Caroline
In this novel authorized by the Little House estate, Sarah Miller vividly recreates the beauty, hardship, and joys of the frontier in a dazzling work of historical fiction, a captivating story that illuminates one courageous, resilient, and loving pioneer woman as never before—Caroline Ingalls, "Ma" in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved Little House books.In the frigid days of February, 1870, Caroline Ingalls and her family leave the familiar comforts of the Big Woods of Wisconsin and the warm bosom of her family, for a new life in Kansas Indian Territory. Packing what they can carry in their wagon, Caroline, her husband Charles, and their little girls, Mary and Laura, head west to settle in a beautiful, unpredictable land full of promise and peril.The pioneer life is a hard one, especially for a pregnant woman with no friends or kin to turn to for comfort or help. The burden of work must be shouldered alone, sickness tended without the aid of doctors, and babies birthed without the accustomed hands of mothers or sisters. But Caroline’s new world is also full of tender joys. In adapting to this strange new place and transforming a rough log house built by Charles’ hands into a home, Caroline must draw on untapped wells of strength she does not know she possesses.For more than eighty years, generations of readers have been enchanted by the adventures of the American frontier’s most famous child, Laura Ingalls Wilder, in the Little House books. Now, that familiar story is retold in this captivating tale of family, fidelity, hardship, love, and survival that vividly reimagines our past.

Caroline Details

TitleCaroline
Author
ReleaseSep 19th, 2017
PublisherWilliam Morrow
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Adult

Caroline Review

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    OK, I just wanted to say that this book, I really wanted to love the story more than I did. I love the TV series and the books the show is also good. And, this book is one that I really, really looked forward to reading. However, I found that the story never really got to me.I liked the whole idea of reading the book from Caroline's perspective, as a young wife and mother on her way to a new home. Her fears as she is pregnant and the whole idea of leaving everything and everyone behind got to me OK, I just wanted to say that this book, I really wanted to love the story more than I did. I love the TV series and the books the show is also good. And, this book is one that I really, really looked forward to reading. However, I found that the story never really got to me.I liked the whole idea of reading the book from Caroline's perspective, as a young wife and mother on her way to a new home. Her fears as she is pregnant and the whole idea of leaving everything and everyone behind got to me. It's just the everyday worries during the travel, well it felt a bit tedious to read about. Sure, it was interesting, but at the same time did I feel that it went on and one now and then. I liked the idea of the book, about reading about Charles, Caroline, and the children traveling to Kansas. If you have read the books and/or seen the TV series is this a must read. Sure, I found the story not perhaps living up to my expectations, but at the same time was it interesting to get Caroline's POV on leaving the old life behind. And, her worries about the baby was the thing that really got to me, just the thought of how worrisome everything would be, not even knowing if there would be someone in Kansas there to help her with the birthing. I just wish the story had been a bit more moving or in some way more engrossing. I almost forgot to bring up the best thing, Mr. Edwards. I was so thrilled when he showed up. He's my favorite character and he did bring much enjoyment to the book and I loved reading about how he saved Christmas for the children. I can't believe that I almost forgot this. So, there were some bright spots in this boo, like the presence of Mr. Edwards. I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Edelweiss for an honest review!
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Growing up the LHOTP books were my refuge, my escape read. The day I received a complete set of books was truly one of my happiest days. They are books I will smell - a cinnamon, paper aroma or something like that.Ma was certainly never my favorite character as she came off as cranky, uptight, and priggish. Of course, I was much closer to Laura's age so I naturally sided with her.Caroline gets her due and her time. This is not a child's story, but a young wife and mother's tale as she finds hers Growing up the LHOTP books were my refuge, my escape read. The day I received a complete set of books was truly one of my happiest days. They are books I will smell - a cinnamon, paper aroma or something like that.Ma was certainly never my favorite character as she came off as cranky, uptight, and priggish. Of course, I was much closer to Laura's age so I naturally sided with her.Caroline gets her due and her time. This is not a child's story, but a young wife and mother's tale as she finds herself leaving family behind to follow her husband's dreams. I was pleased that the author chose to go with historically correct timeline, rather than the more convenient one that original author chose. It makes sense here. Many of the stories were familiar though from a different viewpoint. As an adult and mom myself, I am much more sympathetic to Caroline, but my heart will always side with Laura.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot....I have vivid memories of my first experience with Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books. I was seven, maybe eight, and my cousin and I were taking turns reading aloud from Little House in the Big Woods. I’d come to a line about Pa’s ax, but my tongue wouldn’t cooperate and we’ve made jokes about Pa’s ass ever since. I doubt many readers relate, but the humor of the moment created a treasured family memory and inspired a Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot....I have vivid memories of my first experience with Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books. I was seven, maybe eight, and my cousin and I were taking turns reading aloud from Little House in the Big Woods. I’d come to a line about Pa’s ax, but my tongue wouldn’t cooperate and we’ve made jokes about Pa’s ass ever since. I doubt many readers relate, but the humor of the moment created a treasured family memory and inspired a lingering interest in the story that afforded it.As a biographic fiction, Sarah Miller’s Caroline played to that interest. Laura created her own legacy and one could make a solid argument for Michael Landon’s iconic portrayal of Charles, but Caroline was regulated to a supporting role in both the books and television series so I was naturally interested in seeing what sort of depth Miller’s novel might bring her character. Could such a story compete with the existing canon and cultural memory? There was only one way to find out.Looking back, I have to say that I love how Miller chose to approach Caroline. The role of mother is often stereotyped and stale, but Miller gifted the Ingalls matriarch a complexity that is difficult to ignore. She’s a wife and mother, but more than that, she is woman with spirit, conviction, emotion, and dare I say it, a sex drive. Ground-breaking ideas, right? As a thirty-one-year-old mother of two, I could relate to this character and that’s pretty amazing when one considers how much has changed in the century and half that separates me from the world Caroline knew and experienced.Unfortunately, characterization cannot carry a novel on its own. I adored Miller’s heroine, but I struggled with the pacing of the narrative. Much as I hate admitting it, the novel is slow and I often found it difficult to remain engaged in what was happening. I enjoyed the material, but I knew where this story was going before I picked it up and wish Miller had done more to counter the lack of mystery in the plot.Recommended for fans of the Little House book, frontier and womens fiction.
