Courage Is Contagious
A collection of never-before-published essays celebrating a First Lady whose impact will be felt for years to come, featuring a stunning array of acclaimed contributorsMichelle Obama's legacy transcends categorization; her cultural imprint is as nuanced as it is indelible. She used her time in the White House to fight for women, minorities, and health and education advocates. At the same time, her own genre-busting style encouraged others to speak, to engage, even to dress however they wanted. In this tribute to the former First Lady, T: The New York Times Style Magazine editor Nick Haramis assembles twenty original essays from prize-winning writers, Hollywood stars, celebrity chefs, and politicos, all of whom have been moved and influenced by her extraordinary grace in power. This uplifting book uncovers the many layers of Michelle Obama as she continues to be a role model and icon in the age of Donald Trump.

Courage Is Contagious Details

TitleCourage Is Contagious
Author
ReleaseOct 24th, 2017
PublisherLenny
ISBN-139780399592614
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Essays, Biography

Courage Is Contagious Review

  • Seymone
    January 1, 1970
    Very inspiring. Makes one really think about the mark one leaves on the world. What do people say about you when your not around. Summation, Michelle Obama is a class act. She had a huge impact on so many people, from the young to the old. What you find in this book is their stories.Very inspiring read.
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of short essays about why Michelle Obama is an inspiring woman? Yes. Just yes!
  • Katy
    January 1, 1970
    I received my copy free through Goodreads Giveaways. My copy is an uncorrected ARC, so a couple of chapters are blank.I loved the chapter written by Adasendis and Laura (8th graders) for who Michelle Obama was a role model of working hard and doing better. Gloria Steinem wrote, "We will never have a democracy until we have democratic families and a society without the invented categories of both race and gender. Michelle Obama may have changed history in the most powerful way -- by example."Whet I received my copy free through Goodreads Giveaways. My copy is an uncorrected ARC, so a couple of chapters are blank.I loved the chapter written by Adasendis and Laura (8th graders) for who Michelle Obama was a role model of working hard and doing better. Gloria Steinem wrote, "We will never have a democracy until we have democratic families and a society without the invented categories of both race and gender. Michelle Obama may have changed history in the most powerful way -- by example."Whether one liked or hated President Obama's policies while in office, one cannot but be impressed with what Michelle has accomplished by example and hard work."You should never view your challenges as a disadvantage. Instead, it's important for you to understand that your experience facing and overcoming adversity is actually one of your biggest advantages." -- Michelle Obama
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  • Shelli
    January 1, 1970
    Courage Is Contagious: And Other Reasons to Be Grateful for Michelle Obama is a sweet little volume of essays from mostly (but not only) women, spanning the spectrum of personal fame, each with a varying degree of connection to the former First Lady – from actresses and activists to authors and fashionistas – all of whom describe in short chapters the snapshots of Mrs. Obama's life they'd gotten to see, and how each encounter influenced and inspired them. It was both fascinating and heartwarmi Courage Is Contagious: And Other Reasons to Be Grateful for Michelle Obama is a sweet little volume of essays from mostly (but not only) women, spanning the spectrum of personal fame, each with a varying degree of connection to the former First Lady – from actresses and activists to authors and fashionistas – all of whom describe in short chapters the snapshots of Mrs. Obama's life they'd gotten to see, and how each encounter influenced and inspired them. It was both fascinating and heartwarming to read such vivid and accurate descriptions of Michelle's most subtle and ethereal mannerisms and gestures, how she invites and welcomes with only a few words and a warm smile, how she manages to simultaneously exude both humility as well as complete self-assuredness. Unfortunately, most of the stories were very similar in tone and content, and in the ways and reasons that their authors valued and revered Michelle. Frankly, the two most original and pleasantly surprising essays were by eighth graders; I got the feeling from them more than any of the other authors that they were truly writing what was in their hearts, as opposed to what they thought they should be saying, what they should sound like. And therefore, it was these two young ladies who most successfully captured the spirit of what we love about Michelle Obama – the courage to unselfconsciously and unapologetically march to the beat of their own drum, with skill, grace, and dignity. A great gift for any Michelle Obama fan, and/or young women from Millennials down through higher-grade middle schoolers. 3.5 stars.I received an Advanced Readers Edition of this title via Goodreads Giveaways courtesy of the publisher in return for my honest review.
