The Coffin Path
The Coffin Path is an eerie and compelling seventeenth-century ghost story set on the dark wilds of the Yorkshire moors. For fans of Michelle Paver and Sarah Waters, this gothic tale will weave its way into your imagination and chill you to the bone.Maybe you've heard tales about Scarcross Hall, the house on the old coffin path that winds from village to moor top. They say there's something up here, something evil.Mercy Booth isn't afraid. The moors and Scarcross are her home and lifeblood. But, beneath her certainty, small things are beginning to trouble her. Three ancient coins missing from her father's study, the shadowy figure out by the gatepost, an unshakeable sense that someone is watching.When a stranger appears seeking work, Mercy reluctantly takes him in. As their stories entwine, this man will change everything. She just can't see it yet.

The Coffin Path Details

TitleThe Coffin Path
Author
ReleaseFeb 8th, 2018
PublisherHeadline Review
ISBN-139781472204271
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Gothic, Horror, Fiction, Paranormal, Ghosts

The Coffin Path Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    Katherine Clements serves up a scarily creepy atmospheric gothic tale of ghosts and horror set in the Yorkshire Moors of the seventeenth century. It is a location that has been hit hard and poverty runs rampant, a place that has been deeply affected by the English Civil War, Cromwell's rule and the return of the monarchy to the country. It is steeped in rampant superstitions, rumours, fears and religious divisions. The dilapidated Scarcross Hall is the family home of the Booth family, on the old Katherine Clements serves up a scarily creepy atmospheric gothic tale of ghosts and horror set in the Yorkshire Moors of the seventeenth century. It is a location that has been hit hard and poverty runs rampant, a place that has been deeply affected by the English Civil War, Cromwell's rule and the return of the monarchy to the country. It is steeped in rampant superstitions, rumours, fears and religious divisions. The dilapidated Scarcross Hall is the family home of the Booth family, on the old coffin path that runs from the village and to the top, where there is a stone circle, known as the White Ladies, a site where horrifying macabre happenings occur. It is an area associated with an old evil, a house well acquainted with death, but Mercy Booth pays the local tales no heed, she is a strong, independent woman continuing the family tradition of sheep farming and she expects to inherit. It is a hard and demanding life, all the while under the threat of going under.Mercy's father, Bartram is a man in the throes of dementia, no longer able to work, a man who hides much. There are weird and odd sounds that emanate from a unused bedroom and old coins Bartram collected from the site of the White Ladies have vanished. A new work hand has been taken on by Mercy despite her misgivings, Ellis Ferreby, someone she eventually turns outs to be grateful for, as the local hands leave. Ellis, who has his own secrets becomes transfixed and obsessed with Mercy. Sheep are gruesomely mutilated, and amidst hostility from the local community, it is alleged that Mercy is a witch. Mercy finds strength and faith in her connection with the landscape, as she finds she is no longer able to ignore the danger, nor deny what is happening around her and the weather becomes increasingly inclement.The narrative is related from the perspective of Mercy and Ellis. Clements writing evokes the menace and tension beautifully, her descriptions give a strong sense of place and the nature of sheep farming. She has a real skill in the way she builds up the tension and suspense, creating real fear in me as the reader. This is a story of ghosts and secrets that will chill. I highly recommend this novel for those in search of a spooky atmospheric read. Many thanks to Headline for an ARC.
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  • Bex (Beckie Bookworm)
    January 1, 1970
    🌟🌟🌟STARSARC-REVIEWRelease Date-8/2/18So the Coffin Path By Katherine Clements was a strange one for me, I was really looking forward to this but it didn't quite deliver and left me feeling a tad confused by that unexplained ending.So this book tells the story of Mercy Booth who lives at Scarcross Hall with her father and an old servant called Meg.Scarcross Hall is at the end of the old coffin path that winds up from the village to the top of the moor, hence the stories name. Stories Abound abou 🌟🌟🌟STARSARC-REVIEWRelease Date-8/2/18So the Coffin Path By Katherine Clements was a strange one for me, I was really looking forward to this but it didn't quite deliver and left me feeling a tad confused by that unexplained ending.So this book tells the story of Mercy Booth who lives at Scarcross Hall with her father and an old servant called Meg.Scarcross Hall is at the end of the old coffin path that winds up from the village to the top of the moor, hence the stories name. Stories Abound about the evil that resides up here.But Mercy isn't afraid she loves this land.And when a stranger appears seeking work Mercy reluctantly provides it.So the stranger, Ellis Ferreby and Mercy's tales are on a collision course and the fallout is going to be epic.So this is what I would class as a gothic ghost tale, set in the seventeenth century on the bleak Yorkshire Moors amid sheep country.The Coffin Path gives vivid descriptions throughout of the bleakness of the times.The first visual upon starting this is a graphic portrayal of Mercy aiding a sheeps labour and this book continues to provide vivid optical delights.The atmosphere created throughout hangs heavy with an extremely ominous feel.Despite this, I struggled at times to fully connect and though the mood was set there never seemed to be an adequate explanation for any of the events occurring.The Coffin Path mostly relies on its ambience, setting an aura of terror for the reader.I also felt there were just too many bloody sheep stories being told. I know where it was set, and the author did show her great knowledge of sheep farming back in the day, which is awesome, but for me, it was just a tad too much information.I was sick to the back bloody teeth of sheep.So the ending for this book took me completely by surprise, I saw some of it coming, but there was other stuff that I really wasn't expecting at all, and if I'm honest I actually feel rather sad and heartbroken for Ellis, poor bloke.I would have definitely prefered an alternative ending and actually felt that Mercy was a complete cow to the poor bloke.And also, as I said earlier, I am not quite sure what has actually happened here.It was all a bit weird if I'm honest.I was left feeling a bit deflated, this showed so much promise but for me fell totally flat in places.Saying that this was very well written and had such a lyrical prose you couldn't help being enthralled by the language and also the overall setting.So, in conclusion, this was a somewhat solid read but with some issues that I failed to overcome.I was provided with an ARC of "The Coffin Path" By Netgalley of which I have reviewed voluntary.All opinions expressed are entirely my own. Reviewed By Beckie Bookworm.https://www.facebook.com/beckiebookworm/www.beckiebookworm.com
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  • Blair
    January 1, 1970
