City of Lies (Counterfeit Lady, #1)
Elizabeth Miles scours 1920’s Washington, D.C. for a killer in the first Counterfeit Lady novel from the author of the New York Times bestselling Gaslight mysteries.Every woman plays a part—but some are more dangerous than others…Like most women, Elizabeth Miles assumes many roles; unlike most, hers have made her a woman on the run. Living on the edge of society, Elizabeth uses her guile to relieve so-called respectable men of their ill-gotten gains. But brutal and greedy entrepreneur Oscar Thornton is out for blood. He’s lost a great deal of money and is not going to forgive a woman for outwitting him. With his thugs hot on her trail, Elizabeth seizes the moment to blend in with a group of women who have an agenda of their own.She never expects to like or understand these privileged women, but she soon comes to respect their intentions, forming an unlikely bond with the wealthy matriarch of the group whose son Gideon is the rarest of species—an honest man in a dishonest world. She knows she’s playing a risky game, and her deception could be revealed at any moment, possibly even by sharp-eyed Gideon. Nor has she been forgotten by Thornton, who’s biding his time within this gilded orbit, waiting to strike. Elizabeth must draw on her wits and every last ounce of courage she possesses to keep her new life from being cut short by this vicious shadow from her past.

City of Lies (Counterfeit Lady, #1) Details

TitleCity of Lies (Counterfeit Lady, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 7th, 2017
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139780399586576
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Historical Mystery, Fiction, Adult, Romance

City of Lies (Counterfeit Lady, #1) Review

  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    It was supposed to be a great con, easy money, but this time Elizabeth Miles finds the “respectable” businessman she has conned is a brutal and deadly con man himself and he is out for both his lost money and revenge. Running scared, Elizabeth gets herself carted off with the women of the Suffragists’ movement and for a woman on the run, jail may be the safest place for her. Little did Elizabeth realize, these women would change her life and introduce her to a world of privilege and women who ar It was supposed to be a great con, easy money, but this time Elizabeth Miles finds the “respectable” businessman she has conned is a brutal and deadly con man himself and he is out for both his lost money and revenge. Running scared, Elizabeth gets herself carted off with the women of the Suffragists’ movement and for a woman on the run, jail may be the safest place for her. Little did Elizabeth realize, these women would change her life and introduce her to a world of privilege and women who are equally as strong as she is and not the pampered princesses she always thought them to be. Now she has one last con to pull and it will take all of her skills, skills that could cost her newfound friendships and even her heart. Who knew doing the right thing could be even riskier than being a grifter?With a villain as dastardly as Snidely Whiplash and a romantic interest as honorable as Dudley Dooright, our sweet Elizabeth is up to her neck in lies, cons and a new found conscience that lights up each page of this fast-paced and fascinating read! CITY OF LIES by Victoria Thompson provides a little history, a little drama, some tense moments, and a delightful cast of characters that make this trip back in time a wonderful escape! While Elizabeth may not be the typical heroine, she is a truly memorable and lovable character who steals the show as she manages to shine across each page and wiggle herself out of each predicament she finds herself in! A fun read for sure!I received an ARC edition from Berkley in exchange for my honest and voluntary review!Series: Counterfeit Lady - Book 1Publisher: Berkley (November 7, 2017)Publication Date: November 7, 2017Genre: Historical Mystery/SuspensePrint Length: 320 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • ♥ Sandi ❣
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars Thank you to First-to-Read and Berkley for allowing me the chance to read this ARC. This book publishes on 11/7/17. Elizabeth Miles is a grifter. She lies, steals and cheats for a living. It is in the process of a job that she becomes involved with a Women's Rights Movement where she falls into a suffragette march as she flees from danger. She is soon jailed, along with the women in this march, and sent to a workhouse where she feels she will be temporarily safe from the people she wa 3.75 stars Thank you to First-to-Read and Berkley for allowing me the chance to read this ARC. This book publishes on 11/7/17. Elizabeth Miles is a grifter. She lies, steals and cheats for a living. It is in the process of a job that she becomes involved with a Women's Rights Movement where she falls into a suffragette march as she flees from danger. She is soon jailed, along with the women in this march, and sent to a workhouse where she feels she will be temporarily safe from the people she was fleeing. Lo and behold, who manages to free them from this workhouse but the very person Elizabeth was hoping to remain hidden from. Now Elizabeth has to put her resourcefulness to use. She must become the demure, gentile suffragette that these women believe her to be. Then she finds she is besieged by two separate suitors and must lie to each of them to protect both herself and her new found friends. But what effect is this having on Elizabeth? Can she change? Will she always be a grifter or will one of her suitors finally win her heart? Victoria Thompson is also the author of the Gaslight Mysteries. She is very good at Victorian era novels and series. This is the first Book of the Counterfeit Lady series. In her books you find an immediate sense of belonging and fitting right into the world she has created. You emphasize with the highs and lows of the protagonist. Time, space and distance fall away as you read and savor that which you find is just out of reach, as you take in the familiar underpinning of a world in the early 1900's.
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  • Anna Huber
    January 1, 1970
    Rich with fascinating historical detail, Thompson’s new series dives into the worlds of suffragists and con-men. City of Lies combines a cunning protagonist with a simmering romance and gripping suspense to form a story that is certain to beguile readers hook, line and sinker.
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  • Mlpmom (Book Reviewer)
    January 1, 1970
    Set in a time where the world was on the cusp of change, Thompson's City of Lies will pull you in with both intrigue for the mystery behind Elizabeth's life and the fascinating con that this woman and her brother are pulling on others. With hints of danger and a touch of romance, this was a fun read that kept me entertained and interested right up to the very end.
