Seeds of Change
Imagine the moment when the present ends, and the future begins -- when the world we knew is no more and a brave new world is thrust upon us. Gathering stories by nine of today's most incisive minds, Seeds of Change confronts the pivotal issues facing our society today: racism, global warming, peak oil, technological advancement, and political revolution. Many serve as a call to action. How will you change with the future? These nine stories sow seeds of change across familiar and foreign territory, from our own backyards to the Niger Delta to worlds not yet discovered. Pepper, the mysterious mercenary from Tobias S. Buckell's Crystal Rain and Ragamuffin, works as an agent for change -- if the price is right -- in "Resistance." Ken MacLeod envisions the end-game in the Middle East in "A Dance Called Armageddon." New writer Blake Charlton imagines a revolutionary advance in cancer research in "Endosymbiont." Award-winning author Jay Lake tackles technological change and the forces that will stop at nothing to prevent it in "The Future by Degrees." Other stories by K.D. Wentworth, Jeremiah Tolbert, Mark Budz, Ted Kosmatka, and Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu range from the darkly satirical to the exotic. All explore the notion that change will come.

Seeds of Change Details

TitleSeeds of Change
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 1st, 2008
PublisherWildside Press
ISBN-139780809573103
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Short Stories, Anthologies, Fiction, Speculative Fiction, Collections, Science Fiction Fantasy

Seeds of Change Review

  • Wealhtheow
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of stories about paradigm shifts. This is easily the best anthology I've read this year (although the single author collection Pump Six still contains my favorite short stories of the year). The editor kept his choices to the best, not the biggest names, and thus captured some of the most innovative work in sf. Unlike pretty much every other anthology I can think of, there are no losers here--no stories that insulted or frustrated me, no lazy writing or poorly thought out plot point A collection of stories about paradigm shifts. This is easily the best anthology I've read this year (although the single author collection Pump Six still contains my favorite short stories of the year). The editor kept his choices to the best, not the biggest names, and thus captured some of the most innovative work in sf. Unlike pretty much every other anthology I can think of, there are no losers here--no stories that insulted or frustrated me, no lazy writing or poorly thought out plot points. These are stories with muscle and brain behind them, taking place all over the globe, all over the future. The best:"N-words" by Ted Kosmatka, is of course about racial prejudice, but also has a great deal to say about biology-as-destiny, and the effects of genetic diversity."Faceless in Gethsemane" by Mark Budz. A group has removed their ability to tell facial features and skin colors apart. A man tries to deal with his sister's choice to join the movement."Resistance" by Tobias S Buckell. A cameo appearance by Pepper does not distract from the work this story sets out to do: observe and pick apart the end results of a truly democratic republic.
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  • John Ottinger
    January 1, 1970
    Copied in full from my blog Grasping for the Wind[return][return]When John Joseph Adams, editor of the apocalyptic short story collection Wastelands and Slush God for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction offered readers of his blog the opportunity to read and review an ARC e-copy of his newest collection Seeds of Change, I jumped at the chance. Adams has proven himself to be an editor worthy of comparison to Gardner Dozois, Martin H. Greenberg, and George R. R. Martin. And this antholgy Copied in full from my blog Grasping for the Wind[return][return]When John Joseph Adams, editor of the apocalyptic short story collection Wastelands and Slush God for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction offered readers of his blog the opportunity to read and review an ARC e-copy of his newest collection Seeds of Change, I jumped at the chance. Adams has proven himself to be an editor worthy of comparison to Gardner Dozois, Martin H. Greenberg, and George R. R. Martin. And this antholgy once again proves that Adams is an editor of high skill.[return][return]The first story, by Ted Kosmatka, is a story called "N-words" about the relationship between science and racism. The "n" in the title stands for "Neanderthal" as supposed secondary race of humans long since died or bred out. When the scientists of Kosmatka's future bring them back from the grave, there are significant consequences for homo sapiens. Kosmatka tells the story through the eyes of once of our subspecies of humans who is sympathetic to these neo-Neanderthals. It makes the tale extremely intimate. Kosmataka's story ends on a dire note, serving as a warning against unbridled science and the more evil instincts of humanity's nature, particularly its tendency toward racism. This story has to be my favorite of the anthology.[return][return]Jay Lake's contribution reminds me of the movie version of The Saint with Val Kilmer and Elisabeth Shue. "The Future of Degrees" is about a scientific breakthrough in waste heat management. A brave salesman, Grover, must rescue this breakthrough from being stolen by an evil government seeking to suppress it. Unfortunately, while Lake's contribution is tightly written and interesting to think about, it is so close to the exact same plot of the aforementioned movie, that it ends up being interesting only for its concepts, not for its story. It ends up being unoriginal in that respect. Still, it is worth thinking about whether technology should be in the hands of the people, or the hands of its government.