    Set in a 17th-century sheep-farming community against the harsh backdrop of the Yorkshire moors, The Coffin Path felt like a book I could sink into and just savour right from the beginning. This historical ghost story is a fabulous example of great storytelling, rich with detail and drama.Mercy Booth is the only daughter of a widowed landowner. Her father's health is declining, and Mercy has not married or had children. In an age when women do not tend to inherit, Mercy nevertheless believes she Set in a 17th-century sheep-farming community against the harsh backdrop of the Yorkshire moors, The Coffin Path felt like a book I could sink into and just savour right from the beginning. This historical ghost story is a fabulous example of great storytelling, rich with detail and drama.Mercy Booth is the only daughter of a widowed landowner. Her father's health is declining, and Mercy has not married or had children. In an age when women do not tend to inherit, Mercy nevertheless believes she will ultimately take ownership of Scarcross Hall. But this year, there are bad omens: the first lamb of spring has a difficult birth, and the ewe that bore it dies immediately afterwards. The locals are beginning to turn against the Booths – in part because they are suspicious of Mercy's status – and the arrival of a mysterious stranger named Ellis Ferreby seems to stir up even more discontent. Most disturbing of all are the unaccountable noises, footsteps and other signs of movement emanating from an abandoned bedroom at the Hall.There's a nice feminist slant to Mercy's character, and her independence is well-realised without making her seem anachronistic. Clements does a great job of depicting her faith, too. Mercy is a woman who feels closest to God when she is communing with nature: 'I'm with Him when I'm out on the moor, when I see His hand at work in life, death and the turning of the world.' The Coffin Path contains some creepy details, but much of the narrative is devoted to establishing the character of Mercy, her past, and the relationships the Booths have with the local community, as well as the expert scene-setting required to turn the success or failure of a farm into a nail-biting plight.The plot steps up its pace in the final chapters; I found myself turning the pages pretty feverishly, desperate to find out how it would all end... and I wasn't disappointed. The ending is a virtuoso flourish that ties a neat (albeit pitch-black) bow around the story's various strands and twists.(Also: it's always nice when books you read close together have a kind of serendipitous symmetry. The Coffin Path has enough in common with Andrew Michael Hurley's superb Devil’s Day that it could almost be a prequel. The setting is never specifically named, allowing me to imagine it as the Endlands hundreds of years before the events of Hurley's novel. The rural northern setting, the sheep-farming family, the locals' fear of the Devil lurking on the moors... it's all there. And the coffin path of the Booths' era might have become Reapers' Walk by the time the Pentecosts arrived. The Coffin Path also reminded me of another excellent historical horror novel, Rawblood by Catriona Ward, and there's one detail in particular that makes it uncannily similar to Laura Purcell's The Silent Companions.)I received an advance review copy of The Coffin Path from the publisher through NetGalley.TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr
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  • Maria Chnoic
    January 1, 1970
    “When we first came here, I told him this house had secrets. I warned him. And he flew into one of his rages and forbade me ever to speak if such things again. Promised to cast me out if I did. Seems no sense in changing that now.”This is a creepy gothic tale of a 17th century Hall and sheep farm on the moors of Yorkshire. The plot is worthy of a Victorian sensationalist novel with its dark secrets and melodramatic endings. All the characters are keeping dark secrets that could ruin them all... “When we first came here, I told him this house had secrets. I warned him. And he flew into one of his rages and forbade me ever to speak if such things again. Promised to cast me out if I did. Seems no sense in changing that now.”This is a creepy gothic tale of a 17th century Hall and sheep farm on the moors of Yorkshire. The plot is worthy of a Victorian sensationalist novel with its dark secrets and melodramatic endings. All the characters are keeping dark secrets that could ruin them all... The story is told from the alternating first-person perspective of the Mistress of Scarcross Hall and the third person perspective a shepherd that joins them one spring. As the year progresses we have ghostly presences, ancient coins, animal slaughtering, secrets aplenty and more than one accusation of witchcraft. But what will Winter bring?Some very atmospheric prose in this one. “I’ve had blood on my hands ever since. I’m elbow deep in a thigh, viscous caul of it. Though I’ve never sweated and screamed in my own childbed, I know life and death better than most women. And now, as ever, I’m mindful of my mother. It happens every time I birth a lamb - the weighted pause before the newborn’s first breath, like a clock’s final turning before the hour’s strike, and I always think the same thing: how the moment of birth, of new life, so often means the death of something else.”However, the plot wavered a little for me and I was not a fan of the secret that was revealed. Neverthe less a good gothic read and there is nothing wrong with that. More Gothic than merely ghostly this is recommended for fans of Daphne du Maurier.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Find all my book reviews, plus fascinating author interviews, exclusive guest posts and book extracts, on my blog: https://whatcathyreadnext.wordpress.com/The Coffin Path’s striking opening line - “I was born with blood on my hands” - sets the scene for a story full of atmosphere and chilling moments. Ancient curses, family secrets, a remote moorland setting and a crumbling old house reached only by an ancient track called the coffin path – what more do you want?Very much in the tradition of M. Find all my book reviews, plus fascinating author interviews, exclusive guest posts and book extracts, on my blog: https://whatcathyreadnext.wordpress.com/The Coffin Path’s striking opening line - “I was born with blood on my hands” - sets the scene for a story full of atmosphere and chilling moments. Ancient curses, family secrets, a remote moorland setting and a crumbling old house reached only by an ancient track called the coffin path – what more do you want?Very much in the tradition of M. R. James, the sinister atmosphere the author creates comes more from suggestion than full-blown in your face horror. Noises from empty rooms, objects moving or disappearing without seeming human intervention, sudden chills or unusual scents are far scarier and unsettling to my mind than coming face-to-face with a monster. There is one particular scene that definitely made me want to draw the bedcovers up over my head! All the time the reader is made to wonder whether there is malicious human agency behind the goings-on, whether they are the product of a feverish or disturbed imagination – mass hysteria even - or there is an actual supernatural presence.As word of the strange occurrences at Scarcross Hall reach the wider community it’s not long before superstitious minds see the work of the Devil behind them and seek to assign blame. Like other women down the ages, Mercy, as an independent-minded, unconventional and most importantly unmarried woman, is an easy target for their suspicions, especially when fuelled by grudges of a more personal nature. Alongside the strange events in the house, the author presents a convincing and detailed picture of the everyday struggle to eke out a livelihood on a remote moorland farm. There is some wonderful descriptive writing that conjures up the wild beauty of the moor that surrounds Scarcross Hall. ‘Now, in this moment, the wind brings it to him: the rich savour of damp peat, must and decay, the metallic, coppery scent of snow and ancient, rainwashed stone, a hint of salt and sea storms.’ I also liked the use of alliteration in lines like, ‘He craves the comfort of it, longs for the liquidity of limbs, the gradual sink into silent contemplation.’I have to say that although the story is set in the 17th century, I didn’t get an overwhelming sense of that period for a lot of the book. It felt that it could just have easily been set in the 18th or 19th century. However, this does change towards the end of the book as the events and upheaval of the recent Civil War become more central to the story. The Coffin Path is a satisfyingly creepy ghost story that builds slowly to a dramatic climax as secrets are finally revealed. I received an advance reader copy courtesy of NetGalley and publishers Headline in return for an honest and unbiased review.
