be a teacher, married with a couple of kids. At 32, she was married, had no children, and is a receptionist at her husband's church, Love Ministries. She's content with her life—for the most part—and feels completely blindsided when she discovers that not only is Chad having an affair, he's also mismanaged their money and sold their home without telling her.With no money and nowhere else to go, Posey goes home to her mother, Lark, whose lifestyle and youthful escapades were the source of most of the "bless your heart" comments Posey received throughout her life. With the help of her younger sister and her best friend, she's able to clearly see her husband's true character, and how he manipulated and controlled her throughout their marriage. After years spent following all the rules imposed on her by Chad, Posey is feeling more than a little rebellious. She starts breaking rules for a change—working her way through each of the Seven Deadly Sins—and starts living the life she dreamed of... on her terms this time.The title alone was enough to spark my interest, but when the blurb mentioned it had "just the right amount of Southern sass" I was sold. How could I resist that?Posey Love has earned a spot on my favorite characters list. She made me laugh so hard. I nearly died when she took a pole dancing lesson at the Pole Cat... SO funny! That scene is a treasure, trust me. The banter she had with her friend, Liza, always brought a smile to my face. I'm pretty fond of Liza, as well. I could completely relate to the moments when Liza is a sleep-deprived mess because her baby isn't sleeping through the night. New motherhood isn't always pretty, and I loved the realism of all those scenes.Another character I particularly liked was John. He definitely had flaws, but he was a good guy. I really enjoyed seeing how things unfolded between him and Posey, and I liked that it wasn't always easy. Whenever there was a conflict between them, it made sense to me that (things I won't mention) would be an issue for one of them. Chad, on the other hand, was a character I disliked him almost as soon as he appeared in the story. Later on, I came to despise him for something he did. I won't give away what it was, but he committed a particularly heinous betrayal against Posey that made me so mad, I had to take a moment and say a few choice words before I could go back to reading.I adored this book. All the characters (including several I didn't mention above) are incredibly well written and (with the exception of Chad) delightful in every way. Posey's growth as a character was outstanding, and I loved the way she was able to take charge of her life and do what was in her best interests, and not worrying what someone else would think about it. While the ending came a little too soon for me—I wasn't ready to let go of the characters yet—I loved the final line of the book.Kilpatrick's writing is superb throughout, creating a fabulous cast of characters that I won't soon forget. This is the first book of hers that I've read, but it won't be the last. She definitely has a new fan in me.Be sure to put this one on your TBR list, folks! Trust me when I say you do NOT want to miss out on this little gem—this book is most definitely a book worth reading.I received an advance review copy of this book courtesy of Kensington Books via Netgalley.
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  • Peebee
    January 1, 1970
    Some will find the Christianity references in this book excessive -- I know that I did because the publisher's summary didn't really give a hint about them, except to refer to the protagonist's husband as born-again. When I started, I questioned whether I had missed that this book was really Christian chick-lit (which is its own genre) but apparently it isn't being sold that way. I was raised Baptist, so I could relate to much of it, but I can see that others of different faiths or no faith woul Some will find the Christianity references in this book excessive -- I know that I did because the publisher's summary didn't really give a hint about them, except to refer to the protagonist's husband as born-again. When I started, I questioned whether I had missed that this book was really Christian chick-lit (which is its own genre) but apparently it isn't being sold that way. I was raised Baptist, so I could relate to much of it, but I can see that others of different faiths or no faith would not. So now you know. As for the book itself, I liked it. I'm usually a fan of books where the woman finds herself and fights back against an abusive bully. Posey is a likeable character and transforms over the course of the book, and you want to root for her. I needed a lighter story after some of the heavy and depressing literary books I have been reading lately, and this fit the bill. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    Posey Love hates three little words. Every time someone says, "Bless your heart," Posey sees red.But who could blame her? Her life hasn't exactly turned out the way she pictured it would. After a decade of marriage, Posey hoped to be raising a child with her pastor husband. Still aching each month as she hopes for a positive instead of a negative indicator on a pregnancy test, Posey finds her world turned upside down when her husband absconds with another woman and leaves her with a repossessed Posey Love hates three little words. Every time someone says, "Bless your heart," Posey sees red.But who could blame her? Her life hasn't exactly turned out the way she pictured it would. After a decade of marriage, Posey hoped to be raising a child with her pastor husband. Still aching each month as she hopes for a positive instead of a negative indicator on a pregnancy test, Posey finds her world turned upside down when her husband absconds with another woman and leaves her with a repossessed