Loving Luther
Germany, 1505In the dark of night, Katharina von Bora says the bravest good-bye a six-year-old can muster and walks away as the heavy convent gate closes behind her.Though the cold walls offer no comfort, Katharina soon finds herself calling the convent her home. God, her father. This, her life. She takes her vows--a choice more practical than pious--but in time, a seed of discontent is planted by the smuggled writings of a rebellious excommunicated priest named Martin Luther. Their message? That Katharina is subject to God, and no one else. Could the Lord truly desire more for her than this life of servitude?In her first true step of faith, Katharina leaves the only life she has ever known. But the freedom she has craved comes with a price, and she finds she has traded one life of isolation for another. Without the security of the convent walls or a family of her own, Katharina must trust in both the God who saved her and the man who paved a way for rescue. Luther's friends are quick to offer shelter, but Katharina longs for all Luther has promised: a home, a husband, perhaps even the chance to fall in love.

Loving Luther Details

TitleLoving Luther
Author
ReleaseSep 1st, 2017
PublisherTyndale House Publishers
ISBN-139781414390451
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Romance, Christian, Christian Fiction, Fiction

Loving Luther Review

  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    "Loving Luther" by Allison Pittman is a captivating read about the woman behind (or should I say "next to") Martin Luther. The book is told from Katharina von Bora's perspective--the woman who eventually becomes the wife of the great Martin Luther (the author of the famous 95 Theses). But Katherina's tale is a little known, but fascinating story all in itself. This book is about this smart and witty woman and what her life is like leading up to her marriage to Luther. It starts from her girlhood "Loving Luther" by Allison Pittman is a captivating read about the woman behind (or should I say "next to") Martin Luther. The book is told from Katharina von Bora's perspective--the woman who eventually becomes the wife of the great Martin Luther (the author of the famous 95 Theses). But Katherina's tale is a little known, but fascinating story all in itself. This book is about this smart and witty woman and what her life is like leading up to her marriage to Luther. It starts from her girlhood in a convent and takes the reader on a journey of faith and growth alongside Katharina. Katharina is captivated by Luther's words and ideas and escapes a convent due to Luther's writings and influence. Katharina has to then go through her own journey to find her place in life as an unmarried woman without family to support her. She develops a relationship and friendship with Luther, but it is many years until she comes to realize that she has feelings for this man. Will he return her feelings? Allison Pittman's writing and storytelling ability in "Loving Luther" are superb! She draws the reader right into the story. I experienced many feelings while reading Katharina's story, from humor when reading the scenes of her as a girl interacting with her friends in the convent to fury as I read of the way she is treated by a superior (although not all her superiors in the convent were portrayed as evil). I rejoiced along with Katharina and the other nuns as they realized the truths of the Gospel through Martin Luther's writings. I enjoy the fact that Ms. Pittman starts the story from Katharina's girlhood and made it more Katharina's life story--not just a romance. Ms. Pittman did an amazing time transporting the reader back to the time of the Reformation. Katharina is a well written character and I love seeing the hunger she develops for God's Words, but also her struggles as she has to break free from the only life she has known. The witty exchanges between Katharina and Luther make me smile and it's a great relationship that slowly builds throughout the story. This is one of those books where you get to know the characters so well that you don't want to leave them at the end of it all. I still can't stop thinking about this beautifully written story. Content: When Katharina is in the convent, there is a scene where she is physically abused by a priest. There is mention of a girl's mother being a prostitute and how men would try to do things to the young girl. A character curses once, but the curse isn't actually written. Both Katharina and Luther get drunk. There are a few jokes and references to the marriage bed.Rating: I give this book 5 stars!Genre: Christian Historical Fiction; Medieval; RomanceI want to thank Allison Pittman and Tyndale Blog Network for the complimentary copy of this book for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are my own. This is in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s CFR 16, Part 255.
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  • Staci
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating combination of fact and fiction to bring to life Katherina von Bora. Loving Luther is primarily focused on Katharina. The story begins at age four when her father drops her off at the convent. While Luther is a central character later in her life, the novel is focused on Katharina. It's about her spiritual, physical and mental growth.I enjoyed the entire novel, however, my favorite section was the first third when Katharina was in a convent. A peek into that world was incredibly inte Fascinating combination of fact and fiction to bring to life Katherina von Bora. Loving Luther is primarily focused on Katharina. The story begins at age four when her father drops her off at the convent. While Luther is a central character later in her life, the novel is focused on Katharina. It's about her spiritual, physical and mental growth.I enjoyed the entire novel, however, my favorite section was the first third when Katharina was in a convent. A peek into that world was incredibly interesting.
