Friends and Traitors (Inspector Troy, #8)
John Lawton's Inspector Troy novels are regularly singled out as a crime series of exceptional quality, by critics and readers alike. Friends and Traitors is the eighth novel in the series--which can be read in any order--a story of betrayal, espionage, and the dangers of love.London, 1958. Chief Superintendent Frederick Troy of Scotland Yard, newly promoted after good service during Nikita Khrushchev's visit to Britain, is not looking forward to a European trip with his older brother, Rod. Rod has decided to take his entire family on "the Grand Tour" for his fifty-first birthday: a whirlwind of restaurants, galleries, and concert halls from Paris to Florence to Vienna to Amsterdam. But Frederick Troy only gets as far as Vienna. It is there that he crosses paths with an old acquaintance, a man who always seems to be followed by trouble: British spy turned Soviet agent Guy Burgess. Suffice it to say that Troy is more than surprised when Burgess, who has escaped from the bosom of Moscow for a quick visit to Vienna, tells him something extraordinary: "I want to come home." Troy knows this news will cause a ruckus in London--but even Troy doesn't expect an MI5 man to be gunned down as a result, and Troy himself suspected of doing the deed. As he fights to prove his innocence, Troy is haunted by more than just Burgess's past liaisons--there is a scandal that goes up to the highest ranks of Westminster, affecting spooks and politicians alike. And the stakes become all the higher for Troy when he reencounters a woman he first met in the Ritz hotel during a blackout--falling in love is a handicap when playing the game of spies.

Friends and Traitors (Inspector Troy, #8) Details

TitleFriends and Traitors (Inspector Troy, #8)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherAtlantic Monthly Press
ISBN-139780802127068
Rating
GenreMystery, Novels, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Historical, Historical Fiction, Spy Thriller, Espionage

Friends and Traitors (Inspector Troy, #8) Review

  • Manchester Military History Society (MMHS)
    January 1, 1970
    Good mixture is espionage fact and fiction. Combining fact with fiction Lawton successfully describes the double life of spy Burgess alongside the fictional Troy.This is my first outing with Troy and as a result will be seeking out the rest of the series.Lawton writes well with knowledge of the period whilst keeping a good pace and strong characters throughout. Recommended for anyone interested in the Cambridge Five and good espionage/crime fiction. Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I was Good mixture is espionage fact and fiction. Combining fact with fiction Lawton successfully describes the double life of spy Burgess alongside the fictional Troy.This is my first outing with Troy and as a result will be seeking out the rest of the series.Lawton writes well with knowledge of the period whilst keeping a good pace and strong characters throughout. Recommended for anyone interested in the Cambridge Five and good espionage/crime fiction. Thanks to Edelweiss for the review copy. I was not obliged to write a favourable review.
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  • Monique Daoust
    January 1, 1970
    I am not going to summarise the story, because the blurb says it all, literally. Or rather what comes after around 33% of the book, before that there’s a lot of info dumping and a lot of what seemed to me superfluous details about Frederick Troy and his family, and it should have been shortened quite a bit. I felt the writing style was reminiscent of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s and of Sartre and Camus; I don’t know if it was intentional, as FRIENDS AND TRAITORS was the first book I have read by J I am not going to summarise the story, because the blurb says it all, literally. Or rather what comes after around 33% of the book, before that there’s a lot of info dumping and a lot of what seemed to me superfluous details about Frederick Troy and his family, and it should have been shortened quite a bit. I felt the writing style was reminiscent of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s and of Sartre and Camus; I don’t know if it was intentional, as FRIENDS AND TRAITORS was the first book I have read by John Lawton.I was hoping for a spy novel in the vein of Silva and Le Carré, and it definitely resembles neither; I would advise fans from the above-mentioned not to read this book. The first part is