Golden Age and Other Stories
Naomi Novik ended her acclaimed, beloved nine-volume Temeraire series last year with a stunning finale, League of Dragons. Fans missing their favorite series can now rejoice: Novik returns with Golden Age and Other Stories, an original Temeraire collection as unique as the world she has created, with each tale inspired by an accompanying piece of fan art. In addition to the wonderful stories, the book contains over thirty brand-new illustrations.The Temeraire novels provide a window into an alternate nineteenth century populated with Novik’s own richly human and unforgettably draconic characters as they adventure alongside well-known historical figures. That tradition continues here. Readers will delight at appearances by fan-favorite characters from the series and historical figures like the famed explorer Matteo Ricci. In “Planting Season,” Novik shows us an early glimpse of American dragon John Wampanoag at Boston harbor. “Golden Age” finds a dragon who believes he remembers being called Celeste hatch from a shipwreck-tossed crate onto an island where he meets others of his kind. But other famous fictional characters are to be discovered here as well. Readers will certainly recognize a certain Miss Bennet (here Captain Bennet) and her suitor, Mr. Darcy, in “Dragons and Decorum.”Filled with the inventive world-building, rich detail, sparkling wit, and deep emotion that readers have come to expect from Novik’s work, Golden Age and Other Stories is a treasure at home on any Temeraire-lover’s bookshelf.

Golden Age and Other Stories Details

TitleGolden Age and Other Stories
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreFantasy, Dragons, Short Stories, Fiction, Science Fiction, Alternate History

Golden Age and Other Stories Review

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/09/02/...Golden Age and Other Stories is a charming little anthology that is sure to please fans of Naomi Novik’s Temeraire, though if you are just getting started on the series or are hoping to sample some of the stories here before diving into the main books, this will not be the most ideal entry point. For that, I highly urge you to simply pick up His Majesty’s Dragon, one of my favorite fantasy novels of all time. While I don’t 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2017/09/02/...Golden Age and Other Stories is a charming little anthology that is sure to please fans of Naomi Novik’s Temeraire, though if you are just getting started on the series or are hoping to sample some of the stories here before diving into the main books, this will not be the most ideal entry point. For that, I highly urge you to simply pick up His Majesty’s Dragon, one of my favorite fantasy novels of all time. While I don’t think you have to complete the series to appreciate this collection (I myself have only read the first six of the nine volumes), having some basic knowledge of the world to start will definitely help you out a lot.This anthology also features an interesting format, consisting of six short stories which are then followed by about two dozen snippets termed “Drabbles”. All of them are accompanied by a piece of fan art upon which these tales are based, so not only are you getting plenty of dragon-y goodness with this collection, you’ll also be receiving a generous helping of gorgeous eye candy.But how do the stories themselves stack up, you ask? Well, as with most collections, the offerings here are somewhat unbalanced, hitting both highs and lows. I don’t mind admitting that I was largely unimpressed with the first few stories or any of the Drabbles at the end, but sandwiched between them are several amazing gems that are so good that I would say they are worth the price of admission alone.To begin, we have the first tale called “Volly Gets a Cow”, a short humorous piece that nevertheless left me feeling lukewarm towards it. One thing I did like though, was how this was one of the few stories in here that featured Temeraire displaying a deep font of patience as he tries to reign in one of his dragon friends, the playful and distracted Volly who only has eyes for a delicious yummy cow.Next up is a story called “Planting Season”, which fortunately I enjoyed a lot better than the first. It stars a dragon in the Americas named John Wampanoag, who has fallen into a sort of mediator role between the Native Americans and the European settlers in the aftermath of the Revolution. Offering his services as a courier, John has a talent for making negotiations and a sharp mind for getting the best deal out of a trade. I liked how this one offered another view of the world from a different context, accomplishing just