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  • Janilyn Kocher
    January 1, 1970
    I was fortunate to receive an ARC from the publisher for Caroline: Little House Revisited. Sarah Miller does an admirable job of deftly weaving her story into a smooth fabric befitting of the events portrayed in the novel Little House on the Prairie. Miller's book reveals a more intimate view from Caroline's perspective. She elaborates on her pain, passion, impatience, fear, relief, and joy. Miller captures the voice of Caroline in a sympathetic tone that only enhances the narrative. Her descrip I was fortunate to receive an ARC from the publisher for Caroline: Little House Revisited. Sarah Miller does an admirable job of deftly weaving her story into a smooth fabric befitting of the events portrayed in the novel Little House on the Prairie. Miller's book reveals a more intimate view from Caroline's perspective. She elaborates on her pain, passion, impatience, fear, relief, and joy. Miller captures the voice of Caroline in a sympathetic tone that only enhances the narrative. Her descriptions are very good, especially of the creek crossing, childbirth, and the beauty of nature.Caroline is the linchpin of the family, the anchor to Charles' wanderlust and Miller keenly displays that role in this novel. It's a good addition to the ever growing list of books associated with the Little House series, both fiction and fact.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of those books that I enjoyed immensely, but that took me FOREVER to read. I have no idea what witchcraft made a good 360-page book feel like a 600-page slog, but there you have it. This is Little House on the Prairie told from the perspective of Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother, Caroline Ingalls. For the most part Miller tows the party line (she doesn't divert much from Wilder's account of the family dynamics, or invent many new experiences in Kansas). Miller's main goal is to explore This is one of those books that I enjoyed immensely, but that took me FOREVER to read. I have no idea what witchcraft made a good 360-page book feel like a 600-page slog, but there you have it. This is Little House on the Prairie told from the perspective of Laura Ingalls Wilder's mother, Caroline Ingalls. For the most part Miller tows the party line (she doesn't divert much from Wilder's account of the family dynamics, or invent many new experiences in Kansas). Miller's main goal is to explore Caroline's emotions as deeply as possible. She certainly succeeds in that, although the pacing and energy of the book suffer as a consequence. Still, I'd absolutely recommend this for Little House fans or for those who love a detailed pioneer story.
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  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this advance reader's copy at a conference. Hiding for spoilers but this feels kind of silly since anyone reading this probably already knows the general story from Laura's second book, Little House on the Prairie.I honestly did not enjoy this book. I like the concept of telling one of Laura’s books from Caroline’s point of view, and am a little surprised this hasn’t happened before. However, the voice is so… ponderous and depressing! I’ve often reflected on how difficult life must h I picked up this advance reader's copy at a conference. Hiding for spoilers but this feels kind of silly since anyone reading this probably already knows the general story from Laura's second book, Little House on the Prairie.I honestly did not enjoy this book. I like the concept of telling one of Laura’s books from Caroline’s point of view, and am a little surprised this hasn’t happened before. However, the voice is so… ponderous and depressing! I’ve often reflected on how difficult life must have been for Caroline and Charles, but this book doesn’t lend any joy to their experience at all. Yet in real life, we all have to feel some joy at some point, no matter how small. Caroline seems to be constantly holding herself back from feeling anything. She restricts herself from showing anger or frustration, which is understandable given Laura’s depiction of how controlled she was. But it was frustrating and sad to also read her controlling her own happiness, not showing a smile or a laugh. And then on the few occasions when she did smile or laugh, the voice of the book just weighs down the experience and somehow, the reader doesn’t get to feel that happiness. I’m not an editor and I can’t explain why the book read that way, but it did.One moment in the book that I did like was when Mrs. Scott was still in the house after Carrie’s birth, and Mary, Laura, and Charles returned from the Indian camp. (That was rather clever, too, inserting Caroline’s labor as the reason for why they went to the camp that day). Caroline has a brief moment of perspective where she sees her children as Mrs. Scott must see them. I really enjoyed that, and perhaps that’s one of the elements missing from the book - more connection with the children, who we grew up with. Caroline spends most of the book thinking of them as a chore and a job, and yes, children are, but they also bring us joy - and there’s none of that in this book.I also didn’t particularly care for the way she writes the relationship between Caroline and Charles. I always thought of them as equals in that they cared for and respected each other. But the way she writes Charles’ love for Caroline as that of some kind of worship really bothered me. I don’t believe it and I don’t think it’s appropriate.The author clearly did a lot of research, and there’s a couple points where I wished she remembered that we the readers may not have read a biography of Laura’s real story. The first is the reference to Concord as Caroline’s hometown. I live near Concord, NH and Concord, MA. There is a Concord, NY, and probably many others. My memory is that Caroline came from “back East” and I had absolutely no idea, until reading this book and gradually figuring it out, that “back East” just meant eastern Wisconsin. That completely blew my mind. That had never been my impression from Laura’s books! So it would be a very good idea to clarify in the first mention that Caroline’s Concord is the Wisconsin one.I appreciated the inclusion of real-life elements like menstrual pads and “the necessary” but I felt the author went overboard with these. Mentioning them once is interesting. Mentioning them several times starts to get annoying.I found the Author’s Note to be incredibly jarring. I think I was offended by the assumption that the family would not correctly remember where they settled in Kansas, and I also found it jarring