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  • Lucy Banks
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book, in exchange for an honest review.A slow-burning, atmospheric novel, with plenty of mystery.Say the words 'gothic horror' to me and you've immediately grabbed my attention. As such, I eagerly requested a copy of this book - as anything that promises historic settings, eerie moors and unsettling manor houses I felt certain would be a winner. For the most part, I wasn't disappointed, though I have to admit, it wasn't quite what I was expecting. Mercy Booth lives I received a free copy of this book, in exchange for an honest review.A slow-burning, atmospheric novel, with plenty of mystery.Say the words 'gothic horror' to me and you've immediately grabbed my attention. As such, I eagerly requested a copy of this book - as anything that promises historic settings, eerie moors and unsettling manor houses I felt certain would be a winner. For the most part, I wasn't disappointed, though I have to admit, it wasn't quite what I was expecting. Mercy Booth lives in Scarcross Manor (now there's a name!) with her father, an elderly lady called Agnes, and with a variety of farm-helps / shepherds close by. Right from the start, the mood is established; Mercy senses something evil in the rolling mist and runs home, convinced that she sees a pale figure outside. A while later, a mysterious man called Ellis turns up, looking for work. No-one else quite trusts him, but he proves himself a good worker, and is one of the few who dares to venture out on those sinister moors at night. Meanwhile, things are getting pretty weird back at the manor. Mercy is plagued by nocturnal noises and spooky sights; hands touching her in the dead of night, a strange fire-guard, made to look like a child, seemingly moving from room to room. However, she's hell-bent on the manor being hers after her father's death, and nothing is going to make her flee. One of the strongest aspects of The Coffin Path was the creation of atmosphere. Although nothing out-and-out terrifying happens, the author still manages to create a sense of growing dread, and there were several moments where I felt genuinely chilled. Her depictions of the moors were absolutely spot-on, and she captures the haunting quality of being out in the middle of nowhere very well. Likewise, I found the historical setting completely convincing. I'm often a nit-picker about these types of things, but as far as I could tell, it was all thoroughly researched and as a result, felt very authentic. The characters were earthy, occasionally repulsive, and compelling to read. For me, the stand-out was Mercy herself; mannish, ahead of her time as far as attitudes to a woman's role in the world goes. Her unrelenting determination to own the manor drove much of the action, and I loved the fact that she didn't quit, right until the bitter end. It was also a masterful twist at the end, and one I did not see coming. My main niggle was with the central sections of the book, which did become ever so slightly boggy. After a truly creepy start, I was filled with anticipation, expecting the gothic horror to ramp up even further. However, it never really revved into action for me- it was always a simmering, anticipatory kind of horror, rather than anything actually really happening. I felt like I needed some sort of conclusion about what was going on in the house too - there was never really any resolution, but then, given that this wasn't actually the main thrust of the novel, I can understand the author's reasoning for writing it like this. Overall though, very enjoyable - and deserves to be read for the superb atmospheric descriptions if nothing else.
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  • Jackie Law
    January 1, 1970
    The Coffin Path, by Katherine Clements, is a ghost story set on the edge of a lonesome moor in 1674. Its protagonist is thirty-two year old Mercy Booth who lives in the gradually decaying splendour of Scarcross Hall with her ageing father, Bartram, and his faithful servant, Agnes. Mercy works alongside the shepherds and farmhands hired to till their land and care for the flock of sheep that provide the family’s main income. She has been told that one day it will all be hers.The story opens with The Coffin Path, by Katherine Clements, is a ghost story set on the edge of a lonesome moor in 1674. Its protagonist is thirty-two year old Mercy Booth who lives in the gradually decaying splendour of Scarcross Hall with her ageing father, Bartram, and his faithful servant, Agnes. Mercy works alongside the shepherds and farmhands hired to till their land and care for the flock of sheep that provide the family’s main income. She has been told that one day it will all be hers.The story opens with the arrival of the first of the season’s lambs. It is not an easy birth and proves a portent of happenings to come. The first of these is the arrival of a stranger, Ellis Ferreby, who is looking for employment. Although the locals are wary of outsiders he is taken on, proving himself a capable shepherd and hard worker.Mercy has spent her life out on the moor but notices a new, chilling presence, a feeling of being watched as she goes about familiar tasks. Within the hall she hears unexplained noises above the expected creaks and movement of the old house. There have long been rumours of a curse, and her father is suffering a decline of mind.In her troubles Mercy finds herself drawn to Ellis although both keep their thoughts and fears close. Their interactions are noticed by a local man, Henry Ravens, who grows jealous and threatens to denounce Mercy. Within the hall, Bartram becomes agitated when items he values go missing. These include three old coins, one of which is found under the pillow of a young lad named Sam, the son of the head shepherd and a favourite of the master.Sam is often around the hall, spending time with Bartram in his study. As the year progresses and strange events continue to unfold the boy becomes agitated and withdrawn. Mercy suspects he knows more than he is saying but cannot coax him to confide in her. Likewise she is unwilling to share her fears with even those she would previously have trusted.Mutilated lambs are discovered and bad weather threatens the harvest. Along with the ghostly noises from an unused chamber within Scarcross there is much to concern the Booths and those who rely on their employ. Mercy fears that her sinfulness has brought down punishment from God. Ellis watches and waits, keeping his true reason for being there from all.The plot has many elements of a good ghost story: a run down hall housing secretive sinister artefacts; rumours of an ancient curse linked to the devil; fear of the dead returning; accusations of witchcraft. The church plays a role as does the stranger with a past that is revealed gradually. It is unfortunate that I guessed the main twist early on, and that I struggled to maintain engagement as the Booth’s troubles mounted. I would have preferred a tighter plot construction and a clearer drawing together of the mysterious and the supernatural.Having said that the last fifty pages held the strongest part of the story. There was horror aplenty and a spine chilling final line.A tale that started and ended well enough but felt somewhat bloated in between. I am left feeling underwhelmed.My copy of this book was provided gratis by the publisher, Headline Review.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Atmospheric and very spooky historical ghost story. A compelling read.