what a side story should do.Then comes another dip, I’m afraid, in “Dawn of Battle”, a story starring a young Jane Roland that gives a bit about her background. To my disappointment, of the six full tales in this collection, I thought this was probably the least memorable, though if you’re a big fan of her character then this one may impact you a lot more.Now comes the good stuff: The title story “Golden Age” is a reimagining of Laurence’s first meeting with his dragon. This alternate version has Temeraire’s egg washing up ashore on a desert island following a shipwreck. After hatching and falling in with a group of feral dragons, the lot of them decide to turn to a life of piracy, and their subsequent looting and plundering prompts Laurence to investigate and bring them to justice. Do I really need to spell out why this story was so awesome? PIRATE DRAGONS! Not to mention there’s also a heart-pounding encounter at sea involving dragons and a kraken, which hopefully shouldn’t be a spoiler considering how the image depicting this scene is plastered all over the cover.After all the action, a more emotional, quiet tale is told next in “Succession”, a story about Temeraire’s mother. After laying twin eggs, Qian has to make a difficult decision in order to prevent a rivalry between the princes in the Chinese imperial family. This one really tugged on my heartstrings, reading about a nervous parent fretting for the precarious wellbeing of her growing child, only to find out about a second dragonlet. Something that should have been a blessing becomes the source of even more heartbreak in this beautiful story about motherhood and sacrifice, and I think fans of the series will also enjoy the little insights we get into Temeraire’s origins.Without a doubt though, the crowning glory of this collection is “Dragons and Decorum”, and yes, the title should clue you in on the story’s inspiration, even without the mention of Elizabeth Bennet as the main protagonist. In this lovely, delightful mashup featuring a blend of the worlds of Temeraire and Jane Austen, Elizabeth is sent to the Aerial Corps as a young girl to become a dragon rider, returning home a few years later as Captain Bennett accompanied by her gabby Longwing named Wollstonecraft. Similar to the novel Heartstone by Elle Katharine White, this is a re-imagining of Pride and Prejudice with dragons, but what I loved about this story is that Elizabeth is the dragon rider instead of Mr. Darcy. It’s also quite a close retelling, though I did wish the story had ran a little longer because it was so cute and endearing. Novik also shows what a versatile writer she is, perfectly channeling Austen and the Regency-era style.And finally, we come to the Drabbles, a series of 100-word paragraph-long stories which I honestly could have done without. Like a collection of random notes or passages clipped out of a book, I can see writing them being a fun little exercise for Novik and pairing them with pieces of fan art was also a very unique and cool idea, but for the most part none of them made much of an impression.So, is Golden Age and Other Stories worth reading? If you’re a fan of Temeraire, the answer is absolutely yes. While the early stories and the ending Drabbles may be on the underwhelming side, I wouldn’t let that discourage you from seeking the real treasure found in the intervening pages. I would even go as far as to say standouts such as “Golden Age”, “Succession”, and “Dragons and Decorum” are must-reads, and happily, these three stories make up the bulk of this book. The world of Temeraire is rich and marvelous, and a collection like this reminds me that there’s always something more to discover.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and Subterranean Press for the opportunity to read this digital galley.I have been a fan of the Naomi Novik stories featuring Temeraire since I read the first sentence of the first book. When I saw this collection which seemed to be offering short stories to accompany the now finished series I literally almost broke my finger smushing it down on the "request" button. Naturally, since I already know the author's writing style I enjoyed this book. I don't know if that will b Thank you to NetGalley and Subterranean Press for the opportunity to read this digital galley.I have been a fan of the Naomi Novik stories featuring Temeraire since I read the first sentence of the first book. When I saw this collection which seemed to be offering short stories to accompany the now finished series I literally almost broke my finger smushing it down on the "request" button. Naturally, since I already know the author's writing style I enjoyed this book. I