that there was ever property purchased in Missouri. I had never read that before. (Or if I had, it was many years ago - it’s been a while since I read a biography). I’m not sure how to soften those notes, but to have these new facts just flung at me in a brief author’s note was, frankly, upsetting.Structurally, there was a problematic scene where we’re in the moment with Caroline, but then somehow it becomes some sort of dream sequence or a retelling - after Scott passes out in the bottom of the well. It’s the italic on page 215. I didn’t understand this transition or why it was there; nothing like that happens anywhere else in the book. I would like to compliment the author on the lovemaking scenes between Charles and Caroline. They are beautifully written and I think that is a very difficult thing to do.Considering the popularity of Laura’s books, I imagine there’ll be a lot of opinions about this one, and some may differ from mine. What I really would have enjoyed (and honestly, what I thought this book would be when I picked it up) would have been a historical tale of Caroline before we meet her in Little House in the Big Woods. I would love to know more about her youth, her courtship with Charles, and her experience as a schoolteacher — which so heavily influenced Laura. Guess I'll have to wait.
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  • Asheley
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5The book begins in 1870, as Pa and Ma, Mary and Laura are leaving the woods of Wisconsin for the prairie of Kansas. If you’re like me and Ingalls-obsessed, then you likely know the bulk of the story as Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote it, but Author Sarah Miller has mixed the fiction that we know from the Wilder’s Little House books and real-life fact based on research to show us this portion of their tale thru Caroline’s eyes. Caroline’s perspective on this trip is everything. Caroline, as the m 4.5/5The book begins in 1870, as Pa and Ma, Mary and Laura are leaving the woods of Wisconsin for the prairie of Kansas. If you’re like me and Ingalls-obsessed, then you likely know the bulk of the story as Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote it, but Author Sarah Miller has mixed the fiction that we know from the Wilder’s Little House books and real-life fact based on research to show us this portion of their tale thru Caroline’s eyes. Caroline’s perspective on this trip is everything. Caroline, as the mother and wife, was the glue that held this family together.Right away, we get to witness Ma’s perspective on leaving behind her beloved family and her large support group of women in Wisconsin – this broke my heart a little and opened my eyes to the differences in Ma Ingalls’ story versus how I always assumed she was just as excited about the trip as Pa and Laura. We witness what it was like for Caroline to ride in a wagon for an extended period of time (over approximately-700 miles – can you imagine doing that as a pregnant woman?) and then we experience along with her the nerves that she felt when they finally got to “Indian Territory.” (As many of us know, Ma had feelings of racism and fear toward Native Americans, and that is evident in this book as well since it was part of her life.)Some of my favorite scenes from the Ingalls Family’s story are included, only now from Caroline’s perspective, and I couldn’t help but smile while I was reading. Some favorites of mine are when Caroline helped Charles build their home once they arrived in Kansas (yes, still pregnant!), how she helped Charles rescue their neighbor from the well (still pregnant!), and how Caroline felt about a stranger coming to assist her during childbirth with Carrie because there was no one else, unlike the large community of women they left back in Wisconsin. I loved these moments so much in this book.It is wonderful to be able to experience Caroline’s grief over leaving Wisconsin turn into joy at the bounty and hope of their new home in Kansas. I believe that the feelings that Caroline experienced were very normal and real, and I can say this because I’ve experience somewhat similar feelings over large moves before, except the circumstances are clearly not the same. Caroline’s emotions are very in line with what ours are today despite the difference in time period, and I love being able to finally learn this about her. I love how strong and real she is, yet also vulnerable to many of the same feelings and issues that women are today. Whether she is a favorite character or not, I think she is very relatable since we have her perspective; I personally adored getting to put myself in Caroline’s unique position as she had to make that long wagon trip and start up her new home on the frontier.I cannot stress exactly how much Caroline by Sarah Miller is a true treat. After reading the Laura-centric Little House books, I feel like that children’s historical series is also almost an adventure-series. This book has a quieter pacing, and it is very nice. This book very much carries the perspective of an adult-Caroline who was valued as the center of the home, who was beloved by Charles, who knew she had very little privacy with her husband but took advantage of that time anyway. Caroline was a wise women, and independent, and she had her own thoughts. She knew when she needed to share them, and when it was best to just lead her family by example.I love the familiarity of the setting, the people, and things like Pa’s fiddle, the shepherdess, the delaine. If you’re already familiar with the Ingalls’ story, then you’ll smile when you read about these things too. If this is your first time reading anything-Ingalls, I hope that one thing you take away from this is that the author has obviously researched well and loves this subject matter. I should point out, just to be clear, that this story is historical fiction but that it is based on tons of research. The Author’s Note is exceptionally interesting.As for me personally, there is always a little bit of trepidation when I start a book that I’ve anticipated so heavily. Will it hold up to my hopes? Once I read just a few pages into this one, I realized that I didn’t need to worry at all. Caroline by Sarah Miller is one that I’ll be rereading over and over, just like other Ingalls-related stuff that I often revisit. In fact, I’ve already purchased the audiobook for a reread/listen.This is another book that I’ve made room for on my top shelf, and I would have gladly kept reading if this book had more pages.I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. Thank you, William Morrow Books!Find this review and more like it on my blog, Into the Hall of Books!
