Patina (Track, #2)
Patina, or Patty, runs like a flash. She runs for many reasons—to escape the taunts from the kids at the fancy-schmancy new school she’s been sent to since she and her little sister had to stop living with their mom. She runs from the reason WHY she’s not able to live with her “real” mom any more: her mom has The Sugar, and Patty is terrified that the disease that took her mom’s legs will one day take her away forever. So Patty’s also running for her mom, who can’t. But can you ever really run away from any of this? As the stress builds up, it’s building up a pretty bad attitude as well. Coach won’t tolerate bad attitude. No day, no way. And now he wants Patty to run relay…where you have to depend on other people? How’s she going to do THAT?

Patina (Track, #2) Details

TitlePatina (Track, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 29th, 2017
PublisherAtheneum/Caitlyn Dlouhy Books
ISBN-139781481450188
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Sports and Games, Sports, Young Adult, Family

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Patina (Track, #2) Review

  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    Even better than Ghost and I loved Ghost. I'm already exciting about the next book in the series. Sunny, perhaps?
  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    You cannot be a children’s librarian or an adult children’s book reviewer if you do not constantly remind yourself that you have to read outside your comfort zone on a regular basis. Our current National Ambassador of Young People’s Literature, Gene Luen Yang, put this far more eloquently when he urged people to partake in the Reading Without Walls Challenge. The rules are simple. You can read about a character that doesn’t look like your, a topic you don’t know much about, and/or a format you d You cannot be a children’s librarian or an adult children’s book reviewer if you do not constantly remind yourself that you have to read outside your comfort zone on a regular basis. Our current National Ambassador of Young People’s Literature, Gene Luen Yang, put this far more eloquently when he urged people to partake in the Reading Without Walls Challenge. The rules are simple. You can read about a character that doesn’t look like your, a topic you don’t know much about, and/or a format you don’t usually pick up. I often wonder what would have happened if I’d encountered this challenge as a child. When I was a 9-12 year old I went out of my way to avoid works of realistic fiction that could potentially depress me. But having finished the latest Jason Reynolds title in the Track series called Patina, if I could go back in time and hand my younger self one book that fell squarely outside her comfort zone, I’d probably hand her this. A companion novel to Ghost, Reynolds’s latest takes a long hard look at what it sometimes takes to trust the people around you. Even when they’ve given you absolutely no reason to do so.Patina has lost a race. Patina is not a good loser. Not good at all. If you knew Patina, this would probably be the first thing you knew about her. The thing is, Patina’s already lost a lot of things in her life. Her dad died when she was pretty young, and her mom nearly died of diabetes after that. She lives with her aunt and uncle, helps take care of her younger sister, and attends this hoity toity school that may be good for her future but is death on her friendships. At least there’s track, though, right? Only now Patina has lost a race and, stranger still, she and her fellow runners are going to be forming relay teams. Now the trick to any team is to synchronize yourself with the people around you. Patina, however, can’t afford to synchronize with anyone in her life. She’s a loner (isn’t she?). Someone who doesn’t need help (are you sure?). And she’s not easily surprised. Not easily, but when it happens then maybe a lot of other things in her life will start to change as well.Before we go any further today I would like us to consider the case of The Mighty Miss Malone. Author Christopher Paul Curtis was at the top of his game. Sure he’d had the occasional misfire here and there (his YA never really hit the heights and his Mr. Chickee series wasn’t quite up to his usual standards) but when it came to historical fiction nobody could match him. Bud Not Buddy? The Watsons Go to Birmingham? Elijah of Buxton? The dude was on fire! Of course, there was one thing that ALL his books had in common. They all starred boys. This is, of course, a good thing. Curtis knows boys. Also, do you know how many middle grade novels for 9-12 year olds star African-American boys in a given year? You can usually count the number on your own two hands. So we needed those boys on our shelves. But as he is an artist, Mr. Curtis felt compared to push himself into new territory. So in 2012 he produced the book The Mighty Miss Malone. The hope was to fully flesh out a minor character from Bud Not Buddy. The result was disappointing. Deza, the heroine, is never