The Ghosts of Galway
Jack Taylor is recovering from a mistaken medical diagnosis and a failed suicide attempt. In need of money, and with former cop on his resume, Jack has been hired as a night-shift security guard. But his Ukrainian boss has Jack in mind for some off-the-books work. He wants Jack to find what some claim to be the first true book of heresy, The Red Book, currently in the possession of a rogue priest who is hiding out in Galway after fleeing a position at the Vatican. Despite Jack's distaste for priests of any stripe, the money is too good to turn down. Em, the many-faced woman who has had a vise on Jack's heart and mind for the past two years, reappears and turns out to be entangled with the story of The Red Book, too, leading Jack down ever more mysterious and lethal pathways. It seems all sides are angling for a piece of Jack Taylor, but as The Ghosts of Galway twists toward a violent end, he is increasingly plagued by ghosts--by the disposable and disposed of in a city filled with as much darkness as the deepest corners of Jack's own mind.

The Ghosts of Galway Details

TitleThe Ghosts of Galway
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 7th, 2017
PublisherMysterious Press
ISBN-139780802127334
Rating
GenreMystery, European Literature, Irish Literature, Crime, Fiction, Thriller

The Ghosts of Galway Review

  • Karl
    January 1, 1970
    You can look it up.According to a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture 41,700,000 cows and calves were killed for food in the year 2000, as well as 115,200,000 pigs and 4,300,000 sheep, for a total of 161,200,000. These statistics are also expected to continue to rise. We have no idea how many cows, pigs and sheep committed suicide. These numbers do not include the rest of the world’s slaughter rate.There are some animal casualties in Ken Bruen’s book “The Ghosts of Galway”. They do no You can look it up.According to a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture 41,700,000 cows and calves were killed for food in the year 2000, as well as 115,200,000 pigs and 4,300,000 sheep, for a total of 161,200,000. These statistics are also expected to continue to rise. We have no idea how many cows, pigs and sheep committed suicide. These numbers do not include the rest of the world’s slaughter rate.There are some animal casualties in Ken Bruen’s book “The Ghosts of Galway”. They do not succumb to death due to their desire to become someone’s food or due to suicide. Be warned. A number of humans also forfeit their lives.Jack Taylor, in this the thirteenth installment slogs on. He has cut back onHis drinking.Human involvement.Wearing his Guarda coat.Fighting. After recovering from events in the previous book, Jack becomes a security guard, mainly so he can have time to read books, and continue his recovery. His employer though has loftier plans for Jack.And Jack needs the money.There are some great moments in this book includingHumorPathosLoveDeathAnd the return of characters from previous books in the series. The book reads rather quickly due to Mr. Bruen’s unique writing style,It is best to read this series in sequence.
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    Jack Taylor was once a garda, was great friends with a fellow Garda, Ridge, and once had a great deal of pride. No more! Now he is broken down in body and spirit, uses profanity prodigiously, and freely imbibes his beloved Jameson's and pints despite doctors warning his health was greatly as risk. Yet, he is one of the most interesting characters in fiction. He is an enigma, a man that violence seems to attract, a lover of books, all kinds. He has a very conflicted view of the church,even though Jack Taylor was once a garda, was great friends with a fellow Garda, Ridge, and once had a great deal of pride. No more! Now he is broken down in body and spirit, uses profanity prodigiously, and freely imbibes his beloved Jameson's and pints despite doctors warning his health was greatly as risk. Yet, he is one of the most interesting characters in fiction. He is an enigma, a man that violence seems to attract, a lover of books, all kinds. He has a very conflicted view of the church,even though one of his best friends, those he has left, is a nun. Never, never expect a straightforward plot. Instead expect quotes, from books, poetry and movies, expect fragments, snippets of Jack's thinking, Jack's actions. Expect current affairs, such as Trump, and Brexit thrown into the mix to give one a basis for time placement. I find these highly entertaining, puzzling and most inventive. I would really like a glimpse into Ken Bruen's mind and imagination.Not a good start to the series, one really needs to read this from the beginning. They can be challenging, but are always unique. Yes, there is violence, but there is also unexpected kindnesses. Jack does have a great sense of loyalty, cannot forget his mistakes of the past, is often dismissive, unkind, a conflicted contradiction of all the things that make us human. Some parts will make you smile, some cringe, but I love these books, love this character. Wonder what that says about me?ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    After the last book in this series, readers were left wondering if ex-Gardaí Jack Taylor had finally met his match. Jack’s always been his own worst enemy & it looked like years of hard living had finally caught up with him. But very little in Jack’s life ever turns out as planned which is good news for us. He’s back, with dog Storm supervising his recovery.In the wake of his reprieve, Jack decides to take a stab at “normal” & gets a job as a security guard. But it’s not long before he’s After the last book in this series, readers were left wondering if ex-Gardaí Jack Taylor had finally met his match. Jack’s always been his own worst enemy & it looked like years of hard living had finally caught up with him. But very little in Jack’s life ever turns out as planned which is good news for us. He’s back, with dog Storm supervising his recovery.In the wake of his reprieve, Jack decides to take a stab at “normal” & gets a job as a security guard. But it’s not long before he’s approached by a man offering a whack of cash for a simple job. He’s looking for “The Red Book”, a controversial 9th century text that blasts “The Book of Kells”. Until recently it was hidden at the Vatican. Then a young priest snatched it & ran & rumour has it he’s holed up in Galway. Jack has zero interest in dealing with any clergy but could really use a good payday. Unfortunately, it doesn’t go as planned…again.Then things get weird(er). Someone is leaving animal carcasses in Eyre Square along with cryptic messages. But this is Galway. If you’re aiming for public shock and/or outrage, you’ll have to get in line behind politicians & those responsible for the water tax. Jack’s life is further complicated by the return of Emerald, the young woman who first got his attention in Green Hell. Em’s always been unstable to say the least. But her tenuous grip on sanity has finally snapped & all her personalities are coming out to play. And some of them seem remarkably well informed about the book Jack is looking for.As usual, the story is a combination of Jack’s activities & his thoughts on everything from the state of Irish politics to seeing Trump hug Sarah Palin on TV (“to see them embrace in Iowa was to see ignorance & prejudice entwined”.) Social commentary is delivered with his trademark black humour & profanity. But his recent brush with mortality has revealed a more reflective side & we catch glimpses of a lonely man taking a hard look at his life. Quotes from individuals & literature are randomly inserted throughout the book, adding to the author’s stream of consciousness style of prose.The first half almost lulls you as several plot lines unfold & more characters take the field. Maybe that’s why a sudden act of violence at that point comes as such a shock. The story takes a much darker & deadly serious turn. You realize there’s a showdown coming & some of these characters will not survive. It’s a tough read at times but thinking back over the last couple of books, it feels inevitable & I should have seen it coming.This is a book for true fans of the series & not one I would recommend as a starting point for a couple of reasons. First, Bruen has a distinctive style of prose that becomes looser & less linear as the series progresses. Second, there is a tremendous amount of back story that informs each book & makes for a richer reading experience if read in order.The ending is poignant yet oddly cathartic & once again I’m wondering where Jack will turn up next. Just as an aside, two thumbs up to those responsible for the striking cover art.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Ghosts of Galway is the thirteenth book in Bruen's series. It is a gritty, misty tale that often slips into stream-of-consciousness and reminisces. I was not particularly taken with this novel, but that may be the problem with starting a series after the first dozen books and not knowing the background of the characters. I would also note that it is surprisingly different than the Max & Angela series written with Jason Starr and one should not read this expecting anything like that series.