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  • Jena
    January 1, 1970
    I love everything about the Little House books.Needless to say, I . am . excited!!!
  • Renee C.
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to obtain an ARC and I read it straight through. It was beyond words to be back in the Little House world and being submersed in it solely from Ma's point of view. I have read and re-read the entire Little House series, as well as every book and article outside the series that has been published about Laura Ingalls Wilder. Caroline: Little House, Revisited, remains true to the tone, atmosphere, history and legacy of the Little House series. Evocative and lush in detail, you wi I was lucky enough to obtain an ARC and I read it straight through. It was beyond words to be back in the Little House world and being submersed in it solely from Ma's point of view. I have read and re-read the entire Little House series, as well as every book and article outside the series that has been published about Laura Ingalls Wilder. Caroline: Little House, Revisited, remains true to the tone, atmosphere, history and legacy of the Little House series. Evocative and lush in detail, you will feel as if you are in the wagon traveling across the plains and living the reality of prairie life right along with Caroline, Charles, Mary, Laura and Baby Carrie.Little House fans will not be disappointed!
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    A complex look at a historical figure well-known from the Laura Ingalls Wilder Little House books, CAROLINE takes us to into a different version of Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE - one from an adult perspective. Thanks to the author and William Morrow Books for providing me with an advance copy of this title for review purposes I have two reviews to write of this book - one for the book and writing itself, and another that is entirely about Caroline Ingalls and her deeply entrenched prej A complex look at a historical figure well-known from the Laura Ingalls Wilder Little House books, CAROLINE takes us to into a different version of Wilder's LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE - one from an adult perspective. Thanks to the author and William Morrow Books for providing me with an advance copy of this title for review purposes I have two reviews to write of this book - one for the book and writing itself, and another that is entirely about Caroline Ingalls and her deeply entrenched prejudices toward American Indians. I am currently in conversation with the author about the latter, and will update this review when we have discussed this at length! I am also planning a Q&A with Sarah Miller on my blog theloudlibrarylady.com, and I will update this review with that link in the future. Review of the book itself:If you read and loved the Little House series as a child, CAROLINE will not disappoint. Miller has taken a story near and dear to many of us and revamped it for adults, taking far more care with historical accuracy than Laura Ingalls Wilder did in her writing of the original series about her childhood. Miller has extensive resources on her website and an author's note that details exactly how she married fact and Wilder's story to merge into CAROLINE. This book is rife with description and really gives readers a close look at the inner mind of a late-1800's pioneer woman/wife/mother, including that of childbirth and other intimate topics. The historical detail is very well-done, and the story is very fast-moving and dramatic. Highly recommended for fans of the series.Review of our romanticized obsession with Caroline Ingalls and her racism:THIS IS IN PROGRESS - more to come! (9/12/17 1:00 pm)
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    I can’t speak the praises of Caroline Little House, Revisited enough. It was beautifully written and transported me into the wagon that the Ingalls family was traveling in and then I was living in the house that Charles built for his family in Kansas. Feeling present in the story was completely due to Millers writing style and through her extensive research into the lives of the Ingalls family. Caroline’s character was real and relatable. I would highly recommend this book for fans of the Little I can’t speak the praises of Caroline Little House, Revisited enough. It was beautifully written and transported me into the wagon that the Ingalls family was traveling in and then I was living in the house that Charles built for his family in Kansas. Feeling present in the story was completely due to Millers writing style and through her extensive research into the lives of the Ingalls family. Caroline’s character was real and relatable. I would highly recommend this book for fans of the Little House on the Prairie books but also for those who enjoy reading a good historical fiction book.
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  • Melinda
    January 1, 1970
    When you grow up identifying with Laura as strongly as I did, reading about Ma and Pa having sex is just about as horrifying as walking in on your parents.But otherwise, I loved this reimagining of LHOP from Caroline's perspective. All of the details that made the originals so precious to me as a girl are similarly entrancing as an adult: the salt pork, the patty cakes, the 5 million steps it took to do a simple task. Seeing it all through Ma's eyes, even an entirely imagined version, was a lot When you grow up identifying with Laura as strongly as I did, reading about Ma and Pa having sex is just about as horrifying as walking in on your parents.But otherwise, I loved this reimagining of LHOP from Caroline's perspective. All of the details that made the originals so precious to me as a girl are similarly entrancing as an adult: the salt pork, the patty cakes, the 5 million steps it took to do a simple task. Seeing it all through Ma's eyes, even an entirely imagined version, was a lot of fun.