  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    Visit the locations in the novelThis made the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end, my eyes pop right open, my mouth drop in shock....you get the idea. If I owned a room divider/screen it would now be so far away from my house as I could get it. Next time I hear a sheep, I'm probably going to have a heart attack, and what is that amongst the trees at night?The Yorkshire moors are as bleak here as they've ever been but mix in a ghostly tale, the ghosts of men returning from war and secrets h Visit the locations in the novelThis made the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end, my eyes pop right open, my mouth drop in shock....you get the idea. If I owned a room divider/screen it would now be so far away from my house as I could get it. Next time I hear a sheep, I'm probably going to have a heart attack, and what is that amongst the trees at night?The Yorkshire moors are as bleak here as they've ever been but mix in a ghostly tale, the ghosts of men returning from war and secrets hidden under lock and key and you're in for a real treat. Katherine writes with flair and a flicker of fear in the pen. The scratches of each and every word will pierce your heart and make it go faster...Chillingly brilliant. Read with the lights on - better still read in the daylight as if the lights go out....
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. Maybe I'm somewhat disappointed because it wasn't really what I was expecting. Whilst the writing flows and is often quite beautiful, I found this too hard going. There was plenty of atmosphere but no real sense of dread for me. And there are only so many descriptions of fleece-odours and tallow candles one can read. The ending is pretty gripping with it's twisty-turns but for me, it wasn't worth the effort of reading all that to get there.I think this is something that would appear to a pa Meh. Maybe I'm somewhat disappointed because it wasn't really what I was expecting. Whilst the writing flows and is often quite beautiful, I found this too hard going. There was plenty of atmosphere but no real sense of dread for me. And there are only so many descriptions of fleece-odours and tallow candles one can read. The ending is pretty gripping with it's twisty-turns but for me, it wasn't worth the effort of reading all that to get there.I think this is something that would appear to a particular type of reader, it just isn't me.
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  • The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).
    January 1, 1970
    As always this review can also be found on my blog The tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...I received a free copy of this book courtesy of the publisher and through bookbridgr in exchange for an honest review.When it comes through your doorUnless you just want some moreI think you better call (ghostbusters)Who ya gonna call? (ghostbusters)Who ya gonna call? (ghostbusters)Let’s be honest, it would have been remiss of me not to have used the Ghostbusters theme in a review f As always this review can also be found on my blog The tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress...I received a free copy of this book courtesy of the publisher and through bookbridgr in exchange for an honest review.When it comes through your doorUnless you just want some moreI think you better call (ghostbusters)Who ya gonna call? (ghostbusters)Who ya gonna call? (ghostbusters)Let’s be honest, it would have been remiss of me not to have used the Ghostbusters theme in a review for a ghost story! 👻👻👻The Coffin Path is a ghost story set in the 17th century and takes place within the confines of Scarcross Hall an isolated, remote and rundown house and sheep farm located up on the wild, untamed and harsh Yorkshire Moors.Scarcross Hall is owned by Bartram Booth, he is the master of the house and lives there along with his daughter Mercy and their housekeeper Agnes (though Agnes is much more than just the housekeeper, she is like part of their family and her life is intertwined with that of the Booth’s).Bartram is getting on in years and while he is still master of the house it is in name only and it is now left to Mercy to oversee the sheep farming. Each season men come looking for work to help with the sheep farming, this season, a mysterious stranger, Ellis Ferreby appears from on the moors seeking employment as a shepherd.One coin marks the first to go,A second bodes the fall, The third will seal a sinner’s fate, The Devil take them all. At around the same time as the arrival of Ferreby up on the moors Mercy feels a malevolent presence watching her and three golden coins that hold ominous portents are found to be missing from Scarcross Hall.The ‘coffin path‘ of the book’s title denotes the pathway that leads from Scarcross Hall to the church in the nearby village and it is the only way to reach the Hall itself. Yes, for those of you wondering Scarcross Hall has a cursed history which ties into ‘the coffin path‘ name but if you want to know more then you will have to read the book to find out what it is.For the most part, The Coffin Path is told from the perspective of Mercy Booth. Though, the narration does switch at times to focus on the stranger who has arrived looking for work at Scarcross Hall, Ellis Ferreby.The chapters from Mercy’s point of view are told in the first person whilst the chapters from Ferreby’s point of view are told from the third person perspective. I have to admit that the change in switching from one style to the other was at first slightly jarring but it works well and helps to highlight the fact that The Coffin Path is very much Mercy’s story.I found Mercy to be an engaging character who is strong, determined and fiercely passionate about her independence and Scarcross Hall. Ellis Ferreby is also an intriguing character. A wanderer and stellar shepherd you know that he is keeping secrets and struggling with his past and you are awaiting those secrets to be revealed so that we can find out what his true intentions are.In a book like The Coffin Path for me, the setting is just as important to the story being told as the characters and the events that transpire and I felt that the balance between the three was spot on. With Scarcross Hall and the surrounding moors Clements succeeds in creating a desolate and lonely location that is evocatively described and transports you back to when the story takes place. Her setting is also filled with a dark and gothic imagery that fully incorporates and depicts the harshness, poverty, beliefs and superstitions of the time.Clements handles the supernatural/ghost aspect of the story really well. It’s definitely not a case of Casper the friendly ghost and the supernatural occurrences, disturbances and goings-on that take place are chilling and menacing. Nothing that happens in The Coffin Path is ever surreal, silly or over the top, you don’t have to suspend your disbelief and Clements allows you, the reader and your imagination the chance to play its part too (one bit in particular springs to mind that you are left to come to your own conclusion over). And, let’s be honest, we’ve all heard strange noises and things that go bump in the night.I feel the need to mention that there are a couple of scenes involving animals that some readers might find unsettling. But, they haven’t been added merely for the shock value, they aren’t glorified and they add to the story that Clements is telling.The Coffin Path is a haunting slow burn of a ghost story that is filled with secrets and a creeping sense of unease and trepidation throughout its length as you know that things are only going to escalate and get worse for Mercy and Scarcross Hall.Clements writing is very atmospheric and eerie. She gives her tale plenty of time to build, ramping up the tension and allowing it the opportunity to really get under your skin which combined with her sublime storytelling weaves (or should that be knits, you know, sheep farming, sheep, wool, knitting) a thoroughly creepy and brooding read.
