Electric Arches
Electric Arches is an imaginative exploration of black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose. Blending stark realism with the fantastical, Ewing takes us from the streets of Chicago to an alien arrival in an unspecified future, deftly navigating boundaries of space, time, and reality with delight and flexibility.

Electric Arches Details

TitleElectric Arches
Author
ReleaseSep 12th, 2017
PublisherHaymarket Books
ISBN-139781608468560
Rating
GenrePoetry, Nonfiction, Cultural, African American

Electric Arches Review

  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    Everything about this was everything I needed in life, but didn't know. Every word was chosen carefully, and the combination of real life and magic is sincerely beautiful. Multiple times I cried and the poem about Fullerton Ave was amazing. And to the notebook kid, which I've read before to my students, is still SO GOOD. If you love chicago, if you love being black, if you love magical realism, if you think you like poetry but aren't sure, this book is for you.So basically, for everyone who love Everything about this was everything I needed in life, but didn't know. Every word was chosen carefully, and the combination of real life and magic is sincerely beautiful. Multiple times I cried and the poem about Fullerton Ave was amazing. And to the notebook kid, which I've read before to my students, is still SO GOOD. If you love chicago, if you love being black, if you love magical realism, if you think you like poetry but aren't sure, this book is for you.So basically, for everyone who loves good things.I don't what else to say, man, it's just SO GOOD.
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  • Jacob
    January 1, 1970
    "Speak this to yourselfuntil you know it is true."this book is magic
  • Jalynn
    January 1, 1970
    This collection of poems, lyric essays and so on opened up a deeper meaning to shared black experiences, especially as a black woman. It's a work of time travel for me, and disturbing the timeline to go back to a favorite poem space is totally okay here. I'm still floored to have been able to have an ARC of this book, and I hope it really touches other the way it touched me. I also hope that nonblack women find their own sense of comfort and happiness within the pages.
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  • O'Phylia
    January 1, 1970
    Blending verse with magical realism and a dash of speculative fiction, Ewing's words flow beautifully in a time where ugliness abounds. Electric Arches is what every black girl needs in her arsenal to face a world that hates her virulently. If you read this book, you will feel invincible.
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  • Dionne
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure the last time I read a book that left me feeling so...human. "Electric Arches" reminded me that being Black is to be human in a way that is deeply rooted in the community, the Earth, and the cosmos. I cried multiple times while reading this, mostly because Ewing's writing style is effortlessly moving, but also because the things she talks about are real, and important. I needed this book as much as I can honestly say you, and everyone else, need this book.
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  • Glauber Ribeiro
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVE this book! Except for the part where it made me cry in a crowded cafeteria. That was not cool. It should come with a warning.OK, it wasn't crowded. But it was a cafeteria. And i did cry when i read What I Talk About When I Talk About Black Jesus. And there's a lot more deadly stuff in there.Honestly, buy this book. Give it to your friends and enemies. Then maybe she'll write more.
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  • Chantal Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning. Masterful. Find a copy to keep forever. To teach your daughters and sons and so forth. This book will and should live forever.
  • Leah Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing is absolutely stunning. With a dash of the tale of an alien invasion, Ewing takes us through black girlhood and womanhood, in a variety of prose, poetic, and artistic styles, all of which are gorgeous.Ewing’s book is divided into three sections: ‘true stories,’ ‘oil and water,’ and ‘letters from the flatlands.’ Her poems, stories, and works took my breath away. Her words flow easily from page to page, casting visual shadows and best read, like so much poetry, alou Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing is absolutely stunning. With a dash of the tale of an alien invasion, Ewing takes us through black girlhood and womanhood, in a variety of prose, poetic, and artistic styles, all of which are gorgeous.Ewing’s book is divided into three sections: ‘true stories,’ ‘oil and water,’ and ‘letters from the flatlands.’ Her poems, stories, and works took my breath away. Her words flow easily from page to page, casting visual shadows and best read, like so much poetry, aloud. Her works include a long-form poem about (and titled), “why you cannot touch my hair” that includes so many devastating lines describing the narrator’s hair that I couldn’t choose just one to list here. It includes a sick science fiction short story in verse, telling of the day the moon people came, “smashing the fare boxes at the train stations into wind chimes / and bowing low to the passengers as they entered,” singing Aretha Franklin, Missy Elliott, and others—“the moon people had been listening all this time”—the story a masterpiece a story about aliens and blackness and strangeness. The poem about biking down the street, creating adventures and worlds, is both full of time and timeless, a microcosm of childhood. Ewing’s voice is strong and complex, and her poetry is all the storytelling of genius—there wasn’t a poem or story in this text that made me feel, deeply, or that at some point make me suck my breath in through my teeth because the words were so good. I received a copy of this book from Haymarket Books in exchange for an honest review. Find Ewing on Twitter as wikipedia brown, and pick up this incredible work of poetry, prose, and more on September 5. It’s a must-read of this year for anyone who reads poetry—or those who don’t.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Love struck by the gospel of the fire city.