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  • Darlene Ferland
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Miller did a beautiful job filled with insight into the Mother of Laura, Mary and Carrie, the children of the of the Little House on the Prairie books. Reading the books as a child or watching the show on television really didn't fully flesh out Mrs. Ingalls. Ms. Miller did bring the Mother to life. This book is a wonderful depiction of life on the move in the 1870. The family chose to fill a covered wagon and head to the Kansas Indian Territory to claim land and build a new life away from Sarah Miller did a beautiful job filled with insight into the Mother of Laura, Mary and Carrie, the children of the of the Little House on the Prairie books. Reading the books as a child or watching the show on television really didn't fully flesh out Mrs. Ingalls. Ms. Miller did bring the Mother to life. This book is a wonderful depiction of life on the move in the 1870. The family chose to fill a covered wagon and head to the Kansas Indian Territory to claim land and build a new life away from the Big Woods of Wisconsin. Caroline's family is there and she is pregnant. Her fear is palatable but Charles believes deeply that this is the best move for his growing family. Vividly, the struggle within Caroline and the happenings in a rough passage to Kansas is brought so beautifully to the written page, that I am glad that the Little House Estate authorized this read!
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  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    I loved reading this book. It brought me back to my childhood love of the Little House books, but with an adult perspective. Such a treat.
  • Gina Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of Caroline Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller from Goodreads. Thank you Goodreads, Harper Collins , and Sarah Miller for the opportunity to read and review this book.I loved reading The Little House series to my daughters. So if you liked any or all of The Little House books, you will like this. Miller follows closely to the original books while giving the reader a taste of what "Ma" aka as Caroline might of felt leaving her home in the big woods to travel across the prai I received an ARC of Caroline Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller from Goodreads. Thank you Goodreads, Harper Collins , and Sarah Miller for the opportunity to read and review this book.I loved reading The Little House series to my daughters. So if you liked any or all of The Little House books, you will like this. Miller follows closely to the original books while giving the reader a taste of what "Ma" aka as Caroline might of felt leaving her home in the big woods to travel across the prairie in 1870. It's a grown up version showing how Caroline dealt with leaving family and the comfort of other women to travel across the country, childbirth, the relationship between her and Charles, and her anxiety from neighboring Native Americans . It really reminded me how different life is for women now. I truly enjoyed the complexities and simplicities of this book. Hope there's a sequel!
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I loved The Little House on the Prairie series. That was Laura’s story. This is Caroline’s. I’m hoping this will become a series. I enjoyed reading her story. I knew pioneer life was tough but wow! What a hard scrabble life!
  • Betty
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon.
  • Gertievandermint
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very beautifully written book. Miller did an excellent job of capturing some of the things readers love so much about the Little House books without writing a derivative novel. The novel beautifully describes the minutiae of the Ingalls' lives on the road and on the Kansas prairie, detailing the food, labor, and people that they encounter. This was always my favorite part of the Little House books, and as with those, I learned so much from reading this book, and felt like I could real This was a very beautifully written book. Miller did an excellent job of capturing some of the things readers love so much about the Little House books without writing a derivative novel. The novel beautifully describes the minutiae of the Ingalls' lives on the road and on the Kansas prairie, detailing the food, labor, and people that they encounter. This was always my favorite part of the Little House books, and as with those, I learned so much from reading this book, and felt like I could really see their lives. The details here are much earthier than in the Little House books, which suits the fact that it is written from the point of view of an adult, Caroline, Laura's mother. We get here a much stronger sense of the dirt and sweat and filth of their very difficult life out on the prairie. Caroline, again, as befits a woman in her position, works very hard to hold in her emotions, happy and sad and often angry feelings, and we therefore get a really sharp sense of the real woman behind Laura's stern Ma. Miller has made her a real woman with a very full inner life. At times I felt like we got to spend a little too much time in her head, and the novel felt a bit anachronistic in the way it described Caroline's at times intense navel-gazing. That's of course not to say that I don't think such a woman would have a rich inner life; rather, the way in which she so obsessively thinks about her various emotions and reactions felt very Baby Boomer and touchy-feely, and thus not really accurate to the time period and culture Miller delineates with such care otherwise. I admit, too, that it made me cringe a bit to read about Ma and Pa having sex! But obviously that's because I know these characters from Laura's point of view. Miller has done a great job bringing Caroline to life as a 3-dimensional woman coping with incredible hardship.
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  • Ange
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. It arrived on a Monday night and despite the fact that I had to get up at 5:30 the next morning, I began reading and could not stop. I read the first 200 pages in that one sitting. I loved the depth of Caroline's character. I also appreciated how Miller included the racism of the Little House books, and the era, and showed how it is rooted in deep seated fear. I read the Little House books over and over as a child and loved them. Some of the wisdom - like don't drink cold wate I loved this book. It arrived on a Monday night and despite the fact that I had to get up at 5:30 the next morning, I began reading and could not stop. I read the first 200 pages in that one sitting. I loved the depth of Caroline's character. I also appreciated how Miller included the racism of the Little House books, and the era, and showed how it is rooted in deep seated fear. I read the Little House books over and over as a child and loved them. Some of the wisdom - like don't drink cold water when you are over heated, drink room temperature water or warm - has stayed with me and popped into my thoughts my entire life. This book was like a wonderfully grown up version of all that I've loved about the Little House series. I love the detail that really opens up the world of 1870. I thought the description was vivid and lovely. I did think that the book favored Laura. Granted it's Laura's series, but I think everyone that reads this book will already know who Laura Ingalls Wilder is and there were moments where the focus on the child Laura, and not Mary, felt ... too much. But more than anything else I thought this book was profoundly moving. I could feel Caroline's loneliness and fear about giving birth away from kin. I could feel the heart break of leaving the homestead and Mr. Edwards and Mrs. Smith. I adored this book and will absolutely read it again.