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  • Mark Baker
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Miles makes her living as a con woman, an unusual profession for a woman in 1917. However, when her latest con goes south, she finds herself on the run from the mark’s goons. In her attempts to escape, she joins a group of suffragists outside the White House and is delighted when they are arrested. But has she truly escaped the men searching for her?If you pick up this book expecting a murder and five suspects, you’ll be disappointed. However, with those adjusted expectations pick up t Elizabeth Miles makes her living as a con woman, an unusual profession for a woman in 1917. However, when her latest con goes south, she finds herself on the run from the mark’s goons. In her attempts to escape, she joins a group of suffragists outside the White House and is delighted when they are arrested. But has she truly escaped the men searching for her?If you pick up this book expecting a murder and five suspects, you’ll be disappointed. However, with those adjusted expectations pick up this book because it is wonderful. The story is captivating and moves quickly; I always had a hard time putting the book down. This may be the first in a series, but the characters are already strong. I’m not normally one to root for a criminal, but I couldn’t help but root for Elizabeth in this book. Real history is woven in without slowing down the fictional story at all. I’m not sure where the series will go from this wonderful beginning, but I can’t wait to find out.NOTE: I received a copy of this book.Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.
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  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    The story takes us to 1917 Washington, D.C. and New York City. Women are protesting for their right to vote, but none of that matters to Elizabeth Miles. She has other interests in mind.Elizabeth Miles is a con artist. Along with her brother, Jake, she schemes to steal money from less-than-nice men like Oscar Thornton. Unfortunately, during one of their schemes, their plans take a turn for the worst. Once Thornton finds out, it’s over for the brother and sister team. They get separated. Elizabet The story takes us to 1917 Washington, D.C. and New York City. Women are protesting for their right to vote, but none of that matters to Elizabeth Miles. She has other interests in mind.Elizabeth Miles is a con artist. Along with her brother, Jake, she schemes to steal money from less-than-nice men like Oscar Thornton. Unfortunately, during one of their schemes, their plans take a turn for the worst. Once Thornton finds out, it’s over for the brother and sister team. They get separated. Elizabeth has no idea what happened to her brother, but she has no choice but to go on the run. Elizabeth manages to blend in with a group of suffragists and joins their protest under an assumed name. She is not at all upset when they are arrested and jailed. Prison is the perfect place to hide from Thornton. However, life in prison isn't very enjoyable.Much to Elizabeth’s surprise, she finds herself forming a tight bond with some of these wealthy women, including Mrs. Bates and Anna. Thanks to Mrs. Bates attorney son, Gideon, the women are freed from jail, but Thornton is still hot on her heels. She must find a place to hide. Fortunately for her, Anna insists she stay with her family. Anna agrees, but is she really safe there?The author weaves actual historical facts into this fictional story. I found the storyline and characters fascinating. The author did a great job of making the main character likeable and sympathetic, despite her being a con artist and thief. I’m not really much of an historical fiction fan, but the premise and setting grabbed my interest. I must admit, I originally thought this was a murder mystery, but it’s not. It’s more like fiction with romance and some suspense mixed together. It’s a gripping, cleverly written story that had my attention from the start. I was immediately transported back in time. I felt I was standing right alongside Elizabeth. I enjoyed every minute of this one. I’m so glad I stepped out of my normal genre to try it. This is the first of a new series and I’m looking forward to reading the next one.FTC Disclosure: I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • ☕ Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    City of Lies set in the 1920s both in Washington and New York home to the Four Hundred, Thompson shares an engaging tale about a woman who's running a grift with her brother. When things go terribly wrong she is forced to hide among a group of rallying female suffragists. The tale that unfolds was clever and engaging. So much so that I finished the tale in just two sitting.Thompson weaves historical facts, friendship, LGBT issues, women's rights and a dash of romance into this suspenseful tale. City of Lies set in the 1920s both in Washington and New York home to the Four Hundred, Thompson shares an engaging tale about a woman who's running a grift with her brother. When things go terribly wrong she is forced to hide among a group of rallying female suffragists. The tale that unfolds was clever and engaging. So much so that I finished the tale in just two sitting.Thompson weaves historical facts, friendship, LGBT issues, women's rights and a dash of romance into this suspenseful tale. In the author's notes, Thompson describes how some of the events our heroine Elizabeth Miles, Anna and others suffered through, actually happened during the Women's Movement of the 1920s. Of course, she took some liberties, but I love when actual events are woven into a tale. It gave an air of authenticity and notched up the suspense aspects.Elizabeth is such a lively character, and I found myself holding my breath with the situations she found herself in. Her cleverness and ability to change the outcome of her circumstances kept me flipping the pages. Thompson made Elizabeth's story of escaping near death to befriending Anna seem genuine. I liked Anna, her brother, and mother and a large part of the scenes are spent in their home.  Anna wants her life to matter, doesn't fancy marriage and finds herself drawn to Elizabeth. I loved the added threads concerning her and appreciated how the author addressed them particularly the LGBT issue. In the 1920s loving, someone of the same sex was never discussed despite the fact that homosexuality existed. The frank conversation and support were refreshing.We are treated to a romance, well several actually. I loved seeing Elizabeth tackle these moments, use them to her advantage and become flounder entirely by others. The tale was balanced with the suspense thread at the center, and romantic elements threaded through the story. These features allowed for character growth, suspense and delightful moments to make your heart pitter-patter. Will Elizabeth escape or end up at the mercy of the villain? Who will get their heart-broken? It was all so engaging. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsAfter reading all of Ms. Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries and becoming slightly disenchanted with the last few stories, I was excited to find City of Lies. IMHO, it was not a mystery. I thought of it as historical fiction with a few elements taken from true events. The upside for me was researching this time-gone-by. What was the truth, only you can decide. Though no year was given, it appeared to take place in late August, 1917 and the weeks that followed. This was when the women suffrage 2.5 starsAfter reading all of Ms. Thompson’s Gaslight mysteries and becoming slightly disenchanted with the last few stories, I was excited to find City of Lies. IMHO, it was not a mystery. I thought of it as historical fiction with a few elements taken from true events. The upside for me was researching this time-gone-by. What was the truth, only you can decide. Though no year was given, it appeared to take place in late August, 1917 and the weeks that followed. This was when the women suffragettes actually picketed President Woodrow Wilson in front of the White House. It was the underlying theme that encompassed City of Lies. If you are familiar with Maeve from the Gaslight books, grifter Elizabeth Miles was taken from the same mold: stilted, blunt, even harsh at times. If I continue to read this series, I need hope her character blooms. Like many first stories, there were quite a few characters and subplots. There was an interesting blend of WWI, Wilson’s messy handling of the Suffragettes and an oily secondary strand of selling arms to the American government. And, of course, the con. Plus a confused LBGT character and two men fascinated with one woman. Instead of polishing it off in less than 48 hours, it took me days to complete it. In this case I thought it would help if ‘less is more’.It saddens me to give City of Lies 2 1/2 stars. There was an abrupt HEA that could have made it a stand-alone; I assume there will be other stories. If I read the next one, it will be to see if the MCs expand.