about the infamous British spy Guy Burgess, and his drinking, rants of all sorts, his homosexuality and countless conquests, sex, and it was quite tedious. Not that it was in bad taste or anything of the sort, there was just too much and it was pointless; a little could have gone a very long way: it felt as if the author got somewhat carried away with his research. This book can definitely be read as a standalone, but I wonder how the previous seven books in this series look like. Then there’s the travelogue for the “Grand Tour” that was mostly filler until we finally arrived in Vienna. There was a lot of information about post WWII Austria with which I was wholly unfamiliar, and that was great.FRIENDS AND TRAITORS reads more like a fictionalised Guy Burgess’ sort-of-friendship with the fictional Fred Troy than a spy caper, and I was sorely disappointed; I expected a spy novel, and there isn’t much spying. My mind was numb from all the superfluous details; I read the book over two days, and on day two I had forgotten a few murders, so lost in the meanderings about whatever. Somewhere around the middle of the book, things picked up a bit but unfortunately not for long; there was a lot of chatting about what had already happened previously, with some added information. I think. As I said, my brain was in a fog from all the unnecessary bits and pieces that at some point, the author could have killed off anyone, even Fred, that I would not have really cared. Then more pages of irrelevant – to me – family matters and such. Oh and the “second chance romance” mentioned in the blurb, well I’m afraid I had a good laugh with that one. Alas. I guess it was supposed to be a shocker, but again, all with the pointless details and a particularly unsavoury gesture posed by Troy spoiled all that.The writing is very good, the author is particularly adept at giving great notions of time and space, the vernacular is excellent, and the dialogues brilliant.I voluntarily reviewed an advanced reader copy of this book.
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  • Maine Colonial
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to the publisher, Atlantic Monthly Press, for providing an advance reading copy, via Netgalley.After a seven-year hiatus, Frederick Troy, head of the Met’s Murder Squad, is finally back in a new tale. In prior series books, John Lawton has given us Troy in action during the Blitz, other times during World War II and during the Cold War. In Friends and Traitors, the present day is the waning days of the 1950s, austerity Britain, but with plenty of flashbacks to earlier days.If you’re an es Thanks to the publisher, Atlantic Monthly Press, for providing an advance reading copy, via Netgalley.After a seven-year hiatus, Frederick Troy, head of the Met’s Murder Squad, is finally back in a new tale. In prior series books, John Lawton has given us Troy in action during the Blitz, other times during World War II and during the Cold War. In Friends and Traitors, the present day is the waning days of the 1950s, austerity Britain, but with plenty of flashbacks to earlier days.If you’re an espionage reader, you’re well aware of the Cambridge Spies. Remember the wildly self-indulgent and indiscreet Guy Burgess, who defected to the USSR with Donald Maclean in 1951? Of course you do. Now imagine that while he was passing on British intelligence secrets to his Soviet masters he was a social acquaintance of Frederick Troy. One of the delights of a John Lawton thriller is his deft mixture of real people with his fictional characters. In Frederick Troy’s world, the intensely class conscious England, it’s not at all surprising that Troy would know Burgess. After all, even if Troy is a copper, he also comes from wealth and position, and he hobnobs with politicos and high society, including when they’re slumming it. And Guy could turn any gathering into a sordid exhibition of drunkenness and sexual outrageousness.Troy thought nothing about Burgess could surprise him; he sure wasn’t surprised by Guy turning out to be a Soviet spy. But Guy reaching out to Troy long after defecting, and asking for an unimaginable favor is a most unwelcome surprise. And it’s a surprise that leads to more revelations, danger and heartache.With atmosphere and intrigue to burn, this book a tough one to put down. While the Frederick Troy books can be read in any order, I would recommend that at the very least you read the first book in the series, Black Out, and the most recent, A Lily of the Field.