[return][return]When I say the title of K. D. Wentworth's "Drinking Problem" the first thing that came to mind was the scene in Airplane! where Ted Striker has a "drinking problem" that causes him to spill his drink off to the side when he raises a cup to his lips. Wentworth has continued that tradition to write a humorous story about the consequences of adopting innovations without thoroughly vetting them. The poor unfortunate hero of the story, a frequent denizen of a local bar, is forced by law into owning a sentient bottle that is genetically coded to an individual, and that is infinitely reusable. The "Smart Bottle" was supposed to help reduce filling of the landfills with glass and cans, but ends up having farther reaching social implications than its makers intended. Wentworth's story helped lighten the mood of the mostly serious collection. This story ends happily, and ends up being a quite hopeful. This a rarity among science fiction that also provides social commentary, and for that alone "Drinking Problem" is a worthy read. Wentworth's story will also resonate well with any reader in a deeply committed relationship that has struggled, but still has hope for survival.[return][return]Blake Charlton is a brand new, unpublished writer (who has a three book deal with Tor, with the first novel coming out this year), who is also a medical student at Stanford. His story, "Endosymbiont" draws on his knowledge of the medical field. The story thinks about the idea of the ability of a human mind having he ability to be downloaded into a machine. Would such people whose minds were downloaded remain human? If not, what would it take to help them retain some semblance of humanity? What would the government of the people do about such a technology? Charlton's story has immediate implications even now, in an age where disease ravages a body but leaves a mind whole, or Alzheimer's destroys a mind but leaves a body whole. Some readers with a personal history of such diseases may find this tale painful so some caution is warranted. However, it is too well constructed to miss. The primary character is a sympathetic, cancer ridden fourteen year old girl, and the story's tale of personal sacrifice is hopeful and deeply saddening. There are some technical terms interspersed throughout the story that some readers may not be familiar with, but ultimately they are not distracting. Charlton very likely has a fruitful career in writing as well as the medical profession, and I look forward to more from this debut author who donated all the proceeds from the sale of this tale to the American Cancer Society.[return][return]Ken Macleod writes a tale that echoes the ancient Gaelic ballads. "A Dance called Armageddon" is an extremely pessimistic tale the end of Western tradition. Macleod's tale is short, but in it we learn about the music of defeat, and the strange pride that the Scots and their kin take even in their many defeats. Macleod recognizes the strangeness' of the tradition of the Irish and Scottish people's preoccupation with stories of sadness and loss. What comes from Macleod's pen is both a celebration and a resignation and that strange juxtaposition makes for a powerful tale.[return][return]"Arties Aren't Stupid" by Jeremiah Tolbert, is a story about art and its ability to effect societal change. The arties of Tolbert's tale manage to find a way to meld art and science, and in doing so, create a brave new world. The story takes a little work to understand, as Tolbert creates slang for his ragtag band of arties, but that just adds to the otherness of his world. Though less thought-provoking than others in the anthology, the story is well-written, and is descriptive of the effect art can have on a society.[return][return]Prosopagnosia is a condition where a person is incapable of seeing faces to a defection in the mental faculties. Mark Budz uses this as the primary motivator in his story "Faceless in Gethsemane". The narrator must deal with a sister who voluntarily makes herself a sufferer of prospagnosia. This story was perhaps the hardest to understand. Budz is making a comment on racism and the concept of being colorblind in regards to people, but the concept and the story didn't seem to mesh. Up until the ending of the story, what Budz relates makes sense, But his ending left me confused, as I cannot seem to understand its relationship to the rest of the story. Budz's story was strong on concept, and only fair on execution, though that concept is very interesting to think about.[return][return]Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu writes a story set in Nigeria, in a small town that has an oil pipeline through its backyard but that reaps none of the benefits of the oil production. This a story all to common in today's Africa, and it is in this setting that "Spider the Artist" tells us of a young woman, a musical artist, who encounters a machine designed for the preservation of the oil pipeline that has intelligence. Okorafor-Mbachu's is a modern folk tale that draws on Africa's rich oral tradition. Its story is disheartening, especially when the reader realizes that many of the specifics the author describes are present day reality for many people living in oil-rich Nigeria. The story ends of being a call to action for complacent Westerners, and a tale of hope for the people of Africa, if both set aside their antagonism and realize that though they maybe different in many ways, music can transcend this, as it does for the narrator and the robot of "Spider the Artist".[return][return]The final story of the collection comes from one of my favorite authors, Tobias Buckell. "Resistance" gives another story to the character of Pepper, the favorite creation of Buckell's fans. In it, an asteroid colony's government has been overthrown and a dictator has taken its place. The resistance movement has brought Pepper in to help them destroy the dictator. Things do not go according to plan. Buckell uses this story to make a comment about democracy, and those democratic governments that seem to be chugging along well, only to be overthrown in a coup and replaced with a dictatorial government. The conclusions that Buckell draws will be surprising to many. Fans of Pepper should be warned that although Pepper appears, he does not exhibit his fighting skill a great deal in this story. Buckell has not written an action story in this case. "Resistance" is about the nature of governments, particularly democratic governments and the will of the people who comprise them. For all that, Buckell still writes entertainingly, and it was a good choice for the closing story of this anthology.