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    This book was far too short! I'm just going to have to read the previous two and any other works to enjoy more of this author. So another new author to me and another back catalogue to be added to the TBR pile.It just flows so well. The writing is different to many books I've read so far with it's lyrical style and breaking sentencesDownLikeThisJack, is an ex-Garda turned PI. At least I think he is, it's never worded that way. More that Jack is known for getting things done, finding lost items This book was far too short! I'm just going to have to read the previous two and any other works to enjoy more of this author. So another new author to me and another back catalogue to be added to the TBR pile.It just flows so well. The writing is different to many books I've read so far with it's lyrical style and breaking sentencesDownLikeThisJack, is an ex-Garda turned PI. At least I think he is, it's never worded that way. More that Jack is known for getting things done, finding lost items and generally getting beaten up (and kicking the bad guys too). There's such a mix of characters in here: Ukrainian gangsters that ended up having a smaller part that at first thought, various priests and a femme fatale that plays every side but especially her ownThe whole thing is a wild ride, really enjoyable and I look forward to more.Free arc from netgalley
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars This is not my favorite book but it moves at a rapid rate and keeps your attention throughout. The staccato writing was difficult for me to adjust to but I did love all the literary allusions. “It’s not that the Irish are cynical. It’s simply that they have a wonderful lack of respect for everything and everybody.” – Brendan Behan. This certainly sums up Taylor. A disgraced former garda with an alcohol problem gets a security job. He is hired to find a book that could be the basis for 3.5 stars This is not my favorite book but it moves at a rapid rate and keeps your attention throughout. The staccato writing was difficult for me to adjust to but I did love all the literary allusions. “It’s not that the Irish are cynical. It’s simply that they have a wonderful lack of respect for everything and everybody.” – Brendan Behan. This certainly sums up Taylor. A disgraced former garda with an alcohol problem gets a security job. He is hired to find a book that could be the basis for an Irish Church of Scientology. I don't know why the Irish need their own. I would happily give them the American version. On the search, he runs into some truly despicable people including an old lover, Emerald, who is a really a piece of work. I never once understood his attraction for her. Taylor is not a likable character and I have no expectation that he will change one iota or become someone to root for. I certainly did not. He has so few people who care about him and I can understand why. I really don't want to spend time with him and I probably won't again. If you like fast paced action, this could be the book for you. Thank you Net Galley for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Judy Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley, Grove Atlantic and Mysterious Press for the opportunity to read a digital galley of this novel.I did what most followers of a certain author will tell you not to do. I began reading Ken Bruen with book thirteen in this series featuring Jack Taylor. And I survived. Actually, not just survived but thrived. Yes, the writing is dark. Everything about this book is dark and at times difficult to read. Jack has gone through some very bad times with some of it his own fault but Many thanks to NetGalley, Grove Atlantic and Mysterious Press for the opportunity to read a digital galley of this novel.I did what most followers of a certain author will tell you not to do. I began reading Ken Bruen with book thirteen in this series featuring Jack Taylor. And I survived. Actually, not just survived but thrived. Yes, the writing is dark. Everything about this book is dark and at times difficult to read. Jack has gone through some very bad times with some of it his own fault but certainly not all of it. At the beginning of this story he has just learned that he is part of a huge scandal in the Irish medical system because of dire diagnosis errors. He's not in the best of health, but he's not about to die from any of his health issues. So it's back to the cigarettes and the booze but he has learned that moderation won't kill him so Jack Taylor tries to live like most people do. He gets a job as a security guard by fudging a little on his resume and spends time reading everything that catches his interest, taking care of his dog, going to his many favorite pubs and working his job. He's not on the job long before his employer asks to see him and takes him off the clock to do a private job for him. It all starts going pretty horribly wrong from there.Since this was my first book by this author it took me just a little while before I became comfortable with his writing style; after that the pages of the book seemed to fly by. If you've not read a Jack Taylor book before it is completely true to the environment Jack lives in so there is profanity all over the place. Irish politics play a huge part in the atmosphere, but the political references aren't confined to Ireland. The characters who return from previous novels have deep development, but even a newbie such as I could catch on to the feelings and atmosphere very quickly. Many of the things that take place in this story surprised me because the author has the courage to let them happen. Where the story goes from here, I don't know, and I'm still absorbing what I read so it will take a little time to decide if I want to check out the next book. I have to admit, though, I am intrigued.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this from the publisher through NetGalley to review.THE GHOSTS OF GALWAY by Ken Bruen is the 13th book in the Jack Taylor series, and finds Jack working as a security guard, and bored to tears until he gets a call from the big boss to look into the disappearance of a valuable book belonging to the church and allegedly stolen by a priest named Frank Miller, who is also missing. Jack has an acquaintance named Emily, a Goth girl who’s associated with the color emerald green and I received a copy of this from the publisher through NetGalley to review.THE GHOSTS OF GALWAY by Ken Bruen is the 13th book in the Jack Taylor series, and finds Jack working as a security guard, and bored to tears until he gets a call from the big boss to look into the disappearance of a valuable book belonging to the church and allegedly stolen by a priest named Frank Miller, who is also missing. Jack has an acquaintance named Emily, a Goth girl who’s associated with the color emerald green and is quite disturbing, seemingly having multiple personalities. Emily is an interesting character, and seems to have an unusual fixation on Jack (in a way most unhealthy for Jack), and becomes involved in Jack’s attempts to recover the book and locate the priest.Apparently an old secret group known as “ The Ghosts of Galway” could be involved, and soon things become dangerous for all involved in the case, including Jack’s friend/nemesis Ridge from the guards.Several hilarious quotes and thoughts by Jack make this book very entertaining, and Ken Bruen has done a wonderful job of making an older Jack still relevant, part of the success of this is Jack’s ability to make fun of himself as well as others with no holds barred, even or especially when it involves the church.4 stars.