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  • Sara Mantia
    January 1, 1970
    Talk about having an ideal book to always have by your side to remind you of such a wonderful human being. This book is a love letter to First Lady Michelle Obama by people that were closest to her and just by people that had day to day interactions with her. The general theme from almost everyone's insight stresses just how strong, brave, kind and graceful she is. I grew up on the South Side of Chicago not very far from where Michelle was born and raised so naturally I already worship her but I Talk about having an ideal book to always have by your side to remind you of such a wonderful human being. This book is a love letter to First Lady Michelle Obama by people that were closest to her and just by people that had day to day interactions with her. The general theme from almost everyone's insight stresses just how strong, brave, kind and graceful she is. I grew up on the South Side of Chicago not very far from where Michelle was born and raised so naturally I already worship her but I am so grateful for this book. A book that will constantly be at my reach for me to pick up and thumb through when I need a reminder to hold my head high or am in need of inspiration. Or just when I am wondering to myself "What Would Michelle Obama Do?".
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  • ariesdollface
    January 1, 1970
    NOTE: I received this book free through the Goodreads First Reads program.I still remember how I felt when I first read “To the First Lady with Love,” the 2016 New York Times article that serves as the inspiration for this book. The original contributions of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Gloria Steinem, Jon Meacham, and Rashida Jones were powerful testaments to Michelle Obama’s style, grace, intellect, influence, work, and purpose. Some pieces lyrical and deeply personal, others cerebral and reflect NOTE: I received this book free through the Goodreads First Reads program.I still remember how I felt when I first read “To the First Lady with Love,” the 2016 New York Times article that serves as the inspiration for this book. The original contributions of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Gloria Steinem, Jon Meacham, and Rashida Jones were powerful testaments to Michelle Obama’s style, grace, intellect, influence, work, and purpose. Some pieces lyrical and deeply personal, others cerebral and reflective, all were moving. It was a beautiful public declaration of admiration for the First Lady that gave voice to so many things I admired about Mrs. Obama. So, I was extremely excited to win and read Courage is Contagious. Sadly, the ARC that I read suggests the best of the book remains in the original article. The good:The original pieces. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s contribution in particular remains poignant, powerful, and serves to provoke a sentimental and emotional response. The lead piece of the article, it is the crowning jewel of the book. The artwork of Joana Avilla. Avilla’s artwork, which graces each of the book’s sections, evoke a growing season. From germination to fruition, it is both a glorious homage to Mrs. Obama’s community garden and representative of the evolution of a First Lady. Additionally, it is a shining example of art as a unifying element to a written anthological work. I wish the editor would have taken the artist’s lead and allowed the illustrations of progression to order the book.The bad:Editing. This critique comes with the caveat that I have read only an uncorrected proof. That said, the problem here is far more substantive than grammatical errors or missing articles (TK). There seems to have been a complete lack of direction given to the book’s contributors. The rules which governed an article comprised of four contributors do not work in a book length version that adds 15 more. There is a great degree of repetition in the pieces, a constant reiteration of facts that many readers will know prior to opening the book (the First Lady planted a community garden, for instance). For those who do not, the facts are repeated so often as to quickly render the book mundane. This lack of guidance was a disservice to both the contributors and readers. The Forward. First, there are far too many parentheses. I imagine the final edit will correct this flaw. Second, given the problems inherent in Sheryl Sandberg’s concept of “leaning in” in general as well as the attacks Michelle Obama confronted from the concept’s strictest adherents in particular, I found Lena Dunham’s deliberate effort to position Michelle Obama as the feminist model of “leaning in” not only annoying but disrespectful. The underrepresentation of Black men as contributors. I can just hear critics of this point scream “Why does someone always have to bring up race?” To that, I roll my eyes and disregard disingenuous exasperation and rage because, let's face it, Michelle Obama was one half of the first black couple to occupy the White House as President and First Lady; the other half was, of course, a black man. Yet, Courage is Contagious offers the sole contribution of Charlamagne tha God. Certainly this book could have benefited from the reflections of one or two more of any number of influential African American men. Ta-Nehisi Coates, Marc Lamont Hill, Jesse Williams, Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Kendrick Lamar, Michael Render (aka, Killer Mike), and Damon Young come readily to mind; there are many, many others. Courage is Contagious held such promise; unfortunately, it falls far short of its full potential. To capture the idea’s spirit, read the article. 2/5-3