[return][return]Seeds of Change continues to exemplify Adams ability to pick short stories of distinction. These nine stories of, in Adams words, "paradigm shift - technological, scientific, political, or cultural" are thought provoking without being didactic, asking the reader to think deeply about issues of today through the stories of the future. Conclusions are not drawn by these authors, avoiding the giving of answers. Even though I took some issues with a couple of the stories, they are all still worthwhile reading. This is the sort of writing the speculative fiction the genre was meant to produce. Readers should be pleased with the results of the contributors' and editor's efforts.
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  • MH
    January 1, 1970
    A slim collection of science fiction short stories centered around cultural and technological paradigm shifts. Most of the pieces were fine, with some interesting explorations of identity and art, although a couple didn't work at all for me (I find the central idea of the story about racism problematic, as academics say), but I greatly enjoyed the well-constructed stories from Mark Budz and Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu, and I'm looking forward to reading more of both of those writers.
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  • Res
    January 1, 1970
    Fiction on a theme of paradigm change. I finished nearly every story in the book, but I can't actually say I liked any of them. Some of the authors really struggle with the theme, and I can see why -- it's vague and constrictive at the same time. I must say that as a physical object, this book is one of the most pleasant ones that I've read for a long time. I didn't so much enjoy reading it, but I hated to put it down. So small and friendly!
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  • Scott Marlowe
    January 1, 1970
    RatingReview*** This review originally appeared on Out of this World Reviews. ***Back in early June, John Joseph Adams sent out a request for advanced readers for his Seeds of Change anthology. Of course, I took him up on it.Adams is the assistant editor at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, but he's also been on a tear of late editing anthologies. There's The Living Dead, Wastelands, and, now, Seeds of Change.While Adams gave plenty of advanced notice of the imminent release of the RatingReview*** This review originally appeared on Out of this World Reviews. ***Back in early June, John Joseph Adams sent out a request for advanced readers for his Seeds of Change anthology. Of course, I took him up on it.Adams is the assistant editor at The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, but he's also been on a tear of late editing anthologies. There's The Living Dead, Wastelands, and, now, Seeds of Change.While Adams gave plenty of advanced notice of the imminent release of the anthology, I fell behind with some other reading and wasn't able to start it until after it had already been released. Fortunately, Seeds of Change is a fast-paced, easy read (though I have to admit I did not read every story through, see below), and so this review comes only shortly after the official release. You can purchase Seeds of Change in hardcover or Kindle formats.Now, on to my review…I'm going to start with an introduction pulled from the Seeds of Change web site to give you a taste of what this anthology is all about: Imagine the moment when the present ends, and the future begins–when the world we knew is no more and a brave new world is thrust upon us. Gathering stories by nine of today’s most incisive minds, Seeds of Change confronts the pivotal issues facing our society today: racism, global warming, peak oil, technological advancement, and political revolution. A heady claim, to be sure, but Seeds of Change delivered, for me, seven out of nine times.That calls for an explanation: There are nine stories in total; two of them didn't do it for me, and I had to stop reading. But of the seven stories I did finish, I found each of them both entertaining and thought-provoking. That's a rare combination, IMO. Often an author will go too far into the literary realm, which is all well and fine when one is looking for that sort of thing. But these days I'll take entertaining over literary nine times out of ten. It was a pleasant surprise that Seeds of Change provided both, and probably why I found it such an easy read.Of the seven stories I completed, the most entertaining were those by Jay Lake, Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu, and Ted Kosmatka. Tobias Buckell was up there as well, but I found his Pepper story contribution a bit of a letdown. Perhaps I'd gotten too used to the character's zombie butt-kicking ways from Sly Mongoose that to see him thoughtful and almost introspective threw me. On the other hand, this anthology is about change, so seeing things in a different light may be what it's all about.Seeds of Change scores a ten on quality of writing. Regardless of what I might have thought about a story's theme or characters, the authors each come through with a wholly engaging style. That goes for the two stories I didn't finish as well.For the record, those two were "A Dance Called Armageddon", by Ken MacLeod, and "Artists Aren't Stupid", by Jeremiah Tolbert. There was nothing inherently wrong with either story. The oration simply wasn't doing it for me. At my age (I'm 38), that's enough for me to give it a pass.But that fact takes nothing away from the anthology. If you're looking for a healthy dose of thought-provoking literature leavened by a hefty shot of entertainment to put an exclamation on these final summer days, I highly recommend Seeds of Change.