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  • Alan Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    “It’s not that the Irish are cynical. It’s simply that they have a wonderful lack of respect for everything and everybody.” – Brendan BehanJack Taylor returns in “The Ghosts of Galway” with the “lack of respect” to which author Ken Bruen alludes in his Behan quote, but also with a healthy dose of cynicism. The all-weather Garda coat and the hurley return too along with “newish 501s, and the scuffed Doc Martins. You never knew when you might need to kick someone in the face.” And, as always, kick “It’s not that the Irish are cynical. It’s simply that they have a wonderful lack of respect for everything and everybody.” – Brendan BehanJack Taylor returns in “The Ghosts of Galway” with the “lack of respect” to which author Ken Bruen alludes in his Behan quote, but also with a healthy dose of cynicism. The all-weather Garda coat and the hurley return too along with “newish 501s, and the scuffed Doc Martins. You never knew when you might need to kick someone in the face.” And, as always, kicking is only the beginning of the violence meted out, and suffered, by Jack as the story proceeds and he deals with a strangely named Ukrainian; a Ron Hubbard wannabe and his enforcers; dead animals being dumped in Eyre Square; a girl with an imaginary brother; his former best friend, and now sworn enemy, Garda Ridge; and, most troubling, the return of “Emily and her diffuse weirdness” who made Taylor’s life such a “Green Hell” in his last outing. As Jack muses, “…a thriller writer would throw out all these strands and then, presto, wrap them all up with a rugged hero, battered but unbowed, heading into an award-winning future.”Of course, Jack Taylor, often battered, is not the traditional ‘rugged hero’ but then Ken Bruen is anything but a typical ‘thriller writer’…. There really is nothing like a Ken Bruen novel – the lyrical, poetic prose; the wry commentaries on current affairs (this time the 2016 deaths of musical heroes, the rise of Trump and Brexit; water charges…); the humour in the darkest of dark noir; the unique way he uses language, not only in the words he chooses to use but alsoTheWayBruenPutsWords On ThePageNo other novels read like Ken Bruen’s. Brutal realism collides with stream of consciousness surrealism, commentary on the Kardasians with extreme bloody violence. The dialogue is rhythmic and musical… And profane.For avenging angel Jack Taylor there is little redemption but, for the reader, there are few experiences to rival these books. I couldn’t put this down. Said,“I can’t put this down.”Unfortunately, it was over far too quickly. “The Ghosts of Galway” is not published until November and I thank Mysterious Press and NetGalley for the early review copy and look forward to doing it all again on publication date.
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  •  Natasa
    January 1, 1970
    The book The Ghosts of Galway is a sequel to Jack Taylor's series. If, like me, you have not read the previous twelve books, you will need some time to get used to some of it's special features. For example, Ken Bruen writes in a pretty bare style, often using elliptical sentences, which deprive them of all redundancy. And yet, he left himself plenty of room to cover various actual issues (Brexit, ISIS, Trump, Kardashian Family, Prince and Bowie's Death, Terrorist Attacks in Bataclan Hall etc.), The book The Ghosts of Galway is a sequel to Jack Taylor's series. If, like me, you have not read the previous twelve books, you will need some time to get used to some of it's special features. For example, Ken Bruen writes in a pretty bare style, often using elliptical sentences, which deprive them of all redundancy. And yet, he left himself plenty of room to cover various actual issues (Brexit, ISIS, Trump, Kardashian Family, Prince and Bowie's Death, Terrorist Attacks in Bataclan Hall etc.), as well as for mentioning various literary and television titles, clarifying the Irish mentality and much more. Although it looks like a very interesting style, it is much more interesting in theory than in practice. But I leave the possibility that it may just take a little longer to fit with this kind of writing so that you can freely immerse yourself in the action. Still, I admit, I did not quite succeed to do that this time.In the book, of course, we find the main character of the series, Jack Taylor, in a rather unmanageable situation. Jack is recovering from the wrong medical diagnosis, as well as the unsuccessful attempt of suicide. As a former cop he gets a job of a night guard without much effort. He believes the job is indefatigably boring, but necessary. His boss's offering to find The Red Book, a heretic book kept by the Vatican as a great secret, until Frank Miller, the ex-priest stole it. Jack, of course, accepts the offered job and thus enters a rather complex case involving The Galway Ghosts, some kind of suspicious sect, a multitude of bad guys, but also some old Jack's „friends“, like the odd girl Em.Jack Taylor is a typical anti-hero, so it's not surprising that it's pretty difficult to identify with him. Jack has a weird but amusing sense of humor, and a bit of that famous Irish charm, which I have to admit, I hoped to see to a greater extent in this book. Although we come across stories of different relationships from the past, it seems that Jack has no real friends, and love, same as any other emotion similar to that, are almost non-existent. The most emotional relationships are those with the puppy that follows him and sister Maeve who he occasionally visits.If Jack Taylor is an anti-hero (and he is), I really do not know what to say about Em. Emily. Emerald. First of all, her relationship with Jack is pretty unclear and all the time it's somewhere between love and hate. Em is some kind of Marvel's female villains or at least that's what I imagine her to be like. She is familiar with everything and leaves her mark everywhere, she is also completely dehumanized and does not follow any rules of common sense and logic. To the very end, she remains a complete enigma.In short, The Ghosts of Galway is a thriller like none you read before. You will not find too many redundant descriptions in it, and you will need to invest a lot of effort to understand the action or link the roles of particular characters. And it seems that's what Ken Bruen wants and what his fans like. Before the ending there was a big pile of dead bodies, which is not strange for such literature, and Bruen resolved them with such simplicity that I was astonished.Although I can understand why Bruen's series of novels about Jack Taylor has a large number of fans, I was not completely delighted to read this one. I leave the possibility that it's difficult to understand the author's style when you start from the thirteenth book from the series, but it will take a long time for me to decide to prove that theorem and read the other books. Still, I have to admit, as I look at everything I have noticed and wrote about Bruen's style, I reveal a new dimension of the book I've just read. I'm still far from giving a good grade, but maybe a bit closer to understanding what's so appealing in Jack Taylor's series.