car and a pile of outstanding debt.Moving back in with her mom, Posey decides that she'll "give up" going to church for the Lenten season and follow her younger sister's advice to experience each of the seven Deadly sins during those forty days. Delightful and authentic, Sally Kilpatrick's Bless Her Heart is another winning novel from one of my favorite authors. Posey's world and story is at times heartbreaking (finding out just how far her husband was going to ensure Posey never got a positive result on her pregnancy test when he knew it was breaking her heart each month), at times charming (Posey's flirting with the piano tuning John who she's had a crush on since high school) and at times completely uplifting (Posey's continued reconnection and understanding of her mother). Like real-life, the answer to Posey's problems isn't straight-forward nor is it always the easiest way. Told from Posey's unique point of view, Bless Her Heart offers hope and redemption for Posey without necessarily wrapping things up in a pretty bow by the time the last page is turned. Kilpatrick wisely avoids the "and she lived happily ever after" ending, leaving the door open for a return visit with Posey or a cameo in future novels. And while Posey (and readers) may not get every answer they want, the story provides enough answers and a sense of closure to this portion of Posey's journey to be completely satisfying. I'm probably starting to sound like a broken record here when it comes to the praise for Kilpatrick and her stories. Each story has grown more assured and confident and each one has a satisfying reading experience. The only issue I keep having is that the books seem to fly by and I find myself wanting more after that final page is turned. And while Bless Her Heart doesn't center around University of Tennessee football as her delightful Orange Blossom Special does, this book still hit home in all the right spots. Bless Your Heart is another winner from Sally Kilpatrick. If you haven't picked up a story from her yet, this is a great entry point. Highly recommended.In the interest of full disclosure, I received a digital ARC of this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I will also add that I knew Sally back in the day when we were students at the University of Tennessee together.
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  • Kathleen Gray
    January 1, 1970
    What a terrific book! Posey needs to find her true self after years with her creep of a husband and denial about her family. Giving up church for Lent and a trip through the Seven Deadly Sins is a unconventional way to do that (and please don't find it offensive- it's very funny). She's not the only food character in this novel- her mom Lark and friend Liza are also totally believable, especially since they only have Posey's best interests at heart. There's a romance, of course, and I'll bet you What a terrific book! Posey needs to find her true self after years with her creep of a husband and denial about her family. Giving up church for Lent and a trip through the Seven Deadly Sins is a unconventional way to do that (and please don't find it offensive- it's very funny). She's not the only food character in this novel- her mom Lark and friend Liza are also totally believable, especially since they only have Posey's best interests at heart. There's a romance, of course, and I'll bet you enjoy how Posey deals with it. Thanks to Netgalley for what turned out to be one of my favorite reads this month.
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  • cupcakes and bookshelves
    January 1, 1970
    Sad, funny, honest and hopeful Sally Kilpatrick's Bless Her Heart was a joy to read with characters and settings that felt so real and vivid even when I have no prior connection with the subject matter. Watching Posey's journey from what she hoped for, to what she got and how she dealt with it afterwards was such an adventure. *ARC kindly given by NetGallery in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Jencey/
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Kensington Books and Sally Kilpatrick for a copy of Bless Her Heart. I was given this novel in exchange for an honest review. I received no financial compensation. Posey has been married to Chad for ten years. All she really wants is a child. She has put up with some weird requests from Chad. One day she wakes up to find that he is gone with another woman. The house is gone and the car repossessed. What is Posey to do? Posey moves back in with her family. What to do about her life? Thank you to Kensington Books and Sally Kilpatrick for a copy of Bless Her Heart. I was given this novel in exchange for an honest review. I received no financial compensation. Posey has been married to Chad for ten years. All she really wants is a child. She has put up with some weird requests from Chad. One day she wakes up to find that he is gone with another woman. The house is gone and the car repossessed. What is Posey to do? Posey moves back in with her family. What to do about her life? Now what to do about a job? She had worked for Chad in Love Ministries as a receptionist. Her little sister Lark has the answers. She thinks that Posey should explore the seven deadly sins. Does Posey feel these experiences are fun or have consequences? How will it impact the future?My Thoughts: I enjoyed Ms. Kilpatrick’s novel. I found Posey to be an entertaining character. She has lots of sass. Lark added a lot of entertainment value to Posey’s adventures. The author creates characters that are interesting. The conflict in this story had me rooting for Posey. When I first read the synopsis for the novel I thought the story had a different path. Ms. Kilpatrick writes with great wit. Her writing makes it a joy to turn the page. Bless her heart is an easy read! That readers will enjoy!