don't know if that will be said of anybody who isn't already a fan but who buys this book because they see dragons in the illustrations.There are six short stories at the beginning of the book, five are very short, one is much longer and, honestly, that is what saved the whole reading experience for me. The first is a Temeraire story which will only make sense to fans who have read the series and understand why dragons voting is such a big deal. The final short story is Novik's take on the Meryton Ball sequence from Pride and Prejudice except - naturally - from a totally different angle. I absolutely loved that!Following the stories are 26 Drabbles. Quite honestly, I had no idea what a Drabble was. Novik explains that it is a story in 100 words and she followed that rule - 100 words only in each story. Not only was I underwhelmed, I was totally underwhelmed. It seemed to me that these drabbles were notes made on cocktail napkins, on the backs of grocery lists, jotted down on used envelopes......whatever. They felt more like an exercise in how to organize thoughts for an idea which could be filled out later on. Pretty non-earthshattering stuff.This book seems to be available in print only - at least when it is first released. I'm sure the reason for that is so the artwork in the book can be shown to best advantage. I can see the art quite clearly on my Kindle, but lack all the color the print copy will have. I'm sure it will be stunning. So, if you have a collection of all the Temeraire stories you will definitely want to think about adding this new release to your collection. For me, "Dragons and Decorum" was a total delight and simply points out what a truly talented author Naomi Novik is.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I'd like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.This little anthology is sure to be a hit with anyone who's read and enjoyed the Temeraire series. With 6 short stories, followed by 26 drabbles of exactly 100 words each, and an accompanying piece of fanart for each tale, this collection revisits some of the best-loved characters from the series and explores some alternate universes along the way.I absolutely lo First of all, I'd like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.This little anthology is sure to be a hit with anyone who's read and enjoyed the Temeraire series. With 6 short stories, followed by 26 drabbles of exactly 100 words each, and an accompanying piece of fanart for each tale, this collection revisits some of the best-loved characters from the series and explores some alternate universes along the way.I absolutely loved all of the short stories, but three stood out for me in particular: Dawn of Battle gives us a glimpse into the life of a much younger Jane Roland, who cuts a no less formidable figure even so and reminded me just why she's such a fantastic character; the eponymous Golden Age, a reimagining of Laurence and Temeraire's first meeting, balances high seas adventure with the gentle friendship that characterised the entire series; and Dragons and Decorum, which was probably my favourite of the whole bunch, is literally the impossibly charming, utterly delightful Pride and Prejudice dragon AU that I never knew I needed. I absolutely couldn't put it down!The drabbles were a bit more of a mixed bag, but there were a few gems in there too - the Tharkay-centric one, in particular, was absolutely lovely. All in all, I would definitely recommend Golden Age and Other Stories to any Temeraire fan!
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  • Alysa H.
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful! And frankly, altogether better than some of the books in the main Temeraire series. Although the opening story didn't do much for me, and neither did some of the closing drabbles, all of the stories in between are gems. The longest -- which literally rewrites Jane Austen characters into the Temeraire storyworld -- is a bit self-indulgent but also amazing: the best kind of fan-fiction, really. I also enjoyed the story going into Jane Rowland's backstory, but my personal favorite may b Delightful! And frankly, altogether better than some of the books in the main Temeraire series. Although the opening story didn't do much for me, and neither did some of the closing drabbles, all of the stories in between are gems. The longest -- which literally rewrites Jane Austen characters into the Temeraire storyworld -- is a bit self-indulgent but also amazing: the best kind of fan-fiction, really. I also enjoyed the story going into Jane Rowland's backstory, but my personal favorite may be the AU "What if?" story where Laurence and Temeraire meet under different circumstances. This is even more clearly Novik writing fan-fiction of her own fiction, and it too is amazing.** I received a Review Copy of this book via NetGalley **