allowed to save the day. Instead she’s a fairly passive character who watches as her troublemaking younger brother single-handedly rescues the family from despair. So it was with great trepidation that I picked up Patina. The similarities were already in place. Like Curtis, Mr. Reynolds is an award-winning African-American author who had done us the great good of providing us with a plethora of memorable, wonderful black boy characters. And like Mr. Curtis, Jason decided to write a book from a girl’s perspective. So the question I hand to you today is this: Did it work?Let’s talk a little bit about why Mr. Reynolds wrote Patina in the first place. When Jason was initially approached by a publisher to write a sports book, he was offered "street ball". A different publisher offered him a series deal where he could pick the sport himself. Sold! So right from the start it was clear that there were four kids in these books that would go on personal journeys. Ghost kicks it off, and Patina makes it clear that Reynolds isn’t afraid to dive into his first female heroine right from the start. Along the way he makes some very specific choices. For example, while there are men and boys in the book, the bulk of the focus, as well as the characters themselves, is on girls. Patina is surrounding by a strong support network of women. She has a birth mother and an adopted mom. She has female track friends, female school friends (by the end), old female friends with whom she keeps in touch, and a sister. At the same time, her life isn’t what you’d necessarily call easy. Patina has to keep an eye on her younger sister, deal with her fancy school, and try not to worry too much about her mom. The author once said about this book (and here I'm paraphrasing), “Patina is about someone who deserves to be a little girl and can’t be.” He’s purposefully working to make Patina the hero of her own book, and happily there are moments in the story where she takes steps to be proactive and solve her own problems. There was one aspect of the book that bothered me though, and you might well write it off entirely. Now as a character Patina has a dead daddy, a mom with diabetes, and loving stepparents. But as a children’s librarian I’m very used to these overused, very regular, very predictable middle grade tropes. So when I see a female character with a tricky home life going to a posh private school, I’m going to expect one thing: bullying. Reynolds has all the right pieces in place, but he doesn’t go in that direction. It made me pause and think. Bullying in children’s books is all about the mustache twirling (so to speak). But there are different levels in reality. In this book there is a kind of unspoken assumption that Patina is going to shoulder the bulk of the group project she's assigned. Sometimes the merest of assumptions are the most effective methods of keeping people under your control.Which is all well and good but it doesn’t lead to a whole lot of conflict for Patina. In Ghost we had a boy trying to outrun his own demons (and failing). Patina, in contrast, isn’t running away from anything specifically. Cleverly, Reynolds changes the focus slightly so that her challenge is working well with others. When you’ve been micromanaging your life, you may have a hard time relinquishing power (or what you interpret to be power) to others around you. The struggle to trust is inherently less exciting than the struggle to maintain control over the self. As a result, Patina” is significantly less exciting than Ghost. In Ghost you had shoplifting, past trauma, bullies at school, fights, and showboating. In Patina there’s a car crash, but very little in the way of interpersonal problems. Patina is told from the start of the book to get a handle on her anger. Which she does. You might expect there’d be a scene where she goes off on someone, and there is one on the track. That moment is then resolved neatly and almost immediately with no long-term repercussions. Heck, her family is 100% supportive of her track running. Even the early chapter book Izzy Barr, Running Star by Claudia Mills made it so that Izzy has to compete for parental interest and attention. So Reynolds is very big on the learning and growing with this book. Not so much the immediate conflicts before that.Not that it isn’t still a great book. You know that palpable sense of relief you feel as an adult when you’re reading through a title for kids and you come to a part where you realize the book is packed full of amazing writing? I got that here. Owing to its aversion to conflict Patina probably couldn’t be called Mr. Reynolds’s strongest work to date, but at the same time it’s enormously satisfying to read an author that works hard to give a female character a voice, impetus, smarts, and insecurities. In other words, he makes her a real person. A great book for kids that are into realistic fiction, as well as those kids that are willing to trek out of their comfort zones a little to look at a truly great read. A book with a kick.For ages 9-12.