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  • Ruby
    January 1, 1970
    Alice Waters: "The food from the garden became a metaphor for the values of the First Couple, from welcoming guests to helping neighbors in need."Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: "All over America, black women were still, their eyes watching a form of God, because she represented their image writ large in the world."Janet Mock: "Her gift was her ability to address the truth of the matter, and I always believed her-probably because she was not a politician, because she was doing unpaid labor, because sh Alice Waters: "The food from the garden became a metaphor for the values of the First Couple, from welcoming guests to helping neighbors in need."Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: "All over America, black women were still, their eyes watching a form of God, because she represented their image writ large in the world."Janet Mock: "Her gift was her ability to address the truth of the matter, and I always believed her-probably because she was not a politician, because she was doing unpaid labor, because she was investing her talents in a country that had often made her feel as if she would never measure up, never truly belong simply because she was a black woman."Jason Wu: "She has a comforting spirit about her, and she makes you feel included, listened to, and important. That's part of her strength and her legacy: As smart and inspirational as she is, she is also completely relatable."Cecile Richards: "She's smart, fiercely independent, and determined to chase her dreams. She worked hard to pursue opportunities in her own life, then reached back to hold the door open for all the women who would come after."Adasendis De La Cruz (9th grader): "I only care what certain people say, among them Michelle Obama, who taught me that it's not just okay-but right-to pursue your dreams."Charlamagne tha God: "She was as visible as anyone on TV, and she presented an entirely different model for black women. No matter what the setting, Michelle always acted with poise. We never saw her slip up. Not once. Thanks to her influence, black women I know, including my daughters, felt more empowered."Gloria Steinem: "After a decade under a public microscope, she has managed what no other first lady-and few people in any public position-have succeeded in doing: She has lived a public life without sacrificing her privacy and authenticity."
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  • Olivia
    January 1, 1970
    3.5. stars. This is a heartwarming and uplifting collection of small essays answering the question, "Why are you grateful for Michelle Obama?" Respondents include famous actors, writers, designers, and activists, as well as two young girls. They touched on the example that Michelle Obama has set, the initiatives she has taken under her wing, and the symbolism of her presence in the White House. I enjoyed the pieces presented by Gabourey Sidibe, Charlamagne Tha God, and Jason Wu, but felt that ma 3.5. stars. This is a heartwarming and uplifting collection of small essays answering the question, "Why are you grateful for Michelle Obama?" Respondents include famous actors, writers, designers, and activists, as well as two young girls. They touched on the example that Michelle Obama has set, the initiatives she has taken under her wing, and the symbolism of her presence in the White House. I enjoyed the pieces presented by Gabourey Sidibe, Charlamagne Tha God, and Jason Wu, but felt that many of the others were repetitive ("When they go low, we go high" was said a number of times). The diversity of the voices included could have led to essays with more oomph, but they were just a bit formulaic. In fact, as a couple other reviewers have mentioned, the two essays written by young girls were easily the most compelling. Adasendis De La Cruz is a young Latina girl who wants more than anything to be a boxer, but has to overcome the barriers of her gender and her neighborhood. Laura Kimacho is from Brooklyn and found her voice to speak about injustices through reading countless books as she was growing up. These were essays that did not focus on Michelle Obama and her choice of clothing, her Let's Move program, or something else, but showed that Michelle Obama has an influence that extends beyond meet-and-greets and silly jokes. She is showing the next generation of girls, especially girls of color, that they can be anything they want to be - a sentiment frequently expressed to children, but which previously may not have been as true for families of color.