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  • Belva
    January 1, 1970
    Sally Kilpatrick has woven another enjoyable charming Southern tale. This one felt a little more serious to me than previous books that were just fun and filled with her sassy wit. Even though the author tackled some tough subjects, it is a wonderful book about second chances, one that I would recommend to anyone who enjoys Southern fiction. I'm already looking forward to her next one. My thanks to the author, publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review an advance copy.
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  • Auntshawna
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't expect to enjoy this book as much as I did. Posey is the obedient wife of a domineering self-proclaimed pastor. (Having experienced such individuals, I found Ms. Kirkpatrick's description of Chad to be spot on.) Her mother is a new age hippie that owns a yoga and natural foods store in town. A series of events forces Posey to the stark realities of her husband and his domination and her relationship with her family. The story flowed and felt believable and I came to really like Posey an I didn't expect to enjoy this book as much as I did. Posey is the obedient wife of a domineering self-proclaimed pastor. (Having experienced such individuals, I found Ms. Kirkpatrick's description of Chad to be spot on.) Her mother is a new age hippie that owns a yoga and natural foods store in town. A series of events forces Posey to the stark realities of her husband and his domination and her relationship with her family. The story flowed and felt believable and I came to really like Posey and her family. Themes include marital abuse, infertility, relationships (parent, child, sibling, friendship, etc), adult caregivers and Alzheimers.It's a good read and I highly recommend.
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent tale of overcoming bullying and abuse.Posey Adams Love, church receptionist, is married to Chad Love, head of Love Ministries. Longing to be a mother, she submits to mind numbing manipulation. When she finds herself abandoned, moving home to her former hippie mother, Lark Adams, Posey must face her decisions and move forward with help from her half siblings.Reconnecting with her former self, her friends and career goals was an inspiring story with funny parts that kept the story moving Excellent tale of overcoming bullying and abuse.Posey Adams Love, church receptionist, is married to Chad Love, head of Love Ministries. Longing to be a mother, she submits to mind numbing manipulation. When she finds herself abandoned, moving home to her former hippie mother, Lark Adams, Posey must face her decisions and move forward with help from her half siblings.Reconnecting with her former self, her friends and career goals was an inspiring story with funny parts that kept the story moving quickly.A thoroughly enjoyable book.Told in first person. I volunteered to read an ARC copy of this book through Net Galley.
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  • Patty Nobles
    January 1, 1970
    In Sally Kilpatrick’s latest novel “Bless Her Heart”, Posey Love has spent a lot of life proving to everyone that she is a good girl that follows the rules, and this especially is the case in her marriage. Posey spends her days watching the desk at Love Ministries while her husband Chad is busy watching other women, and when he leaves with one of the women to attend a conference at the last minute Posey has reached her limit of being good. Posey must figure out the life she was meant to have in In Sally Kilpatrick’s latest novel “Bless Her Heart”, Posey Love has spent a lot of life proving to everyone that she is a good girl that follows the rules, and this especially is the case in her marriage. Posey spends her days watching the desk at Love Ministries while her husband Chad is busy watching other women, and when he leaves with one of the women to attend a conference at the last minute Posey has reached her limit of being good. Posey must figure out the life she was meant to have in order to live the best life she deserves and through a series of incidents that involve a sexy piano tuner, a lying soon to be ex-husband, a grandmother who has Tom Brokaw’s love child and a mom she must make peace with Posey finally finds a happy truce with herself. Ms. Kilpatrick writes novels that come from the heart that will make you laugh and cry as she weaves a tale of strength through the voice she lends to her characters. I was given an advanced copy of this book, and all of the opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Jeanne Grace
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Reader Copy from NetGalley for my unbiased opinion of the book. I read this book in less than 12 hours. I really enjoy reading about females, who through adversity find their voice as well as themselves. The book was funny, relatable characters, and a joy to read. I look forward to reading more from this author in the future!!!!