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  • Book Riot Community
    January 1, 1970
    The follow-up to the wonderful National Book Award finalist Ghost. This time, it’s about Patina, a different star runner on the elite middle school track team. Patina has a lot to run from in her life, and a lot to run for – like her mom, who cannot run. But her resentments about her situation are starting to build up, and the coach is not going to put up with Patina’s bad attitude much longer. Can she find a balance and learn to work with others in order to run on the relay team. This is a wond The follow-up to the wonderful National Book Award finalist Ghost. This time, it’s about Patina, a different star runner on the elite middle school track team. Patina has a lot to run from in her life, and a lot to run for – like her mom, who cannot run. But her resentments about her situation are starting to build up, and the coach is not going to put up with Patina’s bad attitude much longer. Can she find a balance and learn to work with others in order to run on the relay team. This is a wonderful story of overcoming obstacles and learning to face your problems.Backlist bump: Ghost (Track) by Jason ReynoldsTune in to our weekly podcast dedicated to all things new books, All The Books: http://bookriot.com/listen/shows/allt...
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  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    Just as brilliant as the first in this series!
  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    A perfectly written follow up to Reynolds’ middle grade smash hit GHOST, this title is narrated by Patina, another member of the Defenders Track team. Thank you to Atheneum/Simon Kids for providing me with a review copy of this book – all opinions are my own. I’ll start by saying to please read GHOST first, or encourage the kids/students in your life to read GHOST first. Of course, you CAN read PATINA first, and the story won’t be ruined, but then GHOST will be ruined for you and I 100% guaran A perfectly written follow up to Reynolds’ middle grade smash hit GHOST, this title is narrated by Patina, another member of the Defenders Track team. Thank you to Atheneum/Simon Kids for providing me with a review copy of this book – all opinions are my own. I’ll start by saying to please read GHOST first, or encourage the kids/students in your life to read GHOST first. Of course, you CAN read PATINA first, and the story won’t be ruined, but then GHOST will be ruined for you and I 100% guarantee you that after reading PATINA, you’ll want to have read GHOST. So, if you haven’t read it yet, go grab yourself a copy of GHOST, settle in, read it, then come back to PATINA. In GHOST, Reynolds introduced readers to a middle school boy nicknamed Ghost, who ends up joining the Defenders track team. It is an excellent story – go read the summary and reviews of it – I gave it 5 stars. It ends with Ghost running a track race……and seriously just ENDS. You finish the book not knowing how the race ends, and it is excruciating!Patina picks up where Ghost left off, with Ghost’s race. This time, however, Patty (Patina) is narrating the story as another member of the Defenders. I absolutely fell in love with Patina, maybe even more than I fell in love with Ghost. I’m not sure if it’s because as a female protagonist it’s easier to relate, or if Reynolds just wrote her so exquisitely that it was inevitable, but I LOVE this character. You learn quickly that her family life is pretty complicated and she’s struggling a bit to assimilate to a fancier school and living with her aunt and uncle. As she describes being a caretaker for both her sister and her mother (I won’t tell you why – go read the book!) I could relate to her even as a 30-something adult – caretaking is a universal issue and it is heartbreaking when kids have to fill that role. Patty is achingly sincere and sweet, but she has a tough side that comes out as a defense in certain situations, sometimes getting her into trouble. As she tries to reconcile her new academy school with her old public school, and describes the neighborhoods in the city she lives in, readers can tell just how aware of class she is. Race too, for that matter. Patty ain’t no junk, as she says, but running may be the only way to prove that. This series is required for middle grade libraries and classrooms – my students just loved Ghost last year and have been eagerly awaiting Patina’s story. When I took my own kids to see Reynolds speak at a local library last winter, they were SO excited to hear him talk about the continuation of the Defenders team story – I can’t wait to see who the next Track book is based on! And there had better be a next book since this one ends……….just like that.