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  • E.P.
    January 1, 1970
    "A failed suicide is a sad, sad *****"So begins "The Ghosts of Galway," dropping the reader right into the action, as Jack Taylor, former Garda member and failed suicide, ends up, not kinder or wiser, but as a security guard, which he calls "Suicide by boredom." Only things don't stay boring long. Soon Jack has been yanked from his relaxing tedium as a security guard and sent off to find the Red Book, a possibly real, possibly fake relation to the Book of Kells. And while he's haring off after t "A failed suicide is a sad, sad *****"So begins "The Ghosts of Galway," dropping the reader right into the action, as Jack Taylor, former Garda member and failed suicide, ends up, not kinder or wiser, but as a security guard, which he calls "Suicide by boredom." Only things don't stay boring long. Soon Jack has been yanked from his relaxing tedium as a security guard and sent off to find the Red Book, a possibly real, possibly fake relation to the Book of Kells. And while he's haring off after the book, dead animals keep turning up in the town square, and there're rumors that it's the work of ghosts.I haven't read any of the previous books in the series, so I wasn't completely up to speed with what was going on with the characters beforehand, but essentially Jack Taylor's life has been on a downward spiral for some time, which makes him just the kind of bitter, life-hardened cynic you need as a PI-ish sort of character in a detective novel. The fact that the action takes place in small-town Galway, rather than the mean streets of Boston or Chicago, only enhances the effect. People can be just as miserable and desperate in the green and beautiful Irish countryside as they can anywhere else.Potential readers should be aware that the writing style is unorthodox and the language is salty, to say the least. In his ruminations Jack's thoughts come out as Mayakovsky-esque ladder and column free verse, e.g.:Emily Em Emerald A goth-like crazed girl who had blasted into my life two years ago and left me Bewildered Burned Bewitched.So if that's the kind of fancy dancing you disapprove of, you might just want to move on. However, while it could be an affectation, it works here, graphically representing Jack's fragmented thought processes, liberally sprinkled, in the best Irish tradition, with the f-word and other strong phrases. Readers will probably either like it or hate it, but it certainly stands out.As for the plot itself, it's full of so much crazy action I won't even attempt to describe any more than I already have, other than to say that the body count is high. While not super-gory, this is not a novel for fans of cozy mysteries where everyone gets off with nothing more than a little scare. By the end of the book, the character list is significantly depleted, and Galway is filled with even more ghosts than before. All in all, an unusual but highly compelling hardboiled detective novel that is likely to polarize readers into "love it" or "hate it" camps.My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    The Ghosts of Galway marks Jack Taylor's return from the dead. The last book ended with a suicide attempt, which apparently was not successful. With each book Jack is a little worse for the wear, but with this new entry it seems he has been transported into a different decade. Instead of lists of books Jack has read, The Ghosts of Galway has a list of mountaineering movies he has watched. (Apparently Jack now likes to binge watch box sets). Trump is mentioned a few times but not Thatcher. Jack l The Ghosts of Galway marks Jack Taylor's return from the dead. The last book ended with a suicide attempt, which apparently was not successful. With each book Jack is a little worse for the wear, but with this new entry it seems he has been transported into a different decade. Instead of lists of books Jack has read, The Ghosts of Galway has a list of mountaineering movies he has watched. (Apparently Jack now likes to binge watch box sets). Trump is mentioned a few times but not Thatcher. Jack limits his cigarettes to five a day, and doesn't get in near as many fights.As usual with the Jack Taylor books, it takes a while for the main plot to get going. This one involves a small group of wanna be anarchists terrorizing the town by leaving animal carcasses around. Long time fans of the series will be rewarded with appearances by a few of the regular characters, but sadly they all seem to be dying off and Emerald is taking a place in the regular cast.Ken Bruen is one of my favorite authors and I have read all the Jack Taylor books. I must admit that this book was not my favorite - Jack drags the reader kicking and screaming into modern times. However, Bruen's writing is poetry as always, and I would buy a box of cereal to read the back if he wrote it.Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an advanced copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mike Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved it. If your a Jack Taylor fan, you will not be disappointed in this one! Bruen brings back all the dark humor and angst of the great Jack Taylor. Wont spoil anything! But this one finds Jack having to fight through a number of painful experiences, and he does so with that quick dark wit. loved it, easy five stars....just love reading this guys books. Keep the coming please Ken Bruen.Thanks to the publishers for allowing me to read and review this book early.
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  • Luscinnia
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to NetGalley and Grove Atlantic for granting me the opportunity to read this e- book as an advance reading copy.It was, admittedly, the cover that first piqued my interest. The description sounded like something I might enjoy and I wasn't wrong with that notion. It did take me a few pages to get into the unique writing style and adjust to the (ahem) colourful language. I don't have a problem with swear words as per se (on the contrary) but there were loads of those.It was my first enco My thanks to NetGalley and Grove Atlantic for granting me the opportunity to read this e- book as an advance reading copy.It was, admittedly, the cover that first piqued my interest. The description sounded like something I might enjoy and I wasn't wrong with that notion. It did take me a few pages to get into the unique writing style and adjust to the (ahem) colourful language. I don't have a problem with swear words as per se (on the contrary) but there were loads of those.It was my first encounter with Jack Taylor and his "verse" but the author managed the balancing act of briefly explaining to new readers who is who and what the dealings with the respective character and Jack had been in the preceding 12 books without boring readers who already knew about it.Just like the writing itself the storytelling is unique. Where other authors of the genre dwell on building suspense, strew in details and try to lay false trails, Ken Bruen is refreshingly "no sh*t and f*cks given". That too needs a little getting used to since it is something else. Despite a lack of "building up" the characters get their unique personas even in the brief descriptions and encounters the reader is granted. For more depth I suspect I would have (will have, more likely) to read the entire series - beginning with book #1 called 'The Guards'.Jack Taylor probably belongs to the category "love or hate" with nothing in between.The unique writing, the characters, the swearing and the many deaths (no spoilers hence keeping this rather vague) and the entire lack of keeping somewhat the protocol of police work up or at least the pretence thereof might be major put offs for many but despite my love for protocol and storybuilding, I enjoyed this book immensely.The things that I didn't like was the fast pace towards the end. It felt rushed through to get to a quick end before running out of pages (or time?) and at times I would have liked a tad more of what is going on in Jack and the other persons. A few times Ken Bruen seemed to have lost the golden thread and picked up loose ends here and there along the way which made it confusing and took me a moment or two longer to swing back into the narration and keep track of what is going on.I didn't expect the hint of X Files vibe at the very end but loved it all the same.Same goes for the - in my eyes - smart use of news headlines (such as the deaths of David Bowie or Prince or President Cheetos' run for his current job) to establish a time line and show the reader how much time has passed between events. It helped that those events are still relatively fresh in my memory - a different story for someone who might read the book in a couple of years from now.Anyway a surprisingly great read I hadn't expected to be so "on point" with its own narration when I started reading it.