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  • Blodeuedd Finland
    January 1, 1970
    17th century. The Moors. A house that is said to be haunted and a stone circle where witches and the devil play. I had no idea what to believe, but something was sure going on.Mercy loves the land, her sheep, her life. She is content as it is. But her dad is loosing it and then things start to happen. Just as they have happened not everyone living there before them. All who have met violent ends.She goes on with her life. It is lambing season, then it's shearing season, then the grass needs to b 17th century. The Moors. A house that is said to be haunted and a stone circle where witches and the devil play. I had no idea what to believe, but something was sure going on.Mercy loves the land, her sheep, her life. She is content as it is. But her dad is loosing it and then things start to happen. Just as they have happened not everyone living there before them. All who have met violent ends.She goes on with her life. It is lambing season, then it's shearing season, then the grass needs to be taken in for the winter. All while things happen. Dark things. Little things. There are footsteps. There are shadows...or is it just imagination?I liked that it took place when it did. Cos then everyone could talk about witches and the devil. Ignorant fools! But, something dark is there. And even as I close the book I do not know what. There is just true darkness in the shadows. And I would have left that place years ago.I enjoyed it and I liked that it gave things away little by little.One of those horror stories where you do not know what to expect and as you turn the last page, you know, you know you are not alone and you get chills down your spine. Then the darkness begins.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    It's the late 17th century and Mercy lives a remote life on the Yorkshire Moors with her father, servant, and the men who work her land. There are stories of hauntings and mysterious happenings but Mercy has thoughts only for her sheep and her land. But then she starts to hear strange noises and has the feeling she's being watched. When a stranger turns up needing work, everything changes for Mercy and her family. This was a very subtle ghost story, made bleak by the setting, and I would recomme It's the late 17th century and Mercy lives a remote life on the Yorkshire Moors with her father, servant, and the men who work her land. There are stories of hauntings and mysterious happenings but Mercy has thoughts only for her sheep and her land. But then she starts to hear strange noises and has the feeling she's being watched. When a stranger turns up needing work, everything changes for Mercy and her family. This was a very subtle ghost story, made bleak by the setting, and I would recommend it to fans of Susan Hill and Diane Setterfield.
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  • Pat Walsh
    January 1, 1970
    Atmospheric, unsettling and beautifully written.
  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Headline and Netgalley for and ARC of this book.The Coffin path is a 17th Century ghost story set in the Yorkshire moors. Where Mercy and Father Bertram Booth live in a place called Scarcross Hall just off the coffin path. Where she has lived all her life. Where they employ other people to look after the sheep over the moors and When her father dies hope to be the mistress of Scarcross hall. But in then times women who are not married cannot inherit the land. It will have t I would like to thank Headline and Netgalley for and ARC of this book.The Coffin path is a 17th Century ghost story set in the Yorkshire moors. Where Mercy and Father Bertram Booth live in a place called Scarcross Hall just off the coffin path. Where she has lived all her life. Where they employ other people to look after the sheep over the moors and When her father dies hope to be the mistress of Scarcross hall. But in then times women who are not married cannot inherit the land. It will have to be sold as presently they have both fallen on hard times and their life is about sheep farming. But one day, some sheep are found mutilated and Mercy senses that there is evil about and watching her closely. Some of the local villagers think that Mercy is a witch. Also her father Bertram is suffering from dementia. Things don’t look good for the both of them. Until Ellis arrives and he fits right it.This is a spooky, atmospheric gothic tale which I enjoyed but, I didn’t like or relate to any characters in the story and I also thought that at times the story just kept on repeating itself talking about dead sheep. Where, the author could have put more action in the story then talk about sheep.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    The Coffin Path is an eerie tale that takes place on the Yorkshire Moors in the 17th century. It’s a hard place to live, the bleakness, the years after the war and its in a remote area that is reliant on good weather to make a decent living. And there is a rumour that has never gone away of an evil presence on the moors and especially at Scarcross Hall, the home of Mercy and her father.The novel has two narrators. Ellis, who has recently arrived in the area and Mercy. Ellis has a barely hinted a The Coffin Path is an eerie tale that takes place on the Yorkshire Moors in the 17th century. It’s a hard place to live, the bleakness, the years after the war and its in a remote area that is reliant on good weather to make a decent living. And there is a rumour that has never gone away of an evil presence on the moors and especially at Scarcross Hall, the home of Mercy and her father.The novel has two narrators. Ellis, who has recently arrived in the area and Mercy. Ellis has a barely hinted at past and at first Mercy doesn’t trust him. But, when all her regular workers abandon her he is one of her only allies. There isn’t much of his narration that covers the sinister events, apart from what happens with the livestock.Mercy is the character who is affected most by what is happening. She can see her father’s health deteriorate with what is occurring as well as changing behavior of Sam, a young boy who lives nearby. Most of her narration had me warily looking over my shoulder and tensing at every noise I heard. If I had a fire screen it would have been removed from the house, it was one of the creepiest parts of the novel, and it brought me out in goosebumps more than once.As well as being a ghost story it was also a historical one. The English Civil War had an impact on the area and many of the characters in the novel were affected by it. Some of them were living in poverty and suspicious of those who had a different religion. Many of the locals weren’t likeable, but living in fear of losing everything and listening to tales of witchcraft and unexplained occurences must have made a difficult situation to live in. I imagine that this was an accurate description for the time.I enjoy a ghost story, but I have found it difficult lately to find one that kept me on edge. The Coffin Path has made up for recent disappointments, it is one of the eeriest books that I have read for a few years. And with the addition of historical fiction in a period of time that had an impact locally.With thanks to the publisher for the copy received.
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  • Yvonne
    January 1, 1970
    Set in the 17th century on the eerie Yorkshire Moors. Meet Mercy, she lives with her father Bartram Booth and Agnes in Scarcross Hall. They are in the heart of the sheep community and part of a close-knit of herders, shepherds and locals. But when a stranger appears looking for work, is it coincidence that things take on a turn that boarders on creepy maybe even supernatural.The descriptions given of the contrasts that can be experienced on the moors have been vividly told, they paint a beautifu Set in the 17th century on the eerie Yorkshire Moors. Meet Mercy, she lives with her father Bartram Booth and Agnes in Scarcross Hall. They are in the heart of the sheep community and part of a close-knit of herders, shepherds and locals. But when a stranger appears looking for work, is it coincidence that things take on a turn that boarders on creepy maybe even supernatural.The descriptions given of the contrasts that can be experienced on the moors have been vividly told, they paint a beautiful and bleak image. She has explored the deeply rooted sense of community. But when uncertainty mixed with fear is in the air then self-preservation is utmost priority, woe betide anyone getting on the wrong side of community spirit. Fear is something that lurks in the minds of some, makes them think of things from the past, it creeps into the heads and when things go missing, noises are heard and items are moved the feeling that something more is going on.The plot itself is a good suspense filled one, it paints the bleak, rugged and dangerous moors as a backdrop for a more intense feeling. I was never quite sure who or what was the cause, but by the end I felt quite satisfied that my questions and thoughts had been answered. Mercy is a hard but likeable character, the epitomizes the strength required to work, a woman in a man’s world, doing a man’s job, just as good as any man as well. She is a powerful character, and there were times that she did have more of a feminine side.I thought this was a great read, it has the eerie suspense of evil that chitters away in the background, occasionally raising its head to remind you of its presence. It is atmospheric and has a beautiful description of the moors and surrounding areas. This is a book I would definitely recommend to readers of historical fiction, suspense and in my opinion only a hint of horror.