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  • Tamsyn
    January 1, 1970
    Another excellent book in the Track series -- equal to or exceeding the first. I loved having a female main character, and such a strong girl she has had to become! Though she is well-cared-for by her aunt and uncle, she is always taking care of her younger sister, Maddy, and always aware of her wheelchair-bound mother. Health issues, portrayal of a successful mixed race marriage, socioeconomic/cultral challenges with her private school, and, throughout it all, her love of running and being on t Another excellent book in the Track series -- equal to or exceeding the first. I loved having a female main character, and such a strong girl she has had to become! Though she is well-cared-for by her aunt and uncle, she is always taking care of her younger sister, Maddy, and always aware of her wheelchair-bound mother. Health issues, portrayal of a successful mixed race marriage, socioeconomic/cultral challenges with her private school, and, throughout it all, her love of running and being on the track team. Another cliffhanger ending. Jason Reynolds is quite a writer!
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  • Carrie Gelson
    January 1, 1970
    Patina is a story of survival. Of keeping on. Family. Connections. Amassing it all around you. Red beads in a multitude of braids. Finger nails painted in a hero’s style. The security in same old, same old turkey wings. Daily car rides filled with chitter chatter. Sunday visits. Patina is a sister. A daughter. A niece. A teammate. A runner. A fast one. Sometimes, it seems that the races speed her away from everything. But each painful and powerful step counts. Each one gets her there.When you ar Patina is a story of survival. Of keeping on. Family. Connections. Amassing it all around you. Red beads in a multitude of braids. Finger nails painted in a hero’s style. The security in same old, same old turkey wings. Daily car rides filled with chitter chatter. Sunday visits. Patina is a sister. A daughter. A niece. A teammate. A runner. A fast one. Sometimes, it seems that the races speed her away from everything. But each painful and powerful step counts. Each one gets her there.When you are running for two people, it’s not about stamping out the rage. It’s about racing for the love.Resilience. Community. Family. Strength. Power.This book delivers.
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  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynolds continues to be one of my favorite authors.
  • Monica Edinger
    January 1, 1970
    My blog review:A year ago I received a box of ARCs from Simon & Schuster and, poking around, came across Jason Reynolds' Ghost. While I'd heard a great deal about wunderkind Reynolds and read with respect some of his YA work, that he had a middle grade book coming out was a complete surprise to me. About track --- my one competitive sport --- no less. And so I jumped right in and fell madly in love with it. (You can read my gushy review here.) And so now here we are a year later with the nex My blog review:A year ago I received a box of ARCs from Simon & Schuster and, poking around, came across Jason Reynolds' Ghost. While I'd heard a great deal about wunderkind Reynolds and read with respect some of his YA work, that he had a middle grade book coming out was a complete surprise to me. About track --- my one competitive sport --- no less. And so I jumped right in and fell madly in love with it. (You can read my gushy review here.) And so now here we are a year later with the next in the Track series, featuring team mate Patty aka Patina.On the very first page of  Patina  we are brought back to the track meet that ended Ghost, Patty telling us what happened and why. No spoilers from me though! Just moving on as this story is Patty's not Ghost's. It is one of legs, strong ones, missing ones, relay race ones, and more. These real and metaphoric legs make their way through the novel, effectively raising and highlighting important themes. They serve beautifully as Patty watches, acts, considers, and grows in her understanding of the world.Where Ghost was about racing for and against yourself, Patina is about teamwork. There is teamwork practice of all kinds for the track team members who will be running relays in an upcoming meet. As well there is the group assignment at school where Patty is resigned to doing the bulk of the work, as usual, sensing no action on at least two of the group members. There is the teamwork of her family -- her little sister, her diabetic and legless mother, and the aunt and uncle the siblings live with. The adults around them are good and caring, supporting the girls in the best ways they can. Reynolds' scenes are beautifully done full of sensory details. You can just see those family meals, smell the uncle's nasty truck, hear authentic conversations, and feel Patty's body as she pushes it as hard as she can in workouts. The relationship between the sisters, Patty and Maddy is especially warm and delightful.What for me elevates this book and its predecessor to such a high level (goodreads five stars:) is Reynolds' fabulous writing. He's got a way with a few sentences that stops me in total admiration, again and again. Say these:Deep breaths, Patty, my mad slowly mellowing. This temper ain't a new temper. Breaking invisible teacups. Smashing them everywhere. No this ain't new. I just be keeping it pushed down, all the way down in my legs.I highly, highly recommend this book and eagerly await the next in the series. 