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  • Hayden
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI'm not sure what it is about the Luthers that inspires romance novels, but I've seen at least three of them that exist- and have read two of them. Loving Luther is the second in that number, and overall, I liked it.I can't help but admit that the middle part dragged a little for me--I think partly because there was a section that focused on Katharina's relationship with another man that, while founded in historical accuracy, we know she doesn't end up with, so it feels pointless and ev 3.5 starsI'm not sure what it is about the Luthers that inspires romance novels, but I've seen at least three of them that exist- and have read two of them. Loving Luther is the second in that number, and overall, I liked it.I can't help but admit that the middle part dragged a little for me--I think partly because there was a section that focused on Katharina's relationship with another man that, while founded in historical accuracy, we know she doesn't end up with, so it feels pointless and even frustrating from a reader's point of view (however realistic it may be). However, while this book is a bit more slow-moving, I still enjoyed it. As I previously said, this isn't the first fictionalized story about the Luthers that I've read; I picked up Jody Hedlund's Luther and Katharina a couple years ago. I actually preferred this one, I think because Loving Luther, despite it's somewhat regrettable title, is much less of a romance novel. There will always be a slight un-comfortableness for me in fictionalizing the stories of real people, but this one had much less of that because it did not seem as romanticized as the other novel about them that I read. But for those looking specifically for romance, you won't find it so much here; most of the book is more of a fictionalized biography of Katharina's early years, and while I greatly enjoyed the growing relationship between her and her future husband, founded on friendship, it was really only the last 1/3 of the book. However, for anyone who enjoys the history surrounding a truly remarkable woman, Loving Luther is worth a try.I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    The start of this book was pretty slow moving for me but still held my interest. Things got a lot more interesting further along and as the characters changed settings. I think Allison Pittman did a good job on portraying this story though I would like to do more research on the history. I thought the difference in a trust/relationship with God vs. following orders and rituals was important. Just by following traditions doesn't mean you have a relationship with Christ.There were some great thoug The start of this book was pretty slow moving for me but still held my interest. Things got a lot more interesting further along and as the characters changed settings. I think Allison Pittman did a good job on portraying this story though I would like to do more research on the history. I thought the difference in a trust/relationship with God vs. following orders and rituals was important. Just by following traditions doesn't mean you have a relationship with Christ.There were some great thought provoking conversations and overall this book held my interest. Thanks to Tyndale for offering me a free copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Loving Luther was a good read. I've been looking forward to reading a book about Martin Luther and Katharina, so I was excited to get started on this book. While the romance did take a long time to get going, I understand why that was. The story made me see Martin Luther in a slightly different light, just because I now think I understand him and the time in which he lived better. I also got to learn about Katharina and her life, which was fascinating to read!I really liked the writing style and Loving Luther was a good read. I've been looking forward to reading a book about Martin Luther and Katharina, so I was excited to get started on this book. While the romance did take a long time to get going, I understand why that was. The story made me see Martin Luther in a slightly different light, just because I now think I understand him and the time in which he lived better. I also got to learn about Katharina and her life, which was fascinating to read!I really liked the writing style and the characters felt real (which is a good thing, considering it is based on historical figures). I truly enjoyed reading the story and I definitely recommend it.*I received a complimentary eBook copy of this book for my honest review. As always, all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.*
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  • Nadine Keels
    January 1, 1970
    As a young woman who's been raised in a convent, Katharina von Bora takes her vows to become a nun for practical reasons. But she desires something more for her future as she begins reading the words of an excommunicated priest: one Martin Luther. Pondering Luther’s teachings about freedom in Christ, Katharina plans a risky escape from her cloistered life in Loving Luther, a novel by author Allison Pittman.Now, this love story isn’t a romance, as much of the novel is (wisely) given to painting a As a young woman who's been raised in a convent, Katharina von Bora takes her vows to become a nun for practical reasons. But she desires something more for her future as she begins reading the words of an excommunicated priest: one Martin Luther. Pondering Luther’s teachings about freedom in Christ, Katharina plans a risky escape from her cloistered life in Loving Luther, a novel by author Allison Pittman.Now, this love story isn’t a romance, as much of the novel is (wisely) given to painting a picture of Katharina’s years in the convent and her thoughts and questions about Christian life, with no love interest around. Neither is this a novel about the Protestant Reformation, as although it’s the obvious backdrop for Luther’s character, the ins and outs of the reformation aren’t the novel’s focus.Rather, this is the compelling story of a woman who loves God, longs for liberty, and faces a challenging life outside the convent walls. There’s a richness to Katharina’s character and experience. She’s flawed, unpredictable, and doesn’t always know how to feel in new situations.It would’ve been easy to spring for too much drama and overdone characters during such a tumultuous period in history. But instead, this novel’s style is nuanced, with emotion that isn’t flashy but runs deep. Now, I agonized through some of the waiting I had to endure during the reading. And after all of that agony, I was somewhat dissatisfied with where and how the story ends.Nevertheless, this is a substantive, poignant, beautiful read. I’d highly recommend it to fans of historical ChristFic—especially those who are already familiar with Katharina and Luther and who’d be interested in a different approach to their love story.___________Tyndale House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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  • Danette
    January 1, 1970
    I was excited to read this book since we hear so much about Luther and I was curious about his wife. Although a work of fiction, the look into the convent of Katharina's young years was fascinating. It got a bit too romance novel-ish to me during her first courtship. I doubt that's the way things were done then. I have heard, though, that she and Martin Luther had a good, loving, joyful marriage together - however it started. 2018 - A book of my choice
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  • Naomi Sutherland
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t normally write reviews but I had to for this one. I could not put it down! I was engrossed in the world and culture. Katharina was so relatable and human. I didn’t see her in a holy light like history tends to portray her. This book was masterfully written and the source material felt cared for. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in historical fiction. I fell in love at the first chapter. I will definitely pick up more from Allison Pittman in the future.
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  • Vera Godley
    January 1, 1970
    The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and specifically the year 1517 when Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door taking his stand against teachings prevalent in the Catholic church.In that same period a child was dropped at the door of a Catholic Nunnery. She was five years old. Her name was Katharina von Bora. While of a prestigious family (in name, at least), there was not fortune. So opens the story as told by Allison Pittman in Loving Luther. A young girl enter The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation and specifically the year 1517 when Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door taking his stand against teachings prevalent in the Catholic church.In that same period a child was dropped at the door of a Catholic Nunnery. She was five years old. Her name was Katharina von Bora. While of a prestigious family (in name, at least), there was not fortune. So opens the story as told by Allison Pittman in Loving Luther. A young girl enters the shadowy and harsh life of the convent and eventually takes her vows to become a nun.The author presents Katharina as a precocious and highly intelligent young girl who carried her thinking capabilities into her adult life enabling her to critique life in the convent, smuggled in bits of information relative to the ensuring reformation movement, and later piquing the interest and conversations of Martin Luther.Through her years in the convent, she begins to doubt and question and then perchance comes upon smuggled scraps of parchment that contain verses from Scripture, that she has never been allowed to read, and snatches of the forbidden writings of a defrocked monk, Martin Luther.About midway the book, Katharina von Bora and a few other nuns are smuggled out of the convent and taken to safekeeping provided by Martin Luther who has searched out potential suitors to marry the nuns. This is in keeping with society of the 1500s when women were either married and under the protection of a husband, still in the keeping of a father, cloistered in a nunnery, or living as a woman of ill repute. Luther ensconced Katharina in the home of a wealthy nobleman where she received the attention of a potential husband, Jerome, though she did not marry him.As we know from historical fact, Katharina did eventually marry Martin Luther. Her story is not complete in the telling by Allison Pittman but the author gives a good accounting of Katharina's life leading up to her marriage and the events and people who shaped her into the woman that loved Martin Luther.DISCLOSURE: I received a complimentary copy from the Tyndale Blog Network on behalf of the author and Tyndale House Publishers to facilitate this review. Opinions are my own and freely given.
