Slobberknocker
There are few people who have been in the wrestling business longer than Jim Ross. And those who have made it as long as he has (half a century to be exact) probably made enemies or burned bridges. But that’s just not JR.Known as the voice of the WWE, Slobberknocker is the story of Jim Ross’s life―probably the most notable person connected to the sport who has never wrestled. He opens up about his life growing up on a farm in Oklahoma and his discovering of wrestling to somehow getting a foot in the door to the business that started a historic career, one where he held almost every job in the business―from putting up the ring to calling matches, to finding talent, to booking programs, to handling payroll. With all those responsibilities, he’s also recognized as the man who built and nurtured a once-in-a-generation talent roster that took the WWE to new heights, including “Stone Cold” Steve Austin and The Rock to name a few. Readers will finally get the opportunity to hear never-before-told stories about the politics and personalities of all the biggest stars.But this isn’t just a wrestling story. It’s a story about overcoming adversity and achieving your dreams. As someone who has suffered multiple bouts of Bell’s Palsy, Ross has never given up on a dream that is still going strong.Currently the host of the podcast The Ross Report, any fan of wrestling―from the territory days to today―will be enthralled with stories from the road and behind the scenes. Slobberknocker is the first time Ross tells his story―and you don’t want to miss it!

Slobberknocker Details

TitleSlobberknocker
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 3rd, 2017
PublisherSports Publishing
ISBN-139781683581130
Rating
GenreBiography, Nonfiction, Sports and Games, Sports

Slobberknocker Review

  • Dan Schwent
    January 1, 1970
    Slobberknocker is the biography of wrestling announcer Jim Ross.My first exposure to Jim Ross was during that shot time when a St. Louis station carried Bill Watts' UWF syndicated show. After that, I listen to him call matches in WCW and finally, the WWF/WWE. When I saw he was working on a book, I knew I had to read it.The book starts and ends at Wrestlemania in 1999. The middle chronicles Jim Ross's life, from his days as a kid watching wrestling to breaking into the business to eventually beco Slobberknocker is the biography of wrestling announcer Jim Ross.My first exposure to Jim Ross was during that shot time when a St. Louis station carried Bill Watts' UWF syndicated show. After that, I listen to him call matches in WCW and finally, the WWF/WWE. When I saw he was working on a book, I knew I had to read it.The book starts and ends at Wrestlemania in 1999. The middle chronicles Jim Ross's life, from his days as a kid watching wrestling to breaking into the business to eventually becoming head of talent relations in the WWE.The material within is great. There's self-deprecating humor and JR doesn't sugar coat much of anything. He freely admits his devotion to the wrestling business destroyed two of his marriages. He also goes into his bouts of Bell's Palsy with candid detail.On the wrestling side of things, JR goes into the nuts and bolts of working for Bill Watts in the UWF/Mid-South, riding with the older wrestlers to learn the business. He goes into the chaos backstage at WCW and tells some very interesting stories about his friendship with Vince McMahon, something that's not normally touched upon in books like this. The road stories are pretty hilarious, as they usually are in wrestling books.And here come the gripes! For one thing, some of the dates were way off. Did know one fact check this? Everyone knows the Montreal Screwjob happened in 1997, not 1998. And why the hell were some really interesting time periods glossed over? We got two pages of Bill Watts working for the WWF prior to Wrestlemania 11, and just a page or two more of Watts running WCW. Jim Ross was in the wrestling business for over forty years. Why wasn't this book about twice as large? And why did it stop at 1999? That's 18 years that weren't covered!Gripes aside, this was a gripping book. It was too short, though. I expected the world from it and it's definitely a second tier wrestling book. 3.5 out of 5 stars.