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  • Mairead Hearne (swirlandthread.com)
    January 1, 1970
    'One coin marks the first to goA second bodes the fallThe third will seal a sinner’s fateThe Devil take them all’ The Coffin Path is the third novel from critically acclaimed novelist Katherine Clements. Just published by Headline, The Coffin Path is described as ‘an eerie and compelling seventeenth-century ghost story set on the dark wilds of the Yorkshire Moors’You’ll feel the shivers up your spine with this one!!Read on for my thoughts…The Coffin Path….even the name alone brings out the goos 'One coin marks the first to goA second bodes the fallThe third will seal a sinner’s fateThe Devil take them all’ The Coffin Path is the third novel from critically acclaimed novelist Katherine Clements. Just published by Headline, The Coffin Path is described as ‘an eerie and compelling seventeenth-century ghost story set on the dark wilds of the Yorkshire Moors’You’ll feel the shivers up your spine with this one!!Read on for my thoughts…The Coffin Path….even the name alone brings out the goosebumps.Katherine Clements takes us all on a journey back to the darkness and wilds of the Yorkshire moors in the seventeenth-century. From the opening pages we are drawn into a shadowy and brooding place. It is the home of the Booth family, sheep farmers of means, living in a very isolated location alongside the old coffin path. Their home, Scarcross Hall, is a house full of menace and mystery, a house that has a past that would raise the hairs on anyone’s skin. But for Mercy Booth, the daughter/mistress of Scarcross Hall, these stories are nothing more than old wives tales, set to frighten small children and to prevent them from venturing too far into the Moors.Do you know what a coffin path is?It’s not a term I would have been too familiar with but it’s a route that was used to carry corpses from oft-times remote communities to the cemetery. These routes became symbolic with ghost stories and spooky tales, with it being said that the spirits remained behind in our world for many reasons. Spirits with unfinished business to attend to. Spooky stuff indeed….Mercy Booth lives with her aged father, their housekeeper Agnes and her beloved dog Bracken. They live a lifestyle that for many would appear rough, tough and very challenging. Mercy, never really one for the feminine ways, is at one with the hardship that the moors offer up. Scarcross Hall is her home. It always has been her home and, for Mercy, there is nothing that she is not willing to do to keep her family and her life secure and safe. But as strange occurrences start unfolding, Mercy soon realises that she is about to face the fight of her life and will need all her resources to face down the foe that is threatening her very soul.The Coffin Path tells the tale of ancient coins disappearing, coins with a very chilling and disturbing history. Shadows appear in unusual places. A presence is felt in the home and in the moors. A stranger arrives at their door offering much needed help but he also has his own story, his own murky history, that will impact the future for Mercy in ways she cannot begin to imagine.The Coffin Path is everything it proposes to be. It is a ghost story. It is chilling. It is eerie. There is a presence throughout this novel that is unsettling and very very threatening. We cannot see it nor touch it, but we can feel it’s existence on every page.The Coffin Path is a historically rich novel with such vivid descriptions throughout. There is a terrible sense of foreboding as the Yorkshire moors come alive to the reader, with superstition and fear rife among this very rural community.Katherine Clements is a writer immersed in history, as both a self-confessed costume drama addict and a member of the Historical Writers Committee. Her passion shines through in her words making The Coffin Path come alive in your hands as you turn the pages.Bursting with an atmosphere that evokes chills and peril, The Coffin Path is a must read for all who like a little scare before bedtime!!
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  • Ophelia Sings
    January 1, 1970
    The Yorkshire moors are in Mercy Booth's blood. As is the crumbling, isolated Scarcross Hall - her childhood home. And she will do anything to remain there. Anything...Religion, love and death stalk the pages of Katherine Clements' deeply atmospheric, ghostly yarn. Rich in historic detail, The Coffin Path is set in an England still reeling in the aftermath of civil war - the effects of which reach even the most desolate corners of the Yorkshire moors. Clements vividly evokes this bleak setting, The Yorkshire moors are in Mercy Booth's blood. As is the crumbling, isolated Scarcross Hall - her childhood home. And she will do anything to remain there. Anything...Religion, love and death stalk the pages of Katherine Clements' deeply atmospheric, ghostly yarn. Rich in historic detail, The Coffin Path is set in an England still reeling in the aftermath of civil war - the effects of which reach even the most desolate corners of the Yorkshire moors. Clements vividly evokes this bleak setting, the changes of the season and the trials of sheep farming in such a punishing location recalling Hardy at his most lyrical. Most effective are the wintry scenes - it's here that Scarcross, cut off from the world, feels at its most desolate and brooding, rendering it the perfect setting for the horrors which occur within its ancient walls.Mercy cuts a wonderful character, no-nonsense and independent with her breeches and calloused hands at a time when such behaviour ran the risk of accusations of witchcraft. Her all-consuming drive to claim what she feels is rightfully hers in the face of deeply superstitious and patriarchal 17th century society is enthralling as it unfolds, even as it leads her into danger. Clements has crafted a chillingly vivid world, one which the reader doesn't always feel comfortable inhabiting - yet we read on, compelled. There is stark beauty here, and the tension is often palpable - though the shadowy figures and curious nocturnal creepings are not the only source of fear, as superstition and the actions of lynch-mob locals chill us to the bone. Few characters are as they seem, yet all are well drawn, substantial and elicit sympathy and revulsion in turn. The strong-willed woman at one with the moor and the intense, handsome stranger seems familiar, but The Coffin Path is written for more modern tastes - this is a visceral tale, unafraid of gore and nature red in tooth and claw, and the shattering denouement would rock even the most open-minded Victorian sensibilities. It's beautifully and sensitively executed, however, and the thick sense of dread never lets up for a moment.The dialogue, unfortunately, is a little inauthentic - we often forget we are in 1674. Although the reader is undoubtedly transported to a past age, it feels more in common with the 19th century than the 17th - perhaps unavoidable, given the tropes with which we're dealing. It's a shame, too, that the chilling - and often, downright terrifying - events at Scarcross Hall are never satisfactorily explained - is it a ghost, and if so, whose? Or is it the Devil himself, rumoured as he is to stalk the moors and Scarcross in particular? Nevertheless, they add another disoncerting layer to what is already an intense, dark tale.The Coffin Path is part ghost story, part dark romance, part historical drama. But for me, it's at its most effective when viewed as a chronicle of the struggles of women at a period when they had no voice. The spiralling horrors are a metaphor for the unravelling of Mercy's mind in her desperation to save her home and way of life, and it is painful and harrowing to witness.A deeply unsettling tale whose minor flaws are eclipsed by darkly shimmering prose, rich texture and immaculate characterisation, The Coffin Path possesses great depth and nuance, and represents spooky storytelling at its (near) finest.My thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Linda Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Living at Scarcross has never been easy for Mercy, but it is about to get considerably harder.Now, I