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  • Elizabeth ♛Smart Girls Love Trashy Books♛
    January 1, 1970
    -POTENTIAL SPOILERS- So yeah, I've been kinda dead on the whole reading scene. I got busy and had to return a bunch of books I actually wanted to read to the library, and now I'm stuck with fifteen new ones I'm sure nobody really wants to hear my thoughts on. Well you get what you get and you don't throw a fit. Ironically, I had no idea this was written by a Christian author and intended for a Christian audience until I looked it up. Some people might say it's obvious, but I've seen numerous tim -POTENTIAL SPOILERS- So yeah, I've been kinda dead on the whole reading scene. I got busy and had to return a bunch of books I actually wanted to read to the library, and now I'm stuck with fifteen new ones I'm sure nobody really wants to hear my thoughts on. Well you get what you get and you don't throw a fit. Ironically, I had no idea this was written by a Christian author and intended for a Christian audience until I looked it up. Some people might say it's obvious, but I've seen numerous times when an author writes about a historical figure that is of a different religion as them. I myself am religious, yet all of the stuff I'm going to write feature characters of a different religion than my own. Anyway, I thought this one was really good. The main reason why I liked it was because of the main character herself. My biggest problem with Christian fiction titles is that the main characters, especially the girls, tend to be too perfect. They're very pious, innocent, chaste, and, for lack of a better word, saintly. And as a result, they tend to be bland and boring. Now I'm not Christian. I have no idea if other Christian girls like these portrayals; it's very likely that they do because of how often I see it. However, a lot of the ones I know are just....people. Really the only thing that sets them apart is their religion, and they're still interesting in spite of that. And so is this heroine. Yes, she is religious and fully committed to her fate, but she's still impulsive, snarky, and caring on top of that. She's prone to feeling lost and hopeless sometimes, even with her faith. However, I feel like the book didn't show her grow very much. I feel like she's the same exact person at the end of the story personality-wise that she is at the start. I was kind of hoping we could really see her grow and mature over the years, but the book's writing style prevented that, which I'll get to later. I also liked the writing style in the book. I felt like it was just descriptive enough that it let me experience each individual scene vividly, yet it didn't overwhelm me with meaningless adjectives. Even though I really gravitate towards that sort of writing style. The third thing I really liked is how she falls in love with another man before she falls in love with Luther. I really like stories that show that the first person you fall in love with doesn't have to be your only love. Sometimes romances don't work out, but that seems to be such a rare portrayal in books for any age, and I think it's important to teach. Or maybe that's just me being overly-sentimental because I fell in love with someone and left them. Now, let's get to the negatives. Even though I liked the writing style in this book, I felt like it was rushed a lot. The ending was so rushed, I pretty much blinked and it was the end of the book. I also didn't get to see a more natural progression of the main character's age. At first, she's six, then ten, then fifteen I think, then twenty-one, then I think she might be thirty? It stops telling you after a while and randomly skips a huge passage of time near the beginning of the novel, which I feel isn't a very good sign. It also didn't explain many things, like the children she was caring for. Whose were they? Random noble children? The children of the people living in the house? I was also bothered by how they kept capitalizing 'von' when using it as a sentence starter. I believe that isn't the correct way to use that title...but I could be incorrect. It just made me feel uncomfortable whenever I saw it. The biggest problem I feel is the title. Yes, she does love Luther...near the very end of the book. Most of her time is spent as Luther's friend and religious partner, while she's engaged to another man. So I felt the title should've been changed to just her name, Katharina. It would've described the contents of the book a lot better, in my opinion. I also would've liked an author's note at the end of the book detailing some of the history behind the setting and the characters. I know Luther and Katharina were real people, obviously, but what about all of the other characters they interact with? How many of them were made-up, and how many of them were real? And some background on the setting of Medieval Germany would've been nice too, and maybe a character list? As a result, I don't know how much is fabricated and how much remains true. No other reviewers spotted inaccuracies with the time period or Katharina's portrayal, so I suppose I'll let it slide too. Overall, I liked this book. I went into this book with no expectations and was glad to have found a good story about the life of a girl I don't have much knowledge of.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Allison Pittman's writing is always engaging. When Tyndale House offered me a free ARC to read, I accepted in exchange for an honest review. I've never read a book by Pittman that I didn't enjoy. I love how she puts you inside the head of - in this case - a young girl who was sent to the convent because her family couldn't afford to keep her. I related well to the young Katharina von Bora. I felt spiritually liberated along with Katie when she started reading the scriptures provided by Luther. B Allison Pittman's writing is always engaging. When Tyndale House offered me a free ARC to read, I accepted in exchange for an honest review. I've never read a book by Pittman that I didn't enjoy. I love how she puts you inside the head of - in this case - a young girl who was sent to the convent because her family couldn't afford to keep her. I related well to the young Katharina von Bora. I felt spiritually liberated along with Katie when she started reading the scriptures provided by Luther. Because they were written in her native tongue they were easily understood. Faith elements were seamlessly woven into the novel and felt natural to the time period. I loved reading about her new experiences that generated from her liberated life and the fresh perspective she found outside the convent walls. The expectation of her generation (1500s) was for her (the weaker sex) to marry. That way they would be under a husband's protection, which weighed heavily on her heart. Finding the right husband was no simple matter. Luther trying to set her up with eligible men didn't help.I loved how the author made me care about Katie's first experience with what she thought was "love." Her sense of abandonment when her prospective husband didn't follow through after initiating a tender romance and many kisses devastates her... at first. Katie is not one to give up, and on good days she's typically very polite and controlled.This story had some believable conflict sprinkled throughout. It held my attention and I finished it. The best part was their mutual attraction and the fact that they both liked each other but neither considered the other as a potential candidate. At least not at first. Anyway, great story!