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  • Bj
    January 1, 1970
    4 "The Grifter Suffragist" Stars!Lovers of historical fiction that takes place during the women's suffragist movement in the US of the early 1900s (circa 1920s) will not want to miss City of Lies. There is also a dash of mystery and suspense thrown in to keep the reader guessing. Additionally, while this is not a traditional historical romance title, I also believe that there is enough of a romance thread (even the beginnings of a romance triangle) to make this historical fiction/mystery title a 4 "The Grifter Suffragist" Stars!Lovers of historical fiction that takes place during the women's suffragist movement in the US of the early 1900s (circa 1920s) will not want to miss City of Lies. There is also a dash of mystery and suspense thrown in to keep the reader guessing. Additionally, while this is not a traditional historical romance title, I also believe that there is enough of a romance thread (even the beginnings of a romance triangle) to make this historical fiction/mystery title also of interest to those who enjoy a historical romance titles. When a con goes bad, grifter Elizabeth (Lizzie) Miles finds herself on the run. Believing their mark (Oscar Thornton) has likely done in her brother, she's left with no choice but to seek desperate measures. It's at that moment--as she's running through the streets of 1920s Washington DC--that she lands eyes on her possible salvation, a women's suffragist march (mostly high society ladies who were protesting to earn the right to vote). She quickly throws herself into the parade of women hoping to blend in, and when the entire group is arrested, Lizzie couldn't be happier as she knows it will give her a safe haven from Thornton and his crew that is out looking for her.What Lizzie, however, never could of imagined is that she would soon come to understand what this group of high society women (a class she many times pretended to be in her cons, but never before felt a kinship with) was fighting for. What at first is just sheer determination to fit in, soon becomes a leadership style and showing of courage that bring her to the attention of Mrs. Bates, one of the leaders of the movement, and Anna Vanderslice, a young suffragist who quickly becomes her devoted friend.The women endure terrible treatment in jail as its clear that politically the administration is trying to make an example of them in order to discourage them and others from demonstrating again. This, however, doesn't deter them in their beliefs. Fortunately, Anna's brother (David) and Mrs. Bates son (Gideon, who is a lawyer) help secure a writ of habeas corpus, though there attempts to find the deputy to serve it on are less fruitful (at least initially). Eventually, however, the women are released which of course is great news for all the prisoners, except Lizzie who now must try to evade Thornton again. Fortunately, Lizzie also makes an impression on David and Gideon, who each want to woe her in their own way. Will Lizzie be able to maintain the friendships she has made and stay safe from Thornton? Moreover, Lizzie is no high society lady, even if she chooses to stay with her new friends, how will she maintain the illusion she has crafted? Will they find out who she really is? And if so will they remain by her side?City of Lies was a fast-action historical fiction title that kept me interested both with the suspense and the interesting and varied inter-relationships among the many characters. I look forward to reading more of Victoria Thompson's titles in the future.Source: Review copy provided for review purposes.
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  • Melliane
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5Mon avis en FrançaisMy English reviewI must say that I did not know about the novel at all but I really had a great time with the story. What to say? Everything seemed fantastic!We discover Elizabeth Miles, a young girl who used to live on the margins of society. With her friends, she usually organizes scams to steal money from dishonest rich men. But while she usually does not have problems after these acts, the latest victim is far from appreciating it. Determined to find Elizabeth and to 4.5/5Mon avis en FrançaisMy English reviewI must say that I did not know about the novel at all but I really had a great time with the story. What to say? Everything seemed fantastic!We discover Elizabeth Miles, a young girl who used to live on the margins of society. With her friends, she usually organizes scams to steal money from dishonest rich men. But while she usually does not have problems after these acts, the latest victim is far from appreciating it. Determined to find Elizabeth and to force her to return his money, or even to kill her, he will pursue her without respite. Yet the young woman, full of resources, does not hesitate to place herself in a feminist manifestation that demands the right to vote in order to escape her pursuers. Putting herself as a woman she is not, she gets arrested by the police and she is sent with all the others to jail. And you suspect that she is one of the only girls who absolutely wants to stay there to be safe. But then, under these conditions, she did not expect to connect so easily to Anna, a young febrile woman or to the matriarch of the group for which she will have great esteem. Elizabeth will help them understand how to act in jail and she will watch over them as best as she can. In parallel, we discover Gabriel, the son of the matriarch who arrives in town determined to save these young women. Thornton, allying himself with him, is also very interested to get them out!I will not say more because it would be very easy to tell you everything but I can tell you that this novel is a pretty little pearl. I loved to follow Elizabeth, see her change at the touch of these young women and see her regret not to be a better person. It was also really interesting to have such a big part devoted to the cause that these women fight for! It was fascinating to have such a theme and it is true that we realize what these women have suffered a lot in order to advance their rights.It was really a great story and I loved all the characters, be it Gabriel is his frankness, Elizabeth and her scams, Thornthon and his wickedness, Anna and her naïveté, and many other things that I’ll leave you discover!