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  • Lance Lumley
    January 1, 1970
    I received an Advanced Reading Copy of this book. As expected with Jim Ross, who has been in the wrestling business since the late 1970s, there is tons of good stories in here. Ross talks about working his way in Bill Watts's Mid South Wrestling all they way to the WWE. There are stories about stars like Ric Flair, Sting, Ted Dibiase, and his fellow announcers that he's worked with throughout the years. This book isn't just a wrestling book, but shows how a man who loved something worked his way I received an Advanced Reading Copy of this book. As expected with Jim Ross, who has been in the wrestling business since the late 1970s, there is tons of good stories in here. Ross talks about working his way in Bill Watts's Mid South Wrestling all they way to the WWE. There are stories about stars like Ric Flair, Sting, Ted Dibiase, and his fellow announcers that he's worked with throughout the years. This book isn't just a wrestling book, but shows how a man who loved something worked his way from the bottom to the top and achieved the American Dream.This is a great wrestling book. There are some stories in it that some causal fans may not remember (he mentions a few people and angles that isn't described in detail before getting to the story- but readers can easily figure out the story's point-or look online for the complete background of the angles), but it doesn't mess up the story. This book should be in a wrestling fan's collection.For a more in depth review, go to my blog page at: https://lancewrites.wordpress.com/201...
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  • Brian Manville
    January 1, 1970
    For wrestling fans beginning the 1980s, there are few names more synonymous with the sport than Jim Ross. He is many fans' favorite play-by-play guy and the playing of Boomer Sooner as his introduction brings fans to their feet. Like all of us, he has a story, and it begins in Oklahoma.Raised on a farm, Ross learns the ways of the farm while watching wrestling with his grandparents. Wrestling in the territory age was close-knit and wary by nature, not easily letting in outsiders. But Ross found For wrestling fans beginning the 1980s, there are few names more synonymous with the sport than Jim Ross. He is many fans' favorite play-by-play guy and the playing of Boomer Sooner as his introduction brings fans to their feet. Like all of us, he has a story, and it begins in Oklahoma.Raised on a farm, Ross learns the ways of the farm while watching wrestling with his grandparents. Wrestling in the territory age was close-knit and wary by nature, not easily letting in outsiders. But Ross found his way in - strangely enough - as a result of getting into trouble with his college flag football team. Ross led the way to make things good with his college by hosting and promoting Jerry McGuirk's NWA Tri-State wrestlers. His work there got him in the door which led to refereeing, marketing, promoting, and later announcing. His career leads him eventually to Atlanta working for WCW and later to the WWF. He also manages between WWF stints to work for Jim Cornette's Smoky Mountain Wrestling and to broadcast Atlanta Falcons games. Eventually, he becomes part of the WWE family to stay and now also does commentary for New Japan Pro Wrestling for AXS TV as well as having his own podcast.Ross lays himself bare in his book, criticizing himself for his first two failed marriages and his lack of relationships with his daughters. These came, as he readily admits, from working too hard and too long for McGuirk and Cowboy Bill Watts. He details the politics that got him heat with certain wrestlers who felt he was a Watts man and later on in the WWF as just another suit. The wrestling life lead by Ross was not glamorous, but it was certainly was unique. After all, only in professional wrestling can you have Jerry McGuirk - a blind man - doing color commentary! Ross has funny stories - such as putting out a fire on McGuirk's crotch, Robert Morton's ability to fart on cue, or Vince McMahon being so competitive that he even wants his farts to be more rank than Morton's. My only complaint with the book is that it is too short. He gives a lot of his life, but I feel the book could've used more stories, both funny and poignant. Strangely, the book stops in 1999 which leaves more stories to tell; perhaps a second book will cover the period of time from then until now.BOTTOM LINE: If you're a wrestling fan, you need this book yesterday.
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  • George Slade
    January 1, 1970
    Yes! How could I not tackle a biography from good ol' JR himself! This guy was the voice of wrestling for a couple of decades, and his talent decisions led to some of the greatest wrestling careers every. Stone Cold, The Rock, Mick Foley -- just to name a few. I knew JR was too close to the industry to shoot hard on anyone, with only a few exceptions in the book, but I enjoyed his stories just the same. It's an underdog story that relied on JR's perseverance and dedication. Like many great icons Yes! How could I not tackle a biography from good ol' JR himself! This guy was the voice of wrestling for a couple of decades, and his talent decisions led to some of the greatest wrestling careers every. Stone Cold, The Rock, Mick Foley -- just to name a few. I knew JR was too close to the industry to shoot hard on anyone, with only a few exceptions in the book, but I enjoyed his stories just the same. It's an underdog story that relied on JR's perseverance and dedication. Like many great icons of any arena, JR sacrifice his personal life to make our entertainment better. I think all of us Attitude era fans owe him a debt of gratitude for that. Although the tale ends in 1999, and he of course, had many years in the industry since, the story is compelling and entertaining throughout. If he ever puts out a volume II, I will be on the waiting list.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    One of those rare but great books on wrestling. If you love to read about the history of the business then this is for you. Jim Ross and his cowriter cover in great detail the business from the territory days in the 70s, into the nwa in the 80s and onto the attitude era of the then wwf with insight and humour. It lacks depth on his personal life but most people, myself included, will read this book and want a focus on the behind the scenes history of wrestling. There's still enough on his childh One of those rare but great books on wrestling. If you love to read about the history of the business then this is for you. Jim Ross and his cowriter cover in great detail the business from the territory days in the 70s, into the nwa in the 80s and onto the attitude era of the then wwf with insight and humour. It lacks depth on his personal life but most people, myself included, will read this book and want a focus on the behind the scenes history of wrestling. There's still enough on his childhood, college days and his heath issues to give you a sense of the man. Read it and love it but know it ends in 1999, so if you wanted the modern era you'll have to wait for what I assume will be a second book in a few years.