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  • Sydney Young
    January 1, 1970
    👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 Lone Star lit book blog review posting on the 5th! What a great book!When I began reading “Loving Luther,” I wasn’t sure what I would encounter, but I never imagined I would be dropped into a nunnery in Germany, where convent girls shivered as they came of age and hungered as they took vows, all while Luther found the friends and power to spread Lutheranism after making his famous proclamations. Nor did I imagine these monastically sheltered women would manage to learn of Luther, read 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 Lone Star lit book blog review posting on the 5th! What a great book!When I began reading “Loving Luther,” I wasn’t sure what I would encounter, but I never imagined I would be dropped into a nunnery in Germany, where convent girls shivered as they came of age and hungered as they took vows, all while Luther found the friends and power to spread Lutheranism after making his famous proclamations. Nor did I imagine these monastically sheltered women would manage to learn of Luther, read and share his biblical translations, and then daringly escape the nunnery to a new Protestant Christian life, with the help and fearlessness of their sister, the nun who would eventually marry Luther. I had never heard of Katharina von Bora, much less conceived the thought that Luther not only married, but wed a former nun, a fascinating woman who complimented him in learning, bravery and wit. Thank you, Allison Pittman, for not only telling me this story, but for planting the idea that I must know more. (Please tell me there is a sequel and an audiobook!)“Loving Luther” is the kind of book that made me irritated at how life kept me from finishing it in one sitting. It’s women’s fiction and historical fiction worthy of the names; I predict that if you enjoy the book, you’ll be calling up your bestie and telling her exactly what book she needs to read next. Word of mouth will carry it far, so I hope you’ll join us in starting the fire that spreads the word about this great new book. Thank you for a copy of “Loving Luther” in exchange for an honest opinion. Kudos, Ms. Pittman.
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  • Tanya
    January 1, 1970
    In reality, we know very little about Katharina von Bora, Martin Luther's wife but this book offers an interesting spin on her life and cloister background. It reads more as historic fiction with a lot of adventure, soul seeking and some romance, than anything deeply theological, however, there is just enough of it to have something to think about. It reminded me contemporary reality shows about young Mennonites that leave their religious communities. So did Katharina, who had grown up very shel In reality, we know very little about Katharina von Bora, Martin Luther's wife but this book offers an interesting spin on her life and cloister background. It reads more as historic fiction with a lot of adventure, soul seeking and some romance, than anything deeply theological, however, there is just enough of it to have something to think about. It reminded me contemporary reality shows about young Mennonites that leave their religious communities. So did Katharina, who had grown up very sheltered in a cloister since she was about five years old. She was very bright and had leadership qualities which was on par with Martin Luther.It was a fun read, the book is big but it does not feel that way, because the author is brilliant!
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  • Raul M
    January 1, 1970
    Allison Pittman is an author who was unfamiliar to me until I read an advance copy of her release for September 1, 2017. Now I can attest to her talent to wield an engaging narrative, with an editing team that reliably ensured no glaring errors in the text. Despite the title, I was surprised this tale did not focus so much on theology, but indeed came across more like a romance novel. The evangelistic activities of Protestant reformer Martin Luther were mentioned but kept in the background to wh Allison Pittman is an author who was unfamiliar to me until I read an advance copy of her release for September 1, 2017. Now I can attest to her talent to wield an engaging narrative, with an editing team that reliably ensured no glaring errors in the text. Despite the title, I was surprised this tale did not focus so much on theology, but indeed came across more like a romance novel. The evangelistic activities of Protestant reformer Martin Luther were mentioned but kept in the background to what is truly the story of Katharina, the nun who would later marry him.Early on, the book explored Kath's cloistered life spanning her childhood and teen years, plus the bonds she formed with fellow Sisters. This leads to my only critique: I would've imagined far more time and inward conflict involved in Kath even fathoming a break from her vows -- although I'll grant that her exposure to Luther's translation of Scripture in the common tongue (rather than Latin) undoubtedly wielded a powerful influence in itself. I appreciated how two leading nuns in Kath's convent were portrayed with personalities that broke any one-dimensional expectations. I relished how Kath's past tied into later events, and how both supporters and detractors of Kath (some likely entirely fictional) were described and given believable dialogue. The novel glossed over more controversial aspects of Luther himself, but still showed the man as down-to-earth and flawed, to the point that he was hilariously insufferable and exasperating! A few German words were untranslated, but that was easily resolved via an online app. Lastly, I suspect my own fascination with Christianity's history explains why the book's 400 pages felt like a breeze to me.
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  • Lori Parrish
    January 1, 1970
    Allison, a fabulous read!! Jody and Allison have both done an awesome job with the different versions of this story about Luther and Katharina. I enjoyed Katharina's sneakiness, steady and reliable sense of adventure along with Girt and Hans.I felt that this story was mostly adventure. I also liked that this book was told in 1st person my fave genre. I felt like I was more connected to the main character. I did feel that it was unfair the way that her family treated her but at least her father d Allison, a fabulous read!! Jody and Allison have both done an awesome job with the different versions of this story about Luther and Katharina. I enjoyed Katharina's sneakiness, steady and reliable sense of adventure along with Girt and Hans.I felt that this story was mostly adventure. I also liked that this book was told in 1st person my fave genre. I felt like I was more connected to the main character. I did feel that it was unfair the way that her family treated her but at least her father did make sure his daughter was safe. (I'm glad I was a married woman when my dad up and done that because I didn't like my step mother at all! She took what was rightfully mine).There were some favorite scenes of mine but I don't want to give anything away!!I think I'd go stir crazy in some parts of the book esespecially since I'm claustrophobic. I don't like small spaces!!I like this book too because I love reading historical fiction and they have the ability to take me on adventure and time travel without having to pat anything lol!!I think that Allison has done a great job in her research of this particular subject. Her style of writing is awesome!!Thank you Netgalley for letting me read and review your books!! No compensations were received. All words are my own!!