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  • Patricia Doyle
    January 1, 1970
    As in previous Ken Bruen novels, Jack Taylor has the bitter edginess of an alcoholic. There were, however, far too many f-bombs. I get it … he’s supposed to be rough-talking. To repeat, excessive on the f-bombs as well as too many killings for the sake of killing.I enjoyed the comments throughout and all their Irish-ness as well as the subtle humor shown in both comments and thoughts.The most minor part of the book is the plot. It’s there, but the real stuff is the side happenings with a little As in previous Ken Bruen novels, Jack Taylor has the bitter edginess of an alcoholic. There were, however, far too many f-bombs. I get it … he’s supposed to be rough-talking. To repeat, excessive on the f-bombs as well as too many killings for the sake of killing.I enjoyed the comments throughout and all their Irish-ness as well as the subtle humor shown in both comments and thoughts.The most minor part of the book is the plot. It’s there, but the real stuff is the side happenings with a little bit of character development thrown in.The writing is erratic and choppy, but it works. It gives a feeling of the anything-but-smooth life of Jack Taylor.I did not like and found annoying all the ramblings and the sporadic and erratic references to other literature. It was as though the author has severe ADD and can’t keep his mind on the tale. Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to review The Ghosts of Galway.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    I really like this author and this character (Jack Taylor) and even though this was a lousy book I am already looking forward to the next one because Jack is a very interesting, compelling, and complicated person and I am always ready to see more of him.This book though - and I think every author writes a stinker once in awhile - has no plot what so ever. There are snippets of this and that and it feels like the author was going to write this story and thought 'no, let's write this one - oh wait I really like this author and this character (Jack Taylor) and even though this was a lousy book I am already looking forward to the next one because Jack is a very interesting, compelling, and complicated person and I am always ready to see more of him.This book though - and I think every author writes a stinker once in awhile - has no plot what so ever. There are snippets of this and that and it feels like the author was going to write this story and thought 'no, let's write this one - oh wait - let's write this, etc.'This series is pretty violent but it usually fits - this time it was violence for violence -maybe to be shocking? It was just tiny and boring. At least some of the characters that bugged me in the last book will no longer be bugging me in the next one.
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  • Ron S
    January 1, 1970
    Jack's back with Bruen, as usual, something like an Irish cross between James Lee Burke and Charles Bukowski, or your favorite, albeit embarrassing alcoholic uncle.
  • Mysticpt
    January 1, 1970
    #13 in the Taylor series and Jack has been put through a lot. Jack is still recovering from the last book but with some good news he takes a legit job as a security guard. that however soon turns into an opportunity to work a side project to retrieve a coveted religious artifact. this brings him into contact with most of his surviving supporting cast including Em and some "ghosts" from his distant past as well. this wouldn't be a Taylor novel without plenty of tragedy and that abounds again in t #13 in the Taylor series and Jack has been put through a lot. Jack is still recovering from the last book but with some good news he takes a legit job as a security guard. that however soon turns into an opportunity to work a side project to retrieve a coveted religious artifact. this brings him into contact with most of his surviving supporting cast including Em and some "ghosts" from his distant past as well. this wouldn't be a Taylor novel without plenty of tragedy and that abounds again in this one. as a reader I am almost numb to the amount of personal hell Jack and his mates are put thru, but events strike very close to home in this one. a good story, lots of action , and great scenes with the supporting crew as only Bruen can tell them. thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the early review copy.
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  • Jay Williams
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like a bad acid trip: bursts of bright colors, streams of wild words, eruptions of passions, and occasionally threads of a story. It seemed like an extended advertisement for Jameson whiskey. Yet, I stayed with it to the end, and had a certain amount of appreciation for the conclusion. Read this book for the adventure of reading, not for the story.
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  • Emma Grace
    January 1, 1970
    Why I chose this book: Crime, Ireland (specifically Galway), and a friend recommended this book even though I'd never read Jack Taylor before. She said I could find it on NetGalley if I posted an honest review.As previously stated, I haven't read any of the other Jack Taylor novels, but it was easy to understand what had previously been happening in his life and get into his mindset. Taylor has a sharp tongue and sharper wit, which made me want to enjoy this book. However, I couldn't get behind Why I chose this book: Crime, Ireland (specifically Galway), and a friend recommended this book even though I'd never read Jack Taylor before. She said I could find it on NetGalley if I posted an honest review.As previously stated, I haven't read any of the other Jack Taylor novels, but it was easy to understand what had previously been happening in his life and get into his mindset. Taylor has a sharp tongue and sharper wit, which made me want to enjoy this book. However, I couldn't get behind the sporadic writing style. This form got too confusing at times, and detracted from understanding the story. While I'm on the story, the characters besides Taylor and Em (a lady with multiple personalities), fell flat. Also, (SPOILER ALERT), the dog dies--bloody.Overall, do I recommend?: It was difficult to get through this book; definitely not a cozy up with tea and read on a rainy day kind of book. There are some witty one liners, and Trump bashing from Taylor, so I kept reading for these little blips of humor.