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  • Janga
    January 1, 1970
    This is Kilpatrick's best since her debut--funny, sweet, honest, irreverent, inspiring and on-the-mark Southern. I loved it! I’m not a huge fan of first-person point of view in fiction, but sometimes it works wonderfully. Such is the case here. Hearing the story in Posey’s voice makes the story funnier and more poignant, and it makes it so easy to love Posey, fabulous and flawed as she is.Chad is vermin, of course, and he is rendered even more repulsive because he is so close to some real-life c This is Kilpatrick's best since her debut--funny, sweet, honest, irreverent, inspiring and on-the-mark Southern. I loved it! I’m not a huge fan of first-person point of view in fiction, but sometimes it works wonderfully. Such is the case here. Hearing the story in Posey’s voice makes the story funnier and more poignant, and it makes it so easy to love Posey, fabulous and flawed as she is.Chad is vermin, of course, and he is rendered even more repulsive because he is so close to some real-life characters I have known. The other characters, like Posey, are richly dimensional. Posey’s mother is wise and vulnerable, and her grandmother’s Alzheimer’s inspires a mix of laughter and sorrow that will be familiar to those who have watched loved ones move through the stages of that disease. Rain, Posey’s half-sister, is as interesting, as complex, and as lovable as Posey herself. And former roadie, current piano tuner John is sweet and flawed and complicated.Kilpatrick’s debut novel, The Happy Hour Choir, is still one of my favorite books. Although I have enjoyed her other novels, none has quite reached that I-want-to-read-this-again-and-again response that the first one did. I rank Bless Her Heart right up there with The Happy Hour Choir. It is a little bit Flannery O’Connor, a little bit Fannie Flagg, but mostly delightfully and originally Sally Kilpatrick. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that the author revisits these characters.I highly recommend this one for readers who like Southern fiction or women’s fiction that evokes laughter and tears. Romance readers should be aware that this is not a romance. It has a strong romantic element, but the conclusion is more open-ended than the conventional HEA.
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  • Crystal Hart
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, thank you to the author and NetGalley for this ARC in return for a review.I'm a little leery of calling this book powerful and painful in case it turns potential readers off. Trust me, if you're just looking for a regular amazing fiction book, go ahead and grab this one. This is a sweet, touching story of a woman that gives up church for Lent, and how she finds herself while checking off the seven deadly sins along the way.But it resonated so strongly with me that I found myself cr First of all, thank you to the author and NetGalley for this ARC in return for a review.I'm a little leery of calling this book powerful and painful in case it turns potential readers off. Trust me, if you're just looking for a regular amazing fiction book, go ahead and grab this one. This is a sweet, touching story of a woman that gives up church for Lent, and how she finds herself while checking off the seven deadly sins along the way.But it resonated so strongly with me that I found myself crying in several places, reliving a past that I had forgotten, and wishing I could reach through the pages and stop Posey from going through the same thing I did. I blessed her poor heart more times than I could count. I couldn't put the book down. I think I probably could have finished it in one sitting if I hadn't started it on a super busy weekend. It really had everything. I even walked around, reading the first page out loud to anyone who would listen because it was just that funny. The characters, the setting...EVERYTHING was just so vivid and real that I felt like I was right there with them. Days after I finished it, I still catch myself wondering how they're all doing. I hope this isn't the last we hear of them. I can't wait to buy a copy when it's released. This one is definitely going to be part of my collection.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    A fun southern read! Brought back memories of koolaid and cookies from VBS at the Baptist Church. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC.
  • Bernie
    January 1, 1970
    Bless Her Heart is a delightful book written by author Sally Kilpatrick. It's funny, sad and hopeful. Thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Books for the advance copy.
  • Jana Anthoine
    January 1, 1970
    Aaaaah... Sally Kilpatrick has done it again. She reached out and grabbed my heartstrings with the very first line of this book and held onto them until the very end. Because let's be honest, the words bless, her, and heart, in that order, can be frightening. Following the up and down story of Posey Love, the daughter of Beulah Land from The Happy Hour Choir, was sometimes sad, sometimes witty, but always charming. As Posey moves out of her marital home, into her mother's home, gives up church f Aaaaah... Sally Kilpatrick has done it again. She reached out and grabbed my heartstrings with the very first line of this book and held onto them until the very end. Because let's be honest, the words bless, her, and heart, in that order, can be frightening. Following the up and down story of Posey Love, the daughter of Beulah Land from The Happy Hour Choir, was sometimes sad, sometimes witty, but always charming. As Posey moves out of her marital home, into her mother's home, gives up church for Lent, and begins to find herself, she learns many valuable lessons about life and love. (Disclaimer: I received an ARC in exchange for my honest review of Bless Her Heart.)
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book with a wonderful story and well developed characters. The story flowed very well and was very enjoyable. This book will keep you reading long into the night and you will not want to put this book down until you finish. This was such a great read and full of surprises. I voluntarily reviewed an advanced reader’s copy of this book. The free book held no determination on my personal review.
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