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    The plot brings a parade of characters from Troy novels past, and for that reason alone, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone new to the series. It also shows Troy at his least likeable.[***SPOILER ALERT***]The most frustrating part of this mystery is that the resolution hinges on Troy matching a face in a photograph to a person he had seen only once, for a few seconds, many years previously in a darkened room. Fine, you might say, his memory is just that good. But then why does Troy fail to recogn The plot brings a parade of characters from Troy novels past, and for that reason alone, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone new to the series. It also shows Troy at his least likeable.[***SPOILER ALERT***]The most frustrating part of this mystery is that the resolution hinges on Troy matching a face in a photograph to a person he had seen only once, for a few seconds, many years previously in a darkened room. Fine, you might say, his memory is just that good. But then why does Troy fail to recognize Venetia at the rehab facility, a person he had met numerous times in his life? Dumb.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    Inspector Frederick Troy has never been one to follow advice, and when his family was warned to avoid Guy Burgess, Troy avoided the advice. Not that Troy was exactly fond of Burgess, thinking of him as more the bad penny always turning up than any sort of confidante. Though who would confide in anyone as indiscreet and reckless as Burgess was a puzzle.Friends and Traitors presents Troy’s tepid friendship throughout the years from their meeting in 1935 to the day Burgess infamously defected to th Inspector Frederick Troy has never been one to follow advice, and when his family was warned to avoid Guy Burgess, Troy avoided the advice. Not that Troy was exactly fond of Burgess, thinking of him as more the bad penny always turning up than any sort of confidante. Though who would confide in anyone as indiscreet and reckless as Burgess was a puzzle.Friends and Traitors presents Troy’s tepid friendship throughout the years from their meeting in 1935 to the day Burgess infamously defected to the Soviet Union with MacLean, one of the Eton spies whose betrayal encompassed a third man, a fourth, and possibly several more. You would think having defected and decamped to Russia, Burgess would finally stop impinging on Troy’s life, but no such luck.Burgess misses England and wants to come home and the person he reaches to for help is Troy, embroiling him in a murder and bringing him under suspicion of being another in the cluster of traitors. Can Troy clear himself and find the real murderer?Friends and Traitors is John Lawton’s eleventh novel and his eighth featuring Inspector Troy. As the series progresses, each book tosses away more and more of the conventions of genre fiction. If this book were a singleton – not part of a series – it would be classified as literary fiction examining the role of identity, family, patriotism, and honor in Cold War England. The fact of being a spy is central to Burgess’ identity and his role in the story, but the particulars of his espionage are immaterial. The murders come very late and are not the purpose of the story which is really about Troy figuring out more about himself and what he values.Lawton has incorporated real historical figures in his books in the past, though never quite so completely as he has with Guy Burgess, the spy. He does it very well and Burgess’ charm and pitiable state come through along with his vulgarity, making it easy to understand how Troy could enjoy him and pity him while also slightly disliking him all at the same time.I have loved this series since its inception. Troy is a complicated character, compromised by his affection for others, by love and loyalty that is personal rather than patriotic. He does not just sail close to the wind, he risks being blown off course. I enjoy this series and would love to see them in a Masterpiece Mystery series though it’s possible Troy with his empathy for friends and traitors like Guy Burgess is too complicated for television.I received an advance e-galley of Friends and Traitors from Atlantic Grove through NetGalleyFriends and Traitors at Grove AtlanticJohn Lawton author sitehttps://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • The Breakneck Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This book has all the thriller elements with a twist on reality. An intriguing and fun read. Having never read any of the previous Inspector Troy books I wasn't sure what to expect from this book however from the start we are introduced to Guy Burgess at a dinner of Troy's father. From the little inform I knew of Burgess I was excited to see how the story stood out amongst the other novels containing him. The book takes you from pre world war two through to the cold war with Troys path always cr This book has all the thriller elements with a twist on reality. An intriguing and fun read. Having never read any of the previous Inspector Troy books I wasn't sure what to expect from this book however from the start we are introduced to Guy Burgess at a dinner of Troy's father. From the little inform I knew of Burgess I was excited to see how the story stood out amongst the other novels containing him. The book takes you from pre world war two through to the cold war with Troys path always crossing Burgess's. You begin with the feeling of Troy being lily white but as the story progresses you see the many personas he holds. Troy doesn't allow others to make up his mind about someone. several warned him off Burgess but for all of Guys flaws his dynamic personality makes Troy endear to him. The books covers several mysteries from Guys defection to the murder of a socialite with many twists and turns along the way.Overall I really enjoyed this book, the pace and twists kept me interested whilst seeing the character development of Troy was fun to read. There are mentions of previous cases Troy has face (I assume as part of the series) but the description leaves the reader informed without the feeling of having to read previous books. This is a very good stand alone novel and I will be looking into purchasing more of the Troy books to read. If you enjoy spy novels then do give this one a go!Thanks to netgalley, the publishers and John Lawton for the opportunity to read an ARC for my honest review.