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  • Tirzah
    January 1, 1970
    *A review of the Advance Reader's Edition*I first read the Little House books when I was a child. When I recently reread them as an adult, I noticed how I perceived the books differently, specifically Caroline. I wondered how she endured the multiple moves and hardships and held her in high regard for being a strong woman.Sarah Miller's novel is told through Caroline's eyes, centering on her strength, doubts, and fears as she leaves her family behind to make a new home in Kansas. Fans will recog *A review of the Advance Reader's Edition*I first read the Little House books when I was a child. When I recently reread them as an adult, I noticed how I perceived the books differently, specifically Caroline. I wondered how she endured the multiple moves and hardships and held her in high regard for being a strong woman.Sarah Miller's novel is told through Caroline's eyes, centering on her strength, doubts, and fears as she leaves her family behind to make a new home in Kansas. Fans will recognize some pieces of the story that were told in Little House on the Prairie.I think Miller did a good job with capturing Caroline's caring nature towards the girls, her support of Charles’s dreams, and her faith during difficult times. My complaint is that some of the writing was graphic, especially when it came to Charles and Caroline. Obviously they loved each other and were intimate, but I don't think it was necessary to write the specifics. I realize this is an adult novel and that Laura wrote the Little House books for a younger audience, but I prefer books that don't give every single detail and let the readers infer. Also, the changes in Caroline’s body during her pregnancy was too descriptive for my personal taste, although I get Miller was trying to convey the hardships and joys of motherhood. This is personal preference so it may not be an issue for others.Overall, an interesting read. Similar to the Little House books, this increased my appreciation for the strong women, men, and children who braved early frontier America.
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  • Debbi
    January 1, 1970
    I won an early copy of the book. I was looking forward to reading this book as I love the Little House series. I did enjoy the book, but something is missing. It just doesn't have the magic the originals have, or I have grown older and my memory has made the originals into something they aren't. I need to reread the originals. The book is written from Caroline's perspective. That was interesting and I would like to read more of the story in her perspective. Her fear of the Native Americans, her I won an early copy of the book. I was looking forward to reading this book as I love the Little House series. I did enjoy the book, but something is missing. It just doesn't have the magic the originals have, or I have grown older and my memory has made the originals into something they aren't. I need to reread the originals. The book is written from Caroline's perspective. That was interesting and I would like to read more of the story in her perspective. Her fear of the Native Americans, her sadness at leaving her home and family, that was all there. I enjoyed reading about her and Charles' relationship more. In the originals, they are just Ma and Pa, here they become individuals in their own right. If you loved the originals, you need to read this book and visit the characters again!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Reading Caroline was like reading Little House on the Prairie again for the first time. When I was young, I spend an entire summer reading Wilder's Little House series. Since then, I've re-read her books many times. I was excited but apprehensive to read Caroline. Would Miller be true to the Ingalls family, or would she twist Ma into an unrecognizable character? I shouldn't have worried. From small details like Pa combing his fingers through his whiskers or Ma making cornbread, to major events l Reading Caroline was like reading Little House on the Prairie again for the first time. When I was young, I spend an entire summer reading Wilder's Little House series. Since then, I've re-read her books many times. I was excited but apprehensive to read Caroline. Would Miller be true to the Ingalls family, or would she twist Ma into an unrecognizable character? I shouldn't have worried. From small details like Pa combing his fingers through his whiskers or Ma making cornbread, to major events like Ma twisting her ankle, Pa digging the well and both together fighting the prairie fire, the familiar story shines through each chapter.Caroline is not a children's book. The realities of life on the frontier are experienced--the loneliness, the good-byes, the loss, the monotony of travel, the difficulties of cooking, the lack of privacy, and the terror of illness and childbirth. But somehow, even as Miller explores the practicalities of life on the prairie, the themes of the original story shine through. Laura is as impulsive as ever, Mary is just a little too good, Carrie is small and peaked, Ma's mottos provide steady guidance, and Pa's fiddle celebrates adventure, memories and home.
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Will have to wait until my review comes out in the Library Journal.
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you the publisher (via Edelweiss) for providing an advance e-galley in exchange for review.Growing up, I was a Laura Ingalls Wilder fangirl. I'm unsure how many times I read the series and how many Halloweens I gave "are you kidding me?" stares to the adults who innocently asked what I was dressed as when clearly my bonnet and prairie style dress meant that I was Laura. We traveled to Pepin, and to Mansfield, and in all that time, I'm not sure I gave one thought to Laura's mother. This boo Thank you the publisher (via Edelweiss) for providing an advance e-galley in exchange for review.Growing up, I was a Laura Ingalls Wilder fangirl. I'm unsure how many times I read the series and how many Halloweens I gave "are you kidding me?" stares to the adults who innocently asked what I was dressed as when clearly my bonnet and prairie style dress meant that I was Laura. We traveled to Pepin, and to Mansfield, and in all that time, I'm not sure I gave one thought to Laura's mother. This book turned out to be an interesting take on Little House on the Prairie from Caroline's point of view. Many of the events will be familiar to Little House fans, but seeing them through the eyes of an adult responsible for taking care of not only herself but two (eventually three) children, as well as home and husband, was vastly different. What always seemed like an adventure from Laura's point of view was harrowing from Caroline's at times, and the reality of how hard their circumstances were very apparent. Caroline is a testament to all the women of her age and time and to the quiet strength it took to survive and thrive in an environment that could at times be bleak and lonely.I'm waffling between giving this book a 3 and 4 star rating. While I really enjoyed it, the pacing was a little slow and stunted, and it took quite awhile to connect to Caroline as a character. Eventually though, her concerns and fears and hopes for her family came through and it became easier to connect with her. One of the questions I had before starting this book, and that I imagine other readers may have was how the author would handle the racism of the Ingalls family (as well as other settlers) toward Native Americans. The author doesn't gloss over this aspect of the Ingalls' life, and doesn't make an attempt within the story to excuse or condone their words or actions either within the story or in the afterword. It's a complicated issue in historical fiction and one I'm underprepared to address.