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys! I received this fantasy eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. So here be me honest musings . . .Ah the beautiful cover with both dragons and ships lured me in. Arrrr! The author, Naomi Novik, hooked me and had me super excited to read this collection of stories revisiting the dragon, Temeraire and his world. This collection did not disappoint. It contains 6 stories and 26 drabbles. What is a drabble? I’ll get to that . . .“Volly’s Cow”This is a very short st Ahoy there me mateys! I received this fantasy eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. So here be me honest musings . . .Ah the beautiful cover with both dragons and ships lured me in. Arrrr! The author, Naomi Novik, hooked me and had me super excited to read this collection of stories revisiting the dragon, Temeraire and his world. This collection did not disappoint. It contains 6 stories and 26 drabbles. What is a drabble? I’ll get to that . . .“Volly’s Cow”This is a very short story about Temeraire trying to obtain the vote of Volly. I am not quite clear on the whole voting plotline as I have yet to finish the whole Temeraire series but of course I like silly Volly and the story did entertain.“Planting Season”This story showcases John Wampanoag, an enterprising dragon trader. Apparently he shows up later in the Temeraire books. All I know is that this story was one of the highlights for me. This is a colonial-era story with John’s navigation of both Native American and European factions. Short yet sweet.“Dawn of Battle”This story involves Jane Roland before the Battle of the Nile and the destruction of L’Orient. Jane is a young captain trying to exert her influence on her male crew. I adored her relationship with Excidium. It is amazing that this story took place before the action of the battle and yet was exciting in its own right.“Golden Age”This fabulous story is a re-imaging of how Temeraire and Laurence meet. Temeraire, called Celeste in this incarnation, is washed up on the shore of a seemingly deserted island. The first part of the story is told from Celeste’s point of view about how he develops and what occurs on this island. The second half is from Laurence’s point of view. From battles at sea to fights with kraken to the burgeoning friendship of man and dragon, this one was a pure delight.“Succession”A lovely story that takes place in China and tells the story of Temeraire’s inception and the start to how his egg ends up meeting Laurence. I loved the viewpoint of Qian and her viewpoint of the Chinese politics. It shows such a different dragon culture from the European fighting forces centered one.“Dragons and Decorum”A Pride and Prejudice retelling with Elizabeth Bennett as a Captain with her own dragon. Amazing. ‘Nuff said.“Drabbles”Apparently a drabble according to the author is “a story of 100 words – and while there are many debates on how strictly this limit should be observed, for purposes of this collection I have kept to the exact number.” The collection contains 26 of them. These snippets were very interesting and well written but overall just left me wanting them to be longer. Perhaps these will be turned into longer stories in the future. Mulan with dragons anyone? Yes please.While I enjoyed this collection immensely, there was one flaw of the kindle edition – the artwork. It was black and white which I did not mind for the historical feel of it. But each image was so small and several were missing altogether. I wish the art could have been enlarged when clicking on it so I could have seen the full details. I am assuming that the hardback will have no such problems of course. So if ye like dragons in general and Temeraire specifically, then pick this collection up!Side note: the author’s website has larger versions of the artwork on it! Hooray! Reading by Amy Thompson is me favorite with Dragons in a Winter Clearing by Stephanie Mendoza being a close second. Okay but the cover art by Sandara Tang is awesome. That much wonderful dragon art . . . can’t complain. Arrrr!So lastly . . .Thank you Subterranean Press!Check out me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...
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  • Bookwraiths
    January 1, 1970
    I could not get interested in this collection. Probably because I'm not at all familiar with Novik's Temeraire series. I'm sure longtime fans will adore this book, as the stories here are about those characters and that world.