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  • Kelly Bridgewater
    January 1, 1970
    Loving Luther by Allison Pittman was a joy to read. Historical fiction might not be my go-to genre, but once in a while, a topic captures my attention and makes me want to read the novel. With Pittman's book, I never knew that Luther was ever in love with someone. Being a monk, I didn't think they could marry, but as the story shows, he left the monk life when he decided to read the Bible for himself. When I read a historical novel, I want the characters to be real and intertwine with the resea Loving Luther by Allison Pittman was a joy to read. Historical fiction might not be my go-to genre, but once in a while, a topic captures my attention and makes me want to read the novel. With Pittman's book, I never knew that Luther was ever in love with someone. Being a monk, I didn't think they could marry, but as the story shows, he left the monk life when he decided to read the Bible for himself. When I read a historical novel, I want the characters to be real and intertwine with the research so well that I don't know I'm actually reading a fictionalized story of a real person's life.The writing is clear and concise. We stayed in Katharina's perspective the entire time. Since the story is told from her point of view, I watched as she interacted with the world and saw her feelings and words about certain topics. As for the research, it flowed nicely. I never once thought that Pittman was giving me a history lesson on Luther and what he accomplished. It was hinted at, but most readers should be familiar with what he accomplished with his theses. The setting came to life. I could feel the cold and taste the thin broth the poor ladies had to endure.The romance really wasn't the focus of the story like I thought it was going to be. With a title like Loving Luther, I thought the story would be more about Katharina and Luther's love story. Yes, it is there toward the end of the novel, but the story focused more on Katharina's upbringing and her failed love to another man. Plus, this love to another man, I still don't understand what happened. Katharina was in love with him, and he appeared to be in love with her. Then he went away, never to talk to her again. It wasn't said what happened or why. I kept waiting for Pittman to tell me what happened, but she never does.The spiritual element is important in this novel, as it should be because Pittman is discussing Luther and the whole Catholic church. I enjoyed how she allowed Katharina to make the discussion that she doesn't have to live in solitude to talk with God. She can still be a wife and a mother and talk with God. This is important, and the Catholic church still needs to hear this today.Overall, the research and the setting stand out in my mind. While the title suggests a love story, it is more about Katharina's journey to discovering her love in Luther while maintaining her love for God. Loving Luther is a good book and taught me a lot, so I recommend this book to fellow readers who enjoy being taught things while they read. It was nice to uncover a part of Luther's life that I didn't know existed.I received a complimentary copy of Loving Luther by Allison Pittman from Tyndale Publishing, and the opinions stated are all my own
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  • Ruthie Jones
    January 1, 1970
    Where to begin? Let me start by telling you that I didn’t want this story to end. I want more. I want another 1,000 pages. I want the fairy tale. Oh wait. Loving Luther is a fairy tale but with a decidedly religious twist. The romance of Katherina von Bora and Martin Luther is most definitely a fairy tale love story for the ages. No matter your religious affiliation or beliefs, Loving Luther is a must read because it is a fictional telling of real people, real heartache, real life-changing decis Where to begin? Let me start by telling you that I didn’t want this story to end. I want more. I want another 1,000 pages. I want the fairy tale. Oh wait. Loving Luther is a fairy tale but with a decidedly religious twist. The romance of Katherina von Bora and Martin Luther is most definitely a fairy tale love story for the ages. No matter your religious affiliation or beliefs, Loving Luther is a must read because it is a fictional telling of real people, real heartache, real life-changing decisions, and real love.I adore the way Allison Pittman methodically builds this story from the ground up. Rather than rushing headlong into Katherina von Bora loving Martin Luther, the author develops the characters, sets the stage, and presents the romantic outcome magnificently. Leaving the reader wanting to know more about the real people and events beyond the fictional account is the epitome of fabulous storytelling. Well done!I’m a devout cradle Catholic but have Lutheran affiliations, so I am doubly interested in this story. I’m grateful for Martin Luther for being one of the catalysts for positive changes in Christian religion as a whole. What I find most interesting about Loving Luther is that it allows me to see Martin Luther through a more sympathetic and understanding lens, and I’m encouraged to find out more about him and the most interesting Katherina. This duo came together against so many odds and through so many obstacles, even their own stubbornness in admitting their feelings for each other.In my humble opinion, the hallmark of a true love story is not that two people meet and fall in love but that two people find each other amidst controversy and dissonance and realize they are truly living God’s plan.***“This isn’t a matter of an escapade, it’s an escape, and the only safe way to escape from a place is to know that you have somewhere to escape to.” ~ chapter 12
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Loving Luther by Allison Pittman is the second story I have read about Martin Luther and his bride Katharina von Bora, and it was especially poignant as this is the 500 year anniversary of the Reformation. This story focuses more on Katharina, how she came to the convent, her growing up years and her decision to become a nun, to her escape on that fateful Easter when she meets Martin Luther face to face, and her ‘loves’ after. I really enjoyed the historical detail the author gave to Katharina, Loving Luther by Allison Pittman is the second story I have read about Martin Luther and his bride Katharina von Bora, and it was especially poignant as this is the 500 year anniversary of the Reformation. This story focuses more on Katharina, how she came to the convent, her growing up years and her decision to become a nun, to her escape on that fateful Easter when she meets Martin Luther face to face, and her ‘loves’ after. I really enjoyed the historical detail the author gave to Katharina, a woman who was to become Mrs. Luther and what type of person she may have been. We are given a very detailed account of the two years of her freedom from the convent and the patronage of the wealthy who hosted her. Martin Luther was a complex man it seems, and I liked how author Pittman portrayed him. A man powerfully used by God, hated by the Church, but yet undoubtedly a flawed human. From the beginning I knew he needed someone like Katharina by his side. This was an interesting period in history as not only was the world waking up from the medieval era, but also God’s people was waking up from the fierce and oftentimes corrupt rule of the Roman Catholic church. To read the Bible on your own in your own language, which we often take for granted, was quite a discovery and an enlightenment of that time.This was much more Katharina’s story than Luther’s; I only wish we could have seen more of the romance between the two of them. However given who they were in history I could see their romance progressing just as the author wrote it. And I do think she did them justice.I received a copy of this novel for free. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own.https://pausefortales.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Rebekah Love Dorris
    January 1, 1970