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  • Milena
    January 1, 1970
    I want to start by pointing out that the Goodreads blurb for this book is not accurate. First of all this is not a murder mystery, Elizabeth does not scour Washington, DC for a killer. The story does not take place in 1920's but few years earlier, in 1917-1918. Lastly, one of the main character's name is Gideon, not Gabriel. (The blurb on Amazon website is more accurate)Now that we cleared this I must say I really enjoyed City of Lies. I found the time period very interesting and I enjoyed readi I want to start by pointing out that the Goodreads blurb for this book is not accurate. First of all this is not a murder mystery, Elizabeth does not scour Washington, DC for a killer. The story does not take place in 1920's but few years earlier, in 1917-1918. Lastly, one of the main character's name is Gideon, not Gabriel. (The blurb on Amazon website is more accurate)Now that we cleared this I must say I really enjoyed City of Lies. I found the time period very interesting and I enjoyed reading about the suffragist movement. The writing is very engaging and the pacing is great. I was never bored, I wanted to keep turning pages and read about Elizabeth's adventures. This book does have a few flaws that in any other book would have caused me to lower my rating, but City of Lies was so entertaining I decided to forgive them. These are the things I didn't love: 1. Insta-love, especially on Gideon's side. I wanted Elizabeth and Gideon's relationship to have more depth and more complexity, I wanted it to grow and develop slowly. 2. We are constantly told that Elizabeth is this incredible, amazing woman like no other. Gideon, Anna, and Mrs. Bates all rave about how different from anyone else she is, but we are never shown this side of her character. Yes, she is clever, resourceful, and street smart, but to imply that she is so much better than everyone else is a stretch. 3. The ending is too neat and tidy for my taste. City of Lies is supposed to be the first book in the series and it's hard to imagine how Elizabeth's story will continue when the ending was wrapped up like a pretty package with a bow on top. As I mentioned earlier I still very much enjoyed this book. The City of Lies is a fun romp full of adventures and likable characters, and it’s an interesting read despite some flaws. I will definitely pick up the second book.*ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss
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  • Caille
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. Any book that includes con artists, and especially smart female ones always intrigues me. When combined with the history of the suffrage movement, I felt like this book was made for me. The use of the the rich history of the suffrage movement was fresh and new, and it was clear that Victoria Thompson put quite a bit of research into it. While the book had me hooked from the beginning, there was a part towards the middle where I wasn't sure I liked where the story wa I absolutely loved this book. Any book that includes con artists, and especially smart female ones always intrigues me. When combined with the history of the suffrage movement, I felt like this book was made for me. The use of the the rich history of the suffrage movement was fresh and new, and it was clear that Victoria Thompson put quite a bit of research into it. While the book had me hooked from the beginning, there was a part towards the middle where I wasn't sure I liked where the story was heading. However, Thompson turned it around and the ending was amazing. This is a great pick for anyone looking for a historical fiction drama, or for anyone who likes stories about sly and smart women. While I did love the character of Elizabeth, sometimes I got frustrated with the way that she was portrayed. I kept having to remind myself that this book was set in the early 20th century, and that whether she was a con artist or not, she would act more demure than women today. The character was well written though, and I look forward to seeing how her character will develop in future books. I do believe that this is misclassified as a detective mystery, because while there is a slight mystery in how the con is going to be pulled off, there is no crime that is trying to be solved. I think this book is better classified as a suspense drama, or a historical fiction. NOTE: I received a free advanced readers copy of this book due to my job as a bookseller. I have not been paid for my opinions, and all of my opinions are my own.
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  • Under the Covers Book Blog
    January 1, 1970
    Elizabeth Miles is just like any other woman trying to get by in 1920s New York...only she does it with clever cons. Only her most recent ploy seems to have gone massively astray and forces her to hide amongst some conveniently located Suffragettes. She never expected to come to admire the ladies she has been stranded with and she definitely didn't expect to find the one honest man in the whole of New York. However, Elizabeth must pull a massive con on the people she has come to greatly respect Elizabeth Miles is just like any other woman trying to get by in 1920s New York...only she does it with clever cons. Only her most recent ploy seems to have gone massively astray and forces her to hide amongst some conveniently located Suffragettes. She never expected to come to admire the ladies she has been stranded with and she definitely didn't expect to find the one honest man in the whole of New York. However, Elizabeth must pull a massive con on the people she has come to greatly respect and form real friendships with, if she doesn't her life will be forfeit.I picked this one up, despite not having read this author before, as I loved the idea of a grifter heroine, especially set in the 1920s New York. It all sounded very intriguing and I love a book with an unconventional heroine at the centre. I am immensely pleased that I decided to pick it up, it was a tale full of suspense, tension, historical events all with a dash of romance.What stood out for me the most in City of Lies was the setting. Thompson has woven into the story true historical events of the women's suffragist movement, all with added liberties. Aside from being fascinating in of itself, it also added an air of authenticity to the setting that Thompson had created. It also added some tension, you know that the situations were very real and very dangerous, the suffragists suffered and some died for their cause, and despite Lizzie - at first- only sticking with the women to escape, her persecutors didn't know that.If you like historical tales full of tension and intrigue, as well as a bit of romance, then you need to pick this up. It was both entertaining, fun and I enjoyed Thompson's inclusion of suffragists. This tale concluded very satisfactorily and I am unsure if it's part of a series or not, if it is I will gladly pick up the next book.*ARC provided by publisherReviewed by Suzanne❤ ♡ Don't want to miss any of our posts? Subscribe to our blog by email! ♡ ❤