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  • Dorothy (D. J.) Emry
    January 1, 1970
    On StaticMultimedia.com I gave this 3 1/2 stars. I have to fess up and say that I wanted to review this anthology because it contains a story written by a friend of mine, Ted Kosmatka. Ted's had a nice amount of success over the past few years and his stories have appeared in Asimov's. (Am I envious? You betcha. But his success is well deserved.) Looking back on this reading experience, I'm so happy that it introduced me to the writing of Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu. I had the pleasure of hearing her On StaticMultimedia.com I gave this 3 1/2 stars. I have to fess up and say that I wanted to review this anthology because it contains a story written by a friend of mine, Ted Kosmatka. Ted's had a nice amount of success over the past few years and his stories have appeared in Asimov's. (Am I envious? You betcha. But his success is well deserved.) Looking back on this reading experience, I'm so happy that it introduced me to the writing of Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu. I had the pleasure of hearing her speak and talking to her briefly this summer at the Printer's Row book festival in Chicago. She's not only an intelligent writer, but one of the nicest people you could hope to meet. Her story in Seeds of Change remains on my mind as one of the best I've read in the last few years.Below is a brief excerpt from my review. To read my full review go to: http://www.staticmultimedia.com/print...Two exceptional stories in this collection are “Endosymbiont” by Blake Charlton and “Spider the Artist” by Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu. Charlton’s story follows a girl who has undergone chemotherapy as she questions the possible unreality of her existence and the next step in human evolution. Okorafor-Mbachu’s story, set in the Niger Delta, shows us the life of a woman who suffers an abusive husband, poverty, and a ravaged environment.
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  • Ross Lockhart
    January 1, 1970
    One book that I have read recently is the John Joseph Adams-edited anthology Seeds of Change, in fact, this was my in-flight reading on the long, long flight back from Worldcon (and may have been one of the only things keeping me sane on said flight). Seeds of Change is a short collection (240 pages) of nine original science fiction stories by the likes of Jay Lake, Tobias S. Buckell, Ted Kosmatka, and K.D. Wentworth, each of which marks the turning point, the paradigm shift, between now and “th One book that I have read recently is the John Joseph Adams-edited anthology Seeds of Change, in fact, this was my in-flight reading on the long, long flight back from Worldcon (and may have been one of the only things keeping me sane on said flight). Seeds of Change is a short collection (240 pages) of nine original science fiction stories by the likes of Jay Lake, Tobias S. Buckell, Ted Kosmatka, and K.D. Wentworth, each of which marks the turning point, the paradigm shift, between now and “the future.” The collection’s agenda is quite progressive, with stories tackling racism, peak oil, scarcity, and electoral politics, among other themes, but never coming across as preachy or polemic. Perhaps my favorite story of the collection is Blake Charlton’s “Endosymbont,” which deals smartly with the question of artificial intelligence and what it is that makes one human. You can read an excerpt from “Endosymbont,” as well as complete stories by Jay Lake, Tobias S. Buckell, and Jeremiah Tolbert, at the Seeds of Change website. And while you’re there, check out the very cool trailer. Trust me on this one.