    Loving Luther by Allison Pittman is the fascinating tale of Katharina von Bora, the nun who would become first lady of the Reformation.The story begins when six-year-old Katharina gets dumped at the local convent by her weak-willed, newly remarried father, who chokes up as Katharina bravely walks away dry-eyed, hoping to relieve his misery at watching her misery.The heartbreaking story plunges us into life in a cold stone pre-Reformation convent. We quake along with little Katharina at the fears Loving Luther by Allison Pittman is the fascinating tale of Katharina von Bora, the nun who would become first lady of the Reformation.The story begins when six-year-old Katharina gets dumped at the local convent by her weak-willed, newly remarried father, who chokes up as Katharina bravely walks away dry-eyed, hoping to relieve his misery at watching her misery.The heartbreaking story plunges us into life in a cold stone pre-Reformation convent. We quake along with little Katharina at the fearsome nuns, relax as she learns the ropes, and hunger with her for relief from her sufferings.I wasn’t familiar with this dark period in history, particularly in German history. The story weaves between fiction and history as we follow Katharina’s coming of age, causing me to look up biographical tidbits to see what was real.It turns out, Mrs. Pittman did an amazing job staying true to the story.Martin Luther loved his beer. I never knew that! In my own research inspired by reading this book, I read how heavily he relied on alcohol.Of course, back then beer and wine were widely consumed, which is why people were so dense and dull. When coffee conquered Europe, so did clear-headedness and progress.But I digress. Ah, coffee. Rather than focusing on Martin Luther, though, this is Katie’s story. It reads in parts like a romance novel. While I’m not a big romance novel consumer, the history and drama made up for the gushy parts.I guess the biggest thing I learned from this novel is that every age, and every great person, has their weaknesses. Of course! Why else would we need grace if any of us had it all together?While Luther loved the Scriptures and wanted them available to everyone, he obviously didn’t understand everything. I guess every age and group has its blind spots.This book didn’t touch on Luther’s antisemitism, and I’m glad since that happened in his senile, diseased years. In his younger, clearheaded days he was a friend to the Jews. “If I had been a Jew and had seen such dolts and blockheads govern and teach the Christian faith, I would sooner have become a hog than a Christian,” he wrote as a younger man. “They have dealt with the Jews as if they were dogs rather than human beings; they have done little else than deride them and seize their property.”Just goes to show we all need grace. Even in old age. Even the leaders of the leaders. We’re all standing in the need of prayer. Especially the leaders.Loving Luther skipped these controversial aspects of Martin Luther and instead focused on the dramatic life of his wife. I enjoyed this book, and I’m grateful to Tyndale House Publishers for providing me a free copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Tamara
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written, with memorable scenes and characters. Loving Luther is a literary treat that you'll want to savor in a scenic, relaxing spot like a porch swing, beach chair, or fireside sofa. It deserves a location where you can make the reading of it a special event. If you're looking for a novel that feels like a gift you've given yourself, this coming-of-age historical romance is it. I bought a hardbound copy for myself and will be purchasing more hardbound copies to give as Christmas gi Beautifully written, with memorable scenes and characters. Loving Luther is a literary treat that you'll want to savor in a scenic, relaxing spot like a porch swing, beach chair, or fireside sofa. It deserves a location where you can make the reading of it a special event. If you're looking for a novel that feels like a gift you've given yourself, this coming-of-age historical romance is it. I bought a hardbound copy for myself and will be purchasing more hardbound copies to give as Christmas gifts.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Loving Luther is the newest release by Allison Pittman. This book was just okay to me. I love to read about the love story between Katharina von Bora and Martin Luther. However, this version was a little too slow for me. The first two-thirds of the book was hard to get through but it finally picked up about the last third of it. I am glad I pushed myself to keep reading on as I did enjoy the ending.Three stars.I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully written story of a young woman in 1500 Germany. Being a Catholic myself I could see myself in Katherina's place, being sent to a become a nun while just a child. I could also see myself rebelling and leaving to explore a life that girls sent away young could only dream of. The author is a masterful story teller and I truly enjoyed every part of this book. I especially enjoyed that the epigraph was a scripture quote from Catherine of Siena, the patron Saint of my childhood churh.
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  • Dorothy Fleming
    January 1, 1970
    This was an historical romance, based on the true life of Katharina von Bora and Martin Luther. After reading about 1/2 the book , I googled the names. I did not know Luther had married, nor had I heard of Ms. von Bora. It details, as much fact as fiction, the life of Katharina from being dropped off at a convent when she was 5 years old, to her leaving the convent and her life, after the convent, in high society, courtesy of Martin Luther. The tale ended with Martin’s proposal. The author’s tel This was an historical romance, based on the true life of Katharina von Bora and Martin Luther. After reading about 1/2 the book , I googled the names. I did not know Luther had married, nor had I heard of Ms. von Bora. It details, as much fact as fiction, the life of Katharina from being dropped off at a convent when she was 5 years old, to her leaving the convent and her life, after the convent, in high society, courtesy of Martin Luther. The tale ended with Martin’s proposal. The author’s telling of the story was easy and enjoyable reading. I would like to read a sequel of the marriage and life of the Luthers after the proposal.
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  • Deon
    January 1, 1970
    Love it! Nicely done
  • Dani Munoz
    January 1, 1970
    An avid reader of historical fiction, I appreciated Loving Luther’s delightfully detailed portrait of Katharina (“Katie”) von Bora, the wife of Martin Luther – a prominent leader in the Protestant Reformation. Despite the title, Loving Luther was less about Katie’s relationship with Martin, and more of a creative, coming-of-age autobiography.The actual love story was slowly-paced, but this makes sense considering there’s little historical evidence for the couple’s romance prior to being wed. Whi An avid reader of historical fiction, I appreciated Loving Luther’s delightfully detailed portrait of Katharina (“Katie”) von Bora, the wife of Martin Luther – a prominent leader in the Protestant Reformation. Despite the title, Loving Luther was less about Katie’s relationship with Martin, and more of a creative, coming-of-age autobiography.The actual love story was slowly-paced, but this makes sense considering there’s little historical evidence for the couple’s romance prior to being wed. While I’ve heard of the strong marriage between Katie and Luther, Mrs. Pittman provides a sweet picture of their possible friendship and short courtship beforehand.With that said, the novel has beautiful characterization, good spiritual lessons on freedom in Christ, and intriguing historical insights. I enjoyed seeing Katie’s background and personality brought to life, because I knew so little about her. We receive a thorough idea of Katie’s spunky, witty, and courageous nature, as well as a window into her emotional struggles.The inside look at life in the nunnery and the legalism of the church in that day was eye-opening, setting a backdrop for the reader about what Luther was facing during the Reformation era. I also appreciated Mrs. Pittman’s ability to sprinkle humor and sentimental details into Katie’s first-person perspective, using unspoken details to reveal the heart behind characters around her.An enjoyable read, overall I would recommend it but it may not be what you expect.Thank you Tyndale House Publishers for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book. The opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Linda Davis
    January 1, 1970
    A masterful story. A fine work of art. Pittman's magnum opus. Bravo, Allison Pittman! Just bravo!