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  • Bridget Vollmer
    January 1, 1970
    I'd rate this somewhere between 3.5-4 stars.I was expecting more of a historical mystery but got more of a historical fiction/romance with a little bit of action. The beginning was definitely heavy on the historical info which wasn't bad but I was not expecting the historical info dump. Although, I did find it enlightening once I changed my expectations as I am shamefully lacking in knowledge of the suffragist movement. After I changed my expectations of the book, I really enjoyed the fast paced I'd rate this somewhere between 3.5-4 stars.I was expecting more of a historical mystery but got more of a historical fiction/romance with a little bit of action. The beginning was definitely heavy on the historical info which wasn't bad but I was not expecting the historical info dump. Although, I did find it enlightening once I changed my expectations as I am shamefully lacking in knowledge of the suffragist movement. After I changed my expectations of the book, I really enjoyed the fast paced, clever story line. The ending was really good and had a bit of a shocker that surprised me. I'm looking forward to reading the next book in the series although I do think the genre should be changed from mystery to historical fiction. It had more of of a "cozy" historical fiction feel than anything else (if that makes sense). I'm curious to see if the next book revolves around a mystery/crime.**I won this book in a GR giveaway in exchange for a review**
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  • Darque Dreamer
    January 1, 1970
    City of Lies is more than just an intriguing mystery. It is an exciting, elegantly written historical fiction story about strong women, crime, betrayal, and wit. This one has all the makings of a fun crime novel, with the addition of women fighting for what they believe in, and rising above their times! For those who love historical fiction with flare and cleverness, this one is for you!I was pleasantly intrigued by this book. Though, the synopsis doesn't quite match the true feel of the story, City of Lies is more than just an intriguing mystery. It is an exciting, elegantly written historical fiction story about strong women, crime, betrayal, and wit. This one has all the makings of a fun crime novel, with the addition of women fighting for what they believe in, and rising above their times! For those who love historical fiction with flare and cleverness, this one is for you!I was pleasantly intrigued by this book. Though, the synopsis doesn't quite match the true feel of the story, the book itself was an exciting read! I am a little ashamed to admit that I did not remember learning about the women's movement involved in this story, and in history, that ultimately led to our right to vote, but I am most definitely going to be doing more research to learn all that I can. I felt like that was an amazing addition to the story.The plot of the story was spectacularly written. Elizabeth Miles was on the run from a man named Oscar Thornton because she and her brother, Jake, had cheated him out of a large sum of money. She found an opportunity to escape his sight by joining the Suffragists in a protest in front of the white house, and things quickly spiraled from there. She became involved in their cause, and emotionally connected with several members, and not only had an amazing character transformation, but also found ways to aid her escape from Thornton's hunt. Elizabeth was so fascinating. She was clever, witty, sneaky, and brave. She was a great con artist, but also had a few hidden morals that showed throughout the story. I felt like she almost measured up to Audrey Rose from Stalking Jack the Ripper, and Lady Helen from The Dark Days Club, in my eyes. I loved seeing the emotional changes she faced, and I am excited to see what happens next!The rest of the characters were a little less developed than I would have liked. But, they were still enjoyable nonetheless. Gideon was a fair match to Elizabeth's wit. Anna was an amazing friend, and strong woman, and Mrs. Bates and Mrs. Vanderslice were both strong characters.I truly loved how the story mixed a large amount of historical aspects in with the fictional story of Elizabeth and her con-artistry. The history of the Suffragists was used to help shape Elizabeth's character, and to shape the time of the story, which led to a fair amount of enjoy-ability in the world building. I was able to get a true feel of the time from the description and imagery the author used. I cannot wait to read the next installment in the series! 4.5 stars for this one!"I promise I will never be boring. I will be the most interesting woman you've ever met."Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with this free e-copy in exchange for my honest review!
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    In a departure from her long-running Gaslight Mystery series, Thompson has written a new historical set in the 1917 at the height of the Suffrage movement. Elizabeth (last name changeable) is working a con with her brother that goes horribly wrong. Now the mark, Oscar Thornton, is out for revenge and Elizabeth ends up throwing in with a group of Suffragists (who land in prison) to escape Thornton's clutches. But what starts out as one more cover story becomes something else when Elizabeth comes In a departure from her long-running Gaslight Mystery series, Thompson has written a new historical set in the 1917 at the height of the Suffrage movement. Elizabeth (last name changeable) is working a con with her brother that goes horribly wrong. Now the mark, Oscar Thornton, is out for revenge and Elizabeth ends up throwing in with a group of Suffragists (who land in prison) to escape Thornton's clutches. But what starts out as one more cover story becomes something else when Elizabeth comes to realize the seriousness of the women's goals and just how much there is yet to do. Though the blurb on Goodreads suggests this is a murder mystery, it might be better be described as an historical caper novel with a hint of romance thrown in. And while some of the characterization needed some fleshing out, I really just enjoyed this. The author immerses the reader pretty quickly in the suffrage movement and those scenes pulled me right in.
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  • Amie
    January 1, 1970
    I was expecting this to be a mystery but it's not. The description here on goodreads is incorrect - it is not set in the 1920s, it's set during WWI and the women's suffrage movement plays a significant role in the plot.