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  • Jay
    January 1, 1970
    Few men in the history of Professional Wrestling have witnessed as much or shared as much of "The Business" as Jim Ross. Known worldwide as "Good Ol' JR" Slobberknocker: My Life in Wrestling chronicles JR's journey from college student and small-town promoter through stints in Mid-South Wrestling, Jim Crockett Promotions, World Championship Wrestling, and Smoky Mountain Wrestling to World Wrestling Entertainment. The book's short chapters will alternately have you laughing out loud, fearful for Few men in the history of Professional Wrestling have witnessed as much or shared as much of "The Business" as Jim Ross. Known worldwide as "Good Ol' JR" Slobberknocker: My Life in Wrestling chronicles JR's journey from college student and small-town promoter through stints in Mid-South Wrestling, Jim Crockett Promotions, World Championship Wrestling, and Smoky Mountain Wrestling to World Wrestling Entertainment. The book's short chapters will alternately have you laughing out loud, fearful for JR, rooting at one incredible comeback after another, and saddened but satisfied when the last page is turned. The man known as "The Voice of WWE" is a master storyteller and those who hunker down to take a bite out of Slobberknocker will not leave disappointed.
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  • Robert Rich
    January 1, 1970
    Jim Ross is the greatest wrestling announcer of all time. Sadly, his ghostwritten book is just so-so. Strangely, it only goes until March 1999 in JR's timeline (maybe there's another one coming?) and while there are some interesting stories from his time in the business, it's altogether a fairly average entry in the world of ghostwritten sports personalities' memoirs. It could also have used a much closer look by a copy editor, for both typos and facts (the Montreal Screwjob is listed in Novembe Jim Ross is the greatest wrestling announcer of all time. Sadly, his ghostwritten book is just so-so. Strangely, it only goes until March 1999 in JR's timeline (maybe there's another one coming?) and while there are some interesting stories from his time in the business, it's altogether a fairly average entry in the world of ghostwritten sports personalities' memoirs. It could also have used a much closer look by a copy editor, for both typos and facts (the Montreal Screwjob is listed in November 1998 instead of the correct 1997). For all the flaws, it's not a bad book for wrestling fans, but it could easily be so much more.
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  • Cole Brown
    January 1, 1970
    A very engaging read that covers Ross’ career up to 1999. Stories are well-told in a much more straightforward and concise manner than one might expect, and the authors skillfully jump between facts, humor and raw emotion throughout the book. Easily one of the better wrestling memoirs. My only negatives would be 1) at times things are stated so concisely and so matter-of-factly that as a reader you long for more detail and more insight into Ross’ thoughts and emotions and 2) there are a number o A very engaging read that covers Ross’ career up to 1999. Stories are well-told in a much more straightforward and concise manner than one might expect, and the authors skillfully jump between facts, humor and raw emotion throughout the book. Easily one of the better wrestling memoirs. My only negatives would be 1) at times things are stated so concisely and so matter-of-factly that as a reader you long for more detail and more insight into Ross’ thoughts and emotions and 2) there are a number of grammatical and some numerical errors that should have been caught by the publisher and can be distracting.