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  • Vijay Anand
    January 1, 1970
    I should mention right off the bat that the publisher was kind enough to send me a digital copy of ‘The Ghosts of Galway’ through Netgalley for review.I honestly had no expectations when I started reading the book. In fact, I wasn’t even aware that it is the latest in a series of books centred around the character of Jack Taylor, so much so, I’m not entirely clear on his history. Only that he used to be a Guard, and things have been on the downward spiral for a while.He’s a security guard when t I should mention right off the bat that the publisher was kind enough to send me a digital copy of ‘The Ghosts of Galway’ through Netgalley for review.I honestly had no expectations when I started reading the book. In fact, I wasn’t even aware that it is the latest in a series of books centred around the character of Jack Taylor, so much so, I’m not entirely clear on his history. Only that he used to be a Guard, and things have been on the downward spiral for a while.He’s a security guard when the story begins, but the name Jack Taylor apparently still commands respect. His employer sets him on the task of tracking down a rare anti-Biblical book, but things go sideways pretty soon.The story itself is a rather simple tale of revenge with an odd cult thrown into the mix.Most of the characters are barely developed, though I suspect it is by design, as we read the story from the point of view of the protagonist. Due to that, we only come to know as much about any character as Jack Taylor cared to share.The narrative has a thick noir-style to it, with our hardboiled cynic of a protagonist barely even making an effort to pick himself up. He stumbles from folly to folly before feeling enough anger to do something about his life.I must spend a little more time on the cynical worldview Jack Taylor has. I could easily relate to it, though I suspect it says more about me than it does the character himself.It is frustrating to see Taylor not give a damn when his world is collapsing about him. In fact, at one point, he suffers a deeply personal tragedy, but so lost is he that he cannot bring himself to do anything about it.The antagonist of the story, Emily (who fancies emeralds) is a rather complex, unhinged and scary young girl. She has a penchant for dramatic, showy and deliberate violence.One of Emily's many shocking actions is a straw that broke the camel’s back, and it directly sets up the novel’s conclusion.And what a brilliant, dark and richly satisfying ending it is, too.The author pulls no punches. His staccato style of prose makes for lines that are the equivalent of an emotional gut punch. His penchant for breaking sentences up over several lines makes it easier for him to write lines that carry great shock value.I may be only a recent initiate to the seedy world that Jack Taylor inhabits, but there is little doubt in my mind that this is a world I’m eager to discover from the start.A solid tale, darkly told. 
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  • Annette Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    It can be difficult coming into a book series that already has twelve volumes, but to it's credit The Ghosts of Galway works well as a standalone, though I am sure that regular readers who are familiar with the backstory might glean some things that I have missed. Despite being new to the characters my enjoyment of them and their story was not negatively impacted, thanks in a large part to the unobtrusive way in which the author slipped in background details to fill in any possible blanks. The c It can be difficult coming into a book series that already has twelve volumes, but to it's credit The Ghosts of Galway works well as a standalone, though I am sure that regular readers who are familiar with the backstory might glean some things that I have missed. Despite being new to the characters my enjoyment of them and their story was not negatively impacted, thanks in a large part to the unobtrusive way in which the author slipped in background details to fill in any possible blanks. The characters are easily one of the best features of the book too, particularly Jack and the enigmatic Emily, and I could see myself reading more of the series, as they really are well drawn, and sufficiently dimensional to warrant more of my time. The plot, which rests on the twin pillars of an ancient religious text and a shadow group of activists known as the Ghosts of the title , moves along at a clipping pace. The writing style also helped to make the story flow, lyrical and almost poetic at times, harsh and almost antagonistic at others.Unfortunately the book did have some flaws. The first is that there are sudden jumps from place to place and from one perspective to another, and a little better delineation of these transitions would have made it much easier to follow the action. This may be resolved by the time the book is finally published, but in its current form it felt a little jumbled or chaotic. The second flaw is probably more noticeable to me that it might be to some other readers, I found the mangling of some of the Gaelic words and text used in the book disappointing, as they did add a nice touch of authenticity, and a small amount of research would have solved the issue. Similarly a little fact checking would have revealed an error involving the story of a Mayo team- the team in question played gaelic football not hurling. Small errors I know, but ones that could easily have been prevented with minimum effort, and again they may be before publication.These minor niggles aside, I really enjoyed this atmospheric tale, and look forward to another encounter with Jack Taylor in the near future. I read and reviewed an ARC courtesy of Netgalley
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  • Joyce
    January 1, 1970
    4 and 1 / 2 starsAlexander Knox-Keaton is from the Ukraine with his odd name and is the owner of the security agency at which Jack Taylor (our hero) works. Jack is recovering from a failed suicide attempt and seems less likely to go off on people anymore – or so he convinces himself. But go off on people he does. Jack is back with all his attitude and savoire faire. When his boss asks him to retrieve “The Red Book” Jack scoffs until he sees the check his boss has proffered. There are those who c 4 and 1 / 2 starsAlexander Knox-Keaton is from the Ukraine with his odd name and is the owner of the security agency at which Jack Taylor (our hero) works. Jack is recovering from a failed suicide attempt and seems less likely to go off on people anymore – or so he convinces himself. But go off on people he does. Jack is back with all his attitude and savoire faire. When his boss asks him to retrieve “The Red Book” Jack scoffs until he sees the check his boss has proffered. There are those who claim it to be the first real book of heresy. An ex-priest by the name of Frank Miller supposedly has the book. Jack locates him in an old hotel and roughs Frank up a bit to get the response that he had some pages but has since burned them. When Jack is questioned about the ex-priest’s death, Jack admits that he met him once. Upon returning to Alexander Knox-Keaton’s home to report Frank’s death, he gets summarily dismissed. What about the dead man? Jack stubbornly refuses to give up the case. He begins to investigate his death and gets into all kinds of trouble. At the same time, some group is dumping dead animals in the street and Em has been badly beaten and is in the hospital. So it’s business as usual for our lyrical Irish hero. Well-read and pugnacious, Jack goes about his business in his inimical way. As Em recovers Jack learns that she has something to do with The Red Book as well. As the bad guys make life difficult and close in on Jack, he fights back in his truly Jack Taylor style. Increasingly plagued by the ghosts of his past, Jack forges on in his quest.This book is very well and uniquely written and plotted. It’s Ken Bruen at his best. I like Jack in spite of his – err…um…faults. I like the way he sees his world – and the way Mr. Bruen puts it on paper. The Jack Taylor series is one of my favorites and I certainly hope Mr. Bruen keeps writing the novels. I want to thank Netgalley and Grove Atlantic/Mysterious Press for forwarding to me a copy of this most wonderful book to read.