  • A
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review :)it was definitely different than what I expected, but I actually really liked it :) will have a full review on the release day, because I need some time to gather my thoughts but for now, 4 solid stars :)edited to add my full review :) I got an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review :) this was definitely a vey different read than what I was expecting... don't get me wrong ARC received from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review :)it was definitely different than what I expected, but I actually really liked it :) will have a full review on the release day, because I need some time to gather my thoughts but for now, 4 solid stars :)edited to add my full review :) I got an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review :) this was definitely a vey different read than what I was expecting... don't get me wrong, it was a good book and I liked it, but it definitely took me a while to reset my mind a bit :) cause what I expected was a romance, and what I actually got was... well... I'll tell you all about it in a moment :) this is the first book in a new series, but can be read as a standalone without any cliffhangers whatsoever :) this was also my first book ever written by this author and I will definitely go back to check out some of her other novels in the future :) so now let me tell you a bit more about the story and our main heroine and then share my thoughts and opinions about it :)When I say that it's not really a romance I don't mean that there is none in the book... but it's definitely not the main focus :) let me explain from the start :) this story takes place in 1920s in United States, where we follow Elizabeth... she's very young... I wanna say 21 or 22, but don't remember precisely :) but she's very mature for her age... mainly because of all the things that happened in her life... because Elizabeth is actually a grifter, which basically means she's a con artist, and part of a bigger crew actually... the book starts when they trick a man into losing quite a lot of money... what they don't realize at the time, is that he's much more dangerous than they thought... so when something goes wrong, Elizabeth has to run... and since she's very clever, she decides to join a protest of women before the White House... and here's the biggest part of the plot in this book... a lot of things are revolving about women fighting for their right to vote :) so we follow Elizabeth and her journey with the women she meets and the romance is just a smaller subplot happening in the background... I don't really want to say any more details as to not spoil you on some twists and turns, so let me jump straight into my opinions about this story :)You should probably know something about me as a reader before I get into my thoughts and feelings... I'm a romance reader... what that means is that basically I need a romance in a story to really enjoyed it... but recently I've been thinking about starting to broaden my horizons a bit when it comes to reading... :) and I think that this book was one of the reasons why :) I liked that Elizabeth and her actions was the main focus of the story... I didn't always liked what she did, but every time I understood her motivations... she was such interestingly flawed character... always concentrated on her survival, because that's what life taught her, I loved seeing her form new friendships with the women she met :) how they changed her and influenced her behaviour... the romance part was definitely in the background, and then it was resolved pretty quickly at the end... a bit too fast in my opinion... but the rest of the book was really good, that's why I gave it ultimately 4 stars :) I adored all the secondary characters in this story... as in all the women Elizabeth met along the way :) I am definitely very curious, since this is the beginning of a series, who will be the main heroine / hero of that second book... :) so if you are looking for an original read about strong women, and trust me... some of the things they had to go through in their fight... those scenes broke my heart... then definitely give this book a try :)XOXOAfor more book-ish stuff visit:my blog -> https://bookworm8619.blogspot.com/my facebook page -> https://www.facebook.com/bookworm8619/
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  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    A con artist escaping from an angry victim gets mixed up with the women's suffrage movement. The ensuing stint in prison, complete with force-feeding, leads to her introduction to New York's social elite.It's an interesting premise to have the heroine of a series be a grifter. Alas, she is a bit of a Mary Sue of a grifter--she only targets people who are themselves crooked and is so stunningly beautiful and intelligent and interesting etc. that men AND women can't help loving her. I feel that Th A con artist escaping from an angry victim gets mixed up with the women's suffrage movement. The ensuing stint in prison, complete with force-feeding, leads to her introduction to New York's social elite.It's an interesting premise to have the heroine of a series be a grifter. Alas, she is a bit of a Mary Sue of a grifter--she only targets people who are themselves crooked and is so stunningly beautiful and intelligent and interesting etc. that men AND women can't help loving her. I feel that Thompson's lost an opportunity to create an imperfect main character whom we love despite her failings; Elizabeth just doesn't have much depth for me.Still, as I said, interesting premise and Thompson executes it with a seasoned author's skill. I wasn't crazy about narrator Kate Forbes's voice, which seemed a little old and noir-ish for what essentially was a lighthearted romp, and there were such long silences between chapters and sections that I kept thinking my Audible app had crashed (which it does from time to time). But as my introduction to Thompson's work, it was enjoyable enough that I might read the next book one of these days.Side note: There seems to be a disconnect between the book's blurb, which sets the story in the 1920s, and the cover, which suggests pre-WWI. I'm sure I remember the war being mentioned as being in its early stages in the book, which would put the action in 1914 or 1915, but I didn't get a very strong sense of the era. I looked at the cover of the next book and was even more confused as the cars look 1920s but the model is distinctly Edwardian. Possibly there's an Author's Note in the text version of the book that explains the background to Elizabeth's prison experience, or possibly it's one of those books where the historical background is just there as color. I'd welcome some elucidation from other readers.