  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Tyndale Blog Tours.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]From time to time I read novels instead of my usual nonfiction from Tyndale [1], and in this particular case the book is a real gem.  I must admit that going into this book I did not know a huge amount about Katherine Van Dora, wife of famed Protestant reformer Martin Luther.  I knew that she had been a nun, that she escaped from her convent in an empty fish barrel, and that she was a stro [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Tyndale Blog Tours.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]From time to time I read novels instead of my usual nonfiction from Tyndale [1], and in this particular case the book is a real gem.  I must admit that going into this book I did not know a huge amount about Katherine Van Dora, wife of famed Protestant reformer Martin Luther.  I knew that she had been a nun, that she escaped from her convent in an empty fish barrel, and that she was a strong and capable woman whose relationship with Luther was loving but was not particularly romantic.  So, going into this four hundred page novel, I wasn't sure what to expect, not being familiar with the author's previous work.  Would this novel romanticize Martin Luther--who was nothing if not an anxious and mercurial man, or would it romanticize his wife, she of a fairly notorious strong personality?  Fortunately for the reader--and for this book's value as historical fiction--it did not take the angle of romance.  To be sure, this is a book about love, but it's a book about love between awkward people who struggle with intimacy, who are anxious and nervous in temperament, intelligent and somewhat fiercely witty.  It is, in other words, a very Nathanish sort of historical novel, and one that hits particularly close to home in its portrayal of Katherine Van Dora as a bright but deeply opinionated person whose romantic exploits border on the tragic.This novel takes place in several parts and covers the period from the Katherine's childhood, when her father gave her over with a small dowry to Christ as a child novice until her mid-twenties when Luther bluntly and somewhat awkwardly proposes marriage to her while she lives as a sort of house servant for some wealthy friends of Luther.  In between, we see over and over again that Katherine is deeply intelligent, has a real hunger for knowledge, and tends to rub people the wrong way.  She appears as a good friend but someone whose sharp tongue lands her in trouble.  Caught up in the search for freedom as a nun, after her escape she struggles to find a settled place and finds herself frustrated that Luther keeps on trying to set her up with inferior men when she finds herself captivated by Luther himself.  Rather than a romance novel, this book is set up as an education novel, on how a brave and unloved little girl becomes a bright and intelligent woman and how she learns to find love even when she does not always feel very lovable.As might be imagined, this is the sort of novel that hits really close to home for me.  While I am no Luther scholar myself and do not know exactly when and how Katherine van Dora found out about Luther's preaching and writing, this book makes an interesting case for a long connection between the two.  Luther's first appearance is one that might come as a surprise when as a young confessor he encourages Katherine about her eating biscuits at night by reminding her of the rules about not eating in bed because food and crumbs draw rats.  Through the way the book focuses on the perspective of Fraulein van Dora, the reader is led to a fairly natural conclusion that the two are meant for each other, and that neither one of them is conventional.  Why Martin Luther should have been so anxious and timid in matters of the heart is something that the book does not explain, although this book gives plenty of explanation why an attractive but strong-willed woman like Katherine would be less ideal as a wife than the rest of her fellow escaped nuns, who all find spouses for themselves pretty easily.  Some things haven't changed much since the 16th century, sadly, when it comes to the inverse relationship between a sharp wit and a clever mind and the ease of success in love and intimacy.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2013...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012...
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  • Belle Whittington
    January 1, 1970
    Pop over to my blog Books & Broomsticks to ENTER TO WIN a signed copy of this book and to view the awesome images that I cannot insert into this review here on Goodreads.I didn’t know what to expect when offered the opportunity of reading and reviewing LOVING LUTHER by Allison Pittman. As a Christian and a history buff (having minored in history at the university), I had a feeling that this book would strike some chord within my nerdy little heart.And so it did. In fact, it struck many a cho Pop over to my blog Books & Broomsticks to ENTER TO WIN a signed copy of this book and to view the awesome images that I cannot insert into this review here on Goodreads.I didn’t know what to expect when offered the opportunity of reading and reviewing LOVING LUTHER by Allison Pittman. As a Christian and a history buff (having minored in history at the university), I had a feeling that this book would strike some chord within my nerdy little heart.And so it did. In fact, it struck many a chord, and sent my thumpin’ gizzard a beatin’.But I’m getting ahead of myself.First of all, one must appreciate the aesthetics of Pittman’s gorgeous book. The cover art is lovely, and despite the fact that it is over 400 pages long, it sits well in the reader’s hands making it easy to sip hot tea while devouring the story. There’s nothing better than a good book and a steaming cuppa tea, I say!Observe how well the two go together.What’s that, you say? You caught that mention of 400 pages? Aha! You are paying attention. Yes, Pittman takes her time revealing the story told from Katherina von Bora’s point of view, of how she comes to live at the convent, and what her life grows to become over the following years.In truth, it is as if the reader is pulled into the very fabric of Katherine’s story. Through her eyes, we meet the people instrumental in shaping her life. For you see, she was a real person. Pittman skillfully tells this tale in such a way as to bring Katherine back to life…or…does she send us back in time? I shall let you be the judge of that.Oh, how I long to tell you all the details of this intricate story. But I won’t give any spoilers. However, I will tell you this: I see an archetype playing out here that tastes strongly like…*Le Sigh* One of my favorite stories of all times. I may have minored in history, but I majored in literature, and I love me some Jane Austen. But I digress…Allow me to illustrate.Sound familiar? Did you love Sense and Sensibility as much as I? Good. For I assure you that you will devour this true story of hardship, rebellion, unrequited love, and a love triangle that will have you longing to punch a dude in the throat.Pittman’s prose is pristine. Her voice fresh, unique, and intelligent. I was immediately engaged in the story and was awoken more than once in the early morning hours by the tugging of the story until I read just a few more chapters.Heartrending and engaging, LOVING LUTHER reveals the untold story of an ex-nun, rescued by a revolutionary, and granted a chance at a new life. Did true love win out? Was there a happily-ever-after? I’ll let you discover that for yourself.Prepare yourself for the story of a lifetime!One last thing, within these pages, you’ll meet other people who shared the lives of the main characters. For instance, you’ll meet the artist who painted Martin’s and Katherina’s portraits (shown above.) Lucas Canach was a gifted artist who also created famous works of art such as this painting of the Gospels:I know you’ll adore LOVING LUTHER as much as I did. I loved it so much that I grant it5 Fabulous Broomsfor making my nerdy heart go pitter patter!
