Literary Witches
Celebrate the witchiest women writers with beautiful illustrations and imaginative vignettes. Literary Witches draws a connection between witches and visionary writers: both are figures of formidable creativity, empowerment, and general badassery. Through poetic portraits, Taisia Kitaiskaia and Katy Horan honor the witchy qualities of well-known and obscure authors alike, including Virginia Woolf, Mira Bai, Toni Morrison, Emily Dickinson, Octavia E. Butler, Sandra Cisneros, and many more. Perfect for both book lovers and coven members, Literary Witches is a treasure and a source of inspiration. Kitaiskaia and Horan bring fresh insights on your most beloved authors, suggest enchanting new writers, and invite you to rediscover the magic of literature.

Literary Witches Details

TitleLiterary Witches
Author
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherSeal Press
ISBN-139781580056731
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Writing, Books About Books, Language, Biography

Literary Witches Review

  • Ron Charles
    January 1, 1970
    Looking for the perfect Halloween gift for the nasty woman in your haunted house? Try "Literary Witches." It’s an enchanted anthology of 30 great female writers — from Anais Nin to Zora Neale Hurston. Each one is captured in a folkloric illustration by Katy Horan and then, on the facing page, illuminated with a bewitching description by Taisia Kitaiskaia.These mini biographies — “the hexen text” — are more witchopedia than wikipedia. Kitaiskaia boils each writer down to three invocations, weavin Looking for the perfect Halloween gift for the nasty woman in your haunted house? Try "Literary Witches." It’s an enchanted anthology of 30 great female writers — from Anais Nin to Zora Neale Hurston. Each one is captured in a folkloric illustration by Katy Horan and then, on the facing page, illuminated with a bewitching description by Taisia Kitaiskaia.These mini biographies — “the hexen text” — are more witchopedia than wikipedia. Kitaiskaia boils each writer down to three invocations, weaving historical facts with her own surreal visions. Emily Bronte, for instance, “Watcher of the Moors, Fantasy, and Cruel Romance,” “makes a telescope from ice and twine. Though this tunnel, she stares into her own eye until she sees a galaxy, and through the galaxy until she sees a stranger’s eye.”Gertrude Stein, “Madame of Roses, Geometry, and Repetition,” “is a spider, weaving a web of funhouse mirrors. . . . For Gertrude, each word is a hedgehog in a metal cage.”If you know the writers, these symbol-laced musings are evocative; if you don’t, they’re alluringly mysterious. . . . To read the rest of this review, go to The Washington Post:https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert...
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  • Joanna
    January 1, 1970
    Seemed appropriate, given the season.This could so easily not have worked, come across as self-conscious and irritating, yet it hangs together. The illustrations are great, but I think the true credit for this goes to Kitaiskaia (from the inimitable Ask Baba Yaga series). There's something about her imagery, surreal but at the same time grounded and confident, that makes believers of us all.
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  • Mia Douglass
    January 1, 1970
    god that was beautiful
  • Kristianne
    January 1, 1970
    "Witches pop up everywhere in October. Ghoulish old women on brooms dangle from house eaves and costume shops are full with warty pickle noses, pointed hats and portable plastic cauldrons. These witches of Halloween are still painted as malevolent cranks, cackling and hexing folks willy-nilly."Read my short witch book round up, Toil and Trouble at Shelf-Awareness.com
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