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  • Minx -The Genre Minx Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    City of Lies was the type of book that only got better as it went on. At the start, I was introduced to Elizabeth Mile’s character and grifter ways, which I found most interesting. When things went bad with a deal, she wound up taking part in a suffragist march in order to try and throw some thugs off of her trail. Only that did not go as she had planned.I will say that I enjoyed reading about the suffragists movement because I tend to take my civil liberties for granted and I forget that my rig City of Lies was the type of book that only got better as it went on. At the start, I was introduced to Elizabeth Mile’s character and grifter ways, which I found most interesting. When things went bad with a deal, she wound up taking part in a suffragist march in order to try and throw some thugs off of her trail. Only that did not go as she had planned.I will say that I enjoyed reading about the suffragists movement because I tend to take my civil liberties for granted and I forget that my rights as a woman was only because of the many brave women who came before me. So, this story made me remember and appreciate that and for that I am grateful. Elizabeth was not a suffragist nor did she really care about their movement per say but she certainly grabbed onto the ruse if only to save her skin.While she was wrapped up with the situation she was in, Elizabeth also met some women who were kind to her and looked after her. Soon they doted on Elizabeth and made it impossible for her to part from their company, especially when Oscar Thornton caught wind of where Elizabeth was staying. It quickly becomes obvious that in order for Elizabeth to live any sort of life she was going to have to pull off the con of a century, even when it meant risking her newly acquired friendships. Even in one case risking something more precious than mere friendship.When I start reading City of Lies I was interested but then it slowed down for me a bit and I really felt like ‘putting it down,’ the main reason I kept reading was that I truly loved the character of Gideon Bates and whenever his chapters came along I became excited again. The something changed and I became actively involved in the story again. BY the time the ending came along I was really excited and happy for the ending. City of Lies is a story that surprised me and although I felt it was a little slow once it took off it was a gem!This review is based on a complimentary book I received from First Reads. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.Find this review and more at The Genre Minx Book Reviews
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    City Of Lies by Victoria Thompson has some pretty excellent elements. There's suffragettes. There's crime. In addition, there is a bit of a chase. Read my full review here
  • R.J. Koreto
    January 1, 1970
    A change of pace for the wonderful Victoria Thompson. I've long enjoyed her Gaslight mysteries, and was excited about this new series. Thompson excels at strong women characters, and Elizabeth Miles is something new--a talented con artist. When a con against a vengeful millionaire goes wrong, she has to hide among a groups of suffragists. Soon she finds her views challenged, as she simultaneously grows to like and respect her new companions, seeks to save her own life, and works to continue her A change of pace for the wonderful Victoria Thompson. I've long enjoyed her Gaslight mysteries, and was excited about this new series. Thompson excels at strong women characters, and Elizabeth Miles is something new--a talented con artist. When a con against a vengeful millionaire goes wrong, she has to hide among a groups of suffragists. Soon she finds her views challenged, as she simultaneously grows to like and respect her new companions, seeks to save her own life, and works to continue her profession. How will it resolve itself? Like all of Thompson's books, this one is well-researched and period details enrich the book without getting in the way of the plot. Especially vivid are descriptions, drawn from real life, of the tribulations women faced in seeking the vote. Equally interesting are the details of grifters and the their cons, also drawn from real life. There is romance, including same-sex romances, presented with skill and taste.Elizabeth Miles is a complex and fascinating heroine, and I look forward to seeing her further adventures.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    The description that is given is a little misleading as is the title, I was expecting a woman that we see very much in the beginning of the novel. We see "Betty" swindling people for their money, using her charms to con a man, and then? She completely loses her agency when she goes into jail. I feel like it was a smart idea for her but at the same time, while she is in jail, she seems to forget about her sense of urgency. I feel like we lost her character while she was incarcerated and my intere The description that is given is a little misleading as is the title, I was expecting a woman that we see very much in the beginning of the novel. We see "Betty" swindling people for their money, using her charms to con a man, and then? She completely loses her agency when she goes into jail. I feel like it was a smart idea for her but at the same time, while she is in jail, she seems to forget about her sense of urgency. I feel like we lost her character while she was incarcerated and my interest in the novel dwindled there. I feel like this novel was supposed to be more interesting and I was very much led astray by the fact that it wasn't as interesting as the description stated. 3/5, the only saving grace is the good writing style.I was given this book through the First to Read program in exchange for an honest opinion.
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  • Olga Godim
    January 1, 1970
    It was an OK novel: a little historical, a little romantic, and a little ‘thriller-y’. The action takes place in 1917 in New York. I finished the book, although I didn’t like it very much. The first half was actually much better than the second. Elizabeth, the protagonist, is a grifter. She and her friends con people, but this time, the con has gone terribly wrong. Their mark – the ruthless businessman Oscar Thornton – is onto them and wants his money back. She is running for her life, and the s It was an OK novel: a little historical, a little romantic, and a little ‘thriller-y’. The action takes place in 1917 in New York. I finished the book, although I didn’t like it very much. The first half was actually much better than the second. Elizabeth, the protagonist, is a grifter. She and her friends con people, but this time, the con has gone terribly wrong. Their mark – the ruthless businessman Oscar Thornton – is onto them and wants his money back. She is running for her life, and the safest place she finds is a suffragists’ demonstration in front of the White House. The suffragists, Elizabeth included, are arrested and sent to prison. Elizabeth doesn’t care a fig about the suffrage movement, but the prison is the safest place for her right now. It keeps her away from Thornton. On the other hand, she likes the women suffragists: educated, sophisticated, friendly, and principled. She has never encountered such women before. She pretends to be one of them, helps and supports them in the horrible prison, and at some point becomes one of them.So far, the tension mounts nicely, and the pace of the story keeps the reader to the pages. Then the women are freed, and the second part of the book starts. And the story deteriorates. Thornton seems omnipotent, always one step ahead of Elizabeth. She, contrary to the logic of the plot, develops a silly love interest in an absurdly honest lawyer. Instead of leaving town, she shuttles from place to place, always getting in the way of Thornton or his mean bodyguards. She is supposed to be a smart, tough con-women, but the author makes her feel like a stupid, naive, and helpless damsel. And she lies to everyone. With the heroine sliding from interesting and capable to vapid and incompetent, the book rapidly becomes boring despite the constant threat of Thornton and his henchmen. I had trouble finishing it.