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  • Evan Kirby
    January 1, 1970
    I feel bad rating this so low, but it did absolutely nothing for me. Ross obviously has a storied career and a ton of stories to tell, but it feels like he's literally (in a figurative sense...) just skimming the top of everything. He'll boil down a whole year or several to just a few random, inconsequential stories. And I know this one only goes up to '99 or so, but even still it feels like you just jump through the whole thing from story to story and you don't really connect with any of the na I feel bad rating this so low, but it did absolutely nothing for me. Ross obviously has a storied career and a ton of stories to tell, but it feels like he's literally (in a figurative sense...) just skimming the top of everything. He'll boil down a whole year or several to just a few random, inconsequential stories. And I know this one only goes up to '99 or so, but even still it feels like you just jump through the whole thing from story to story and you don't really connect with any of the narrative.
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  • Paul Mannino
    January 1, 1970
    If you love wrestling, you could do a lot worse than virtually sitting across the table from Good ‘Ol JR. BAH GAWD, this book takes you from his childhood to the crazy territory days to the Monday Night Wars. All along the way, you get the sense that this humble guy scratched and clawed all the way to the top (with class and hard work). How can you not pull for a guy like that?I only wish it was longer. He left me wanting to read so much more. And that’s the key to wrestling, isn’t it? Give them If you love wrestling, you could do a lot worse than virtually sitting across the table from Good ‘Ol JR. BAH GAWD, this book takes you from his childhood to the crazy territory days to the Monday Night Wars. All along the way, you get the sense that this humble guy scratched and clawed all the way to the top (with class and hard work). How can you not pull for a guy like that?I only wish it was longer. He left me wanting to read so much more. And that’s the key to wrestling, isn’t it? Give them what they came for, but always leave the crowd clamoring for more.
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  • Jim J
    January 1, 1970
    J.R. is one of the best wrestling commentators ever. I grew up admiring his ability. He has some great stories from his myriad experiences in the wrestling business. The writer, however, left out important details to the point that I searched back a few pages to see if I had overlooked something. Having read, and loved, Mick Foley's first book I enjoyed the perspective on some of the same events chronicled in the Foley book.
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  • Charlie Oliver
    January 1, 1970
    This was a great read...up until the time he starts working for the WWE. I would give this FIVE STARS if I was sure that there was going to be a second book published after Vince McMahon dies that has some meaty stuff about working for that company. As it is, this is a fantastic overview of everything until Ross starts working for WWF and then it gets vague and skips around.
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  • Brandon G. Smith
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just as informative and entertaining as one would expect from the greatest play-by-play man in professional wrestling history. With one unique anecdote about his time in the pro wrestling business after another, this is another peek behind the curtain into a fascinating world that is told in “good ole JR’s” unique voice.
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  • Richard
    January 1, 1970
    Jim Ross is a great story-teller in the world of wrestling, and that strength translates well into the autobiographical world. This was a great book, but I definitely would love to read more stories from JR.
  • Scott Rosser
    January 1, 1970
    Slobberknocker my takeThis is a very interesting book about a man that I have admired for a long time. His toughness and candor have shown throughout his career and he is quite simply the best wrestling announcer I have ever heard. Bravo JR.
  • Brittni
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful read for any wrestling fanThe title is completely true for this book - it truly is a Slobberknocker. I loved reading about the best announcer I've ever heard call a match. From childhood on, it's a wonderful story to be able to read.
  • Nollaig Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    good old JR's life in Wrestling warts and all starts naturally at the start and his few jobs before breaking into wrestling and that was not as easy as it seemed numerous setbacks; firings and marriage breakups he holds nothing back and very well written by Paul o Brien
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  • Taylor Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    Very good listen. I have never done an audiobook before, and I throughly enjoyed this one. However, that may be because it was Jim Ross telling his stories. His life in his voice is unique for someone who has been a talker for his job his whole career.
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  • Chris Eaton
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for anyone curious about the inner workings of the professional wrestling business or how one man navigated it. It’s a entertaining, fast read that grants new insight into this distinguished figure from pro wrestling’s past and present
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  • Todd Glaeser
    January 1, 1970
    Exactly what the cover says; exactly what you want the book to be. JR is a good guy, so we don’t get as much dirt as he could have shared.
  • Tony Christ
    January 1, 1970
    ExcellentA good read from Jim Ross. I learned a lot about his early life and his first years in the business. I look forward to another one that covers the recent years.
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