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  • Brooke
    January 1, 1970
    Seeds of Change is an anthology that contains nine short stories confronting issues that our society faces today such as: racism, global warming, peak oil, technological advancement, and political revolution. All with a Science Fiction twist. This is a book that activist will enjoy, and if as readers, we don't understand the problems our world faces, Seeds of Change can really open our eyes to them. I really enjoyed what John Joseph Adams has done here. As an author and editor he has put this in Seeds of Change is an anthology that contains nine short stories confronting issues that our society faces today such as: racism, global warming, peak oil, technological advancement, and political revolution. All with a Science Fiction twist. This is a book that activist will enjoy, and if as readers, we don't understand the problems our world faces, Seeds of Change can really open our eyes to them. I really enjoyed what John Joseph Adams has done here. As an author and editor he has put this information out there in an entertaining way, in an attempt at making people more aware.The authors are knowledgeable about the issues, and have taken the time to write intelligent Scifi stories for readers to enjoy. Seeds of Change is a fantastic addition to anyone's book collection, and I highly recommend it to all readers to check it out. John has also put together a great website for Seeds of Change that contains three free stories (with excerpts of the rest), as well as interviews, author bios, and a book trailer featuring dramatized excerpts of each story and an original musical score. http://www.seedsanthology.com/ Don't forget to go there and check that out :)
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  • Alan
    January 1, 1970
    This slim volume of original science fiction stories went well with The Starry Rift, which I also recently read. This anthology too is largely positive about the future.The theme is "paradigm shift" - radical changes growing from small seeds of technology, the essence of science fiction. With such a wide-open framework, the stories here are all over the map, both figuratively and literally. The settings range from Nigeria to outer space to California; the topics are as varied as voting, racism, This slim volume of original science fiction stories went well with The Starry Rift, which I also recently read. This anthology too is largely positive about the future.The theme is "paradigm shift" - radical changes growing from small seeds of technology, the essence of science fiction. With such a wide-open framework, the stories here are all over the map, both figuratively and literally. The settings range from Nigeria to outer space to California; the topics are as varied as voting, racism, genetic engineering and artificial intelligence, going so far as to address what to do when your smart bottle won't let you throw it away.Every story here is good, from Ted Kosmatka's "N-words" (not what you may think) to Tobias S. Buckell's "Resistance." This book is heartening, proof positive that good, strong, upbeat science fiction is by no means dead... or even moribund.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    Seeds of Change was one of the best collections of new short fiction I read the year it's release. The cost of admission is worth the first story alone with it's treatment of prejudice and the possible reactions of people to a reborn species in our reactionary fragile and emotion filed world. There are stories that are hopeful and ones that are dystopic but in all they give a mixture of hope and failure. I recall even one that moves towards the revelation of post singular freedom. Seeds of Chan Seeds of Change was one of the best collections of new short fiction I read the year it's release. The cost of admission is worth the first story alone with it's treatment of prejudice and the possible reactions of people to a reborn species in our reactionary fragile and emotion filed world. There are stories that are hopeful and ones that are dystopic but in all they give a mixture of hope and failure. I recall even one that moves towards the revelation of post singular freedom. Seeds of Change plays with the future in ways that stays with you.... take it from the library or buy it buy to read it...
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  • Tyrannosaurus regina
    January 1, 1970
    This rating is definitely an average of how I felt about the stories, some of which fell on either side of this center line. Endosymbiont, for instance, really moved me (despite any passing similarities to The Matrix trilogy), but Drinking Problem felt more like a call to alcoholism than to responsible recycling. In general, the stories tended to lean a touch more towards talking about ideas than writing stories about those ideas, but just a touch, and the writing itself was overall high quality This rating is definitely an average of how I felt about the stories, some of which fell on either side of this center line. Endosymbiont, for instance, really moved me (despite any passing similarities to The Matrix trilogy), but Drinking Problem felt more like a call to alcoholism than to responsible recycling. In general, the stories tended to lean a touch more towards talking about ideas than writing stories about those ideas, but just a touch, and the writing itself was overall high quality.
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  • Cesar
    January 1, 1970
    I thought that this was a very interesting and unique book. I've never read a book like this before, mostly because it had nine stories in one book. Each story to tell and had a different author. Each story explains in some way science-fiction, our future, or addressing some of our world's most pressing problems. Since there was different authors, there were different types of stories. There was one really good story, one bad story, and the rest were decent. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book I thought that this was a very interesting and unique book. I've never read a book like this before, mostly because it had nine stories in one book. Each story to tell and had a different author. Each story explains in some way science-fiction, our future, or addressing some of our world's most pressing problems. Since there was different authors, there were different types of stories. There was one really good story, one bad story, and the rest were decent. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book because of its uniqueness and its stories.