  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    A really fun collection of stories set in the Temeraire universe. The Pride and Prejudice mash-up is the longest and most detailed (and really delightful) but I have to confess my favorite story is the short bit of backstory on John Wampanoag, a dragon who shows up in the later Temeraire books. It says a whole lot, and wrenches a whole lot of heartstrings, in just a few words. ARC via netgalley, although I'll probably buy the book for completion's sake -- I own all the other Temeraire books.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Golden Age and Other Stories is a short story collection from Naomi Novik, all set in her Temeraire universe – set in the Napoleonic period, with the inclusion of sentient dragons. I’ve really enjoyed Novik’s efforts recently – her Uprooted, which I reviewed last year, was brilliant. So this collection had me quite excited as I went into it.The collection contains several short stories, and a set of ‘drabbles’, stories of exactly one hundred words. A *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*Golden Age and Other Stories is a short story collection from Naomi Novik, all set in her Temeraire universe – set in the Napoleonic period, with the inclusion of sentient dragons. I’ve really enjoyed Novik’s efforts recently – her Uprooted, which I reviewed last year, was brilliant. So this collection had me quite excited as I went into it.The collection contains several short stories, and a set of ‘drabbles’, stories of exactly one hundred words. All have accompanying art, which both sets the mood for the associated story and, to be honest, look rather nice on the page.The first story, Volly Gets a Cow is rather short, tracking Temeraire, the sentient dragon at the heart of the series, as he attempts to get the notoriously unfocused Volly to vote for a dragon member of parliament. Volly is uncooperative, mostly because his attention is focused on his own hunger, and the titular cow. There’s a warmth to this story, the gentle aggravation of Temeraire trying to nudge others into doing something they want to do. We only get quick strokes of Volly and his potential MP here – but enough that their personalities shine through; the dragon representative is a smidge arrogant and abrasive, Volly wooly-headed and, well, hungry. But it’s a cheerful comic tale, showcasing the sort of gentle warmth and humour that sits near the heart of the series, alongside more serious issues – that dragons should be politically represented is an interesting turn, and if it’s only lightly touched on here, still suggests an interesting larger tapestry of events at play.But it’s not all Temeraire – or if it is, sometimes in a different context. Planting Season for example shows us a dragon in the hinterlands of America, after the convulsions of the Revolution. Here, the dragons acts a bridge between the Native American and European cultures – shuttling goods from one to the other, and stepping between the cultures of both. It’s sympathetic and sharply observed, giving us people on both ends of the trade simply trying their best – and left me wondering how the counterfactual Americas were getting on after the fact; the policy of careful integration suggested here is intriguing, and Novik’s talent for making both colonial-era Boston and the Native American wider spaces feel colourful and alive is in full force.Then there’s Golden Age, which shows us an alternative meeting for Temeraire and his Captain – the latter sent out to investigate rumours of French piracy, the former, somewhat accidentally, the cause. The dialogue between Temeraire and the Captain here evoked something in the tradition of Aubrey Maturin; both coming to the table as equals, even if one is a naval officer, and the other a thirty-foot lizard which can breathe fire. Here, it seems like the theme is acceptance – as what would be Temeraire sleeps warmly on a beach, gathering treasure and food – and is shocked out of complacency by the arrival of a human with a loud voice, and a willingness to negotiate.There’s a sense in which several of the stories work better if you’re aware of the larger series; it works as a stand-alone collection, but the context from the wider series helps give it more depth. It was great to see some of the genesis of Roland, for example – a woman with a fine career ahead of her, a forceful personality if ever there was one. As presented, the story of a young woman’s growing into her Captaincy of a dragon, refusing to back down into social expectations, and leading her crew by strength of will and main courage is inspiring and delightful. Knowing what she will go on to do in the broader series gives it the narrative a more complex (but no less pleasant) flavour.One story that works as a genuine standalone, and which I thought was the highlight of the collection, was Dragons and Decorum. Blending the fictional world of Temeraire with that of Austen, it gives us an Elizabeth Bennett who is a naval officer, leading a dragon crew. Novik scrupulously matches Austen’s prose style, but injects her own energy and enthusiasm. Watching an Elizabeth Bennet with agency approach a nervous Darcy, both still constrained by the customs of manners embedded in society of the period – well, it’s an absolute delight. I laughed, several times, and was transported by the evident genuine emotion growing between the two. Bennett is an active participant here, and all the better for it. If other stories in the collection are love letters to fans, then I’d say this one is a paean to the regency novel genre – one which plays with the conventions of that genre, and produces a fine alloy as a consequence.The drabbles are fun, leaping across time and space equally, and providing more insight into the Temerire universe. They’re like short mood paintings, and after the main repast that is the collection, make an excellent dessert.Is it worth buying? Well, if you’re a fan of Temeraire, this may be the last fiction available in that universe. It’s a diverse collection of stories, and there’s something for every fan here – it’ll probably reward your time. If you’ve never read the series before, I’d say it works as a stand alone – but you owe it to yourself to give the other books a try, as they’ll make this collection a richer, more complex experience.