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  • Fizzy
    January 1, 1970
    I have no idea where I want to start this review. I actually finished the book yesterday and while I had time to write and schedule it I didn’t have a clue what I wanted to say. Guess what? 24 hours later I still don’t. Let’s say this: I’m very ignorant of the reformation period and Martian Luther. I mean I know it’s a thing but it’s not a thing I’ve ever studied about or learned about. I’ve picked up nuances here and there but that’s about it. I didn’t know when (like years) it all happened or I have no idea where I want to start this review. I actually finished the book yesterday and while I had time to write and schedule it I didn’t have a clue what I wanted to say. Guess what? 24 hours later I still don’t. Let’s say this: I’m very ignorant of the reformation period and Martian Luther. I mean I know it’s a thing but it’s not a thing I’ve ever studied about or learned about. I’ve picked up nuances here and there but that’s about it. I didn’t know when (like years) it all happened or even where (Europe anyone?). I just knew some guy decided that the Church was getting too big for it’s britches and he nailed a manifesto (of sorts) to the church door. That’s it. I didn’t know he was a former priest, I didn’t give any thought to his home life and spouse or lack there of and I’d never heard of Katharina von Bora. Honestly, when I read the synopsis of the book I was drawn to the idea of a historical novel, I didn’t even pick up on the name and realize this was real people. Not until partway through the book and I was like ‘wait, what? this sounds eerily familiar. Sorta.’ How many IQ points did you just take away from me? You know you did. Judge away, I’m good with that.This book had a lot going for it but there were a couple of drawbacks. The time jumps. Oh tomatoes and gravy, the time jumps. I mean, I understand the need to move the story forward and get to the heart of the matter but sometimes they felt abrupt. The other thing was the characters. There were so many different Sisters that after a fashion I gave up caring who was who and what and where and why. Even the nobles she met once she was free became overwhelming. I’m terrible with name so this is a legitimate thing that probably bothered no one but me.Starting the book not realizing this was about a legitimate, real life, once lived person I had begun to thing that this girl was going to pine away for Luther all her days. He, trying to set her up with men he deemed worthy and her rejecting them as they were not him. Sometimes being ignorant has it’s perks. I didn’t know the end of the story. Once I realized this book was about THE Martin Luther I didn’t go Googling the story or even reading other reviews of the book. I wanted to keep my innocence and carry forward. I think I got a better story because I didn’t know how it was supposed to end. I’m glad the synopsis spoke to me. I’m glad I requested to read this book. I’m glad I was ignorant. Without all of those things I would not have had the privilege to read this book with no preconceived notions. I was saved frustrations when, perhaps maybe, things didn’t follow history to the point. I wasn’t frustrated through her other relationships since I didn’t know the ending. I’ve never read Allison Pittman before and I can’t wait to read her again. I appreciate her writing style and I feel like she’s going to be an amazing fit for my future reading needs.I was provided a complimentary copy of this book by NetGalley. I was not compensated for this review and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own. I was not required to write a positive review.Originally published at https://fizzypopcollection.com/loving....
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Katharina von Bora, the youngest daughter of an aristocratic German family which had fallen on hard times, was handed over to the care of the Church at the tender age of six. Fresh on the heels of her mother's death, her father remarried a "new mama" who had little use for the mournful and sassy extra mouth to feed. Stripped of all personal belongings at the convent gate, save a locket hidden from the Sisters' watchful eyes, little Käthe clings to the hope that one day she will be reclaimed by t Katharina von Bora, the youngest daughter of an aristocratic German family which had fallen on hard times, was handed over to the care of the Church at the tender age of six. Fresh on the heels of her mother's death, her father remarried a "new mama" who had little use for the mournful and sassy extra mouth to feed. Stripped of all personal belongings at the convent gate, save a locket hidden from the Sisters' watchful eyes, little Käthe clings to the hope that one day she will be reclaimed by the father who so easily surrendered her. Her hopes dwindle, however, as time passes with little communication from the outside world, so she dons the veil and joins the Sisterhood of nuns serving first in Brehna, then Marienthrone.As the flame of the Reformation sweeps across Germany, Katharina is drawn into reading smuggled fragments of Martin Luther's incendiary writings to some of her less educated yet cautiously curious Sisters. These inflammatory ideas threaten to tear Katharina from yet another home and the only Sisters who claim her heart. When the time comes, can she possibly turn her back upon the vows she took to serve God and the Church? Can she find peace and happiness outside the walls of the convent? While the 500th anniversary of the Reformation passed with little fanfare in many American churches, Allison Pittman's novel about the Reformation also escaped my notice until a recent trip to the library. I had previously read several of Ms. Pittman's books, which I enjoyed, but this one grabbed my attention immediately - the lovely cover lured me, the author's acknowledgements set the hook, and the first paragraph reeled me willingly into its pages well past my bedtime. Ms. Pittman's thrilling saga of the Reformation's reach through the gates of German convents is an absolute gem! Readers will be swept into medieval Europe and treated to a rich and splendid first person fictionalized account of Katharina von Bora's tumultuous tale. Ms. Pittman develops the characters of well-known historic figures with a master's touch, breathing life into the well-known portrait of the father of the Reformation. Katharina, herself, is a masterpiece of bold femininity. Cloistered convents and medieval manors emerge in the reader's imagination, painted in vivid hues. Skillfully, the author draws stark contrasts and shades tender nuances. I highly recommend this novel. My only criticism would be its somewhat precipitous ending. While it was a satisfying conclusion, my appetite was far from sated. Now I'll have to read more and learn, as Paul Harvey would say, "the rest of the story!" (Hmmm. More reading? I guess that's not such a bad thing.) That minor criticism aside, this book definitely belongs on your "to-read" list!
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