  • Grace Lapointe
    January 1, 1970
    Lyrical, original, and life-affirming.
  • Liz Matheny
    January 1, 1970
    Whip smart. I loved Marilyn Mosby.
  • Adam Morgan
    January 1, 1970
    This might sound like hyperbole, but I'm being 100% honest when I say: 'Electric Arches' will go down as one of the best and most iconic poetry books about Chicago...ever. You have never seen Chicago this way before, and regardless of where you live, it'll change your perspective. Can't recommend enough.
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  • Haley
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars, rounded up. I really wanted to like this collection (which mainly includes poems but also features some short essays and a few pieces of art) but it fell flat for me. Part of the problem is that I personally never experienced black girlhood, the focus of Ewing's diverse and experimental work, so I never felt that thrill of resonance in the poems. There were a few instances with some of the longer poems where I didn't understand how the pieces of the poem related to one another. I ofte 2.5 stars, rounded up. I really wanted to like this collection (which mainly includes poems but also features some short essays and a few pieces of art) but it fell flat for me. Part of the problem is that I personally never experienced black girlhood, the focus of Ewing's diverse and experimental work, so I never felt that thrill of resonance in the poems. There were a few instances with some of the longer poems where I didn't understand how the pieces of the poem related to one another. I often felt that the poems were too specific (either in their imagination or to Ewing's experiences) for a general reader to be able to really understand or glean something from them. Some poems I felt were more interested in the premise than in the content. There were definitely some poems and other pieces that I enjoyed and found interesting and strange, but the vast majority left very little impression on me. Here's one of my favorites from the collection, "what I mean when I say I'm sharpening my oyster knife," which is based on the following Zora Neale Hurston quote: "No, I do not weep at the world - I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife."I mean I'm hereto eat up all the ocean you thought was yours. I mean I brought my own quarter of a lemon, tart and full of seeds. I mean I'm a tart. I'm a bad seed. I'm a red-handled thingand if you move your eyes from me I'll cut the tender place where your fingers meet. I mean I never met a dish of horseradish I didn't like. I mean you're a twisted and ugly root and I'm the pungent, stinging firmness inside. I mean I look so good in this hat with a feather and I'm a feather and I'm the heaviest featherweight you know. I mean you can't spell anything I talk about with that sorry alphabet you have left over from yesterday. I meanwhen I see something dull and uneven, barnacled and ruined, I know how to get to its iridescent everything. I mean I eat them alive. what I mean is I'll eat you alive, slipping the blade in sideways, cutting nothing because the space was always there.
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  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    An excerpt to close~ "Ever since black people came to this country we have needed a Moses. There has always been so much water that needs parting. It seems like all black children, from the time we are born, come into the world in the midst of a rushing current that threatens to swallow us whole if we don't heed the many, many warnings we are told to heed. We come into the world as alchemists of the water, bending it, willing it to bear is safe passage and cleanse us along the way, to teach us t An excerpt to close~ "Ever since black people came to this country we have needed a Moses. There has always been so much water that needs parting. It seems like all black children, from the time we are born, come into the world in the midst of a rushing current that threatens to swallow us whole if we don't heed the many, many warnings we are told to heed. We come into the world as alchemists of the water, bending it, willing it to bear is safe passage and cleanse us along the way, to teach us to move with joy and purpose and to never, ever stop flowing forward into something grand waiting at the other end of the delta. We're a people forever in exodus."
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  • Anton
    January 1, 1970
    Eve Ewing's Electric Arches is a beautiful collection of poetry and prose. Reading it filled my heart with joy and sadness, often at the same time, and filled my mind with ideas. Every word of this book feels like a gift, every page a discovery, every poem and story a whole universe. Standout pieces for me were poems about Prince and Marilyn Mosby, and a moving reflection on going to therapy, but I expect everyone will take something different away from this wonderful book.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    This came in the mail today, I sat down to look at it and ended up reading the whole thing in one sitting. Eve Ewing's writing is spectacular, the kind of poetry that makes you hold your breath as you read without even realizing it. Please, get this book.
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  • Jamin Clutcher
    January 1, 1970
    The best book I have read all year.
  • Allen Mark
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminded me why I love writing.
  • Grahm Wiley-Camacho
    January 1, 1970
    Read a little bit and thought it was OK... three poems later I was weeping.
  • Ceillie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book of poetry. Read my full review HERE!
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Review here: https://angryangelbooks.com/2017/09/1...
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