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  • Matthew Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic collection of short stories set in the world of Temeraire. Full review: https://booksmjb.blogspot.com/2017/07...
  • MB (What she read)
    January 1, 1970
    As I read each of the Temeraire books upon publication (way back when), I found that I have only a very general remembrance of most of these characters and their backstories. This hindered my enjoyment.So...unless you have a much better memory than myself, I would recommend this only for fans of the series and add a recommendation that it be read only after a recent series re-read for full enjoyment potential.The fan art at the chapter headings makes for a nice bonus.The Jane Austen tribute was As I read each of the Temeraire books upon publication (way back when), I found that I have only a very general remembrance of most of these characters and their backstories. This hindered my enjoyment.So...unless you have a much better memory than myself, I would recommend this only for fans of the series and add a recommendation that it be read only after a recent series re-read for full enjoyment potential.The fan art at the chapter headings makes for a nice bonus.The Jane Austen tribute was fun. The drabbles were annoying.
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  • Kiwi Carlisle
    January 1, 1970
    This is perfect for those of us who haven't had enough of Temeraire's world yet. The short stories explore a wide range of possibilities and answer some interesting questions. One of the stories is among the funniest Jane Austen parodies I've ever read. Another seems to be set in yet another alternate universe. As usual, they are charming and well thought out.
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  • Susana Zemlyakova
    January 1, 1970
    Golden Age and Other Stories is a lovely collection of illustrations, short stories and drabbles featuring characters from the Temeraire canon as well as the author's own musings. I particularly enjoyed seeing Jane again and Laurence's tale before the hatching of Temeraire. The drabbles were interesting but did not diminish my appreciation of the collection all that much. However, the jewel in this collection is Novik's interpretation of Pride and Prejudice. Imagine a no-nonsense Lizzie and a su Golden Age and Other Stories is a lovely collection of illustrations, short stories and drabbles featuring characters from the Temeraire canon as well as the author's own musings. I particularly enjoyed seeing Jane again and Laurence's tale before the hatching of Temeraire. The drabbles were interesting but did not diminish my appreciation of the collection all that much. However, the jewel in this collection is Novik's interpretation of Pride and Prejudice. Imagine a no-nonsense Lizzie and a surly Darcy - but with dragons. This alone is a reason to order this book. "You mercenary creature. Are these the qualities which have won him your pardon?" Novik ability to capture the period really stands out in this 50 or so page short story. I believe Ms Austen would have been pleased. To that end, I would love another regency book if you have the time! You capture that era so effortlessly and if it happens to be a full interpretation of another of Austen's works, I would not complain!If you enjoyed the Temeraire series be sure to grab this beautifully illustrated collection and also read Novik's standalone novel, Uprooted! I received an ARC courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher for an honest review. Thank you so much the opportunity!
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    Full disclosure: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.This is basically Naomi Novik writing fan-fiction of her own series. My absolute favorite story in this bunch was Golden Age, which is an alternate universe meeting between Laurence and Temeraire. It was utterly delightful and I kind of love it even more than the original, canon meeting in His Majesty's Dragon. My second favorite story was Dragons and Decorum, which can be summarized as Pride and Pre Full disclosure: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.This is basically Naomi Novik writing fan-fiction of her own series. My absolute favorite story in this bunch was Golden Age, which is an alternate universe meeting between Laurence and Temeraire. It was utterly delightful and I kind of love it even more than the original, canon meeting in His Majesty's Dragon. My second favorite story was Dragons and Decorum, which can be summarized as Pride and Prejudice and Dragons. Novik does that premise justice.As for all the other, shorter bits, I really liked the story with John Wampanoag and the ones that gave Jane Roland more backstory. I felt like the drabbles at the end were a little hit or miss. Some offered interesting glimpses into the world and some didn't feel like they had enough substance.This book should have nice artwork for each story. I couldn't see it terribly well on the Kindle version I received from NetGalley, but I imagine the print version will be beautiful.