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Allow me to begin my review of Ken Bruen's latest novel featuring Jack Taylor, " The Ghosts of Galway" by saying that I have enjoyed all of his books. But not everyone might.To begin with, the hero, or non-hero or anti-hero, or despicable drunk, Jack Taylor is a character who lives in a world of despair. It is a world of his own making. He is an alcoholic ,a drug abuser, and treats people with great distain, if not outright contempt. He has no friends; all who come close he pushes away, maybe be Allow me to begin my review of Ken Bruen's latest novel featuring Jack Taylor, " The Ghosts of Galway" by saying that I have enjoyed all of his books. But not everyone might.To begin with, the hero, or non-hero or anti-hero, or despicable drunk, Jack Taylor is a character who lives in a world of despair. It is a world of his own making. He is an alcoholic ,a drug abuser, and treats people with great distain, if not outright contempt. He has no friends; all who come close he pushes away, maybe because he fears-knows- that everyone who nears his circle of the damned, will die. And he is suicidal to the point that he looked upon a mostly satisfactory medical report as a curse of further life.Yer, reading one of Bruen's books is not depressive; in fact, it is reaffirming. For one thing, Taylor has a will to to love, but he is just not that good at it. He does try to help people and sometimes even has a good result, as long as one defines "good" loosely. And third, Bruen's writing is lyrical, even poetical. His descriptions of Galway and Ireland are such as one can feel the rain. No, it is not soft and gentle like an Irish Brogue, but cold and hard like a hurled curse. His dialog, spoken and interior can be raucous or poetic, sacrilegious or moving. Bruen is unlike any other contemporary crime writer I know and I have read many.What is the book about , then? Taylor, more or less on the wagon, is hired to find a priest who has an ancient book which has been condemned by the church. No, it's not a Dan Brown saga; it's all about money. Along the way, people die, old loves return, and Taylor struggles on, as hard, and soft, as ever. There are ghosts he lives with. Ghost he sees every day. And fears their portents. Note: it would be helpful to have read at least the previous book, " The Emerald Lie" for some background. Not to mention to get a taste of Bruen's almost stream-of- consciousness style.
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    January 1, 1970
    This is another installment in Bruen’s Jack Taylor series so I think you’ll enjoy this more if you’ve read the previous books which would have given you a more thorough understanding and appreciation for the characters plus Bruen’s writing style which can be on the rough side with lots of ‘colorful’ language. For non-UK people: he uses words and phrases common to Ireland and the area so if you aren’t familiar with them you might feel lost. If you haven’t read him before, particularly his previou This is another installment in Bruen’s Jack Taylor series so I think you’ll enjoy this more if you’ve read the previous books which would have given you a more thorough understanding and appreciation for the characters plus Bruen’s writing style which can be on the rough side with lots of ‘colorful’ language. For non-UK people: he uses words and phrases common to Ireland and the area so if you aren’t familiar with them you might feel lost. If you haven’t read him before, particularly his previous Taylor novels, hopefully you’ll cut Bruen some slack and if you aren’t familiar with the different phraseology look at this as an adventure, a chance to expand your vocabulary and appreciate a culture different from yours.Bruen returns in his typical brilliant fashion to provide another nail-biting plot that combines some great action sequences with Taylor’s wonderfully written emotional trauma that is his life. Fans of Taylor will love this book as you get dive back into the type of humor only an Irishman can write with settings that somehow still jump off the page as if you’re there taking in the beauty and grit around you.Bruen is not for the faint hearted as he doesn’t pull his punches and seems to revel in graphic details which comes out full force in this novel. Whether his plot devices contain politics (after all with Trump president who is NOT wading into those waters these days?), bloody violence, disturbing psychological behavior, or seemingly impossible actions for a man who at his age should be spending his time having a pint of the black stuff while telling rousing tales in the pub Bruen is going to hit a nerve and that edginess is what makes him worth reading.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    *** This is a review of an uncorrected proof copy. Thanks to Netgalley for the opportunity to do a pre-publication review. ***The Ghosts of Galway is the latest instalment in Bruen's Jack Taylor series. At the outset Jack is in a right state, following a failed suicide attempt. Amid considerable self-loathing and ongoing pain, he takes a job as a security guard. His reputation precedes him, however, and he is soon summoned by the boss to take on a more lucrative job, recovering a missing religio *** This is a review of an uncorrected proof copy. Thanks to Netgalley for the opportunity to do a pre-publication review. ***The Ghosts of Galway is the latest instalment in Bruen's Jack Taylor series. At the outset Jack is in a right state, following a failed suicide attempt. Amid considerable self-loathing and ongoing pain, he takes a job as a security guard. His reputation precedes him, however, and he is soon summoned by the boss to take on a more lucrative job, recovering a missing religious text: the Red Book.Jack makes snippy references to Dan Brown, but still takes the gig. In the process, he soon finds himself involved with Jeremy, the leader of a nascent cult, and with Emerald, a ruthless woman prepared to stoop to almost anything.Emerald reminded me a bit of Alice from the Luther TV series; both appalling and attractive at the same time. She's a complex and distinctive character, and a perfect foil for Taylor's surly, alcohol-fuelled PI. Neither is to be under-estimated, and both are implacable.I enjoyed the prose in this book, with its blend of a very hard-boiled narrative with almost poetic strings of short sentences. It is a bit circumlocutory (perhaps intentionally?) at times, for example we are introduced to the character of Sister Maeve in almost the same terms, three times.I'm a bit late to the party with this series, picking it up at instalment 14. I sensed that there might be plot twists here that I could be missing due to not having read earlier entries in the series. This wasn't a problem, but it has whetted my appetite for going back and reading the earlier books.