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  • Ralph Blackburn
    January 1, 1970
    Friends and Traitors by John Lawton- A Frederick Troy espionage novel, about spies during World War Two and later. Troy is just starting out at Scotland Yard at the beginning, and hoping to become a detective on his own merits. He hails from a wealthy Russian family, who escaped to Britain after the first World War, and became English aristocrats. He keeps running into a gadfly named Guy Burgess, who always seems to know the best people and the latest news. Years later, Troy, a Chief Inspector n Friends and Traitors by John Lawton- A Frederick Troy espionage novel, about spies during World War Two and later. Troy is just starting out at Scotland Yard at the beginning, and hoping to become a detective on his own merits. He hails from a wealthy Russian family, who escaped to Britain after the first World War, and became English aristocrats. He keeps running into a gadfly named Guy Burgess, who always seems to know the best people and the latest news. Years later, Troy, a Chief Inspector now, runs into Burgess again, a known spy for the Russians, who wants to come home to England. But it's not that simple, and chaos follows. Lawton's books are very well crafted and I enjoyed this one, especially the Blackout sequences during WWII. I think this is book number eight in the series but I'm not sure it matters that much where you begin as this stood up well as a standalone book. Not quite Le Carre, but then who is. A good intriguing spy novel.
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  • Jean Kolinofsky
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank NetGalley for providing this book in exchange for a review.As a young policeman, Frederick Troy first met Guy Burgess at a dinner given by Troy's father. Warned that Burgess was a suspected spy and that he should keep his distance, he still encounters him in a number of social situations and they become casual friends. It comes as no surprise to Troy when Burgess eventually defects to Russia. Now on a vacation to celebrate his brother's birthday, he is once again approached I would like to thank NetGalley for providing this book in exchange for a review.As a young policeman, Frederick Troy first met Guy Burgess at a dinner given by Troy's father. Warned that Burgess was a suspected spy and that he should keep his distance, he still encounters him in a number of social situations and they become casual friends. It comes as no surprise to Troy when Burgess eventually defects to Russia. Now on a vacation to celebrate his brother's birthday, he is once again approached by Burgess, asking Troy to arrange his return to England. Fans of Lawton's Troy novels will welcome the return of Meret Voytek, a Russian spy who appeared in A Lily in the Field. There is enough background offered to introduce her to new readers and her appearance is smoothly woven into Burgess' story.Murders, the hunt for Russian spies and a look at life in 1950s England provide a fascinating read. This will also appeal to readers of John le Carre.
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  • Cassie Holland
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided this book by NetGalley and in return am writing this review.I have not read any of the previous Detective Troy novels but that was not a problem in following this story. Previous police cases were referred to however there was enough information provided to understand the references.The story ranges through Frederick Troy’s past, including his introduction and subsequent encounters with Guy Burgess and his current day (1950’s) dealings with “Burgess, Maclean” affair.Lots of intere I was provided this book by NetGalley and in return am writing this review.I have not read any of the previous Detective Troy novels but that was not a problem in following this story. Previous police cases were referred to however there was enough information provided to understand the references.The story ranges through Frederick Troy’s past, including his introduction and subsequent encounters with Guy Burgess and his current day (1950’s) dealings with “Burgess, Maclean” affair.Lots of interesting plot twists and turns make it difficult to anticipate the final outcome. True events and fictional scenarios make for an intriguing novel.The final scenes involving the denouement Kearney was just a step too far in my opinion.
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  • Melissa Dee
    January 1, 1970
    Inspector Troy #8 has Frederick Troy reviewing his long career in the reflection of his relationship with Guy Burgess. Although fictional, the book feels historical, and paints a grim picture of post-war England and its ambivalence with regard to ex-ally Russia.
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  • PWRL
    January 1, 1970
    E
  • WHPL Reference
    January 1, 1970
    Find it at the West Hempstead Public Library http://encore.alisweb.org/iii/encore/...
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