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  • Colin
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars on this. Great concept, the stories were all thought-provoking at minimum, and there were a couple standouts, like Tobias Buckell's "Resistance" and Nnedi Okorofor's "Spider the Artist." But I wish it had at least been longer; there are only 10 stories in here. A specifically social justice-oriented science fiction collection could have had more to offer on a greater variety of issues.
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  • Nicole Bunge
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, how I loved this book! At least 3 of these stories have been featured on "Escape Pod" - which is why I bought it. Near-future paradigm shift moments. Yummy good. I got to meet the editor and get it signed at Wiscon. He does a lot of anthologies - zombies, and a new one coming out on vampires - woot!Assistant editor of Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.If'n you want to borrow my copy, holler, but I AM KEEPING THIS. I GOT IT SIGNED. :P
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  • Ezmyrelda Andrade
    January 1, 1970
    Seeds of Change had highs and lows. Some of the stories were quite engaging, others failed to capture interest. Some of the stories such as Faceless in Gethsemane were subtly intriguing and emotionally charged, while others like Arties aren't Stupid were pointless and needlessly confusing due a glut of ill defined words or concepts. But since the entire book was a short read it wasn't much of a loss of wasted time or effort.
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  • Anthony
    January 1, 1970
    This really is one of the strongest anthologies I've read in a while, perhaps because the TOC is reasonably short and the theme is reasonably broad. There wasn't a story that didn't make me think. Some made me laugh, and a couple did make me cry (Blake Charlton's story in particular, and parts of Ted Kosmatka and Nnedi Okorafor's stories as well). Individual story reviews can be found at http://365shortstories.livejournal.co...
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Haven't had a chance to read through the entire collection, but read Blake Charlton's Endosymbiont and was thoroughly impressed with his work. I am a big science fiction fan and this short story was a quick read and brought up very important issues with medical ethics that I really enjoyed. Definitely take time to read this collection, and make sure to read Endosymbiont!
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    What a fabulous collection of stories! There wasn't a single one I didn't like. The stories all deal with the authors' thoughts about how our world is changing and where that might go. There were some really interesting and thought provoking takes on robots and AI's. I highly recommend this anthology.
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  • David Littlewood
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this because because I was following Ted Kosmatka who has a short story, "N-Words" in this anthology. I'm not as taken with this story as I was with his "Divining Light", but it's another good one. I was also impressed with Blake Charlton's "Endosymbiont" and Tobias S. Buckell's "Resistance".
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  • Rochelle
    January 1, 1970
    Many of the stories in this collection has vey intriguing ideas based on themes in science I myself have noticed in recent years. These ideas lent themselves to stories well in about the half the stories - the other half felt a little under-baked, as if there wasn't enough "story" there to hold the piece together.
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Some of the most mind bending, political, sci fi I have read in a long time. All things I enjoy!Dance of Armageddon was one of my favorites, but all too real. I could really lose myself reading the n-word. Gave reality a new twist.
  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    A short anthology of SF stories about, as the title implies, sowing seeds of change, usually involving change that affects the whole world. As with most anthologies, some stories are much stronger than others. I think my favorite was the first; it was the most affecting. A good weekend read.
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  • Christie
    January 1, 1970
    A compact volume that packs a punch. As with any anthology there were hits and misses for me as a reader. My favorite stories were "N-Words" by Ted Kosmatka, and "Arties Aren't Stupid" by Jeremiah Tolbert.
  • Diana
    January 1, 1970
    OK, so I blew through this book in one evening. It is just science fiction. But the premise is interesting. Write a futuristic answer to a problem of today. The most interesting stories (they each can stand alone) for me were the ones about racism and about global warming.A fun read.
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  • krista.
    January 1, 1970
    There were only two stories that I truly didn't like, and several of them, I liked very much. The collection was the perfect length for me, too. Worth checking out for sure.
  • Tom Dillon
    January 1, 1970
    I found this anthology to good, but uneven. I enjoyed most of them well enough, but the only one that really engaged me was Nnedi Okorafor's Spider the Artist.
  • Cissa
    January 1, 1970
    Really great stories. I loved all of them- and they made me think! That's one of the things I love about really good SF.
  • Bill Glover
    January 1, 1970
    Clever, insightful, science fiction in the classic style. A thoroughly enjoyable read that will also make you think.
  • Constance Burris
    January 1, 1970
    The best anthology I've read in a while. I was very impressed.
  • Steven Farmer
    January 1, 1970
    More often than not, each of the nine stories hit their intended mark.
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