must confess that I don’t usually read books marketed in the ghost or horror genre as I find them too unsettling, but The Coffin Path was a perfect read for me with just the right amount of creepiness and supernatural to disturb and entertain me. Hardcore horror readers might find it wasn’t horrific enough, but I loved it.The quality of writing is outstanding. There’s a sophistication to Katherin Living at Scarcross has never been easy for Mercy, but it is about to get considerably harder.Now, I must confess that I don’t usually read books marketed in the ghost or horror genre as I find them too unsettling, but The Coffin Path was a perfect read for me with just the right amount of creepiness and supernatural to disturb and entertain me. Hardcore horror readers might find it wasn’t horrific enough, but I loved it.The quality of writing is outstanding. There’s a sophistication to Katherine Clements’s prose style that draws in the reader and that is completely convincing so that I felt I was really able to understand the 1600s when the book is set, and to comprehend its superstitions and practices making for a realistic and powerful reading experience. There’s such realism alongside the more supernatural elements so that this narrative is finely balanced and nuanced.I thoroughly enjoyed the way the story switches from Mercy’s first person perspective to the other third person aspects so that the reader is kept guessing right the way through. I simply couldn’t decide if this was a story where there really are malevolent elements at work or if there is a more mundane explanation. You’ll have to read the book to find out!The appeal to the senses throughout is so cleverly done that I could envisage every scene so vividly. I’d love to see The Coffin Path translated into film or television, although I’m not entirely sure I’d have the nerve to watch it. Whilst Katherine Clements is not afraid to describe more visceral aspects clearly, she does so with a deftness of touch that is never gratuitous. This is such fine writing.I adored the characterisation. Mercy and Ellis in particular hold the reader in thrall, but not one of the minor characters is extraneous to the action and atmosphere so that there’s a wonderful coherence which is quite perturbing. I never quite knew who was trustworthy or honest and found the protagonists of Mercy and Ellis multi-layered and fascinating. The environment is also a compelling character in its own right and at times I thought of the poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins as I read. There are definitely echoes of the Brontes here too with a gritty bleakness and considerable passion woven throughout.I loved the story telling. At its simplest this is a story about a place where some inexplicable events take place but my goodness, Katherine Clements knows how to keep the reader guessing, how to uncover just enough atmospheric and tantalising detail to keep them hooked and to deliver the most satisfying resolution.The Coffin Path is my first Katherine Clements read and it will definitely not be my last. I thought The Coffin Path was brilliant.https://lindasbookbag.com/2018/05/23/...
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  • Victoria Farrow
    January 1, 1970
    "One coin marks the first to go.A second bodes the fall.The third will seal a sinner's fate.The Devil take them all."I've been reading quite a lot of short ghost stories recently, I like M.R. James, Edgar Allen Poe and H.P. Lovecraft. So when The Coffin Path cropped up on NetGalley and was described as 'The perfect ghost story' I thought I'd give it a go.This is an excellent book to read in a cold and miserable winter, it has a good balance of supernatural and human interactions. I do think the "One coin marks the first to go.A second bodes the fall.The third will seal a sinner's fate.The Devil take them all."I've been reading quite a lot of short ghost stories recently, I like M.R. James, Edgar Allen Poe and H.P. Lovecraft. So when The Coffin Path cropped up on NetGalley and was described as 'The perfect ghost story' I thought I'd give it a go.This is an excellent book to read in a cold and miserable winter, it has a good balance of supernatural and human interactions. I do think the story line was a little predictable, but I still enjoyed the read.The Coffin Path has all the basic elements of a good ghost story; creepy house, check; stark moor; check; bucket load of family secrets, check. It harks back to more traditional ghost stories and I like that element.However, it also interweaves complex family dynamics, a little in the way of Shirley Jackson but not as surreal. The characters at first appear to be stock characters in a ghostly drama, but Clements invests them with realism and depth.It is also a little gruesome at times and is overly dramatic, but Clements sort of owns this and it works.There is some lovely writing and the descriptions, particularly of the landscape around are original and invoking.I did have a few issues, as previously mentioned the plot, especially the 'twist' ending, was a bit obvious. Plus, I felt the story was dragged out quite a bit.However, I found The Coffin Path a dark and atmospheric read with a depth that isn't always found in books of this genre.My Rating: 4 StarsI received a copy of The Coffin Path, via NetGalley, in return for an honest review. My thanks to the author and publisher.Read my full review here: http://readingwritingbooking.blogspot...
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  • Irene
    January 1, 1970
    Gothic 17th century ghost story set high up on the Yorkshire moors. Mercy Booth is content with her life, mistress of Scarcross Hall, assisting her father, and being a shepherdess but all that changes when she suddenly senses great danger, that something is watching and chasing her as she rushes home one evening. Shortly after an enigmatic stranger turns up - who is he and what does he want? A chilly, atmospheric story, best read when the light is fading and then the imagination can run riot! I Gothic 17th century ghost story set high up on the Yorkshire moors. Mercy Booth is content with her life, mistress of Scarcross Hall, assisting her father, and being a shepherdess but all that changes when she suddenly senses great danger, that something is watching and chasing her as she rushes home one evening. Shortly after an enigmatic stranger turns up - who is he and what does he want? A chilly, atmospheric story, best read when the light is fading and then the imagination can run riot! I loved the very descriptive scenes and could see how hard life must have been in those days - not just the hard work but they were living in superstitious times. Some very creepy moments but wish there had been more of those and less about sheep and all their doings! I was given this ARC by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tracy Shephard
    January 1, 1970
    Firstly I loved the reading voice in my head for this novel..and I think that owes a lot to the author Katherine Clements. It is a beautifully written tale.Mercy Booth feels that someone is watching as she rushes back to her house after birthing the first lamb of the season, unfortunately the ewe died during the birth just like Mercy's own mother did having her.Her father now to old to Shepherd, is superstitious, and collects coins. Not money, but odd coins that he'd found at the stone circle on Firstly I loved the reading voice in my head for this novel..and I think that owes a lot to the author Katherine Clements. It is a beautifully written tale.Mercy Booth feels that someone is watching as she rushes back to her house after birthing the first lamb of the season, unfortunately the ewe died during the birth just like Mercy's own mother did having her.Her father now to old to Shepherd, is superstitious, and collects coins. Not money, but odd coins that he'd found at the stone circle on the moor.The Coffin Path is an atmospheric and descriptive novel. Mercy is quite a character. A hard worker who has no time for anything but the sheep farming.A story combination of historical fiction and ghostly goings on is the perfect read for cold wet nights and is one I thoroughly enjoyed and would recommend.