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    Oh how excited I was to learn that there would be a fiction book telling the story of “Little House on the Prairie” from Ma’s perspective. I am almost what I would call a scholar of Laura Ingalls Wilder. I am intensely passionate about her life and legacy and have been since I first watched the TV show as a young child. I remember finding out that the series was based on a book series. Once I read the books, the TV show was definitely a secondary to them in my heart. As I grew older, I grew more Oh how excited I was to learn that there would be a fiction book telling the story of “Little House on the Prairie” from Ma’s perspective. I am almost what I would call a scholar of Laura Ingalls Wilder. I am intensely passionate about her life and legacy and have been since I first watched the TV show as a young child. I remember finding out that the series was based on a book series. Once I read the books, the TV show was definitely a secondary to them in my heart. As I grew older, I grew more passionate about studying the real Laura Ingalls Wilder and her journeys and writings. The idea of the “Caroline” novel excited me but I also worried about the ways it could potentially go wrong. I shouldn’t have worried. The author Sarah Miller knows her subject matter. It was for the most part a joy reading Caroline’s version of the events from the family’s journey to Kansas. It followed the book very closely follows the same story that Laura Ingalls Wilder told in her novel. However, “Caroline” goes a step further and writes a story that follows that of the true Ingalls family even more closely. Mary and Laura are both younger in age. Ma is pregnant with third daughter Carrie during the entire trip to Kansas. At the end of the novel the family does not leave because they ended up on land the government hadn’t marked for settlers but leaves instead for a much different reason. They had no money to even pay for their homestead when they learn the person buying their house in Wisconsin is not going to make them further payments. Now, at first I wasn’t 100% sure how I felt about the book. This is because the world according to Caroline’s point of view, and written for an adult audience, is grim. Really grim! She suffers in almost total silence riding in that wagon, pregnant and miserable. She doesn’t want to leave her family behind in Wisconsin. Leaving home is hard enough in these modern times, but back then there was no guarantee they would see each other again. Telephones were still a little ways into the future and there certainly wasn’t FaceTime or Skype for video calls. She was seriously traumatized at leaving them behind. And again, she held most of it inside. But as the book continued along, there were more and more scenes that I thought were just beautiful. The scene where Caroline goes into labor especially touched me and in turn made me feel more connected to Caroline. Caroline goes into labor and Charles leaves with Mary and Laura as the children shouldn’t see the birthing. A neighbor lady comes by to help her and Caroline is so grateful. Then when she sees her daughter for the first time, she connects with her in such a lovely way. I felt like this scene was where Caroline first starts to recognize that desolate cabin in Kansas was her home. Two other chapters really stick out in my mind as well. The scene where the family fights the prairie fire and the iconic scene where Mr. Edwards saves Christmas are also absolute favorites. I found it truly heartbreaking that when it was time to leave to move back to Wisconsin, Caroline was also devastated. She focused on how great it would be to see the family again, and surely that did gladden her heart, but she was still disappointed and sad to see the family lose what they had worked so hard for.Mrs. Miller dealt with the issue of racism and the Indians well. I am one of those who was horrified even as a child by the way Indians were written in this book. But even as an 11 or 12 year old, I understood that the time period was a very different one than the world we lived in now. Ma’s hatred of the Indians was rooted in fear. She was very afraid from the stories she heard of the Sioux Uprising. There wasn’t the communication or media we have today where we know the details of every national story right away. She was relying on gossip which told her that settlers were being murdered by the Indians. Charles didn’t have enough fear, in my opinion. He jumped straight into unknown situations. But this lack of fear also led to a different experience with the Indians. Who could see they were like everyone else, some were good people, some not so much so. Mrs. Miller made a point to explain to the readers that the Indians that showed up in Ma’s cabin and took from them, believed it was their ‘rent’ for them settling illegally on their lands. They weren’t malicious, but she was afraid. Mary took on Mas’ fear, while Laura was just young and very interested in the unknown. There is absolutely racism in the series, mostly in the book “Little House on the Prairie”. It is blunt and it is shocking to read of now. I think most people are horrified when they study what happened to the Indians by the government back then. However, to clean up or change the text of these books now, would be wrong. We need to be reminded, we need to be shocked, by what history was then so we don’t repeat anything close to this ever again.