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  • Mary Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Cannot wait to share this with kids. Reynolds' writing explodes during race scenes. And Patty's character is richly drawn. She carries such a load, so much responsibility, taking care of her little sister, caring for her mom, navigating school scene that isn't comfortable or rooted in her own culture. She's vulnerable and strong at the same time. At times I felt like I was hearing Patty tell the story too much instead of seeing it unfold. But this brought me right into Patty's head, helping me h Cannot wait to share this with kids. Reynolds' writing explodes during race scenes. And Patty's character is richly drawn. She carries such a load, so much responsibility, taking care of her little sister, caring for her mom, navigating school scene that isn't comfortable or rooted in her own culture. She's vulnerable and strong at the same time. At times I felt like I was hearing Patty tell the story too much instead of seeing it unfold. But this brought me right into Patty's head, helping me hear her voice, understand her thoughts.Loved the track and teamwork elements of this story, with the importance of supporting each other and being in tune, in step with one another.
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  • The Reading Countess
    January 1, 1970
    Advanced reading courtesy of Edelweiss. Jason Reynolds is a master at getting a character's voice to climb into your head and whisper-read the book with you. I thought I loved Ghost and his foibles. No. Patina is my girl. Don't let her tough exterior fool you. Nope. Underneath, you'll find a second mama to Waffle, a master braider and a wise sage when it comes to selecting true friends. I gobbled this little pancake up in one gulp. Run, don't walk, to grab the baton of this second book in the se Advanced reading courtesy of Edelweiss. Jason Reynolds is a master at getting a character's voice to climb into your head and whisper-read the book with you. I thought I loved Ghost and his foibles. No. Patina is my girl. Don't let her tough exterior fool you. Nope. Underneath, you'll find a second mama to Waffle, a master braider and a wise sage when it comes to selecting true friends. I gobbled this little pancake up in one gulp. Run, don't walk, to grab the baton of this second book in the series.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    Yes. YES. Yes! Yes. Did I say yes? Jason Reynolds has a hit series and the second one does not disappoint with his strong girl main character. Patina is every girl that he knew growing up who had the weight of the world on her shoulders. Every chapter begins with something (usually too large to handle) TO DO. Patina's mom goes to dialysis several days a week and has lost both of her legs. Unable to care for Patina and her little sister Maddy, their white aunt and her husband, Patina's mom's brot Yes. YES. Yes! Yes. Did I say yes? Jason Reynolds has a hit series and the second one does not disappoint with his strong girl main character. Patina is every girl that he knew growing up who had the weight of the world on her shoulders. Every chapter begins with something (usually too large to handle) TO DO. Patina's mom goes to dialysis several days a week and has lost both of her legs. Unable to care for Patina and her little sister Maddy, their white aunt and her husband, Patina's mom's brother, take over the daily care. It's on Sunday when the girls get dressed up and Momly takes them over to church with their Mom. Momly talks to their mother each day to fill her in on what's going on and then it's rehashed on Sunday. And Bev didn't make no junk. So Patina feels responsible for her little sister, the care of her mom, and everything else. She's on the same elite running team as Ghost and she's now attending Chester Academy, a preppier school closer to Momly and Uncle Tony's house and Patina is starting to fit in better, recognizing her values and how other people are. Reynolds creates so much depth and feeling and I LOVE that it's not about romance! It's about a chick doing her thing. Yes. And more yes. Give me all of this a hundred times over.Love Coach-- "We all just sort of nodded, numbly. This was going to be hell. 'I don't understand nods and I can't read minds,' Coach growled. 'We got it, Coach,' Mikey said, putting on his game face. "She would take a bite, then stare at the slice as if it was talking to her, telling her how delicious it was." (Isn't that how we all eat pizza? It speaks to us on an elemental level.)