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  • CoffeeandInk
    January 1, 1970
    Received from NetGalleyThis is the 13th novel in the Jack Taylor series from the prolific, award-winning Ken Bruen. I love Noir and crime fiction and ripped through this in a very short time. The first person point of view prose of the rambling, sometimes shambling, Jack Taylor is riveting. The author tips his hat to other crime writers, quoting snips from their novels where appropriate, but I especially loved that the title is homage to James Lee Burke’s “In the Electric Mist with the Confedera Received from NetGalleyThis is the 13th novel in the Jack Taylor series from the prolific, award-winning Ken Bruen. I love Noir and crime fiction and ripped through this in a very short time. The first person point of view prose of the rambling, sometimes shambling, Jack Taylor is riveting. The author tips his hat to other crime writers, quoting snips from their novels where appropriate, but I especially loved that the title is homage to James Lee Burke’s “In the Electric Mist with the Confederate Dead.” James Lee Burke is one of my top favorite authors—though I only read the Robicheaux stories—I never really fell into the Montana or Texas novels. Big plus, Electric Mist is my favorite of his novels. Apparently, Jack has had a long and harrowing fall from having once been a Garda, and he’s left a lot of violence and hatred in his wake, but new trouble always seems to find him. Also, the story takes place in 2016 where the deaths of music icons Bowie, Prince, and Cohen have an affect on Jack’s inner landscape, as does Trump creeping up America’s skirts…something ugly has crept into Galway dragging with it a fallen priest, a psycho ex, and a long list of innocents. I’ve never read Ken Bruen before, and I love his short and lilting, yet brutal style, the near stream-of-consciousness of Jack’s thoughts as he races from pun to pun only he seems to get. He must have a good rep, though, as everyone wants to hire him to get the job done.My one complaint: Contractions don’t get used enough and the language sometimes feels a little stilted, which takes away, in my opinion, from the casual style.So, I’m going to go back to the beginning of this series and start reading.
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  • Cheryl M-M
    January 1, 1970
    Bruen has a very specific style when it comes to his Jack Taylor books. They are in your face coarse, gritty and hardcore realistic or rather the character of Jack Taylor is.Jack always seems to walk on the thin line between abiding by the law and breaking it, well he tends to lean more towards the latter, especially when it comes to protecting those in his bubble. Not that they are always grateful, but then again perhaps they take lessons in etiquette and being polite from Jack.His nemesis, str Bruen has a very specific style when it comes to his Jack Taylor books. They are in your face coarse, gritty and hardcore realistic or rather the character of Jack Taylor is.Jack always seems to walk on the thin line between abiding by the law and breaking it, well he tends to lean more towards the latter, especially when it comes to protecting those in his bubble. Not that they are always grateful, but then again perhaps they take lessons in etiquette and being polite from Jack.His nemesis, strangely enough, is a bizarre combination of seductive temptress, a complete and utter fruitcake, and a ruthless player in this game of ghosts. Jack never seems to be able to decide which category to place her in.As I mentioned above, Bruen has a distinctive writing style, which is staccato like and abrupt. Despite that he still manages to fill the story with important national and international topics, ranging from pseudo celebrities, fraudulent medical systems to Brexit and terrorism.It is done in a subtle and witty way, and there are also often imperceptible nods in a certain direction, and off the cuff remarks. It’s almost like experiencing the thought and speech processes of the main character in real-time. It has a noirish quality to it, coarse and brutal, which is what gives it a strong sense of realism.*I received an ARC courtesy of the publisher via Edelweiss.*
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  • Pavlovsky
    January 1, 1970
    Je to čím dál jasnější. Romány Kena Bruena nejsou kriminálky. Jsou to zlé sny autora detektivek, drsná škola zcela vymknutá z kloubů, něco mezi Chandlerem a opilými výkřiky agresivního irského básníka. Hlavní hrdina, detektiv Jack Taylor, se tu už ani nesnaží o pátrání, jen tu prochází příběhem jako oko hurikánu, které spojuje zcela náhodné události. Jako by to bylo nějaké jeho irské prokletí. Pokud už vyrazí do nějaké akce, tak se obvykle situace vyřeší zcela mimo, nebo skončí v nemocnici. Jsou Je to čím dál jasnější. Romány Kena Bruena nejsou kriminálky. Jsou to zlé sny autora detektivek, drsná škola zcela vymknutá z kloubů, něco mezi Chandlerem a opilými výkřiky agresivního irského básníka. Hlavní hrdina, detektiv Jack Taylor, se tu už ani nesnaží o pátrání, jen tu prochází příběhem jako oko hurikánu, které spojuje zcela náhodné události. Jako by to bylo nějaké jeho irské prokletí. Pokud už vyrazí do nějaké akce, tak se obvykle situace vyřeší zcela mimo, nebo skončí v nemocnici. Jsou tam vzácné svazky, tajemné sekty, psychopatičtí zabijáci - ale tyhle věci se pohybují kdesi na okraji knihy a pokud už dojde k nějakému vyvrcholení, tak je obvykle odbyté jen v jedné větě a proběhne až urážlivě jednoduše a nedramaticky. Jmenuje se to Ghost of Galway - a vážně má člověk pocit, jako by se hrdina pohyboval mezi duchy. Každý žije ve svém světě a mezilidská komunikace je skoro nemožná. Bruenovky jsou nikotinovými výkřiky. Nejsou perfektní, ale je v nich síla a strhující nálada. A hlavně, člověka to fascinuje číst, už jen pro to, aby zjistil, kdy už hrdina konečně spáchá sebevraždu. Myslím, že tahle série ani nemůže mít jiný konec.
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  • Tim Niland
    January 1, 1970
    Off the books PI and perennial shit magnet Jack Taylor returns, reeling from a failed suicide attempt, and trying to put his life back together once again. He has new dog that he showers attention on, a new gig as a night watchman he hates, but that all changes when the owner of the security firm asks for a sit down. He learns of Jack's previous exploits and hires him to find the mysterious Red Book, supposedly a critique of the Christian gospels stolen from the Vatican by a defrocked priest. Af Off the books PI and perennial shit magnet Jack Taylor returns, reeling from a failed suicide attempt, and trying to put his life back together once again. He has new dog that he showers attention on, a new gig as a night watchman he hates, but that all changes when the owner of the security firm asks for a sit down. He learns of Jack's previous exploits and hires him to find the mysterious Red Book, supposedly a critique of the Christian gospels stolen from the Vatican by a defrocked priest. After the priest turns up dead, Jack's nemesis Emerald returns with news of a shadowy organization called The Ghosts of Galway that are looking to re-shape Ireland under the cloak of radical religious conservatism. Jack is dragged through the mud once again, losing some of his closest confederates in the process only to discover that the path he must take is one of revenge, that that the punishment must be biblical. Jack Taylor novels are always a treat, and Bruen writes noir in the tradition of the masters, giving Jack a sharp tongue and ferocious wit.
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