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  • Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    Having read and enjoyed this authors gaslight mysteries I figured I'd give this new series a try. I expected it to be similar to her other books but it was completely different, Elizabeth Miles is a grifter who cons the rich out of their money. Sort of a female Robin Hood. When one con goes horribly wrong Elizabeth finds herself running from wealthy businessman Oscar Thornton who embodies all that is evil in this world. She blends in with a group of suffragists protesting in front of the White H Having read and enjoyed this authors gaslight mysteries I figured I'd give this new series a try. I expected it to be similar to her other books but it was completely different, Elizabeth Miles is a grifter who cons the rich out of their money. Sort of a female Robin Hood. When one con goes horribly wrong Elizabeth finds herself running from wealthy businessman Oscar Thornton who embodies all that is evil in this world. She blends in with a group of suffragists protesting in front of the White House and soon finds herself arrested and eventually dragged to a workhouse in Virginia. Despite her best efforts she soon befriends the women she is imprisoned with Mrs. Bates an older woman with a lawyer son named Gideon, and Anna a frail young girl who latches onto Elizabeth from the moment the meet. After their nightmarish ordeal they are released and Elizabeth tries to find a way to flee when she discovers Thornton played a huge role in her release and will do anything to capture her. She soon finds herself having to do what she never wanted paying a con on Anna and her brother David in an effort to save her own life and trying to keep her identity hidden from the sharp eyed Gideon and his equally sharp mother. Can she turn the tables and ensure Thornton gets what he deserves while keeping her new found friendships? A promising start to a new series this book is unlike any I've read before and Elizabeth is a truly unique and brave heroine. Can't wait to see where future adventures take her.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to First to Read for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. City of Lies by Victoria Thompson is a fast-paced, easy historical fiction about a female con-artist/grifter on the run after a con gone bad. Elizabeth Miles and her brother Jake are casing their next mark, Oscar Thornton, and trying to make out with thousands of dollars of his money. When the con goes bad, Lizzie runs off and ends up in a group of suffragists outside the White House. To get away from Thornton's goons, she get Thanks to First to Read for the ARC in exchange for an honest review. City of Lies by Victoria Thompson is a fast-paced, easy historical fiction about a female con-artist/grifter on the run after a con gone bad. Elizabeth Miles and her brother Jake are casing their next mark, Oscar Thornton, and trying to make out with thousands of dollars of his money. When the con goes bad, Lizzie runs off and ends up in a group of suffragists outside the White House. To get away from Thornton's goons, she gets herself and the group arrested and sent away to a workhouse, where they are treated very badly. Being kept in prison, she befriends Anna Vanderslice and Mrs. Bates and they invite her to New York with them to recuperate after their ordeal. Thornton is not going to let her go without retaliation, so she has to figure out how to make her biggest con yet but not lose her new friendships. I really enjoyed this story and the fact that it is not wrapped up in romance, while learning new things about the suffragist movement. Historical fiction at its best and an overall good story, even some things are a little unbelievable. Definitely will check out the next installment to the series.
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  • Kathy Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Lizzy Miles is a grifter. She and her brother run a number of cons. However, their latest con goes wrong and Oscar Thornton is now and the hunt for Lizzy. He wants his money back or Lizzy dead. Lizzy runs into a protest by suffragists who are picketing in front of the White House. Lizzy finds herself arrested and taken to a workhouse. She meets a number of upper class women and makes friends as they go through the horrors of the workhouse. She becomes especially close to Mrs. Bates and Anna Vand Lizzy Miles is a grifter. She and her brother run a number of cons. However, their latest con goes wrong and Oscar Thornton is now and the hunt for Lizzy. He wants his money back or Lizzy dead. Lizzy runs into a protest by suffragists who are picketing in front of the White House. Lizzy finds herself arrested and taken to a workhouse. She meets a number of upper class women and makes friends as they go through the horrors of the workhouse. She becomes especially close to Mrs. Bates and Anna Vanderslice. While they are undergoing horrors inside the workhouse, Mrs. Bate's son Gideon and Anna's brother David are trying to get them out. They are assisted by Oscar Thornton who wants Lizzy and who wants David to broker a deal with the Army to let him sell some questionable weapons.Once out of jail, Lizzy is taken home by Mrs. Bates and Anna. However, Lizzy is kidnapped by Thornton and the only way she can get herself free is to plan another con. She has to convince Thornton that she has enough influence with David to get him to broker Thornton's deal. She finds herself engaged to David while falling in love with Gideon and running the biggest con of her life. This was a great historical thriller. I liked Lizzy and I liked the historical detail about the woman's suffrage movement. It was fun trying to keep track of who knew what and what story Lizzy was going to try next.
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  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    I love Victoria Thompson's "Gaslight" series and have followed these from the beginning. I just truly love her writing. Thanks to a "bestie" who gave this book to me I was able to read and decide if I'd continue with this newest series. This book deals with Elizabeth Miles who is part of a con artist scheme and finds herself hooked up with a group of suffragettes -to escape from the bad guys. The author did a lot of research about the suffragette movement and the brave women who were part of it. I love Victoria Thompson's "Gaslight" series and have followed these from the beginning. I just truly love her writing. Thanks to a "bestie" who gave this book to me I was able to read and decide if I'd continue with this newest series. This book deals with Elizabeth Miles who is part of a con artist scheme and finds herself hooked up with a group of suffragettes -to escape from the bad guys. The author did a lot of research about the suffragette movement and the brave women who were part of it. I will admit that I have no idea where the series will go but I'm not sure I will be following it.
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  • Vanessa
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was surprisingly good. I just expected a fun mystery type read, but this was really a well written historical fiction novel. Elizabeth is a grifter, running a con with her partner in crime and the target is a vicious and dangerous man. When they make off with his money, he beats her partner and Elizabeth hides among a suffragist protest and ends up getting herself (and an entire crowd of women) arrested and shipped off to prison. And that's just where the fun begins. I was really I thought this was surprisingly good. I just expected a fun mystery type read, but this was really a well written historical fiction novel. Elizabeth is a grifter, running a con with her partner in crime and the target is a vicious and dangerous man. When they make off with his money, he beats her partner and Elizabeth hides among a suffragist protest and ends up getting herself (and an entire crowd of women) arrested and shipped off to prison. And that's just where the fun begins. I was really impressed with this. The cover made it seem sort of YA and not that serious. It was actually quite awesome and the author did a great job with the research.
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book thank you. This is the second book I have read this year about the Suffragette movement, and only being familiar with the movement in the U.K. I found it very interesting to read what our American Sisters went through to earn the right for us all to have the vote. I appreciate this, I never fail to vote, and because of what our sisters went through, we have the right to vote in our respective countries. However, this is not a boring book about our history, it also includes scams, I won this book thank you. This is the second book I have read this year about the Suffragette movement, and only being familiar with the movement in the U.K. I found it very interesting to read what our American Sisters went through to earn the right for us all to have the vote. I appreciate this, I never fail to vote, and because of what our sisters went through, we have the right to vote in our respective countries. However, this is not a boring book about our history, it also includes scams, that have taken place in the past, marks and a love story. Although I found the ending closing with too many questions, I found the book a fast read and enjoyable.
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