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  • Tzu-Mainn Chen
    January 1, 1970
    "Golden Age and Other Stories" has author Naomi Novik step back into her wonderful alternate history of men and dragons... except she doesn't so much step back into that world, as gently dip a toe into it. This collection of short stories and drabbles (extremely short narratives of 100 words) feel more like Novik's idle thoughts regarding her creation. Most are short on plot and resolution; reading these feels like reading a single scene out of a far longer play.The exception is "Dragons and Dec "Golden Age and Other Stories" has author Naomi Novik step back into her wonderful alternate history of men and dragons... except she doesn't so much step back into that world, as gently dip a toe into it. This collection of short stories and drabbles (extremely short narratives of 100 words) feel more like Novik's idle thoughts regarding her creation. Most are short on plot and resolution; reading these feels like reading a single scene out of a far longer play.The exception is "Dragons and Decorum," a pastiche of "Pride and Prejudice." This story is both complete and enjoyable, if not entirely satisfying due to the inevitable nature of the plot. The latter quality makes the story feel a bit inconsequential, without the nation-changing events that gave the main series novels such weight.Nevertheless - dragons! "Golden Age and Other Stories" may not stick in my mind, but a few enjoyable hours in the presence of such magnificent beasts is nothing to scoff at.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Inspired by fan art, Novik has produced a series of short (sometimes extremely short) stories set in her Temeraire universe. The briefest tales, which bookend the collection, are forgettable, but the five in the middle are all well worthwhile. They fill in back story for secondary characters, illuminate other nations' relationships with dragons, and examine alternate possibilities. The standout entry is “Dragons and Decorum,” a reimagining of Pride and Prejudice if Elizabeth Bennet were burdened Inspired by fan art, Novik has produced a series of short (sometimes extremely short) stories set in her Temeraire universe. The briefest tales, which bookend the collection, are forgettable, but the five in the middle are all well worthwhile. They fill in back story for secondary characters, illuminate other nations' relationships with dragons, and examine alternate possibilities. The standout entry is “Dragons and Decorum,” a reimagining of Pride and Prejudice if Elizabeth Bennet were burdened with a highly opinionated dragon. A charming love letter to the series and its fans. Thanks, Netgalley.
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  • Iris Chacon
    January 1, 1970
    Lovers of Naomi Novik's Temeraire series will delight in this anthology of her short stories told from the dragons' points of view. Whether getting to know a new rider or learning how to practice piracy on the high seas, the dragons tell their tales with refreshing innocence and candor. Expect to be charmed by the personalities in each story, the creative imagination of Novik, and the exciting world of the British Navy in an alternate reality.Golden Age and Other Stories, by Naomi Novik, is sche Lovers of Naomi Novik's Temeraire series will delight in this anthology of her short stories told from the dragons' points of view. Whether getting to know a new rider or learning how to practice piracy on the high seas, the dragons tell their tales with refreshing innocence and candor. Expect to be charmed by the personalities in each story, the creative imagination of Novik, and the exciting world of the British Navy in an alternate reality.Golden Age and Other Stories, by Naomi Novik, is scheduled for release on August 31, 2017, and is currently available for pre-order at Amazon.com.
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    A little less than meets the eye, as there are but six stories all told, padded out with a handful of 100-word "drabbles." The actual stories are good, with "Dawn of Battle" and the title story at the top and Novik's spin on Pride and Prejudice, "Dragons and Decorum" a labored but amusing comedy of manners. The art varies wildly in quality, but the various dragons are properly draconic.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this volume of short stories just made me remember how much fun it was to read all of the other books in this series (as well as Novik's standalone). She writes such interesting stories and you get sucked right in. The story starring the characters from Jane Austen was especially enticing and the small 100 word stories had an appeal I wasn't expecting. The one where Temeraire is in Queen Victoria's Jubilee parade was especially poignant. I can't wait for whatever Naomi Novik writes next Reading this volume of short stories just made me remember how much fun it was to read all of the other books in this series (as well as Novik's standalone). She writes such interesting stories and you get sucked right in. The story starring the characters from Jane Austen was especially enticing and the small 100 word stories had an appeal I wasn't expecting. The one where Temeraire is in Queen Victoria's Jubilee parade was especially poignant. I can't wait for whatever Naomi Novik writes next.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This was WONDERFUL. I loved the stories, especially "Golden Age" and "Dragons and Decorum." Also, it was really cool of Naomi Novik to feature so much fan art. I know that she is a fan fic author from way back and it's fantastic to see her interacting with fandom this way. Highly recommended for fans of her excellent Temeraire series.