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  • Sally Boocock
    January 1, 1970
    Have you ever read a book you never want to end. Well this is one of those. It grips you like a vice which won't let go.It is a beautifully written tale encapsulating the bleakness, beauty and cruelty of the Yorkshire moors. Reminiscent of Wuthering Heights but with a far more menacing presence. Cannot recommend it highly enough.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know what to think about this book. On the cover it says, 'spine tingling', but I was at the end of the novel and nothing had tingled.It felt a bit flat and I didn't like the ending at all.I'm sure there are people who loved it, so I'll leave the reviewing to someone who can do it justice.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of my most ancipated new releases of 2018 and I'm sorry to say that I was quite disappointed. On paper it sounded like the perfect book for me. A gothic ghost story set in Yorkshire in the late 17th century? Sign me up! Oh how I wish it had lived up to my expectations.The main problem I had with this book was the way it was written. There was no tension, no atmosphere and I felt better use could have been made of the 17th century setting. Some of the superstitions of the period were This was one of my most ancipated new releases of 2018 and I'm sorry to say that I was quite disappointed. On paper it sounded like the perfect book for me. A gothic ghost story set in Yorkshire in the late 17th century? Sign me up! Oh how I wish it had lived up to my expectations.The main problem I had with this book was the way it was written. There was no tension, no atmosphere and I felt better use could have been made of the 17th century setting. Some of the superstitions of the period were present in the narrative but I felt Katherine Clements could have explored them more than she did. The characters were also a disappointment. They were all undeveloped, to the point where I could only describe them using the most basic of details, and most were very unlikeable. I also felt they did not act or behave in believable ways which I found incredibly frustrating. There were a number of things that occurred that could have been avoided had they just opened their mouths and talked to each other. Instead we get the usual convenient plot device of people withholding information from each other because they want to protect them only to put them in more danger as a result. The pacing of the plot was also problematic for me. It took far too long for everything to kick into gear and there were far too many scenes that got repeated and added nothing to the plot. If you have ever wanted to know what sheep farming was like back in the day this is the book for you! At one point it actually felt like the plot was moving sideways instead of forward. Pages were being read yet the story wasn't really progressing. And then, about 50 or so pages from the end, this book found its groove and the whole thing took off in a big way. I found myself frantically turning the pages to see how it would all end. If only the rest of the book had been like this and I would have given it a much higher rating. As things stand I have settled on a low 3 star rating because the last few chapters saved this for me to a certain extent. If not for them, I would probably have given it 2 stars.
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  • Katherine Kreuter
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book a lot, which surprised me. I wouldn't think the ghost story was a genre with much mileage these days. Everyone loves vampires (it's the evening wear) but not so wraiths and spirits. Yet the scary parts were so well written that you really felt the goosebumps. I couldn't quite buy some of the plotlines. Spoiler alert: I don't think women in her position would risk name, family and property for a roll in the hell with a sheep shearer. But I can see why the overall plot needs this I liked this book a lot, which surprised me. I wouldn't think the ghost story was a genre with much mileage these days. Everyone loves vampires (it's the evening wear) but not so wraiths and spirits. Yet the scary parts were so well written that you really felt the goosebumps. I couldn't quite buy some of the plotlines. Spoiler alert: I don't think women in her position would risk name, family and property for a roll in the hell with a sheep shearer. But I can see why the overall plot needs this transgression and therefore motivation for further mischief, so I will let her off. Would be a good winter read.
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  • Kirsty
    January 1, 1970
    The lamb scene. Eww. I can't deal.
  • Thelastwordreview
    January 1, 1970
    As we are still in the winter months The Coffin Path by Katherine Clements is just the perfect ghost story for those chilly dark evenings set in the 17th century among the bleak and dark Yorkshire moors. The year is 1674 and the focus is an isolated Manor House and farm on the misty and eerie Yorkshire Moors. Scarcross Hall is the manor house and the coffin path that leads to the house. They say the manor house is haunted and that there is something evil that lurks there. The story follows Mercy As we are still in the winter months The Coffin Path by Katherine Clements is just the perfect ghost story for those chilly dark evenings set in the 17th century among the bleak and dark Yorkshire moors. The year is 1674 and the focus is an isolated Manor House and farm on the misty and eerie Yorkshire Moors. Scarcross Hall is the manor house and the coffin path that leads to the house. They say the manor house is haunted and that there is something evil that lurks there. The story follows Mercy Booth; she is not at all bothered about the stories of hauntings. Scarcross Hall is owned by her elderly father and the property is now pretty dilapidated, but she knows that one day her father will die and that Scarcross Hall will belong to her. Enter the story a man by the name of Ellis Ferriby who now will work as a farm hand and now the story takes on a whole new twist. The narration moves between the two people. Events now start to take effect on the main characters and also those around them. Mercy starts to feel rather uneasy at the home. Strange noises and also creaks coming from her home. Her father’s health has declined. Many stories of the house being cursed, could this now be true and will this now start to affect her and what of the farm workers. Now as winter sets in and the bad weather mutilated sheep start to appear on the farm. Strange goings on with some of the staff at Scarcross Hall and items that just seem to mysteriously disappear. What are those strange creepy sounds coming from deep within the Hall? There is something about Ellis and he is hiding his true reason for being there, and now Mercy is beginning to think that everything that is going on is her punishment. Who really is Ellis and what does he want from Scarcross Hall? The pace continues and then your pulse rate quickens. A true gothic ghost story that is superbly told by Kathrine Clements that is rich in historical terms. Both the main characters are interesting and you have the feeling that there could be something between them but then the ending comes along. A chilling and engrossing creepy tale that I really enjoyed. Perfect Winter reading. 384 Pages
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in return for an honest review via Netgalley.This story gave me the creeps from the very start, a chill down my spine, and the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Let me tell you, very few books spook me as this one did.The story begins on a bleak Yorkshire Moor with death, and it creeps on from there! I can’t say that the characters were likeable, as I don’t think that was the intention. Instead they are effective in their roles in chilling the reader.I loved t I received a copy of this book in return for an honest review via Netgalley.This story gave me the creeps from the very start, a chill down my spine, and the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Let me tell you, very few books spook me as this one did.The story begins on a bleak Yorkshire Moor with death, and it creeps on from there! I can’t say that the characters were likeable, as I don’t think that was the intention. Instead they are effective in their roles in chilling the reader.I loved that we are introduced to Mercy right away, and to Scarcross Hall. The Hall certainly is the star of the show.This is for anyone who loves a gothic ghost story. Looking forward to Katherine Clements’s next book.
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