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  • Mrs. Krajewski
    January 1, 1970
    Patina "Patty" Jones is the female newbie on the Defenders track team. She also happens to be the fastest. Like Ghost, she runs for a reason. Ever since her mother got "the sugar" and lost her legs, Patty has cared for her little sister Maddy. Maddy looks to her big sister for guidance and support, so Patty has had to grow up a lot quicker than most girls her age. She has a loving aunt and uncle who take care of them and their mother, who is on dialysis. It's a lot to handle, so Patty runs. She Patina "Patty" Jones is the female newbie on the Defenders track team. She also happens to be the fastest. Like Ghost, she runs for a reason. Ever since her mother got "the sugar" and lost her legs, Patty has cared for her little sister Maddy. Maddy looks to her big sister for guidance and support, so Patty has had to grow up a lot quicker than most girls her age. She has a loving aunt and uncle who take care of them and their mother, who is on dialysis. It's a lot to handle, so Patty runs. She runs for her mother, her sister, and even the fake girls at school. Patty wants to do it all, but sometimes even a tough girl like her needs support.All of Jason Reynolds's books impress me, but Patina is something special. This is his first novel with a female protagonist, and he nailed it. Patina is a book for all the girls out there who need a little extra inspiration, for "Patina Jones ain't no junk."
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Patina has a lot going on in her life. She lives with her aunt and uncle because her mom's diabetes is so severe. Patina takes care of her little sister and helps her aunt as much as she can. Plus she's starting at a new private school. Track is a place for her to turn off her brain and outrun her worries. And she likes to win.Why I started this book: I loved the audio of Ghost and I was eager to listen to the next book in the series.Why I finished it: Reynolds writes strong believable character Patina has a lot going on in her life. She lives with her aunt and uncle because her mom's diabetes is so severe. Patina takes care of her little sister and helps her aunt as much as she can. Plus she's starting at a new private school. Track is a place for her to turn off her brain and outrun her worries. And she likes to win.Why I started this book: I loved the audio of Ghost and I was eager to listen to the next book in the series.Why I finished it: Reynolds writes strong believable characters. He's fast becoming one of my new favorite teen authors.
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    Another fantastic book from Jason Reynolds! Loved Ghost, and now seeing the perspective of a second member of the track team, I'm especially eager to hear the next two after this. This is the kind of series, about kids doing their thing and dealing with their lives and showing their resilient spirits, that kids in our classrooms and in our lives need to be reading. The books are engaging and speak to kids in a realistic voice, which will have them clamoring for more. Love!
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  • Megan Kurleman
    January 1, 1970
    Jason Reynolds does it again in this wonderfully real and heartfelt story. Readers will fall in love with Patina and her family, and be cheering for her through the whole book, both on and off the track. Was definitely misty reading Reynolds' dedication "for all young girls who feel the weight of the world on their shoulders". This was made for the eyes of a YA reader!! (And their teachers, let's be honest).
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  • Lauren Phelps
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't love Patty's story as much as Ghost's, but I do love Jason Reynold's ability to capture the voice of his characters. He is a brilliant writer and I can't wait to read more from him! I loved Patty's sass and sensitivity, especially when it came to Maddy. Looking forward to Sunny's story next!
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  • Jennifer Mangler
    January 1, 1970
    I am loving the Track series from Jason Reynolds. Both Ghost and this latest addition to the series, Patina, are wonderful. I instantly loved and cared for Patina and her family. It's interesting that in the first book Ghost was running from his demons whilst in this book Patina was running for her family. I eagerly await the next book in this series. I want to get to know every member of this track team.
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  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so happy that Jason Reynolds is writing more middle grade. His voice needs to be heard by this age. Loved this one as much as "Ghost". I love that sports is being used as a positive in these books.