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    The 2016 election pulled many of us out of our private political closets, as issues and words could not be overlooked, accepted, or ignored. Although I'd had no opposition to the Obamas, the sharp contrast now became apparent, and I was drawn to their calm strength and compassion for others. Each time I heard Michelle Obama speak, my respect and admiration grew. This small book of essays about her impact on the lives of others from differing backgrounds, cultures, and ages was a good way for me The 2016 election pulled many of us out of our private political closets, as issues and words could not be overlooked, accepted, or ignored. Although I'd had no opposition to the Obamas, the sharp contrast now became apparent, and I was drawn to their calm strength and compassion for others. Each time I heard Michelle Obama speak, my respect and admiration grew. This small book of essays about her impact on the lives of others from differing backgrounds, cultures, and ages was a good way for me to get to know her better. She has been a role model, example, and inspiration to so many. We see a woman who loves her family and her country and wants everyone to live with dignity, respect, and justice. As First Lady, she had the courage to be herself in spite of harsh criticism and stand firm for her convictions. We would do well to follow her example. Thanks to the Goodreads Giveaways for this uplifting book.
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  • Jeanie
    January 1, 1970
    I have nothing but love and respect for the greatest first lady since Eleanor Roosevelt. Michelle Obama has shown all men and women what it is to be wholly respectful, unique, empowered, & enlightened.Mrs. Obama showed us how to live your life leaving what you inherited, better when you leave. Her involvement with Veterans, health of children, a pro garden movement to encourage healthful eating and knowledge, a movement to get children and adults to move more; may seem like very motherly thi I have nothing but love and respect for the greatest first lady since Eleanor Roosevelt. Michelle Obama has shown all men and women what it is to be wholly respectful, unique, empowered, & enlightened.Mrs. Obama showed us how to live your life leaving what you inherited, better when you leave. Her involvement with Veterans, health of children, a pro garden movement to encourage healthful eating and knowledge, a movement to get children and adults to move more; may seem like very motherly things to stand behind. But remember She is a Princeton, Harvard educated Lawyer, who was running a Hospital before her husband became president.Michelle brought style, grace, pride of race, intelligence, compassion, lazer focus on important issues and still was a wonderful mother, wife, daughter, and the Best First Lady I have ever witnessed in my 61 years.
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  • Jan Olsson
    January 1, 1970
    Nick Haramis in the Introduction to this book writes "Each of us knew who Mrs. Obama was from the moment we were introduced to her. She hasn't changed. What she changed was us, encouraging us to lead better lives and teaching us to be better people through her example". "Michelle Obama will have her own legacy, separate from her husband's. And it will be that she was the First Lady to show women that they don't have to choose. Nth at it's okay to be everything".What a great example she has left Nick Haramis in the Introduction to this book writes "Each of us knew who Mrs. Obama was from the moment we were introduced to her. She hasn't changed. What she changed was us, encouraging us to lead better lives and teaching us to be better people through her example". "Michelle Obama will have her own legacy, separate from her husband's. And it will be that she was the First Lady to show women that they don't have to choose. Nth at it's okay to be everything".What a great example she has left for everyone and what a great role model for so many. I just love her and all the good she has done for this country.
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  • Janet Womack
    January 1, 1970
    I received Courage Is Contagious as a Goodreads giveaway. I found the book very disappointing. My entire life I've listened to comments about people not being black enough and statements like "that's such a black thing". To see these statements and other negative, racially divisive statements in this book was just more of the same things we deal with daily. I enjoyed the essays by the two eighth grade students and loved the books artwork. This was an advance uncorrected proof and was missing two I received Courage Is Contagious as a Goodreads giveaway. I found the book very disappointing. My entire life I've listened to comments about people not being black enough and statements like "that's such a black thing". To see these statements and other negative, racially divisive statements in this book was just more of the same things we deal with daily. I enjoyed the essays by the two eighth grade students and loved the books artwork. This was an advance uncorrected proof and was missing two chapters.
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  • Laura Shavers
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway. I, myself, am a huge Obama family fan. The grace, the humility, the way THEY led the country is humbling, especially with what we have now. I loved this book. I loved to see the POSITIVE comments about Michelle Obama and reflections from people that look up to her instead of criticisms because I think that she is such an awesome role model for our beautiful black girls in the nation that need this so much right now.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Good Reads.Compilation of (mostly) previously unpublished essays about Michelle Obama. Some were about how she affected the writer; others were about her demeanor and positive attitude.I loved the uplifting feeling I felt as I read about our first black First Lady. Such class and dignity in the face of much uncalled for negativity.
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    Not an incredibly compelling read, but good to be in the world that Michelle Obama led again.
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Read from cover to cover in one sitting with tears in my eyes.
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