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  • Amanda (TheBookwormAdventures)
    January 1, 1970
    I was so grateful to receive this book, which was generously given to me by a friend who received two ARCs. I loved the Little House series growing up, and while it's been many years since I've read them, I had no problem jumping right back into the story. When reading the Little House series as a kid, I remember thinking of how neat it was that they were constantly traveling, going new places, starting from scratch. Seeing it through an adult's - Caroline's - perspective, as an adult now myself I was so grateful to receive this book, which was generously given to me by a friend who received two ARCs. I loved the Little House series growing up, and while it's been many years since I've read them, I had no problem jumping right back into the story. When reading the Little House series as a kid, I remember thinking of how neat it was that they were constantly traveling, going new places, starting from scratch. Seeing it through an adult's - Caroline's - perspective, as an adult now myself, was entirely different. I remarked to a coworker that if I was Caroline, I would've killed Charles. She is expected to pack their entire life in Wisconsin into a wagon, making sure they had enough provisions to get them to Kansas (Indian Territory) and everything they needed to set up a new homestead. Also, she's a few months pregnant with their third child - so not only will she be traveling pregnant, but she's going to have to give birth in an isolated place where she knows no one, and will have no idea if there's anyone to help her. Not that Charles is represented in any way as a bad husband, it's the contrary: he goes out of his way to ask Caroline's advice and when she tells him she's pregnant, he offers to wait until after the baby is born to leave, which she refuses. Because she loves him and is clearly a much, much stronger woman than I.This book was exactly what I needed after spending the last few months reading mostly YA fantasy. The pace is slow, and not much "excitement" happens, but it is a beautiful look into how life must have been for Caroline. Her innermost thoughts, wishes, discouragements are on display. It is fictionalized, of course, but very easy to imagine that the author is spot-on with her portrayal. It reads almost as a memoir because I felt that there was almost no creative licensing taken. It did not mar my nostalgic feelings for the Little House series; rather, it enhanced them and made me want to revisit those books again, this time taking special care to pay attention to Caroline, Charles, and the presentation of the adults in Laura's life.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars. I was lucky and found an ARC at my local library. This has been on my TBR list since I heard about it, so I was very excited to read it. Caroline tells the Little House on the Prairie story through the lens of Ma Ingalls. While the timeline and events of the LHOP story are told, the perspective of Ma gives a very different picture. It was very apparent that the author had done her research and had 'corrected' some of the timeline that appears in the original LHOP book. Caroline gives 4.5 Stars. I was lucky and found an ARC at my local library. This has been on my TBR list since I heard about it, so I was very excited to read it. Caroline tells the Little House on the Prairie story through the lens of Ma Ingalls. While the timeline and events of the LHOP story are told, the perspective of Ma gives a very different picture. It was very apparent that the author had done her research and had 'corrected' some of the timeline that appears in the original LHOP book. Caroline gives a very real picture of what life as a pioneer traveling to the frontier must have been like. At times, I felt the book was a bit wordy and found myself skimming passages. About 40 less pages, and it would have been perfect.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    3.75/5. First of all, I would have never made it as a Pioneer woman. So I have much respect for everything they had to do to keep their families alive and well. Caroline Ingalls is a marvel but even more so is her marriage to Charles. He treated her like an equal when I'm pretty sure men in the time didn't always share that view. He was head over heels for her and she with him. He respected her opinion and valued it.She knew what was expected of her but it didn't stop her from wanting a bit more 3.75/5. First of all, I would have never made it as a Pioneer woman. So I have much respect for everything they had to do to keep their families alive and well. Caroline Ingalls is a marvel but even more so is her marriage to Charles. He treated her like an equal when I'm pretty sure men in the time didn't always share that view. He was head over heels for her and she with him. He respected her opinion and valued it.She knew what was expected of her but it didn't stop her from wanting a bit more than what was in front of her.It is obvious that Ms. Miller did her research.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. Many millennials will tell you that growing up the books that got them into reading was the Harry Potter series. Well, that just isn't true in my case. I fell in love with reading through the pages of Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House series. so when I received a copy of this in the mail I was thrilled! I had actually found out about this book while I was looking around on Amazon. For various reasons I am very sentimental when it come I received an ARC of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. Many millennials will tell you that growing up the books that got them into reading was the Harry Potter series. Well, that just isn't true in my case. I fell in love with reading through the pages of Laura Ingalls Wilder's Little House series. so when I received a copy of this in the mail I was thrilled! I had actually found out about this book while I was looking around on Amazon. For various reasons I am very sentimental when it comes to the Little House series so whether I had won this book or not I had planned on purchasing it when it came out. Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller is Little House on the Prarie told through Caroline Ingalls (Ma's) perspective. It's a mixture of historical fact and the fictional story that Laura Ingalls Wilder herself wrote. Reading the story through Ma's perspective was definitely interesting and enjoyable. Ms. Miller did a fantastic job writing this book. You can tell that she took the time to research the Ingalls family which, as a fan of the Little House series I appreciated very much. Reading this took me back to when I was a little girl and read Little House on the Prarie for the first time. Except now I was even more excited when certain characters arrived through out the story. I have nothing but praise for this book. It's something that I think fans of Little House will definitely enjoy. Even if you haven't read the Little House series I highly recommend you check this out when it's released on September 19th. It's still a fantastic book to read whether you've read Little House on the Prarie or not.
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  • Tracy
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful story about being a mother on the frontier. Sarah Miller does a fantastic job of revealing Caroline's feelings about her place in the world and in her family. Such great articulation of all the fears and joys mothers hide about their children, no matter when or where they are raised.
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