  • Kris Morahan
    January 1, 1970
    The second book in Reynolds's Track series, this one focuses on Patty -a sprinter who needs to run away from her problems. Patty is dealing with a lot - the loss of her father, her mother's illness, a new school and new living situation and her little sister. But Patty can run and that's her escape and therapy. Once again, Reynolds fills his stories with real characters. Patty isn't perfect. She's just a kid trying to do her best and figure things out. Highly recommended.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic series! Love getting to know these characters and their blended families! A great showcase for families looking so many different ways and how important it is for teens to feel love and support from different angles of their lives.
  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    Everything Jason Reynolds writes is amazing. The running scenes are fantastic. And the dramatic tension? HIGH. Patty has some life going on.
  • Kristen Unger
    January 1, 1970
    I'm just so grateful Jason Reynolds writes.He certainly ain't no junk.
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    I think I liked Ghost better, but I did love learning about Patty and her adorably different family.
  • Jack Pando
    January 1, 1970
    I can't believe I have to wait another year to read the final book.
  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    2nd installment in the Track series that is told through the perspective of Patty, a star 800 runner. Great character development and good pace! Looking forward to the 3rd book as this one left you with a cliff hanger ending!
  • Theresa Grissom
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, how I loved this book!! Even more than Ghost. Patina is such an enjoyable character. I laughed hard off and on throughout this entire book, which I read very quickly. Super excited to read the next book in this series. I know the upper elementary kids at school will love this book... can't wait to share it with them. Huge fan of Jason Reynolds!!Thanks to Edelweiss for an ARC copy of Patina!!
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  • Holly McGhee
    January 1, 1970
    the 12 year old says "It's really good and it deserves a 5 star rating. It's as good as GHOST."
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelinePatty loves to run, but even more than that, she loves winning races. This is understandable, since there is a lot in her life that hasn't worked out. Her father passed away before her younger sister Maddy was born, and a few years after that, her mother lost her legs to diabetes. The girls are fortunate in that their father's brother and his wife (whom they call Momly) are caring for the girls, but they do get to see their mother once a week when they take E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelinePatty loves to run, but even more than that, she loves winning races. This is understandable, since there is a lot in her life that hasn't worked out. Her father passed away before her younger sister Maddy was born, and a few years after that, her mother lost her legs to diabetes. The girls are fortunate in that their father's brother and his wife (whom they call Momly) are caring for the girls, but they do get to see their mother once a week when they take her to church. The girls attend a fancy charter school, where Patty doesn't feel she quite fits in. She misses her best friend, Cotton, from her old neighborhood. Patty takes very good care of her sister, but is difficult on the track team and at school. When she is assigned a group project in history, she is not excited to work with the other girls, even though they do pick her topic, Frida Kahlo. Patty's event is the 800, so she's not excited to run a relay, either, especially when one of the other girls in the group upsets her with a comment about Momly. When a car accident injures members of her family, Patty learns that she occasionally has to rely on the help of others, and it makes her appreciate the help she has been getting more. Strengths: Ghost has been wildly popular in my school, so I'm hoping that readers will pick up this second book. The character development really shines in this story, and is very well layered and nuanced-- the whole concept of learning to work in a group is huge, yet rarely discussed in middle grade literature. The details about how Patty and Maddy ended up with their aunt and uncle, as well as their aunt's back story, were realistic and compelling. There is a lot of good track information as well; if I worked with runners doing relays, I'd definitely make them waltz together! The inclusion of the health consequences of diabetes is handled deftly as well. Weaknesses: I really disliked Patty at the beginning of the book, so I was glad to see her character develop. I wish the coaches were nicer and more helpful. And this is personal-- I was VERY confused by Momly serving turkey legs for dinner every night. I can't say that in 30 years of grocery shopping, I've ever even seen a turkey leg in the store! What I really think: This is a title that is growing on me. I do love the covers, and can't wait to read the next one!
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  • Abby Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Another hit in the Track series by a master of voice, Jason Reynolds. This book is told from Patina's perspective, a track star who doesn't take kindly to coming in second place and fights to stay on top of everything in her complicated home life. I listened to GHOST on audio and it was amazing. I may have to revisit this one on audio when it comes out - Jason Reynolds's work begs to be read aloud. Coming out in August.
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