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  • Samuel Blondahl
    January 1, 1970
    Fun, interesting stories, a pleasure to read, and a jewel of my bookshelf. I am very glad I picked up the limited Ed. If you're new to the series, don't start here though, look for Temeraire first and carry on from there.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Well, that didn't take long. This book was surely worth the wait to explore beloved side characters, although natch I will always say 'would've liked more Tharkay'. The drabbles were hit or miss but that's how I usually feel about drabbles in general.
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  • Ticklish Owl
    January 1, 1970
    ★★★★☆ Volly’s Cow (Temeraire)★★★★☆ Planting Season★★★★★ Dawn of Battle★★★★☆ Golden Age★★★★☆ Succession★★★★☆ Dragons and Decorum★★★★☆ Drabbles
  • Carol Lynch
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it, something for everyone, be you into fantasy, history, British naval stores or even Pride & Prejudice.
  • Evy
    January 1, 1970
    3.5
  • Lark of The Bookwyrm's Hoard
    January 1, 1970
    4 stars for some of the stories in particular: "Golden Age," "Dawn of Battle," and "Dragons and Decorum." Full review to come.
  • Foggygirl
    January 1, 1970
    a must have for any fan of Naomi Novik's dragon series.
  • Iryna Khymych
    January 1, 1970
    [Disclaimer: I received a free e-copy ARC of this book from NetGalley. Thank you to the publishers!]4.5 starsWhat a wonderful collection of 7 short stories, all illustrated! I absolutely love how Novik writes dragons, they're like spoiled cats, very self-assured and witty. I also love how Novik incorporates a lot of different cultures into her stories - her stories are always varied and diverse. My absolute favorite story was 'Dragons and Decorum' which is a delightful retelling of Pride and Pre [Disclaimer: I received a free e-copy ARC of this book from NetGalley. Thank you to the publishers!]4.5 starsWhat a wonderful collection of 7 short stories, all illustrated! I absolutely love how Novik writes dragons, they're like spoiled cats, very self-assured and witty. I also love how Novik incorporates a lot of different cultures into her stories - her stories are always varied and diverse. My absolute favorite story was 'Dragons and Decorum' which is a delightful retelling of Pride and Prejudice with Lizy as an aviation Captian with her own dragon. Novik imitated Austen's writing style to the T, it was just as playful, witty and delightful as the original! If you liked The Temeraire Series - these short stories will delight you!
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  • Kris Sellgren
    January 1, 1970
    This is an utterly delightful collection of stories about dragons, set in the same universe as Naomi Novik's Temeraire series. Some stories feature Temeraire and Laurence, the dragon and human heroes of that series; others center on other characters, like Jane, Emily, Demane, or Tharkay. Each short story or drabble (100 words long) is accompanied by wonderful artwork by a different artist, which I loved. The best story in the collection is "Dragons and Decorum", about aviator Elizabeth Bennet, a This is an utterly delightful collection of stories about dragons, set in the same universe as Naomi Novik's Temeraire series. Some stories feature Temeraire and Laurence, the dragon and human heroes of that series; others center on other characters, like Jane, Emily, Demane, or Tharkay. Each short story or drabble (100 words long) is accompanied by wonderful artwork by a different artist, which I loved. The best story in the collection is "Dragons and Decorum", about aviator Elizabeth Bennet, and her encounters with a certain Mr. Darcy! It is funny and cleverly written. The title story is also excellent, about Laurence in his navy days encountering a feral dragon turned pirate in the Caribbean. I highly recommend this collection to any fan of dragons.
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